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De Oude, Hsiao, and Prest utilize repeated overlapping lines that create somewhat disarming shifts in color, moiré patterns, linear distortions, or phantom shapes. For Evertz, the juxtaposition of colors with gradations of black and white creates a push and pull, with vertical and angled stripes advancing and receding at varying rates. These artists construct spaces that are arresting and elusive at the same time. Although some works have an optical immediacy, they may also benefit from a slower read—what de Oude calls “a visual time delay.”1 At first glance Stephen Maine’s painting HP 13-0909 imparts a visual kick with its trio of saturated colors, but a longer look produces optical sensations in which the fractured fields of color float back and forth, obscuring any discernible sequence in their layering. Sarah Klein and David Kwan explore the perception of light over time in their collaborative animation Lone Star. Three hundred printed video stills, which were embellished with colored pencil and used to make the animation, are displayed alongside it, enabling the viewer to “slow down” the sequence and experience the individual abstractions that the finished work comprises.2 Artists working within the two-dimensional formats of painting and drawing sometimes convey illusionistic space through drawn perspectival projections; in Doppler Shift these forms are often visually ambiguous or implausible. Using line and shadow, Enrico Gomez builds cubic forms that shift between two- and threedimensional representations of the letter E. By omitting one section of the font, Gomez forces the viewer’s eye to complete the image, composing and dematerializing form at the same time. Steven Baris’s meandering drawings on Mylar disorient in an almost Escher-like way. The heavy black outlines simultaneously resemble floor plans and elevations, or suggest a series of intersecting planes in space. The eye wants to complete the picture, but is confounded at every turn. Similarly, two small shaped paintings on aluminum by Brent Hallard initially read as cubes, but a second look reveals that they are geometrically impossible. These works provide dynamic visual experiences while challenging the viewer’s perception of space. top: Brent Hallard, Green Candy, 2011 bottom: Brent Hallard, Orange Candy, 2011 1 Conversation with the author, June 13, 2014. 2 Klein has also curated a related selection of time-based media works by seven other artists that runs concurrently with Doppler Shift at the Visual Arts Center of New Jersey.

Doppler Shift  
Doppler Shift  

Twenty seven artists from the US and Europe use geometry and color to explore the illusion of difference between two- and three-dimensional...

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