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DAN ANDERSON

# 1 $75

# 2 $100

# 3 $100

# 4 $75

MAO Porcelain, woodfired (shino glaze), decal fired

Reddy Kilowatt & Willie Wirehand: the Electric Boys Stoneware, woodfired (celadon over white slip), decal fired

Midway Water Tanks Porcelain, woodfired (Wert’s Shino glaze), decal fired

Water Tank Porcelain, woodfired (Wert’s Shino glaze)

# 5 $100 Triple Water Tanks Stoneware, woodfired (Celadon over white slip), decal fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Since clay became a medium of expression over 10,000 years ago, it has allowed archeologists the ability to ascertain much about a given society/culture. As a young, undergraduate art student, my art advisors enrolled me in several studio classes before I took a clay class. Many observers of my clay work are unaware of my background in printmaking before I ever touched clay. One of my favorite techniques in my print classes was photo silkscreen. It did not take me long to combine silkscreened ceramic enamel decals on my ceramic surfaces once I "caught the clay bug." I have been utilizing decals - both "ho-made" screened decals in my studio and laser printed decals that I have printed for me - for over four decades. The decal images on my work give viewers important information and insight into my background and experiences. In addition they are a "road-map" as to how my brain ticks. I enjoy how the decal imagery contemporizes my ceramics. The words humor, nostalgia and satire do not escape me.

Dan Anderson was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on November 2, 1945. He grew up in a typical middle-class family that operated a family-run corner grocery store in Hudson, Wisconsin. Dan attended the nearby University of WisconsinRiver Falls where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education. At the time, he had every belief that he was going to be a high school art teacher. During his junior year, he traveled to Italy through the university studies abroad program. This serendipitous experience, apprenticing for Renato Bassoli (a Renaissance artist who lived and operated a studio in Milan) turned Dan’s life topsy-turvy. When he returned to the United States, with a new mission, he finished his undergraduate degree (1968) and immediately applied to graduate school at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Dan graduated with his MFA degree from Cranbrook in 1970. He received several job offers to teach college level ceramics and began his teaching career at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE). Located 20 miles from St. Louis, Missouri, Dan chose SIUE because the campus was relatively new and he knew that if he worked hard, he could build the program from the ground up and leave his mark. Thirty-two years later, in 2002, he retired from university life. Over these three plus decades, Dan positioned SIUE as one of the top 10 graduate ceramic programs in the country (US News & World Report). A frequent workshop presenter, Anderson has lectured and demonstrated at over 150 venues over the past four decades. Major galleries represent Dan across the United States and his work is in numerous private and permanent collections. His “mounds’ anagama wood kiln is fired at his rural Edwardsville studio, Old Poag Road Clay & Glass, twice a year.


LINDA ARBUCKLE

# 1 $90

# 2 $90

# 3 $90

# 4 $90

Tankard: Desirable Highbush Fruit Majolica on terracotta

Tankard: Sunflowers with Grey Ground Majolica on terracotta

Tankard: Purple Lowhanging Fruit Majolica on terracotta

Cup: Sweet Red Low Fruit Majolica on terracotta

# 5 $90 Cup: Sunflowers with Blue Rim Majolica on terracotta

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

The functional vessel brings experiences into one’s daily life through the useful art object. Line, color, gesture, and the lure of materiality articulate the value of indulgence and the transience of (plant) life. The alchemy that transforms common terra cotta clay into a resonant object in a domestic setting points the way toward parallel transformations possible in the observed moments of personal life.

BFA

1981

Cleveland Institute of Art

MFA

1983

Rhode Island School of Design

Current position: tenured Professor, University of Florida School of Art and Art History Arbuckle has shown work and taught workshops at many venues across the U.S. and in several international locations. University of Florida has recognized her research with Graduate Research Professorship and her teaching with Teaching Improvement and Graduate Mentoring awards. Recent activities include participation in a team-taught class with Suze Lindsay at Curaumilla Arts Center, Chile, and a month-long residency and 3-day workshop at the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, MT. Linda has served as Director-atLarge on the board of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts, and as juror for state arts grants in Louisiana and Florida, and juried the NCECA Clay National, and the Strictly Functional Pottery National. http://lindaarbuckle.com


BOB ARCHAMBEAU

# 1 $300

# 2 $300

# 3 $300

Cup Stoneware, reduction fired with overlapping Shino glazes

Cup Stoneware, reduction fired clear glaze over crackle white slip

Cup Stoneware, reduction fired with overlapping Shino glazes

# 4 $300 Cup Stoneware, reduction fired with Shino glaze

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My aim in creating is not the decoration or didactic or clay as visual entertainment, it is not political. Instead, I hope my crockery is, in some measure, a distillation of the magic and mystery that surrounds me on this, my part of the Canadian Pre-Cambrian Shield. I strive for, at its best, pottery that is serene, rich in detail, detached from the mundane and timeless.

Robert Archambeau is a Canadian studio potter from Winnipeg and Bissett, Manitoba. He received his MFA from Alfred University and taught at RISD (4 years) and the University of Manitoba (23 years), retiring in 1991. Robert is the recipient of a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts and a Manitoba Arts Council Senior Grant. His pottery is represented by Akar Gallery (Iowa City, Iowa, USA) and David Kaye Gallery (Toronto, Ontario, CANADA).


CHRISTA ASSAD

# 1 $150

# 2 $150

# 3 $150

Pint Glass, War Series Porcelain Underglaze, glaze

Pint Glass, War Series Porcelain Underglaze, glaze

Pint Glass, War Series Porcelain Underglaze, glaze

# 4 $150 Pint Glass, War Series Porcelain Underglaze, glaze

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Making pots provides a few very important things for me: discipline, including regular physical and mental exercise; a measure of creativity and productivity; a role in history as artisan. The choice to pursue potting as a profession came as a bit of a surprise to me at first, but now seems the ideal solution to the puzzle of life. It satisfies the athlete, the academic, and the connoisseur in me alike. I can be my own boss, make my own inventory, and connect with those who buy and use my work. Along with the rewards, there are many lessons to be learned in patience, cooperation, and loss.

Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, mid-career artist Christa Assad is best known for her Re-objectification series — teapot designs based on objects and buildings from American industry. Assad explains the inspiration for her pieces:

Working within the timeline of ceramic history, my position comes humbly after centuries of past civilizations, whose technological developments and discoveries are still viable today. I have been strongly influenced by Chinese pots from the Han and Sung Dynasties, as well as the contemporary Yixing teapots. Equally stirring are the ancient Etruscan black ware vessels, Korean celadons, and the dynamic forms and surfaces of Persian and Egyptian wares. My education and formal training honors these cultures and their ceramic traditions, and places me in the context of contemporary American art…a culture wherein handmade pottery seems archaic, but somehow manages to endure.

A teacher, traveler and full time ceramicist with an MFA from Indiana University, Assad’s work is in the permanent collections of The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Ceramic Research Center at Arizona State University Museum, and The Penn State Fulbright Scholar Collection. She was named, “Ceramic Artist of the Year,” in 2012 by Ceramics Monthly. Assad is represented by Ferrin Gallery (MA), Harvey Meadows Gallery (CO), Friesen Abmeyer (WA), and Chloe Fine Arts (CA).

“Growing up in Pittsburgh, PA, I was strongly influenced by the Steel City’s dying industry and the grit of these oft-abandoned sites. Tagged with graffiti and other remnants of trespassers and squatters, the physical remains of these sites serve as archaeological artifacts in the study of human behavior and societal evolution.”

www.christaassad.com


BEN BATES

# 1 $75

# 2 $100

# 3 $50

Tea Cup Soda fired porcelain

Tea Cup Wood fired porcelain

Tea Cup Reduction fired stoneware

# 4 $75 Tea Cup Soda fired porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I am interested in the functional format as a realm of exploration, but I strive for my pieces to transcend their utilitarian boundaries and function as sculptural elements. I use the ideals of the vessel to clarify design and explore form as it relates to space. I want to manipulate the plasticity of the material and accentuate its softness to heighten the viewer’s awareness of the forms interior volume. My hope is to make pieces that are able to communicate feelings and ideas without recalling specific objects. I intend for these compositions to be mysterious and open-ended enough to evoke multiple interpretations.

Ben Bates, a resident of Libertyville, IL, was born and raised in Southern California, earned his BFA at Kansas City Art Institute (1995) and his MFA at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (2000). After graduate school Ben established himself as the head Resident Ceramic Artist at Crabtree Farm a living museum in Lake Bluff Illinois (1998 – 2003). He was also the Lead Consultant for the construction of the Sterling Hall Ceramics Center (1999 – 2001) and Art Department Chair at Woodlands Academy (2003 – 2005) both in Lake Forest, IL. His work has been featured in Feats of Clay, NCECA Clay National, Strictly Functional, 30 x 5 at AKAR Gallery, History in the Making, Lillstreet International, American Studio Ceramics, George Ohr Challenge, Platters and Pourers, Burnt, Yunomi Invitational, Linearity and as a solo Featured Artist at AKAR gallery. Ben was Personal Studio Assistant to Ken Ferguson (1993 – 1995) and to Ruth Duckworth (2004). He is currently a Ceramics Studio Artist, Ceramics Instructor and Ceramics Studio Technician at the College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois.


JOE BENNION

# 1 $50

# 2 $45

# 3 $50

Faceted Cup Wood fired stoneware

Stamped Cup Wood fired stoneware

Squared Cup Wood fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I enjoy making pottery by hand on a foot powered treadle wheel. The physical involvement places me deeper in the process. The gentle sound of the wheel and the soft resistance of the clay in my hand are at once comforting and pleasant. Pleasure is an important element of our life in this world. It gives meaning and balance to the confusion, pain and sorrow we encounter here. I hope that as people take my pottery in hand and raise it to their lips they will recognize some of the experience I have had in making it and will find pleasure of their own in daily use. The influences that most powerfully shape who we are located in the household and family. I want my pottery to be there and to promote and influence that growth, however small its part may be. The family dinner table is sacred space and the venue of first choice for my pottery. I prefer making domestic pottery that is plain, quiet and understated. I try to make pots that will play in the background, that speak gently but carry information to those willing to wait and listen. I love the kinds of surfaces derived from wood firing and salt glazing processes. In the case of the wood fired kiln I also enjoy the deeper involvement with process that the stoking of the kiln affords me. I love to sit with a kiln late at night and listen to the wood popping and the quiet sounds of the draft. Because of my decision to make quiet pottery I have had to leave the more public sales venues of street fairs, shops and galleries and sell my pottery at home where it is made. Somehow that environment shows my work to best advantage. I live and work in small Mormon farming village in the mountains of central Utah. Over the past 15 years I have shifted my marketing to bring people to my door rather than sending the work out. This seems to work best and it feels right to me.

Joseph Bennion is a native of Utah. For the past 36 years he has lived and worked in Spring City, Utah with his wife Lee Udall Bennion who is a painter. Joseph attended Tuscarora Pottery School and Brigham Young University where he earned a MFA in Ceramics. He has lectured and taught workshops in Japan, Europe, Canada, Jamaica and through out the United States. His work, which is widely published, appears in numerous private and public collections in the US and abroad. He currently operates Horseshoe Mountain Pottery and works seasonally as a Grand Canyon river guide. www.joethepotter.com


DAVID BOLTON

# 1 $65

# 2 $65

# 3 $65

# 4 $65

# 5 $65

Wood fired

Wood fired

Wood fired

Wood fired

Wood fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

David Bolton is a potter and is the Head of Ceramics at the College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois. Where he started teaching in 2005. Previously Bolton worked as the Ceramics and Sculpture Tech at Central Michigan University from 1998 to 2004.

Bolton references textile patterns and patterns from other sources and applies them to the “fabric” of the clay. Often these patterns are tessellations, patterns that repeat and go on and on, only to be met with a seam, a lip, a foot and then continue on in the next panel in a different direction. Many of these patterns are nostalgic, such as paisleys, plaids, checkerboard, houndstooth, and other loud patterns found on 1970-era clothing. The patterns are created digitally using sign vinyl, sand blasting, and then wood-firing. The idea of new and old process is evident, but in the end his work utilizes the variation in color and soft flowing flash marks and flux created by the kiln atmosphere that blurs the tight edge designs. The firing gives the “fabric” a sense of time and wear like an old garment.

Bolton received his BFA at the University of Evansville in Indiana with Les Miley in 1991, and his MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with Bill Farrell, Jim Lawton, and Kitty Ross in 1994. Bolton has exhibited at LillStreet Gallery and won the Best of Show at 4th Annual LillStreet International: Below the Surface. In addition, he has exhibited at Anthony Schaller Gallery, AKAR Gallery, Blue Spiral 1 Gallery, Duhbe Carreno Gallery, Market House Craft Center, Wayne Art Center, San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, and Lincoln Arts & Culture Foundation. His work also appears in publications such as Ceramics Monthly, Clay times, and the 500 Teapots book.


WILLIAM BROUILLARD

# 1 $55

# 2 $55

# 3 $45

# 4 $55

Machine Age Cup & Saucer Porcelain, wheel thrown & altered, gloss black glaze

Stein 1 Stoneware, wheel thrown & altered, wood fired to cone 10

Stein 2 Stoneware, wheel thrown & altered, wood fired to cone 10

Art Deco Cup & Saucer 1 Stoneware, wheel thrown & altered, shino glaze, gas fired, cone 10 reduction

ARTIST STATEMENT

# 5 $55 Art Deco Cup & Saucer 2 Stoneware, wheel thrown & altered, shino glaze, gas fired, cone 10 reduction

ARTIST BIO I began my Art education studying with John Perri at the State University of Wisconsin, at Menomonie, Wisconsin. After serving in the armed forces I returned to Wisconsin to study with Don Reitz at The university of Wisconsin, Madison. I applied to Alfred University in 1973 and graduated in 1976. After leaving Alfred, I traveled to North Carolina and was a resident craftsman at the Penland School. After several years as a studio potter I taught ceramics at ETSU for a year and then returned to Penland School where I worked and taught till 1980. I currently live and work in Cleveland Ohio. I have a studio in the old steel making district and have taught ceramics at The Cleveland Institute of Art for the last 31 years. In 2002 I was awarded a McKnight grant and travel to Minneapolis MN where I was a resident artist at the Northern Clay Center. At the end of my residency I returned to Cleveland and resumed teaching at CIA. I spend three days each week teaching at the Art Institute and the rest making pots and doing commission work in my Tremont studio.


RICHARD BURKETT

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $40

Toasting Cup Soda-fired porcelain

Toasting Cup Soda-fired porcelain

Toasting Cup Soda-fired porcelain

Small Tumbler Soda-fired porcelain

# 5 $40 Small Tumbler Soda-fired porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work hovers between pottery and sculpture. Some pieces move in a sculptural direction, yet still derive some of their form from vestiges of my more functional work. I find this a fascinating interplay, with one body of work informing the other and making both stronger for their interaction. These toasting cups and tumblers fall into a long line of functional cups that I have made, most of them soda or salt fired. Atmospheric firing is the way that I think when I’m making work after 40-plus years of soda and salt firing my work. I love the complex surfaces that result from creating forms that will react to the movement of sodium through the kiln.

Richard Burkett, Professor of Art at San Diego State University, has traveled extensively in Ecuador many times over the past fifteen years with Joe Molinaro, researching and photographing Ecuadorian potters, with a focus on documenting indigenous pottery cultures in the Amazon basin. He is currently working on a book on Ecuadorian Kichwa pottery with Joe Molinaro. One of the first ceramists to make extensive use of computers and the Internet, Burkett has lectured internationally on ceramics and the Internet at events in Stockholm, Sweden, Eskeshihir, Turkey, and Helsinki, Finland. He has traveled to Jingdezhen, China to study porcelain making in this city near the original source of porcelain clays. He is the author of HyperGlaze, educational glaze calculation software for artists, students and teachers, and the coauthor of the sixth edition of Ceramics: A Potter’s Handbook, one of the most widely used ceramics textbooks, and curated an international group of forty porcelain artists and wrote essays for the Lark book Porcelain Masters: major works by leading artists.


LINDA CHRISTIANSON

# 1 $40 Brownish Cup Wood fired stoneware

# 2 $40 Blue Cup Wood fired stoneware

# 3 $45

# 4 $40

Big Cup Wood fired stoneware

Blue Cup Wood fired stoneware

# 5 $45 Striped Teabowl Wood fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My daily practice begins with the making of 4 cups. While seemingly a simple form, the cup contains all the challenges I like: the pairing down of an essential lively form, comfortable feeling yet visually compelling, and a volume that suggests a specific liquid. Being put to the lip, the cup is the most dauntingly personal pot one could make. It has the capacity to change one's daily life. In my household, the favorite cups never make it into the cupboard. Their life moves from dish drainer to hand to sink and back to drainer. The best cups always end up in the shard pile, for they are loved to death.

Linda Christianson is an independent studio potter who lives and works in rural Minnesota. She studied at Hamline University (St Paul, Minnesota), and the Banff Centre School of Fine Arts (Banff, Alberta, Canada). She exhibits nationally and internationally, including one person exhibits in London and St. Louis. Her pieces are in numerous public and private collections, including the American Museum of Ceramic Art and the Glenboe Museum. An itinerate educator, Linda has taught at colleges and universities, including Carleton College and the Hartford Art School. She received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the McKnight Foundation. Her recent writing appeared in Studio Potter and The Log Book. One of her goals is to make a better cup each day.


SAMUEL CHUNG

# 1 $80

# 2 $80

# 3 $80

Cloud Cup Porcelain, china paint

Cloud Cup Porcelain, china paint

Cloud Cup Porcelain, china paint

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I work within the context of pottery to exploit its universal identity and impart my own vision of merging historical/ contemporary and cultural influences. I am interested in the relationships between art, traditional craft, contemporary design and architecture. When I combine these sometimesdisparate relationships, they bring forth a new object that is intended to provoke one’s perception of what is familiar versus what is new by displacing the element of time.

Sam Chung received his MFA from Arizona State University and his BA degree from St. Olaf College. He taught at Northern Michigan University from 1998-2007 and has been teaching at Arizona State University since 2007 where he is an Associate Professor of Ceramics. He has exhibited at Harvey Meadows, AKAR, Greenwich House Pottery, Cervini Haas, Sherry Leedy, Santa Fe Clay, Lacoste Gallery, Taipei County Yingge Museum and Incheon World Ceramic Center. Sam’s work is included in the collections of The Crocker Art Museum (CA), Incheon World Ceramic Center (Korea), Guldagergaard (Denmark), San Angelo Museum (TX) and ASU Ceramics Research Center (AZ).

My recent work draws imagery specifically from cloud motifs originating from Korean art and design. I am interested in their reference to my own cultural background, but also their representation of a phenomenon that is constantly in flux. The inherent nature of clouds to morph and adapt are similar to the way in which I relate to my own floating sense of crosscultural identity. They also represent notions of freedom and change, and allow me to expand the formal language of traditional pottery forms.


BEDE CLARKE

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

# 4 $45

Espresso Wood fired stoneware

Espresso Wood fired stoneware

Espresso Wood fired stoneware

Espresso Wood fired stoneware

# 5 $45 Espresso Wood fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My goal in making this work has been to create quiet, simple pots, which like a good meal leave a healthy, full feeling. Pots like these have been my constant companions for over forty years. They are forms and surfaces which I never grow tired of. They are rooted in ceramic history; yet, I hope they reflect a personal and individual quality of feeling. Above all, these pots are intended to be good to live with and interact with on a daily basis. They are made with others in mind.

Bede Clarke has been a Professor of Art at the University of Missouri since 1992. He received his Master of Fine Arts from The University of Iowa (1990) and a BFA from Eckerd College (1982). Bede’s work is found in public and private collections in the U.S. and abroad.

For me, good pots spring from compassion. My working method amounts to simply wishing the work well at each stage of creation. Always, I return to the clay trying to bring as much sincerity as I can muster to bear on the work.

Bede maintains a studio in Columbia, Missouri where he produces his ceramic art work and continues to exhibit worldwide, recently at: Yingge Ceramics Museum 2012 Taiwan Ceramics Biennale, Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA, and, Arvada Center for Fine Arts and Humanities, Arvada, CO. Web Site: http://www.bedeclarkestudio.com


BRUCE COCHRANE

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

# 4 $75

Teabowl Wood fired porcelain

Teabowl Wood fired porcelain

Teabowl Wood fired porcelain

Teabowl Wood fired porcelain

# 5 $75 Teabowl Wood fired porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

After 30 years of working in clay, utility continues to serve as the foundation for my ideas. The pots I make, no matter how simple or complex, are meant to be experienced on a physical and contemplative level. The way an object carries, lifts, cradles, pours and contains are properties which I strive to make engaging for the user, offering more than just convenience. Pottery has the potential to affect peoples lives in a very real way. The challenge is to go beyond the mundane and purely technical solutions which only compete with a vast industrial market. The pottery I find most compelling in terms of its vitality and its reflection of the maker are those who reach back into the traditions of vessel making not simply in reproduction but rather how these historical models are reinterpreted and revitalized to have more relevance to contemporary society.

New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, MFA (1978) Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, BFA (1976)

My current work is made with stoneware clay and gas fired in a reduction kiln or a soda or wood fired atmosphere. I am also working with similar forms in earthenware with terra sigillata in a reducing atmosphere. The pots are constructed from thrown sections which allows for greater articulation of form and facilitates the application of pattern and texture through the use of carved roulettes

Bruce was born in Vancouver and moved to Montreal at the age of ten. There he was introduced to ceramics at John Abbott College and was encouraged by his first instructor, Julia Manitius, to continue his education at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, where he studied with Walter Ostrom. From 1976-78, he attended the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, where he received his M.F.A. He has taught ceramics at Sheridan College in Ontario from 1978-2010 and continues to conduct workshops and exhibit on an international level. His work is in the collection of such notable institutions as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art in Toronto and the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa. Bruce’s home and studio are located in Mississauga, Ontario.


ELAINE COLEMAN

# 1 $350

# 2 $325

# 3 $325

Incised moth ice white tea bowl Coleman porcelain

Incised leaf and bird Korean blue cup Coleman porcelain

Incised frog and leaf green celadon cup Coleman porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I have been incising porcelain for thirty years and I still love doing it as much as when I started. My work used to only involve the taking away of clay from the form but in the last several years I have been adding clay to make another layer and surface dimension. There is something magical about this technique that seems to bring each piece to life towards the end of that process. The final lines in my carved pieces are enhanced by the use of celadon glazes that help define the design. Moving to Nevada has influenced my drawing but I still like doing other images. I carve for myself first and have been most fortunate that serious collectors appreciate my work.

Born 1945 in Long Beach California Attended the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon 1964-1965 Studio potter in Portland and Nevada since 1968-2013 Moved from Oregon to Nevada in 1987 where Elaine shares a studio with husband Tom Coleman in Henderson Featured in many national shows and international exhibitions Has given workshops and lectures throughout the United States Included in many publication, Ceramics Monthly, Clay Times and various ceramic books Incised ceramic pieces included in the collection of the Racine Art Museum, College of Wooster, American Museum of Ceramic Art and The Museum of Contemporary Crafts


TOM COLEMAN

# 1 $250

# 2 $250

# 3 $225

# 4 $100

Wood fired bourbon bowl Coleman porcelain

Wood fired bourbon bowl Coleman porcelain

Soda fired bourbon bowl Wood fired stoneware

Ice white loose thrown bourbon bowl Coleman porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I’ve been writing artist statements for many years and for the most part I find the experience much like a self-message. Recently when asked to repeat this task someone said just tell us what you’re about, what do you believe in? It didn’t take me long to think about this since I talk about it in every workshop I give. First and most, I believe one must have a true love of the medium. Second I believe in quality, the highest one can achieve to their ability. Third, since I was trained in the classic Japanese tradition I think that pure form, composition and balance must be learned before one can attempt such things as sculptural or a-symmetrical pieces.

Born in Amarillo, Texas 1945

Starting off as a functional potter with a degree in fine art helped me advance to the position I am in today. Money helps pay the bills but it can’t be the sole reason one becomes involved with any art form. My true love of clay, glazes, and the process of finishing my pieces have helped me to stay just as excited about my art as I was when I started thirty-eight years ago.

# 5 $125 Crystal matt glaze, shell bourbon bowl Coleman porcelain

Attended the Northwest College of Art in Portland Oregon Graduated with a fine art degree from the Northwest College of Art in 1968 Instructor of Ceramics at Portland State University in Oregon and UNLV in Las Vegas Studio potter from 1967-2013 Moved to Nevada in 1987 and set up a studio in Henderson Featured in many solo and group ceramic exhibitions nationally and internationally The subject of the book by John Nance “The Mud Pie Dilemma” Given numerous workshops and lectures in Canada, Denmark, US and Australia. Included in many ceramic publication, Ceramics Monthly, Studio Potter and Clay Times magazine and various ceramics books Has work in the collections of the Smithsonian, American Art Museum, Nora Eccles Museum, San Angelo Museum, Earl Mallard Collection, Portland Art Museum.


JAMES CONNELL

# 1 $75

# 2 $50

# 3 $50

# 4 $100

Tall Salt Carved Cup Salt fired stoneware

Red Blue Shell Yunomi Reduction Ʌ10 porcelain

Lavender Carved Cup Reduction Ʌ10 porcelain

Red Carbon Trap Carved Cup Reduction Ʌ10 porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I strive for beauty and elegance in my pieces. On my very best days in the studio I get glimpses of it and it keeps me going. It is all about that eternal elusive quest for beauty.

Born in Woodstock, Illinois.

# 5 $75 Red Fluted Teabowl Reduction Ʌ10 porcelain

M.F.A. University of Illinois (Urbana, IL), 1984. B.F.A. Kansas City Art Institute (K.C., MO), 1982. B.A. Loyola University (Chicago, IL), 1976. Working in ceramic since 1975. Currently Professor of Ceramics, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC since 1987. National Council on the Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) On-Site Conference Liaison for the 2001 Charlotte, NC, NCECA Conference. National K-12 Ceramic Exhibition Foundation board member since 2001. NCECA International Residency Award 2004, China. 15 Museum Acquisitions 53 Publications. 498 total exhibitions. 81 awards and honors. 50 Workshops/lectures. Juried into 6 out of the last 10 NCECA Clay National Exhibitions. Juried into 19 out of 20 Strictly Functional Pottery Nationals.


MICHAEL CORNEY

# 1 $85

# 2 $85

# 3 $85

# 4 $85

Pussy Cat High fired porcelain glaze, under glaze and ceramic stains. Not wood fired

Guy Cup High fired porcelain glaze, under glaze and ceramic stains. Not wood fired

Girl Cup High fired porcelain glaze, under glaze and ceramic stains. Not wood fired

Skeleton Cup/Vibrator High fired porcelain glaze, under glaze and ceramic stains. Not wood fired

# 5 $85 Skeleton Cup/Globe High fired porcelain glaze, under glaze and ceramic stains. Not wood fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I make work for folks who think like me. It’s not for everybody, but for those who get it no explanation is necessary.

Michael Corney is a teacher and studio potter currently living in northern San Diego County. Mike received his BA degree from Cal State University, Fullerton and went on to complete a MFA degree at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Michael has taught workshops at Anderson Ranch, Penland School of Crafts and Santa Fe Clay. He has participated in shows at Santa Fe Clay (NM), Northern Clay Center (MN), The Schaller Gallery (MI) and Akar Design Gallery (IA) Corney’s work is in the permanent collections of The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, The Ceramic Research Center at Arizona State University Museum, John Michael Kohler Arts Center, the Racine museum of Art and the Boise Museum of Art.


CHARITY DAVIS-WOODARD

# 1 $50

# 2 $50

# 3 $50

Cup 1 Porcelain, wood-fired

Cup 2 Porcelain, wood-fired

Cup 3 Porcelain, wood-fired

# 4 $50 Cup 4 Porcelain, wood-fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

To express what I find moving and beautiful through the making of functional ceramics is a great privilege. The life of a potter demands something from all aspects of one’s being and is a wonderful dance of routine and experimentation, hard work and soulful searching. I am most interested in making pots that can be held in the hand and enjoyed visually and tactically, and every work session in the studio is an opportunity to explore new variations on familiar themes, keeping them fresh and recharged. I am deeply influenced by the environment I grew up in as well as by the natural world, architecture, functional objects of many types and historical decorative arts. Through my work I hope to contribute something to people’s lives that may help them pause and reflect on a bit of beauty or on a memory that brings pleasure during their daily routines or ritual celebrations.

Originally from Indianapolis, Charity holds both a Bachelors degree in Spanish and a Master of Library Science degree from Indiana University, and a Master in Fine Arts degree from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. As a full-time studio potter for the past 15 years her focus has been on limited production porcelain wood-fired pottery. Charity has taught ceramics for the Saint Louis (MO) Community College system and is a frequent workshop presenter for clay guilds, universities and craft schools such as Anderson Ranch Arts Center and Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Her work can be seen in numerous professional publications, private and public collections, and at exhibitions and gallery events around the country.


JOSH DEWEESE

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

# 4 $45

Mug Woodfired sald soda glazed stoneware

Mug Woodfired sald soda glazed stoneware

Mug Woodfired sald soda glazed stoneware

Mug Woodfired sald soda glazed stoneware

# 5 $45 Mug Woodfired sald soda glazed stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I am inspired and challenged by the art of pottery and strive to make work that is successful on multiple levels. I want my pots to be well designed and comfortable to use; to be rich with ceramic wonder, and seductive to behold; and to have reference to history and the field of ceramic art to spark the imagination.

Josh DeWeese is a ceramic artist and educator. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Art teaching ceramics at Montana State University in Bozeman, where he and his wife Rosalie Wynkoop have a home and studio. DeWeese served as Resident Director of the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts in Helena, Montana from 1992-2006. He holds an MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred, and a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute. DeWeese has exhibited and taught workshops internationally and his work is included in numerous public and private collections.

I’m drawn to the beauty and mystery of high temperature ceramics and the element of chance that occurs in atmospheric firings. Wood firing and salt/soda firing are processes where extreme surfaces can be achieved, in the subtle qualities of raw clays and the vibrant depths of a running glaze. I have a passion for painting with ceramic materials on a three-dimensional form, having the drawing unfold as it moves around the pot. I enjoy the phenomenon of the melt and the element of gravity that enters the image through running glaze. The loss of control is important, blurring the lines made with the hand. The viscosity and movement of the glaze becomes an important element in the final image. The drawings often disappear among the layers of information that become the final surface, creating depth and a sense of curiosity. Perhaps pottery’s greatest power lies in its association with the human body. The language of pottery is the language of the body, with necks and feet, bellies and shoulders, and lips to touch our lips. The intimate relationship that develops with use strengthens this association. A personality develops, and the pots become our friends. In this friendship they become reflections of our humanness, and help give meaning to our lives.


SUSAN DEWSNAP

# 1 $60

# 2 $60

# 3 $60

Black & White & Green Stoneware, soda fired, slips and glazes

Black & White & Green Stoneware, soda fired, slips and glazes

Black & White & Green Stoneware, soda fired, slips and glazes

# 4 $60 Black & Yellow Stoneware, soda fired, slips and glazes

# 5 $60 Black & Yellow Stoneware, soda fired, slips and glazes

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work draws from my passion for the visual in art history as an eternal source and presence. I consider each pot as presenting a particular issue or problem to be solved and brought to fruition where interior meets exterior. Recent passions are how to evoke the gesture of a pot by merging the structure of the three-dimensional form with a surface of composed drawing. The pot is the setting for the active and contemplative to work together to create beautiful objects.

Susan grew up in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Her ceramic study began at a community clay studio in Boulder, Colorado and matured through intensive summer workshops at Haystack Mountain School in Maine and The Penland School in North Carolina. She received a BFA in painting from the University of New Hampshire and a MFA in ceramics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she also taught from 2008 through 2012. Susan currently teaches ceramics at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Her work is represented in galleries across the United States. Susan exhibits her ceramic work nationally and internationally with awards from the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts Biennial, the World Ceramic Biennale Korea International Competition, and Best of Show in the Strictly Functional Pottery National Exhibition.


PAUL DRESANG

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $40

Tea Bowl Porcelain Wood fired porcelain

Tea Bowl Porcelain Wood fired porcelain

Tea Bowl Stoneware Wood fired porcelain

Tea Bowl Porcelain Wood fired porcelain

# 5 $40 Tea Bowl Wood fired porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I make ceramic sculpture and functional pots. Each of these informs the other in many ways. The practice and skill, which comes from making pots, supports more accuracy when assessing the details of all forms, be they “simple” cup or trompe L’oeil sculpture. The careful consideration of balance, volume, profile, skin, tension, and the rhythms of light and shadow scrutinized in the sculptural work, hones these same sensibilities of the potter. When we potters realize that we are all making sculpture, we make much better pots. Some of our work holds soup or conveys coffee to the lips, and these pieces are no less engendered with significant aesthetic concerns. Ceramic sculpture may function in additional ways, to convey a complex narrative, political point of view, or some social agenda. A sculptural piece may help to inform you about your political leaders’ squabbling and robbing you, and a bowl may help you to eat while you weep. Though both forms of work develop from training, planning, and intuition, the “multiples” nature of pot making allows for a flow of intuition through a series of objects. Training and intuition with sculptural work evolves from a series as well, but it is centered in an ongoing sorting or analysis within the individual object (sculpture).

Paul Dresang received his MFA Degree in Ceramics from the University of Minnesota. He has been an Instructor at Wisconsin State University at Oshkosh, The Cleveland Institute of Art, and is currently Professor of Ceramics at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. His work is avidly pursued by collectors and has been shown extensively throughout the country. Dresang makes both functional and sculptural work in stoneware and porcelain. His work is defined by a unique sense of form and decoration.


NEIL ESTRICK

# 1 $36

# 2 $36

# 3 $36

Porcelain Mug Layered glazes fired to cone 6 in oxidation

Porcelain Mug Layered glazes fired to cone 6 in oxidation

Porcelain Mug Layered glazes fired to cone 6 in oxidation

# 4 $36 Porcelain Mug Layered glazes fired to cone 6 in oxidation

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

There is a cupboard full of hand made mugs in my kitchen. Over the years my wife and I have decided which of the mugs are our favorites, and those pieces have migrated to the front of the cupboard. The rest of the mugs rarely see the light of day, unless we have a large party. All of the mugs in our cupboard have some level of visual appeal, but what sets our favorites apart from the rest is that they are a pleasure to use. There is something about the quality of their construction and design that makes us want them to be a part of our daily lives. I want every pot I make to have that same appeal. I demand from myself a high level of craftsmanship. My pots must be light enough to be handled comfortably, but not so thin as to make them too fragile for daily use. The walls must be of consistent thickness for good balance, and the glaze application must be clean and even. This attention to detail helps to ensure that my pots will be used for their intended purpose. Functional pieces that are aesthetically pleasing but do not successfully perform their intended function will not be used, and will be destined to sit in the back of the cupboard.

Neil Estrick holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Art with an emphasis in ceramics and photography, and a Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics. He has been making pottery for 20 years, and specializes in wheel thrown porcelain. Neil was born and raised in Colorado, but currently resides in Grayslake, IL with his wife Sara, a veterinarian, and his two young sons, Jack and Henry. For the past 9 years he has been the owner of Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC, in Grayslake. In addition to being a working studio and gallery, the business has a large classroom studio space where Neil holds pottery classes for kids and adults. Neil also offers workshops for teachers, sells kilns and other pottery equipment, and repairs pottery kilns and wheels in the Chicago-Milwaukee area. Neil’s pottery features smooth forms covered with visual textures created with incised and layered glazes. He primarily works in porcelain, fired to cone 6 in oxidation.


ADAM FIELD

# 1 $60

# 2 $60

# 3 $60

# 4 $60

Cup with Carved Pattern Reduction fired porcelain with celadon glazes

Cup with Carved Pattern Reduction fired porcelain with celadon glazes

Cup with Carved Pattern Reduction fired porcelain with celadon glazes

Cup with Carved Pattern Reduction fired porcelain with celadon glazes

# 5 $60 Cup with Carved Pattern Reduction fired porcelain with celadon glazes

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I am fascinated with antique artifacts, the way they can speak of mastery of lost peoples, places, and cultures. This inspires me to create works that both radiate history and capture my own place and time. I work toward a clean aesthetic that celebrates the masterful simplicity of antique Far Eastern pottery, while retaining the modest utility of colonial American wares. The surface of my pottery is meticulously carved with intricate designs that borrow from nature and incorporate the human touch. Much of the carving on my work is informed by pattern languages found in indigenous fiber art, such as Hawaiian tapa, Incan cordage, and Zulu basketry.

Born and raised in Colorado, Adam earned his BA in Art from Fort Lewis College. For two years he immersed himself in the culturally rich art scene of the San Francisco bay area, where he began his full time studio practice. From there, he relocated to Maui, where he established a thriving studio business. He spent most of 2008 in Icheon, South Korea, studying traditional Korean pottery making techniques under 6th generation Onggi master Kim Il Mahn. In 2013 he created and debuted HIDE-N-SEEKAH at the NCECA conference in Houston, TX. After maintaining his studio in Durango, CO for 5 years, Adam recently moved to Helena, MT where he is currently a long-term artist in residence at The Archie Bray Foundation. His works are included in private collections and kitchen cabinets internationally.


MARTY FIELDING

# 1 $65

# 2 $65

# 3 $65

# 4 $65

Mug Thrown and altered Earthenware, cone 2

Mug Thrown and altered Earthenware, cone 2

Mug Thrown and altered Earthenware, cone 2

Mug Thrown and altered Earthenware, cone 2

# 5 $65 Mug Thrown and altered Earthenware, cone 2

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

The inherent usefulness of pottery has provided a vehicle for self-expression for twelve millennia. Clay is seductive; it can be molded into nearly any shape, adorned and embellished, metamorphosed into stone, and sealed with glass. Working with one of the oldest technologies known to humans excites me as a counterpoint to the abundance of new technologies on which we depend.

Marty Fielding became captivated by clay as an anthropology major at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He continued his study of ceramics as a student and teaching assistant at Penland School of Crafts. Marty is currently an M.F.A. candidate at the University of Florida.

Contrast sparks interest. One visual aspect of an object often goes unnoticed without the juxtaposition of its opposite. By searching for elements that accentuate each other via resistance, I strive to construct a visual statement that attracts attention, and therefore use. To this end, I seek tension and balance by pitting loose vs. tight, curve vs. angle, warm vs. cool, shiny vs. matte, smooth vs. coarse, and historical vs. contemporary. Color has the power produce a visceral reaction in us. I am interested in the way color and its context can punctuate and activate my work. In music, a chord must be made up of at least three notes. I have found that color also works well in a triad.

Fielding’s work has been included in invitational and juried exhibitions locally, nationally and internationally. Craft galleries throughout the U.S. represent his pottery. Marty’s teaching experience includes adjunct positions at Ohio Northern University and Middlebury College, several community studios including Frog Hollow in Middlebury, Vermont where he was Resident Potter, and various workshops including Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville and Truro Center for the Arts on Cape Cod. His work has been published in several books as well as Ceramics Monthly, Pottery Making Illustrated, and Clay Times.


JULIA GALLOWAY

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

Cup with Still Life Porcelain, mid range soda fire glaze and lustre

Cup with Still Life Porcelain, mid range soda fire glaze and lustre

Cup with Still Life Porcelain, mid range soda fire glaze and lustre

# 4 $75 Cup with Still Life Porcelain, mid range soda fire glaze and lustre

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I always wonder, how am I nourished by where I live? I find utilitarian pottery the best method to express my ideas. Handmade pottery is naturally rich in ideas and metaphor; pottery seeps into our houses, our kitchens, and enriches our lives. Pottery weaves into our daily lives through use and decorates our living

Julia Galloway is a utilitarian potter, professor and the director of the School of Art at The University of Montana. She exhibits, lectures, and teaches workshops across the United States and Canada. Julia recently moved to Missoula from New England.

spaces with character and elegance; pottery is joyous. Pottery is a reflection of our reality, our fantasy and ourselves. I make pottery out of porcelain clay. It is extremely sensitive and responsive to the human touch when it's soft; when fired it becomes dense and strong. It is this responsive nature of clay that continues to interest me. It responds to your touch, then you respond to it. The same happens in the firing process with glaze materials and the atmosphere of the kiln. Clay is a supportive and demanding medium for the creative journey of making. I am insistent about making things with my hands. The need for beautiful domestic objects and the instinctual drive to create things are tremendous dance partners for idea and desire. Utilitarian pottery supports and represents our intimate rituals of nourishment and celebration.

Julia currently serves on the Board of the Archie Bray Foundation and served on the Board of Haystack Mountain School for Crafts for nine years. She has demonstrated at the Utilitarian Clay Conference, and National Conference for the Education of Ceramic Arts. Julia has exhibited across the United States and Canada, including solo exhibitions at Lill Street in Chicago, the Clay Arts Center in New York, and Trax Gallery in California. Her work has been featured in Ceramics Monthly, Studio Potter, Art and Perception and Clay Times. Julia work has also been featured in the “The Ceramic Spectrum” by Robin Hopper and “The Art of Contemporary Pottery” by Kevin Hulch. Julia’s pottery is in the collections of the College of William and Mary, the Archie Bray Foundation, the Long Beach Museum of Art, the Huntington Art Museum, The Crocker Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian. She developed the "Montana Clay" (www.montanaclay.org) and the "Field Guide for Ceramics Artisans" (http:// juliagalloway.com/field-guide) websites.


STEVE GODFREY

# 1 $42

# 2 $42

# 3 $42

Coffee Mug Medium

Coffee Mug Medium

Coffee Mug Medium

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Creating a simple coffee mug comes from my desire to use something everyday that strikes up an interesting conversation with me. Making pots allows me to be a formalist who loves the symbolic results of shape, color and texture combinations. I can be an engineer who develops a refreshing approach to something we have seen or used before. I have the freedom to design work that will compliment an environment. With these attributes, I try to raise the importance of a mug from mundane to meaningful.

Steve Godfrey grew up in the town of East Longmeadow, Massachusetts He received his Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree from the Hartford Art School in 1993. He went on to spend a year studying at the Kansas City Art Institute. He received his Masters of Fine Arts Degree from New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 1996. In 1998, Steve spent the year as a resident artist at The Archie Bray Foundation for Ceramic Arts. In 1999, Steve accepted the position of term instructor and ceramics area technician at the University of Alaska Anchorage. In 2004, Steve was hired as the area head of the ceramics at UAA. Presently, Steve is finishing up a sabbatical from teaching during which he was a short term artist in residence at the Archie Bray Foundation for Ceramic Arts in Helena MT. Aside from teaching, Steve has been consistently making and showing his work. He has participated in numerous exhibitions and sales throughout Alaska and the lower forty eight states. Recently, he was invited to be a featured artist at the Clay Studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and also participate in the Northern Clay Center American Pottery Festival in Minneapolis Minnesota.


CHRIS GUSTIN

# 1 $250

# 2 $250

# 3 $250

Tea Bowl - Blue Shino Wood fired

Tea Bowl - Gold Shino Wood fired

Tea Bowl Wood fired

# 4 $250 Tea Bowl Wood fired

# 5 $250 Tea Bowl Wood fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Most of my work is of a much larger scale, where function and utility are left behind in order to pursue ideas of sculptural form and abstraction. Yet the desire to make things that function in our daily lives still resonates deeply within me. I make tea bowls only a couple of times a year, when I’m getting ready to fire my wood kiln. It’s is a way for me to connect with the basics of functional ceramics and to touch the roots of utilitarian clay. What interests me about the cup form is in its scale and inherent intimacy, in the way our hand interacts with the object, quietly taking in information while we go about our task of drinking our morning coffee or tea. The tea bowl is a small object, but it has the potential to be a universe in and of itself.

Chris is a studio artist and an Emeritus Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, where he retired in 1998. Chris received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1975, and his MFA from Alfred University in 1977. Chris lives and works in South Dartmouth, Massachusetts. Chris’ work is published extensively, and is represented in numerous public and private collections, including the Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the World Ceramic Exposition Foundation in Icheon, Korea, and the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art. With over forty solo exhibitions, he has exhibited, lectured and taught workshops in the United States, Caribbean, South America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. He has received two National Endowment for the Arts Artist Fellowships, and three Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowships, the most recent in 2009. Chris is cofounder of the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts in Maine, and currently serves as Vice President on its board.


PETER HESSEMER

# 1 $90

# 2 $175

# 3 $190

Scraped Cup, no handle Translucent Porcelain

Fork Buttons Cup, no handle Translucent Porcelain

Slab Flower Cup, no handle Translucent Porcelain

# 4 $80 Spiral Wheel Cup, no handle Translucent Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I enjoy handling my translucent porcelain as directly and with the same vitality as large scale stoneware forms. That said, the small size of these “cups” makes forming the “clay” easier and encourages immediacy and playfulness because there is less inherent difficulty at this smaller scale. The translucent porcelain I work with is not a commercial material. I developed these formulas to be extremely translucent so that the surface and form produce an image when they are filled with light as in a window. Whether my “clay” is built up or cut into, the thickness in contrast with the thinness of the walls creates the light/dark “drawing” qualities of these pieces.

For over 40 years I have had commissions, done research, and exhibited my work.

Much of my work is the result of interacting with the clay, playing with the clay. I also recognize the importance of nature and visual stimulus for my work. My wife and I were recently in Iceland where icebergs floating in Jökulsárlón, a bay at the foot of the Vatnajökull glacier, were spectacular and an inspiration.

MFA- University of Chicago 1976 BFA- Tyler School of Art, Temple University 1974 Teaching: Oakton Community College, 1976-2012 Currently: Emeritus Professor, Ceramics


STEVEN HILL

# 1 $100

# 2 $100

# 3 $80

Yunomi ^6 Electric Fired Porcelain

Yunomi ^6 Electric Fired Porcelain

Mug ^6 Electric Fired Porcelain

# 4 $80 Mug ^6 Electric Fired Porcelain

# 5 $80 Mug ^6 Electric Fired Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I simply have to make pots! While making pottery nourishes my soul, selling it puts food on my table. When I am sitting at the potters’ wheel with music reverberating through my studio, life is good! The dance that is born of clay spinning through my fingers is the place in my life where magic happens. I’ve always had a relatively narrow focus, making wheel thrown, single-fired functional pottery. My work never stands still, however… It has been a slow evolution of form and surface. Function is what keeps me rooted, but I don’t mind stretching the boundaries of usefulness just a little as I explore my tiny vision.

Steven Hill has been a functional potter since 1974, originally working out of a backyard studio and selling his work mostly at art festivals. By the mid 1990’s he was looking for a way to expand his studio, to begin a resident artist program for aspiring potters, and to provide space for other ceramic artists to work. In 1998 Steven co-founded Red Star Studios Ceramic Center in Kansas City, MO and co-founded Center Street Clay in Sandwich, IL in 2006. Currently Steven is doing what he does best… Making pots, writing about ceramics, teaching workshops and letting someone else take care of business! His new home is 323 Clay in Independence, MO.

A trip to Italy in 1995 profoundly influenced my direction with glazing. It wasn't the Majolica pottery that Italy is famous for, but the colors and textures of Tuscany that spoke to me. The weatherworn painted wood and stucco surfaces, which highlight architectural form by stripping away surface embellishment, exerted their influence on my pottery.

Steven Hill received his BFA from Kansas State University in 1973. His work is featured in nationally juried shows and in many ceramics books. Steven has taught over 250 workshops throughout the United States and Canada and has written ten ceramic articles. – "An Approach To Single-Firing", (January 1986, Ceramics Monthly), "Long Distance Runner", (December 1989, Studio Potter), "Don't Put The Flames Out", (February 1994, Ceramics Monthly), “Pulling Handles”, (Spring 1998, Pottery Making Illustrated), “Where You’ve Been Is Good and Gone, All You Keep Is The Gettin’ There”, (April 1998, Ceramics Monthly), “Spraying Glazes”, (March 2002, Pottery Making Illustrated), “An Approach to Single Firing – Further On”, (January 2006, Ceramics Monthly), “Rethinking Ceramic Workshops”, (Comment, May 2007, Ceramics Monthly), “The Eight Month Workshop – A Journey of Discovery”, (June 2008, Ceramics Monthly), “AtmosphericLike Effects for Electric Firing”, (March 2012, Ceramics Monthly).

Sometimes I wonder what direction my life would have taken if I had not discovered clay. The only thing I know for certain is that I lead a privileged life making my living doing something I love as much as making pottery.

stevenhillpottery.com


CATHI JEFFERSON

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

# 4 $45

Dogwood Yunomi Salt soda fired porcelainous stoneware

Arbutus Branch Yunomi Salt soda fired porcelainous stoneware

Grasses Yunomi Salt soda fired porcelainous stoneware

Olive Branch Yunomi Salt soda fired porcelainous stoneware

# 5 $45 Trillium Yunomi Salt soda fired porcelainous stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

The ritual of use can be shared and give special memories to celebrations and every day occasions between family and friends or make quiet solitary moments rich experiences. Hand made pieces contribute unique qualities that engage. With salt firing the yunomi has rich colour and texture variations that you want to look at, pick up, feel, and hold. The yunomi is light and comfortable in your hand, with warm earth toned designs on the outside and a shino glaze on the inside that makes every liquid look and taste better.

Cathi was born and raised in North Vancouver, British Columbia. She is a studio-trained potter studying under Herman Venema. Since 1993 she has been salt/soda firing altered wheel thrown and hand-built functional and sculptural stoneware. Her work is inspired by earth tones, images from nature and form fitting abstract designs. Over the years Cathi’s work has been published in several books and shown in numerous exhibitions. Recent shows include: ‘Connecting Art and Manufacturing’ at Paros Gallery in Tokyo, Japan, ‘Celebrate the Salish Sea’ at Fraker Scott Gallery, NCECA, Seattle, WA, ‘Table Salt’ at Gallery of BC Ceramics, Vancouver, BC, ‘Matter of Clay III’ at Jonathon Bancroft Snell Gallery, London, Ontario, ‘Northerners’ at Akar Gallery, Iowa City, IA. In 2010 Cathi was awarded the Carter Wosk BC Creative Achievement Award for Applied Art and Design. She has been actively involved in the clay community and enjoyed teaching experiences locally and abroad. In 2008 Cathi moved to the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island and is living on the Cowichan River near Duncan immersed in and inspired by the natural environment that surrounds her. Currently Cathi works as a studio artist and teaches at the University of Victoria.


DOUG JEPPESEN

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $40

Mug Wood fired B-mix

Mug Wood fired B-mix

Teabowl Wood fired B-mix

Teabowl Wood fired B-mix

# 5 $40 Teabowl Wood fired Stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Today we live in a world of convenience rather than one of necessity, and to make functional pottery is a reaction against this convenience. From a solitary morning cup of coffee, a noisy family dinner, or sipping a cup of whiskey with a friend, pots are used every day by millions of people as they record and discuss their ideas, activities and experiences. For me, this opens a door to a part of our society that wishes to rekindle a relationship with our past and push beyond the industrialized object of contemporary society.

Doug Jeppesen holds a BA in Art History and a BFA in Art with an emphasis in ceramics from the University of Tulsa, and a MFA from Northern Illinois University. Doug is an Associate Professor of Art/Ceramics at Waubonsee Community College in Sugar Grove, Illinois where he has taught full time since 1998. He specializes in wood firing and has built a number of different styled wood fired kilns at the college. The latest was an Anagama, which was completed during the fall of 2006 and is one of only three in the state of Illinois. His work has appeared in numerous national juried and invitational exhibitions across the United States. Doug has presented workshops at area colleges and universities, and in 2006 he participated as a panel member at the International Wood Firing Conference at Northern Arizona University.


MATT KELLEHER

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $40

Cup Cone 3 Soda fired red clay

Cup Cone 3 Soda fired red clay

Cup Cone 3 Soda fired red clay

Cup Cone 3 Soda fired red clay

# 5 $40 Cup Cone 3 Soda fired red clay

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Pottery is a continuous curiosity; how it’s made, how it feels, its shape, its surface, how it exists in a home as an object, or a tool, or maybe an image. When making pottery, I search for poised forms that suggest sculpture, respect utility and perform well; they should be confident and handsome.

Matt Kelleher is a studio potter in the mountains of western North Carolina. In 2005, he made the decision to leave University teaching and pursue full-time studio work through a three-year residency at Penland School of Crafts. Matt has also been artist in residence at Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, MT (1999-2001) and Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park in Shigaraki, Japan (2003). While Matt continues to investigate soda-fired tableware, he has broadened his interests to include sculptural vessels, bird inspired forms, and collaborative work with Shoko Teruyama. You can learn more at www.mattkelleher.com.

I create my surfaces for contemplation. Moods are suggested with warmth, fluidity, and translucency. Atmospheres are veiled with fog and cool mist. Pouring and layering slip, I respond intuitively to the qualities of liquid. Slip warms up during the firing, the surface dampens and layering is revealed. The relationship between form, firing, and my hand is complete. Each piece is ready for a conversation and willing to be part of a greater surrounding. Aware of the tendency to put parameters around my work, of what should and should not be made, I do my best to get out of the way. It is important for me to pursue the ideas that linger around my pottery, which are often sculptural and beyond the scale of tableware. The process each new idea reveals drives me forward.


BEN KRUPKA

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $40

Mug Porcelain with inlaid and Applied slips and glazes

Mug Porcelain with inlaid and Applied slips and glazes

Mug Porcelain with inlaid and Applied slips and glazes

Mug Porcelain with inlaid and Applied slips and glazes

# 5 $40 Mug Porcelain with inlaid and Applied slips and glazes

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

In discussing his work Krupka states, “I’m interested in how aesthetic ideals and both intentional and unintentional selfimposed parameters lead to a body of work. Most recently this question has driven me to ease my parameters, allowing for the exploration of ideas to take form outside of a prescribed “style.” This pursuit has opened the doors for investigation into both functional and sculptural work.

A native of Maryland, Ben Krupka is now Associate Professor at Bard College at Simon’s Rock in the Berkshire Mountains in Southwestern Massachusetts where he’s been since 2005. Before moving to the Berkshires he completed a two year residency at the Archie Bray Foundation as well as completed his MFA at Utah State University.

I see the stabilizing practice of making pots as a language in which I as maker, remain dedicated to the evolving conversation with material, aesthetic ideals and function. I work within the parameters of aesthetic functionalism while striving to build pots that look and feel soft and fresh, tell a story and maintain a historical reference. My most recent pots reference Oribe style ceramics but through a contemporary lens; both in pattern and narrative themes, as well as in form which is influenced by my lifestyle and how I eat and drink.” In his free time he can usually be found on his bike, the trail, or in the kitchen.

Ben has taught many workshops nationally and internationally, most recently at King Mongkut’s University of Technology and Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand where he was resident artist and visiting faculty. His work has been exhibited in over 150 exhibitions; at galleries, art centers, colleges and museums and is held in a number of public and private collections. His work has been featured in a number of books as well as the periodicals, Ceramics Art & Perception, Ceramics Monthly, and Clay Times.


JAYSON LAWFER

# 1 $50

# 2 $35

# 3 $50

# 4 $45

Soda Fired Yunomi Porcelain with silica sand, soda fired, 2013

Soda Fired Yunomi Porcelain with silica sand, soda fired, 2013

Soda Fired Teabowl Porcelain with silica sand, soda fired, 2013

Shino Teabowl Stoneware, shino, slip, wood ash, reduction fired

# 5 $45 Shino Yunomi Stoneware, shino, slip, wood ash, reduction fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

It is important for a teapot, bowl or cup to engage with the user a sense of existence and duty. I feel that in the world we live today, where many objects are mass produced and without thought, a handmade ceramic pot reveals something more. It reveals a sense of dedication and determination by the creator to release artistic thought and meet the demands of practical purpose.

Jayson Lawfer is a potter and director of a fine art gallery and consulting business entitled The Nevica Project (www.thenevicaproject.com). After graduating from the University of Montana, Jayson completed an artist residency at Guldagergard (2002) in Denmark, The Archie Bray Foundation (2004), A.I.R. Vallauris in Vallauris, France (2006), and Lillstreet Art Center (2007). His work has been featured in prestige American exhibitions at the Lancaster Museum of Art (Pennsylvania), Missoula Art Museum (Montana), Cedar Rapids Museum of Art (Iowa), and New Hampshire Institute of Art. His pottery has been selected for the Totally Teabowl exhibition in England, the Sydney Meyer Fund International Ceramic Award in Australia and The Salzbrand 2006 competition in Germany. The American Society of Ceramics awarded Jayson one of the "2005 Emerging Artists of the Year". From 2002-2006, he was the Executive Director of The Clay Studio of Missoula (USA), Gallery Director of its exhibition space and Resident Director of its artist-inresidence program. He was a Resident Artist and Guest Curator at Lillstreet Art Center in Chicago, Illinois from 20062007 and their Executive Director of the nonprofit sector of Lillstreet from 2010 - 2011.

Passion lives within everybody. Mine is in the momentum of clay.

Jayson’s talents of being an artist and holding positions of directorship have granted him the opportunity to present lectures and lead workshops in Mexico, Italy and in the USA.


JIM LAWTON

# 1 $60

# 2 $60

# 3 $60

# 4 $60

# 5 $60

Barrel Cup 1 Wood fired

Barrel Cup 2 Wood fired

Barrel Cup 3 Wood fired

Barrel Cup 4 Wood fired

Barrel Cup 5 Wood fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Pottery’s utilitarian archetypes: pitcher – bowl – cup come to what we think as their conventional shape through millennia of reductive cutting & nipping so to correspond to a particular functional choreography embodying the act of pitching fluid, the circular motion of mixing, or tipping tea into one’s mouth.

Jim Lawton received a BS degree in Constructive Design (Ceramics & Metals) from Florida State University (1976) and MFA in Ceramics from Louisiana State University (1980).

This said, the pot has enjoyed a history of quite idiosyncratic formal directions, and has been the gist of my teapot, vase & pitcher explorations while keeping to the basis of utility. I’ve said the most radical challenge I could present myself was to make the interior of my pots relevant again, meaning the enterprise of pot-making is not merely a formal activity, but linked to our relationship to food, the delivery & presentation of human sustenance.

Lawton is Professor of Ceramics in the College of Visual & Performing Arts at UMass Dartmouth and former Chair of the Artisanry Department. He has held appointments at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. He serves on the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts Advisory Board. Awards include National Endowment Visual Arts Fellowships, the South Carolina Artist Fellowship, and research grants from the Art Institute of Chicago and UMass Dartmouth. He was elected a member of the International Academy of Ceramics in 2011. Lawton’s work is in the collections of the Renwick Gallery of American Art, Smithsonian Institution/Washington DC; L.A. County Museum of Art; the Mint Museum of Craft + Design/ Charlotte; Victoria & Albert Museum/London; and the Icheon World Ceramic Center/Korea, among others; and numerous private collections. Lawton maintains a studio in South Dartmouth, MA and Bluffton, SC. Website: www.jimlawton.com


SIMON LEVIN

# 1 $48

# 2 $42

# 3 $48

# 4 $48

Light and Dark Yunomi Wood fired Porcelain with Iron Slip

Espresso Cup Soda Fired Porcelain

Blushed Yunomi Wood Fired Porcelain

Soft Yunomi Stoneware Soda Fired

# 5 $48 Striped Yunomi Wood fired Porcelain with Iron Slip

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Connection to our world and people around us is the failed promise of technology; technology alone cannot bring us closer. Touch, interaction, engagement and conversation are the inroads to intimacy. Functional pottery in the home, in the hand, can begin to forge connection between artist and user, between object and human, between process and people. I see my work as an artist is to forge deeper connections; to create interactive forms that communicate across the synapses of our compartmentalized world. My work speaks eloquently about my love, exploration and development of a hugely rich and ancient process of wood fired ceramics. I use technology as a tool to create opportunities where the intimate connection to clay can occur. My website, SimonLevin.com, is a resource for information, relevant links, images of work and kilns, published articles, and recently, candid photos of pottery in other people’s homes.

In 1993 I fell in love with the movement of flame through a wood-kiln. Its sensuous quality is something I seek to capture in my work with soft forms, sensuous full curves and flame paths etched into the surface. This quest led me to an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa. I now own Mill Creek Pottery in Wisconsin, where my apprentices and I work to advance the cause of wood-fired pottery. In 2013 I was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Taiwan exploring the potential of local materials. Clay is central to my life.

I believe that our lives are richer for being connected to our everyday objects. Artistic potters are privy to a unique and subversive role in contemporary art. Whereas much of late twentieth century art has been an attempt to merge art and life, pulling art out of galleries and bringing life scenes into the setting of the museum, the functional pot continues to hold a place in everyone’s home. A cup is one of the first things we hold in the morning and often one of the last things we touch at night. When we touch our cups to our lips, it is an intimate moment. Honored by that intimate space, I hope to fill it with deep connections between user and maker, clay and fire, in an ageless exploration of emotion.


SUZE LINDSAY

# 1 $28

# 3 $32

Tumbler Salt-fired stoneware

Mug Salt-fired stoneware

# 4 $32 Yunomi Salt-fired stoneware

# 5 $32 Yunomi Salt-fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I focus on creating altered pottery forms that are good companions for daily use. An integral part of my work includes surface decoration to enhance pottery form by patterning and painting slips and glazes for salt firing. I make things to entice the user to take pleasure in everyday activities, inviting participation, promoting hospitality.

Suze Lindsay is a studio potter living and working in the NC mountains. Her ceramic studies include a two-year fellowship from 1987-89 at Penland School of Crafts as a “core student�, followed by earning an MFA from Louisiana State University. She also holds two educational degrees, one in special education and the other in Montessori teaching theory. In 1996, after completing three years as an artist in residence at Penland, Suze and her husband, Kent McLaughlin set up and began potting in their studio in Bakersville, NC under the name Fork Mountain Pottery.

When I make pots, I subtly suggest figure and character by manipulating forms after they are thrown. I roll out clay slabs and use them to hand build elements that are then assembled with thrown parts to create pieces that have a personality of their own. I like to experiment and play with form and proportion on functional ware by altering and stacking parts. When I decorate the surfaces with slips and glazes, I am very interested in making the marks and designs enhance the volume of each pot. I am inspired when I see historical pots from many cultures, including Japan, Crete, Chile, China, and native North American. The pots I respond to may be a quirky Pre-Columbian animal ewer, or the sophisticated designs of a Mimbres bowl.

Her stoneware pots subtly reference the figure, as she is known for her altered pottery forms that are decorated and fired in a salt kiln. Her mark-making is strongly influenced by the study of historical ceramics with a focus on surface decoration used to enhance form by patterning and painting slips and glazes. Suze has taught at numerous art centers and universities including Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Penland School of Crafts, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Nova Scotia School of Art and Design, Metchosin International Summer School of the Arts, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute Curaumilla Art Center, and Ohio University She has been a presenter at the Utilitarian Clay Conference in Tennessee, the Alabama Clay Conference, North Country Studio Conference in Vermont, and FusionOntario Clay and Glass Association Conference in Toronto. Awards include Best of Show in the First Annual Strictly Functional Pottery National, and Emerging Artist at the 2000 National Council on Education for the Ceramic Art conference.


BETH LO

# 1 $65

# 2 $65

# 3 $65

Good posture cup, Good Children Series Porcelain

Good posture cup, Good Children Series Porcelain

Good posture cup, Good Children Series Porcelain

# 4 $55 Good posture cup, Good Children Series Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work in ceramics and mixed media collage revolves primarily around issues of family and my Asian-American background. Cultural marginality and blending, tradition and Westernization, language and translation are key elements in my work. Since the birth of my son in 1987, I have been drawing inspiration from major events in my family’s history, the day-to-day challenges of parenting, and my own childhood memories of being raised in a minority culture in the United States. I also enjoy investigating, celebrating and sometimes satirizing traditional Asian aesthetics, including calligraphy, origami, scrolls, Socialist Realist artwork, Chinese souvenirs and toys, the game of mahjong, as well as Ming and Tang dynasty ceramics.

Beth Lo was born on October 11, 1949 in Lafayette, Indiana, to parents who had recently immigrated from China. She received a Bachelor of General Studies from the University of Michigan in 1971, and then studied Ceramics with Rudy Autio at the University of Montana receiving her MFA in 1974. She assumed his job as Professor of Ceramics there when he retired in 1985, and was honored with the University of Montana Provost’s Distinguished Lecturer Award in 2006 and 2010. Much of Beth’s ceramic and mixed media artwork revolves around issues of family and ethnicity. She has exhibited her work internationally, and was recently commissioned to make a new work for the Main Exhibition of the 7th Gyeonggi International Ceramics Biennale in Korea. She has received numerous honors including the United States Artists Hoi Fellowship in 2009, a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Fellowship Grant in 1994, a Montana Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship in 1989 and an American Craft Museum Design Award in 1986. She has recently collaborated with her sister, author Ginnie Lo, on two children’s picture books, Auntie Yang’s Great Soybean Picnic (2012) and Mahjong All Day Long which won the 2005 Marion Vannett Ridgeway Award. Beth is also active as a bass player and vocalist for several musical ensembles including The Big Sky Mudflaps and Salsa Loca.


KENT McLAUGHLIN

# 1 $25

# 2 $25

# 3 $24

Red Tumbler Reduction fired stoneware

Yellow Tumbler Reduction fired stoneware

Small Mug Reduction fired stoneware

# 4 $28 Roped Mug Reduction fired stoneware

# 5 $28 Red/Yellow Mug Reduction fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I’ve been involved in making pottery for about 40 years. I get a great deal of satisfaction from making an object that someone might want to have in their life- a mug for morning coffee, a bowl to eat from or a platter to display fruits and vegetables. All of my pots are made with the consideration of how they will be used. I imagine how the handle of my mug will feel in the hand of its’ owner, or the way a pasta bowl will present a meal.

Kent McLaughlin is a studio potter who began his training in 1973 at Brevard Community College, the University of Central Florida, and Penland School of Crafts. He apprenticed with a production potter before opening his own studio in 1985. Since 1996, he has owned and operated his private studio, with his wife, Suze Lindsay.

It’s my wish that in some way, using these pots will make someone’s day just a little better.

He makes his living selling his pots, and teaching workshops. Kent has taught nationally and internationally at well known art centers like Penland School of Crafts in Penland NC, Anderson Ranch Art Center in Snowmass CO, and Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Gatlinburg TN. He has been a visiting instructor at Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute in Jingdezhen, China, and at Curaumilla Art Center in Chile. Recent exhibitions include “Functional Ceramic Invitational”, at the Wayne Center in Wooster OH , The American Pottery Festival at Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, and “La Mesa” Santa Fe Clay NCECA Invitational, Houston TX


LORNA MEADEN

# 1 $52

# 2 $52

# 3 $52

Tumbler Wood/Soda fired, cone 10

TTumbler Wood/Soda fired, cone 10

Mug d/Soda fired, cone 10

# 4 $52

# 5 $52

Mug d/Soda fired, cone 10

Mug d/Soda fired, cone 10

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work is soda fired porcelain. It begins with the consideration of function, and the goal is for the form and surface of the pots to be interdependent. Making the work starts with a three dimensional division of space, continues with drawing on the surface, and finishes with the addition of color.

Lorna Meaden grew up in the western suburb of Chicago, La Grange. After receiving a B.A. from Fort Lewis College in 1994, she established a studio in Durango, Colorado where she worked as a studio potter for the next eight years. She received an MFA in ceramics from Ohio University in June of 2005. She has recently been a resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana, and at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado. She was featured as a demonstrator and lecturer at the National Council on Education in Ceramic Arts, as well as Utilitarian Clay V: Celebrate the Object. Her work is represented my several national galleries. She is currently a studio potter in Durango, as well as Adjunct Professor of Art at Fort Lewis College.

New ideas are gradually incorporated into previous bodies of work through making. Source information for my work can be as simple as looking at the patterns in the stacked bricks of my kiln, to something as complex as forms from 18 th century European manufactured silver. I experience the evolution of my work through creative repetition in the studio. I am interested in having my work display both practical and extravagant attributes. I am drawn to work that is rich in ornamentation, with lavish use of materials- both scarce in a culture of mass production. Functional pottery, in its connection to sustenance, closely relates to the human body, revealing what it means to be human. Handmade pots are potent in their power to reveal the extraordinary, within the ordinary. I am driven by the insatiable pursuit of the “good pot�. Successful in terms of tactile, visual, and functional attributes; lastingly significant when packed with the passion of the maker- reflecting humanity, and contributing to the craft.


MATT METZ

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

# 4 $75

Cup 1 Porcelain, woodfired, salt glazed

Cup 2 Porcelain, woodfired, salt glazed

Cup 3 Porcelain, woodfired, salt glazed

Cup 4 Porcelain, woodfired, salt glazed

# 5 $75 Cup 5 Porcelain, woodfired, salt glazed

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

For me, the process of developing my own voice and work in pots has been intuitive, personal, and situational. Whenever I speak about my work and my life, I express the caveat that while a full time studio potter, I don’t have a broad philosophy that I project outside of my own daily experience. The work comes from my own history and interests, and the places that life and work have lead me. It comes out of my own tolerance for a certain sort of labor, maybe like knitting or quilting, whose repetitive pace might drive another person batty. The work changes through baby steps rather than heroic struggles, which, again, is my preference given my personality.

Matthew Metz has been a making his living as a studio potter for the last 25 years. He shares a home and studio in Alfred Station, NY with potter/educator Linda Sikora. Awards he has received include a NEA Crafts Fellowship, and two McKnight Fellowships. He shows and sells his pottery throughout the U.S. and internationally- including the St. Croix Potter’s tour, the Old Church Pottery Show, and the Philadelphia Craft Show. His work is in numerous private and public collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Minneapolis Institute of Art.

I like the way pots live in the domestic space: the way ‘function’ brings you into relation with an object that’s informal, specifically not creating the aesthetic distance of a gallery, or museum. If an object looks like it should function, then I feel it should do just that. For instance, a teapot should pour. When I do push the edge of functionality it is in objects such as vases and boxes that are generally meant anyway to have a purely decorative ability when both in or not in use. If work and interests, however, lead me away from function, I imagine that I would follow…

Matthew received his B.F.A. from Ball State University, and an M.F.A. from Edinboro University, and was a resident at the Archie Bray Foundation from 1989-1991.

I have had an ongoing passion for the history of pottery. I relate to the description of our process in pots as personalizing a riff on something recognizable –like a musician playing a standard song in their interpretation. The tune you know leads you into a new experience; gives you a way to enter. There’s a pleasure to that recognition, and pleasure is primary in my work. I once said to a good friend, whose work I admire greatly, that his work was like someone shaking your shoulder and saying, “wake up and see this ”, while mine says “here, sit in this comfy chair, and have some cocoa.” This is obviously hyperbole but a lush and pleasurable richness is what I aim for. I suppose if I had one hope for others and myself in our field, it would be to sidestep our inherited need for hierarchy and the need to self define by validating one’s own choices through the rejection of the other’s. We are lucky to live in a richly open and confusing time.


TED NEAL

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

Yunomi #1 Stoneware with Iron bearing slip

Yunomi #2 Stoneware with Iron bearing slip

Yunomi #3 Stoneware with Iron bearing slip

# 4 $75 Yunomi #4 Stoneware with Iron bearing slip

# 5 $75 Yunomi #5 Stoneware with Iron bearing slip

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

In all of my work one constant is my use of the vessel as a framework upon which to hang concepts of utility and selfexpression. Specifically, my utilitarian work is most satisfactory when a single object occupies space as both a useful object and one that also embodies loftier ideas such as beauty, connectedness and shared kinesthetic experiences.

Born and raised in rural upstate New York, Ted has received degrees from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (MFA 1998), Utah State University (BFA 1995), and Brigham Young University Idaho (AAS 1991). After graduate school Ted taught as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He moved back to Logan Utah in 2001 to take the position of technology instructor and studio coordinator for the ceramics area at Utah State University. (2001 – 2006) His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including: Earth Matters NCECA 2010 Invitational in Philadelphia, PA, Strictly Functional Pottery National in East Petersburg PA, Forms and Shapes: The Useful Teapot at AKAR Gallery in Iowa City, IA, NCECA Clay National in Columbus, OH, and Feats of Clay XXIII at Lincoln Arts in Lincoln, CA. Ted is currently a studio artist and Associate Professor of Ceramics in the School of Art at Ball State University in Muncie Indiana.

The concept of pure function is to me a misnomer, and I challenge the notion than any object can really fit this description. If I envision the work as a truly useful object then it can really only be complete when it is employed in that role daily. It is my hope that the object is not passive, but participates by elevating awareness during the experience. All of these vessels are thrown using an iron rich stoneware clay body. While no glaze has been applied to the surfaces, I do utilize high iron slips and clays on the bisque surfaces. Each is then fired in a train style wood kiln in a process called reduction cooling. This process creates natural ash glazes common to most wood fired forms, but also promotes the dark metallic surfaces by a controlled reduction of oxides (primarily iron) in the cooling cycle.


JEFF OESTREICH

# 1 $110

# 2 $50

# 3 $35

Teabowl Soda fired

Cup-Petal Soda fired

Mug Soda fired

# 4 $35 Mason-Hamlin Cup Soda fired

# 5 $35 Last Cup Soda fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

What consumes my interest in making cups is the fact that they have been made for the past 10,000 years in nearly every country, each culture refining this universal object to fit it's needs to contain a variety of liquids whether for daily use, court use or some other ritual. One would think that this small object largely made from nearby materials would be restraining. But one trip to a museum proves otherwise. In modern times, particularly in this country, making a cup that has one's mark on it is an ever increasing challenge and for this reason I am passionate about this form. Of additional interest is the fact that of all pots produced the cup is the most often used and touches the hand and lip. What could be a more intimate exchange?

Jeff Oestreich began his pottery training in 1965 at Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. He later studied at the University of Minnesota with Warren MacKenzie. Upon graduation Jeff moved to England to apprentice for two years with Bernard Leach at the Leach Pottery in St. Ives, Cornwall. Upon returning to the US in 1971, Jeff set up his pottery in rural Wisconsin, later relocating to Minnesota. He exhibits and conducts workshops nationally and internationally. He is a recent recipient of a McKnight Foundation grant as well as a Jerome Foundation grant allowing him to exhibit and teach in England, Scotland, Wales, New Zealand and Australia.


DOUG PELTZMAN

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

# 4 $75

Mug High fire glazed porcelain w/inlaid slip

Mug High fire glazed porcelain w/inlaid slip

Mug High fire glazed porcelain w/inlaid slip

Mug High fire glazed porcelain w/inlaid slip

# 5 $75 Mug High fire glazed porcelain w/inlaid slip

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

As a potter, I strive to craft a balance between dynamic surface and inviting form. When I began working in clay, the transition from my early studies in painting felt natural as I came to realize the potential in ceramics. I work in cycles, shifting between porcelain and earthenware clay bodies. This practice keeps me engaged and responsive to various material and conceptual developments. The detailed handwork in my pieces serves as a conduit to heighten one’s perception and sensitivity about what a pot can be. Lines, dots, dashes, texture, and color are counterpoised to create structure, movement, and depth. Marks are both blurred and enhanced by the gravitational movement of glaze. Creating utilitarian objects with layered and active surfaces is an outlet for playful yet structured investigation. Essentially, I aim to produce well-crafted functional objects that provide lasting experiences and moments of pause in day-to-day life.

Doug Peltzman is a full time studio potter in the Hudson Valley area of New York. After several formative years studying painting, Doug came to earn his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics at SUNY New Paltz in 2005. From 2006-2008 he served as the ceramic area technician and adjunct instructor at the University of Hartford. In 2010, he received his Master of Fine Arts degree in Ceramics from Penn State. Most recently, he had the honor of presenting and demonstrating at the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts for the Utilitarian Clay Symposium. Doug is actively exhibiting his work, as well as teaching workshops both locally and nationally. His work has been featured in many national publications and can be found in homes and kitchens across the country.


LOU PIEROZZI

# 1 $475

# 2 $475

# 3 $225

Baltimore Cups Cone 10 Reduction

Coal Miner’s Delight Cone 10 Reduction

Baltimore Cup Cone 10 Reduction

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I am primarily interested in functional ceramic art that is more than just a utilitarian object. My vessels, although functional, draw upon a unique time in history when machines first became mainstream. The rise of the Industrial Revolution brought trains, boilers, steamships, iron clad warships and other heavy steel machinery. I am particularly interested in the smoke stacks, rivets, gears, and steels plates that made up this early machinery. My ceramic pieces look to emulate the visual weight, and mechanical parts that were present in these historical objects. I want my viewers to be able to make a slight connection to this time period, but also be able to see the stylization that make my pieces unique. The process I use to create these industrially inspired objects involves throwing many of the pieces on the potter’s wheel. I first throw the main body of the piece on the potter’s wheel and alter the shape considerably. Once I have created the main body, I then decide what shapes will work best for the extruding parts. I then throw the extruding parts, cut them and reassemble them into various mechanical forms. Once the vessel is fully assembled I carefully handcraft each rivet and meticulously place them onto the piece. Finally, I carve in the lines to make the piece look metal plated. After each piece is completely assembled and bisqued, glaze is applied and fired to cone 10. This long and evolved process combines to make an industrially inspired vessel that is not only functional, but also sculptural.

Lou Pierozzi was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. His interest in ceramics started his first year in college. Pierozzi is deeply interested in making forms that are functional, but the real excitement happens when he alters the form and surface of the piece. He strives to make work that is more sculptural than functional. Lou Pierozzi received his BFA from De Paul University and his MFA degree in ceramics from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Pierozzi is currently Chair of Art and Design and Professor of Art at Oakton Community College in Des Plaines, IL. His work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums throughout the country, featured in multiple publications and represented in various public and private collections.


ADAM POSNAK

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

# 4 $45

Skull cup 1 Earthenware, low fire

Skull cup 2 Earthenware, low fire

Skull mug Earthenware, low fire

Eye mug Earthenware, low fire

# 5 $45 Stripe mug Earthenware, low fire

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Having grown up in Macon, Georgia, the culture of the southern United States, whether in terms of pottery, music, or folk-religion has been the basis for much of the investigations of my life, and continues to fascinate me. In terms of inspiration I look to traditional “Folk” (for lack of a better term) artists of The Americas (writ large: North, Central, and South), as well as contemporary artists such as Jose Bedia, Eduard Duval Carrie and Belkis Ayon.

I grew up in Macon, Georgia. My mother is a potter, her father was a woodworker, his father was a blacksmith, his father was a blacksmith…

I have been greatly inspired by West and Central-African traditions and the various African-inspired, syncretic religious -cultural practices of North, Central and South America, particularly those of Cuba and Haiti. Within the Afro-Cuban cosmological view specifically, the concept of “El Monte,” which in this context roughly translates as “The Wild,” has complex and deep significance. In a nutshell, the natural world is seen to be both the source of spiritual power and the home of various personified embodiments of this power. I have drawn on this concept in approaching the decoration of my work. In my investigation of indigenous cultural material I embrace the notion of “Primalism,” a term coined by Yale Art Historian Robert Farris Thompson: “…primalism lets us measure just how far we've traveled -- how far we've been pulled forward - from the devouring primitivism of the past.” Robert Farris Thompson, Art in America, July 1997

In a separate but related endeavor, I also make a limited number of religious vessels for practitioners of African and African-Diaspora religions, including West African YorubaOrisa, Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lukumi (Santeria) and Palo Mayombe, and Brazilian Candomble.

Besides Georgia, I have had the good fortune to live in Louisiana, Florida, and Arkansas, where I currently reside in the White River Valley of the Boston Mountains.


LEE REXRODE

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

# 4 $75

Nesting Cup Porcelain, salt-fired

Nesting Cup Porcelain, salt-fired

Nesting Cup Porcelain, salt-fired

Teabowl Porcelain, wood-fired

# 5 $75 Teabowl Porcelain, wood-fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work has evolved over the past 30 years of making pots. In the mid 1980’s, I made some pots with double rims. Over the years, these rims became exaggerated, creating the illusion of one form nesting inside another. I often use contrasting colors and textures to heighten the illusion of two forms within the same pot. These pieces are inspired by layering forms found in nature; things like blooming buds, sprouting seeds, and peeling tree bark.

Lee Rexrode earned his MFA degree from Rochester Institute of Technology and subsequently became Head of the Ceramics Department at the Worcester Center for Crafts in Massachusetts throughout most of the 1980’s. Lee has been a Professor of Ceramics at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania since 1990.

I seek simplicity and clarity in my work. Rather than adding more, I tend to remove elements as I strive to achieve the purity and essence of an idea. I am interested in various ways of depicting contrast and a sense of the soft clay material. I often use porcelain for it’s durability, texture, and purity of color. I have always found making pots to be a truly challenging and significant endeavor. Our hands play a vital role in our perception of pots and our fingers are extremely receptive to it’s surface, weight, and balance. I hope my work is appreciated and enriches people’s lives.

Lee has taught workshops throughout the country at places such as the 92nd Street Y in New York city, Baltimore Clayworks, El Camino College in Los Angeles, and at the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Tennessee. He received a Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts in 1995. During the spring of 2001, Lee toured China researching contemporary and historical ceramics and attended an International Yixing conference. Lee Rexrode has published images of his work and written articles for Ceramics Monthly Magazine since 1989. In fall of 2010, he had a solo-exhibition at the Holstein Gallery at the Erie Art Museum. In 2009 and 2010, he exhibited his work in the International Onggi Competition in Ulsan Korea, and won awards for his work both years.


BRAD SCHWIEGER

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

# 4 $45

Mug Soda fired stoneware

Mug Soda fired stoneware

Mug Soda fired stoneware

Mug Soda fired stoneware

# 5 $45 Mug Soda fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I find an interesting parallel between architecture and pottery. Like architecture, pottery deals with elements of form and structure, interior/exterior, utility or containment, surface detail and adornment. I have attempted to produce work that shares the minimal and complex, the miniature and monumental, the formal elements of design, the implied and the possibility of actual function.

Brad Schwieger has been teaching at Ohio University since 1990 and is presently a Professor of Art. Brad received his MFA degree from Utah State University and his BFA degree from the University of Iowa. Brad’s work has been shown nationally and internationally. His work has been in multiple exhibitions throughout the USA, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, England, Germany, Czech Republic, Lithuania and Spain. He has presented workshops and lectures at more than 90 Universities, Colleges and Art Centers. His work has been published in Ceramics Monthly, American Craft, Clay Times, Ceramics Art and Perception as well as several textbooks.


JANE SHELLENBARGER

# 1 $75

# 2 $75

# 3 $75

Goat cup Soda fired porcelain and post fired

Goats and industry 1 Soda fired porcelain and post fired

Goats and industry 2 Soda fired porcelain and post fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

My work focuses on a pottery idiom, often incorporating historical references and images with domestic objects. I work in both porcelain and black clays, firing with atmospheric kilns. The pieces undergo multiple post firings to achieve a depth of surface.

Jane Shellenbarger was born in Detroit, Michigan. She was a CORE student at Penland School of Crafts in Penland, North Carolina from 1987-1989. Jane received her B.F.A. degree from the Kansas City Art Institute, and her M.F.A. from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

While function continues to be an essential concern, I am most intrigued with the ability of pots to transcend themselves as objects and convey information. The work that holds my fascination draws relationships to history and culture through form and surface content.

Following graduate school, she worked as a resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts in Helena, MT, 1996-97. She established her studio pottery, Mill Station Pottery, in rural Hale, Michigan in 1997.

At its best the work becomes both artifact and object of the contemporary world. The use of glaze as a painterly ground provides terrain to interact with imagery and or form that results in a fertile ground for endless investigation. Pots are intimate by nature. The history of ceramic objects to commemorate and document our culture is rich. As pots intersect with utility they have the ability to choreograph domestic experience affecting people in a deep and interactive way. The rhythm of making pots is, for me, an endless pursuit to express ideas and define interaction through form.

She has held teaching positions at multiple academic institutions, Kansas City Art Institute and Northern Michigan University and currently, she is an Assistant Professor in The School for American Crafts at Rochester Institute of Technology. She has taught at many craft schools around the country, among them, Penland School of Crafts, Arrowmont School of Crafts, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. Shellenbarger has exhibited her work in several prominent galleries around the country including: Leslie Ferrin Gallery, Lacoste Gallery, Lill Street, AKAR Gallery, Santa Fe Clay, Philadelphia Clay Studio, Red Lodge Clay Center and Baltimore Clayworks. Her work is also in the permanent collections of the Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., San Angelo Museum of Fine Art, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, The Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, and The University Museum, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Jane recently bought a house and studio in rural western New York. She is anxious to build some atmospheric kilns and establish a new studio pottery on Buck Run Creek.


LINDA SIKORA

# 1 $45

# 2 $45

# 3 $45

Yellow Tortoise Cup Porcelain, polychrome glaze, salt fired

Yellow Tortoise Cup Porcelain, polychrome glaze, salt fired

Yellow Tortoise Cup Porcelain, polychrome glaze, salt fired

# 4 $45 Yellow Tortoise Cup Porcelain, polychrome glaze, salt fired

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Jars and teapots have been central to my practice for a number of years now. The hard working teapot is insistently engineered to fulfill performative goals of service. The jar is a generous canvas for pattern and color, with more permissive criteria of containment. These formats of service, storage and display act as counterpoint or fuel for other subjects under consideration in the studio. Cups are a subject addressed less often in recent work cycles. Seemingly the most approachable of pottery forms, it can take some doing to get around them. Making several small groups/ of cups in anticipation of this exhibition has brought forward a few lively questions. A small polychrome group is shown in The Cup II, 2013.

Linda Sikora is a studio potter and professor of Ceramic Art at Alfred University. Academic study in visual art and an apprenticeship in a ceramic studio in British Columbia, Canada established a professional beginning. Formal education continued at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University (BFA) and, University of Minnesota–Minneapolis (MFA). Authored articles are printed in Studio Potter, Ceramic Review and, online at Interpreting Ceramics. Professional activities are national and international: Public collections include: Art Gallery of Nova Scotia; Racine Art Museum; Schein-Joseph International Museum of Ceramic Art; LA County Museum of Art; Minneapolis Institute of the Arts; Everson Museum of Art; Huntington Museum of Art.


GERTRUDE GRAHAM SMITH

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# 1 $35

# 2 $54

# 3 $54

Impress Tankard Soda fired porcelain

Cup and Saucer Soda fired porcelain

Cup and Saucer Soda fired porcelain

3 # 4 $35 Impress Tankard Soda fired porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

I celebrate porcelain clay with the vessels I form on my pottery wheel. How lively and responsive it is! Spontaneous and thoughtful manipulation of forms, surfaces, and attachments animate the work. Handles sweep up and out from bellies and shoulders. Jars raised on feet dance in space. Surfaces appeal to the tactile sense, and smaller forms long to be held. In the kiln, flames filled with sodium decorate anticipated edges, and brighten a wide, colourful palette.

Gertrude Graham Smith, nicknamed Gay, is a studio potter and teaching artist single firing porcelain ware in a soda kiln near Penland, NC. She held artist-in-residencies at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana and at Penland School in Penland, NC. Her teaching credits include workshops at Penland, Haystack, Harvard, and Findhorn, Scotland. Her work is represented internationally, is in collections such as the Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, and Yingge Ceramics Museum in Taiwan. She’s been featured on the cover of Ceramics Monthly magazine, and her work is in numerous publications such as Making Marks and Functional Pottery by Robin Hopper, and Working with Clay by Susan Peterson. Grant awards include a North Carolina Arts Council Visual Artist Fellowship award and two Regional Artist Project Grants. She currently serves on the Board of Trustees of Penland School of Crafts.

I often question the relevance of living as a practicing artist in a world filled with struggle, conflict, and exploited for resources. Years as a working potter seems to develop qualities I believe may benefit: caring attention, commitment, honesty, courage, passion, hard work, love of beauty, and a willingness to get one’s hands dirty. I intend my vessels to bring joy, usually a welcomed quality, with their use and presence. And I’m imagining a reality where when a hand grasps a handle, compassion arises in the heart.


KEVIN SNIPES

# 1 $180

# 2 $180

# 3 $180

Cats Porcelain

School Bus Porcelain

Red Cup Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

# 4 $180 Olympian Porcelain

# 5 $165 Swimmers Porcelain

ARTIST BIO Using the language of pottery, ornamented with animated narrative drawings, Kevin Snipes acts as a storyteller. He uses a combination of building techniques to build quizzical porcelain forms that are flat paneled and multisided, with unexpected additions that give each piece a personal stance. In conjunction the artist is constantly drawing. The contemporary look of the figurative drawings is developed through traditional pottery surface techniques, such as mishima and sgraffito. Both processes involve physically incising or carving away part of the surface of the porcelain with sharp instruments. Snipes uses these techniques in multiple layers to create lush personal narratives that speak of the concept of the self in confrontation with otherness.

Kevin was born in Philadelphia, but grew up mostly in Cleveland, Ohio. He holds a BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art and did graduate work at the University of Florida, in Gainesville, Florida. From there he participated in several artist residency programs, including the Clay Studio, in Philadelphia and Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, in New Castle, Maine he was also a visiting artist at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge and did a two year residency at the Archie Bray Foundation in 2008 through 2010, in Helena, Montana. Kevin currently maintains a studio in Cleveland. Exhibiting both nationally and internationally, Kevin has exhibited as far away as Vallauris, France, Rome, Italy and Jingdezhen, China.


SHOKO TERUYAMA

# 1 $64

# 2 $64

# 3 $64

# 4 $64

Cup Pinched porcelain

Cup Pinched porcelain

Cup Pinched porcelain

Cup Pinched porcelain

# 5 $64 Cup Pinched porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Growing up in Japan, I remember tradition being part of daily life. Temples and shrines were everywhere, even inside our home. I was drawn to these sacred spaces and ceremonial objects because they were decorated with texture and pattern contrasted by areas of calm and stillness.

Shoko Teruyama grew up in Mishima, Japan. She earned a BA in education and taught elementary school two years before coming to the United States to study art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1997. Shoko received her MFA in ceramics in the fall of 2005 from Wichita State University. She finished a three-year residency at the Penland School of Crafts in 2008 and is now a studio artist in Marshall, NC.

These memories inspire my current work. I make boxes, intimate bowls, and small plates for precious objects, vases for flower arranging and a variety of serving pieces. Many of the forms allude to function and would serve food well, but are more comfortable being placed in sacred spaces of the home like the center of a formal dining room table, a hope chest, or a bedside stand. The making begins with bisque molds, slab construction, and coil building to make thick, heavy forms. I carve, shave, and sand excess clay away to slowly reveal the final shape. Puff handles and other elements are added for physical decoration. White slip is brushed over the red earthenware to create depth and motion. Then I carve back through the slip exposing the red clay. Shiny translucent glazes are applied over the decorated areas and opaque matte glazes over the calm areas. Ornamentation is important to my ideas. I have created motifs called vine patterns to lead your eye around the work. Patterns run continuously to create narrow borders or to fill large amounts of space. They can flow into tight curves just as easily as they can bend around the belly of a form. The patterns create visual movement representing water, wind, and clouds. I create characters based on human relations and things I have experienced. To me it is much easier to draw owls than humans. I don't want to tell specific stories to people, I want people to create their own. Sometimes you feel like the weight of a turtle standing on top of you and sometimes you feel like an owl standing on top of the world. Some of my characters have a dark nature. I think that is life. Sometimes dark things happen. Overall, I want my work to have a sense of hope and a sense of humor because life goes on.

Shoko's handbuilt work is made of earthenware with white slip and sgraffito decoration. She has developed a cast of characters based on experience with human relations. As the characters interact, Shoko wants the viewer to find their own stories. The work is seemingly whimsical, but reveals itself to be something more devious and interesting.


JACK TROY

# 1 $225

# 2 $180

Teabowl-like Object Porcelain

Leaf-stamped Cup Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

" fter first firing a small anagama a few of us built at Juniata A College in 1978, there was no going back; no resisting the unquantifiable magnetism. There has been only a persistent, ravenous, curiosity about how to understand and apply what we began to learn by striking that first match: how to yield to humbling beauty that doesn’t give itself up easily or to everyone.

2014 is Jack Troy's 52nd year of making pots. He taught for 39 years at Juniata College in Huntingdon, PA, where he lives, reads, writes, fires his kilns, and leaves now and then to teach workshops. On the best of days he manages to juggle clay, fire, and living in the world.

Wood-firing is an amalgamation of chainsaws, airplane travel, alluring books, cremating botanical corpses, waking up in new places, transmogrifying earthflesh, hiring log-trucks, laying bricks – skews, wedges, arches, soaps and splits - by the thousands, wearing shirts holding smokesmell, divine and calamitous kiln-openings, splitting wedges, museum visits, pots revealing fiery origins, axes and splitting mauls, aesthetic theories both elegant and fatuous, and being hypnotized by flames – surging, eddying, then vanishing. You can’t look the adventure in the eye; you just try to keep pace with it. The beauty of anagama-fired work sometimes contradicts and displaces culturally acquired aesthetic values; all to the good. In the long run, my preference for firing an anagama lies in the simple, reductive process offering, on a good day, a happy ratio between challenges and rewards. Local trees provide the fuel, delivered by a friend. The participants know one another, work together for a common purpose, and learn the vanity of claiming to be fully responsible for the work we make. That we take nothing for granted and count our blessings when we are less than cursed comes with the territory.


MIKEY WALSH

# 1 $52

# 2 $52

# 3 $52

Penguin Cup Earthenware, handbuilt

Spotted Owl Cup Earthenware, handbuilt

Animal Cup Earthenware, handbuilt

# 4 $52

# 5 $52

Animal Cup Porcelain

Animal Cup Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

For me, a cup is a daily, comforting device. Filled with a favorite beverage- the animals, color, softness and attention to functional details on my cups hopefully add a cheerful quality to a routine experience.

Michaelene/ Mikey Walsh received her BFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign and her MFA from N.Y.S.C.C. at Alfred, NY. She has held teaching positions at Massachusetts College of Art, the University of Georgia, the University of Washington, Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of California-Davis in addition to instructing at numerous alternative-learning venues such as Haystack School of Crafts, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Arrowmont and Santa Fe Clay. Currently, Mikey is an Associate Professor of Art at Louisiana State University. Her sculptural ceramic work is exhibited internationally and is also featured in the publication The Figure in Clay by Lark Books.


KURT WEISER

# 1 $300

# 2 $300

# 3 $300

Cup Thrown porcelain/ underglaze cobalt painting, cone 10

Cup Thrown porcelain/ underglaze cobalt painting, cone 10

Cup Thrown porcelain/ underglaze cobalt painting, cone 10

ARTIST STATEMENT For years the work I did in ceramics was an effort to somehow express the beautiful nature of the material. As interesting as this exploration was I always had the vague feeling that the best expression if the material only came as a gift of nature, problem was, nature and I never got along that well. Somewhere in the midst of this struggle I realized that the materials are there to allow you to say what you need to say, not to tell you what to say. So I gave up trying to control nature and decided to use what I had learned about the materials to express some ideas about nature itself and my place in it.

# 4 $300 Cup Thrown porcelain/ underglaze cobalt painting, cone 10

# 5 $300 Cup Thrown porcelain/ underglaze cobalt painting, cone 10

ARTIST BIO Born: 1950, Lansing, MI; Studio: Tempe, AZ. Education: Interlochen Arts Academy, Interlochen, MI, 1967-69; Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, MO, BFA, 1972; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, MFA, 1976. Director of the Archie Bray Foundation 1977-1988. Since 1988 he has taught in the ceramics department Arizona State University where he is now a Regents Professor. Awards: Aileen Osborn Webb National Artist Award, 2003; American Craft Council College of Fellows, 2003; Arizona Commission on the Arts, Artist Fellowship, 1999; National Endowment for the Arts, Artist Fellowship, 1992, 1989. USA Fellows Award 2013 Collections: Victoria and Albert Museum; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Smithsonian Foundation :Carnegie Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Ceramics, Shigaraki, Japan; Mint Museum of Craft and Design; Racine Art Museum and the National Museum of History in Taipei.


EMILY SCHROEDER WILLIS

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

Cup Porcelain

Cup Porcelain

Cup Porcelain

# 4 $40 Cup Porcelain

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

“I am sorry to have wearied you with so long a letter but I did not have time to write you a short one.” ~17th c. French philosopher & mathematician, Blaise Pascale

Emily Schroeder Willis received her MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2006. She is the recipient of numerous awards and scholarships, including the Jerome Fellowship from the Northern Clay Center and the Sage Scholarship from the Archie Bray Foundation. She has exhibited her work across North America as well as in Europe, Central America and Australia. She has been an artist-inresidence/visiting artist at the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana, the Zentrum für Keramik in Berlin, Germany and at the Alberta College of Art and Design in Canada. Most recently she was a presenter at Arrowmont’s 2012 Utilitarian Clay Conference. Currently, she has a studio in Chicago.

I love this quote by Blaise Pascale and the way he speaks about the economy of words. In many ways, I feel this same way about the economy of my work; to say enough without saying too much. In the past few years I have been trying to simplify the work I make, constantly asking myself, how much is too much? What is essential and what is excess? I try to make every mark on the surface of my work matter, every dart necessary, every line indispensable. Each pot I create shifts into form through pinching and darting the surface of the clay. My fingertips guide the shape of the vessel, creating lines, giving rise to the visual landscape of my work. Through this slow and intimate process of pinching, I create a different type of relationship between the viewer and object. My fingerprints act as a brush stroke on the surface of the clay, each pinch making a formal impression of the hand that created it. Simplicity and the mark of the hand are important to my work, which steps back to a time where work isn't about production, but rather the touch of a fingertip.


TARA WILSON

# 1 $40

# 2 $40

# 3 $40

Mug Wood soda fired stoneware

Mug Wood soda fired stoneware

Mug Wood soda fired stoneware

# 4 $40 TitMug Wood soda fired stoneware

# 5 $40 TiMug Wood soda fired stoneware

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

Embodied in my atmospheric fired vessels is the serenity that I experience by surrounding myself on a daily basis with a rich natural environment. While the surfaces of the vessels represent the natural world, the forms often relate to the figure. Quiet pots initially speak softly yet reveal complexity in both form and surface through continued investigation and use. Pottery’s inherent relationship to the figure is accentuated in my gestural forms.

Tara Wilson set up her studio in Montana City, Montana in 2008 after finishing a two-year residency at the Archie Bray Foundation. She has given lectures and workshops throughout the United States; and her wood-fired utilitarian work has been exhibited internationally.


GWENDOLYN YOPPOLO

# 1 $245 Tea for Two Cone ten matte crystallineglazed porcelain (sold as a set)

ARTIST STATEMENT

ARTIST BIO

To be held in the hands or touched to the lips, these are intimate objects. The forms I make engage the threshold of subjectivity by offering a conduit for nourishment into the body or between bodies. The experience is more than visceral, as the body’s pursuit of sensual experience is tied into the process of making existence meaningful on all levels. How we choose to feed ourselves and others is connected not only to our sensations of hunger and gratification, but also to our deeper perceptions of ourselves, and of the larger stories we live by.

Gwendolyn Yoppolo is spending this year teaching ceramics at Ohio University and at The Ohio State University. She has spent the previous five years as a studio artist in residency at the Penland School of Crafts, the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, and the Archie Bray Foundation. Prior to entering residencies, she worked for one year as a Studio Technician at Alfred University and for one year as Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. She received her MFA from Penn State University in 2006. While at Penn State she received two fellowship awards for her research using the scanning electron microscope to photograph the tiny landscapes of beach rubble, sugar cereals, plant seeds, and insect parts.

Making utensils enables me to dwell in the moment of appetite, where the anticipation of satiation moves the body through the world of materials towards the consumable. It is a movement driven by desire and guided by memory, by ancestry, and by our sense of self. A utensil extends the body and transforms the energy of this movement into purposeful action. The verbs of the kitchen are not only the processes of food preparation – grind, separate, mix, ream, drain, heat – they are also metaphors for our internal processes of combustion and transformation. The moment of consumption also transcends bodily experience, invoking our senses of culture, body image, emotion, and relational identity. By making visible those layers of meaning that reside in a food event, the forms I create arouse the physical and nonphysical faculties and extend our understanding of significance. Through a minimalist design that attracts the quiet eye and responsive touch, my forms invite you to access your own silence, listening to the echoes of my gestures for the arousal of your own resonance and response.

She creates sensuous kitchen- and table-wares that use the physical experience of hunger and satiation to allude to larger issues of human desire and relationship. Her visionary designs challenge us to rethink the ways we nourish ourselves and others within contemporary food culture. By preparing whole foods with minimal technology, by sharing food with a group from a single serving dish, or by sitting down with a loved one to create a shared experience, we break apart from the individualized ready-to-eat mentality of our industrialized food system.

Profile for Artcetera Gallery

Static cup ii catalog  

Static cup ii catalog  

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