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My first presentation life in Dubai.

Hello Art by Nature readers! Life became busy after Edition 6 was published! Since then, I lost my old job and started a new one, as well as working on ‘ Art by Nature’ by myself. Apart from drastic changes in my professional life, good things have been happening to me in my private life as well - that’s right I’m pregnant! And the due date of my newest ‘edition’ is 29th of March. Will keep you posted, of course! On another note I had to look for a new editor. For months I searched for a replacement and with some luck, I finally found a new collaboration with Middlesex University Dubai. Stephen King, a lecturer in Media and Communications, is going to guide his students this year to edit ( ) articles for ‘Art by Nature’, how amazing is that!

going to be exhibiting at a design exhibition in Zuruck, Blickfang. Can’t wait to hear more about that!

I want to thank Danielle Spires for her help in editing Editions 2 through 6, making it possible for me to have 6000 people read the magazine and more than 45000 views on the pages. She will be missed!

You can follow the magazine

Thanks again to Katia Plewnia for taking the time to talk about the magazine. She’s

Not only did I go to the exhibition, ‘Earth matters’, curated by Philip and Lidewij Edelkoort, but I also got a press card to visit ‘Dutch Design’ week. It was such a great experience that I couldn’t withhold it from you. So I didn’t go one day this year, but two! However, I still had to make a choice about the new and renewed artists to talk about.

And share with others. Thanks! Tessa Valk Founder, Editor in chief, Designer by Fatima Rao & Samia Azhar Naim


INITIATIVE OF Tessa Valk COVER COLLAGE tessaontwerpt.nl

LIKE THE MAGAZINE? Support the magazine artbynaturemag.com CONTACT tessa@artbynaturemag.com

ADVERTISE To advertise in upcoming issues click here SPECIAL THANKS TO Stefan Boerboom for prechecking my articles • Danielle Spires of Danielle Spires Photography • Katia Plewnia of Labour of Art • Julie Trienekens of Dutch Design Foundation • Ritsert Mans • Paul Höhner • Cees van de Ven • Eric Klarenbeek • Marcel Witte • Irena murphy • Genevieve Mariani • Jelte Keur • Suzan Russeler of Textiel Museum • Sarmite Polakova • Alix Bizet • Philip Fimmano Every person who is in this magazine has been contacted by email. No content maybe used without permision of Art by nature magazine, photos of artist (work) are owned by the artist (all rights reserved). If you find an image that is yours, I couldn't find the owner and you aren't credited; please let me know and I will give you the credits.

contents

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54-67 Nature gallery special Earth matters 58 Sarmite Polakova barking up the right tree 62 Alix Bizet The ‘Extraodin- hairy’ tale 66  Philip Fimmano makes the “Earth Matter"

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Nature through the eyes of 42 Jelte Keur High up in the sky

IN SPI RE D B Y

Craft by Nature 6 Marcel Witte Human Nature 68 Thirsty? Here’s a popsicle that you shouldn’t suck Column 28 Irena murphy Pretty in the sand 50 Genevieve Mariani getting In touch with nature

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DDZ Ritsert Mans Riding on Algy 14 Paul Höhner Cauli me flower, experience the space 18 Cees van de Ven Fishy Business 20  Eric Klarenbeek PRINT & GROW, The Mycelium Project

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‘Plastic seal’ is a subtle reference to the ‘plastic soup’ (great Pacific garbage patch); a gyre of marine debris particles in the central North Pacific Ocean.

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HUMAN NATURE

By Marcel Witte

Ever since he can remember, Marcel has had a strong bond with nature. His art shows human behavior and shortcoming, visualized through animals. In his own unique style, he wants to communicate to his audience in a gentle way.

CRAFT BY NATURE | ART BY NATURE


In what way does nature play a role in your life? During my holidays I go into nature to recharge and focus mostly on animals in my work. In my paintings I use animals to tell a political or social story. I’m inspired by the way that the ancient Greeks used animals to visualize fables and show human nature, without becoming too personal. In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? For as long as I can remember I’ve made drawings of animals. You wouldn’t find any houses or figures or cars in my books.

‘Migration’: A polar bear mother with two cubs standing on a mattress of air, searching for a new habitat, like refugees.

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ART BY NATURE | THROUGH THE EYES OF


As a child I wanted to become a forester. My ultimate dream was to live in the forest with deer around my house, driving a Jeep: drawing would be a hobby. Which route did you travel to become an artist? I went to the College of Forestry and after graduating, I worked a couple of years for Het Utrechts Landschap. At first I drew and painted only for friends and family. After presenting a plan for nature conservation as a visual story, my employer asked me to make more illustrations and from that moment on more organizations started to contact me. In 2003, I started painting animals like I do now. As a test I put a couple of my paintings on artolive.nl. Within a week I sold three of my paintings and gallery owners started asking for exhibitions. Because it was such a success I decided to become a professional artist and quit my day job. Who and what inspires you and in what way? Observing people in their common routine often makes me wonder how I can translate this into a painting. In my field, issues in our society or history are an important subject. Can you take us through your creative process? Before I start painting, I visualize the entire story - from the colour of the

‘Multicultural’ is a painted installation of 40 small canvases (birdhouses), symbolizing a harmonic metropolis visualized by using different species of birds. Bottom image unknown photographer. Fun fact: The canvases are sold individually and are replaced with new “inhabitants”


“T HE ANIMAL LOOKS AT ME AND I FEEL A CONNECTION BETWEEN US.” background to the way the animal will be positioned on the canvas. To get familiar with every little detail of the animal I do a lot of research and with this knowledge I draw a sketch on my computer. The animal will be depicted in a nearly life-size manner on the canvas. The background gets a couple of layers of the same colour paint. After the paint has dried, the image is sketched with lead-pencil filled with paint in the darkest colour of the animal. To paint the animal I use a thinner brush. I start with the eyes. the animal looks at me and I feel a connection between us. This way I can paint the animal’s emotions. Next I start with its fur. Hair after hair, layer after layer and from dark to light. When the image is finished I take an even closer look, to maybe add some detail. Finally the artwork looks finished. v marcelwitte.com

‘Behind the scenes’: The diptych of two canvasses are a reference to the recreational hunting. There’s a living creature behind the trophy on the wall.

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ART BY NATURE | THROUGH THE EYES OF

by Suzanne Hart & Will Fewtrell


Last year DDW was such an amazing experience I decided on going, not for one, but two days this year. But even then I still couldn’t see everything. That’s why I chose to show you a couple of the projects inspired by nature.

DDW | ART BY NATURE

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WITH RITSERT MANS

Riding on Algy

Before I went to DDW I got in contact with Ritsert Mans. He designs and manufactures different things from objects, furniture and vehicles to homedecor. Ritsert studied for a Bachelors of Industrial Design degree at the Delft University of Technology, and now together with scientist Peter Mooij he has found a way to show the world that algae oil could be a great alternative to motor fuel. In what way does nature play a role in your life? Of course as a motivation and inspiration but also as a mentality, I don’t just try, don’t hesitate, I create quality through the diversity of my work.

Inspiration the real Tony Stark

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What was your route on becoming an artist/ creative, etc. I can’t remember a moment where I was not visualising ideas or thinking about structures or building projects. Because I was always building stuff,


DDW

it was a logical step to study industrial design in Delft. While I studied I found out that digital design, simulations and visualisations were not working for me. I needed a direct link between the idea and building it. I started a surf and music festival (MadNes) together with some friends. It was the perfect excuse to build ideas, experiment with sustainable installations and see how the visitors reacted. After my Bachelor I tried an office job for one year, but it was not for me. Due to a combination of viruses and extreme fatigue I was really ill for two years. When I was healed I wanted to experience life to the fullest. After I graduated from a nautical education I sailed with a friend on a big sailing ship for two more years. I experienced a combination of the force of nature and adventure. Because I missed designing and building things, I got back on shore and started my own company where I do design, building and restoration assignments.

“I NEEDED A DIRECT LINK BETWEEN THE IDEA AND BUILDING AN IDEA.� In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? I grew up on an old farm near Hoorn. There was a lot of space to ride on old mopeds, and it was close to the IJsselmeer and the sea. On the farm there were always building materials and work that had to be done. My dad loves old cars and other stuff. I was always able to try new things. Who and what inspires you and in what way? Joost Conijn, a Dutch artist that made really cool vehicles and travels. Colin Furze that really shows the fun of building and experimenting. v mansmaakt.nl

DDW | ART BY NATURE

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DDW

BY PAUL HÖHNER

Cauli me flower, experience the space Day two: I started at TAC, a place for talent development. Their motto for DDW was, “Trajectories - Future Pathways in Design.” One of the Exhibitors was Paul, who has been exploring the possible applications of using the empty space within broccoli, cauliflower and other members of their family (called Brassicaceae).

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ART BY NATURE | DDW


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In what way does nature play a role in your life? I think that nature fills every gap by competing or working together. With its collection of collaborations and structures from birds that clean the tusks of hippos to the ingeniously divisible and beautifully packaged tangerine.

perfectly. He combines art and the commercial side of social events, very well, by planning realistically.

What was your route on becoming creative/an artist? In my youth I never had the aspiration or talent to become a proffesional artist. I was an okay writer so some teachers encouraged me to study Dutch or journalism - instead I chose economics. After the construction company I was working for went bankrupt, I started my own company. I decided to quit my studies and apply for HKU. Here I experimented with lots of techniques and materials such as oxidation of metals and plant materials. Nature became a big part of my inspiration.

Theo Jansen develops creatures called “strandbeesten” which come alive through air . He always works to improve them year in year out. Just like Theo Jansen, I see my work as an ongoing process; never finished, just like evolution itself.

In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? My father is an artist. So I grew up being around art, artists and museums. For me this was completely normal and I developed a taste for art at a very early age. Who and what inspires you and in what way? Couzijn van Leeuwen, who makes characters from fruit peels. At its core a simple idea, but executed

My father (Paul Höhner) inspired me to look closely at things people normally discard. He painted intestines with sometimes no more than three hairs on his brush.

Can you take us through your creative process? By looking closely at the broccoli I found that the negative space of a fractal makes a fractal of its own broccoli, cauliflower and many other natural occurring objects, most famously a fern or our nervous system are built following a fractal structure which means that the smaller parts are similar to the object itself. I filled one with plaster and when I poked out the broccoli I was amazed by its beauty and the strength of the structure, nature as its architect. The brassicaceae family had already gone through a man-made selection process. Kale has the same basic DNA as broccoli and was cultivated for its leaves and broccoli for its flow-

 rom top left clockwise: Negative space of a cauliflower in porcelain by me (lamp), Negative F space of a cauliflower in silver in progress by me (ring), Watercolour of a butterfly with intestines by my father and "schillenbeesten by couzijn van Leeuwen

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er buds. They can interbreed just like a chihuahua and a Danish dog can. My next phase would be to find someone who is interested in interbreeding a different brassicaceae. I’m working on a digital model to see how strong a broccoli really is and what applications it could have. The objects I made are the first step in this alternative evolution of the negative space of the brassicaceae family. v

paulhohner.com

by Sharvari Alape & Fizza Juddy

“I SEE MY WORK AS AN ONGOING PROCESS; NEVER FINISHED, JUST LIKE EVOLUTION ITSELF”

DDW | ART BY NATURE

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CEES VAN DE VEN

Fishy Business

Cees contacted me wanting to introduce and promote fish leather, as well as to collaborate with designers and producers. I saw his work at multiple places at the DDW, where he displayed his craft with this byproduct of the fish industry, which is a perfect and beautiful alternative for cow leather as we know today. I learned about this by-product during my time living in Iceland.


“T HE NEXT 17 YEARS I WAS IN TOUCH WITH AND PART OF NATURE.� Since my youth I have been attracted by wide, natural landscapes, travelling by bike, or boat, or just running in the northern Europe. Instead of laying on the beach in Spain, as every other youngster of that age was doing, I was biking in Scandinavia. At the age of 24 I moved to Iceland. The next 17 years I was in touch with and part of nature. I want to be part of a more sustainable world in which we respect and behave in a more balanced way. I learned about the way we process fish, especially salmon, cod, perch and catfish. Fish skin was a unwanted product, that was collected at fisheries, tanned and finished in almost fifty different ways. Combined with a variety of colors it resulted in a beautiful product with almost endless applications. Fish leather is flexible and amazingly strong, an exciting new material for designers, producers and other creative people.

Only about 2% of fish skins is used. It is eco friendly compared to traditional leather. It is flexible and surprisingly strong. A great alternative for most purposes. NYVIDD wants more fish leather to be used in a wider variety of products. We are happy to promote the use of this valuable waste product. v nyvidd.nl

by Afreen Khan, Shehla Momin

DDW | ART BY NATURE

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BY ERIC KLARENBEEK

print & grow, The Mycelium Project DDW had a lot of seminars with interesting subjects. One of these was from Eric Klarenbeek. Even though I couldn’t be at this event I thought it too interesting to not share this. Eric Klarenbeek’s studio is exploring ways of 3D-printing living organisms, such as, mycelium, the threadlike network of fungi in combination with local raw materials to create products with a negative carbon footprint. “We are the first in the world to 3D-print living mycelium using this infinite natural source of organisms as living glue for binding organic waste. Once it’s full-grown and dried, it turns into a structural, stable and renewable material. Combined with 3D-printing it gives us tremendous design freedom,” says Eric Klarenbeek. Why now? Most products today are created with intensive industrial processes. We’re imprisoned in this chain of waste, both in material fabrication as well as the negative effect on our surroundings due to transportation of these materials and goods. 3D-printing provides a partial solution, since we can produce locally by 20

connecting nearby ‘Makers’ through existing web portals. In the Nether­ lands for example, the available Maker network with 3D-printers is so dense, you can upload a design, and collect it by bike once it’s finished. The problem is the applied materials, which are mostly oil based plastics, and industrially produced. The same goes for ‘bioplastics’, which also deal with other issues, such as the use of GMOs. Worldwide there are few producers of filaments, resulting in the requirement for extensive transportation. Secondly, there is little attention for the working conditions of Makers, as the printers have no filters and are mostly worked in unventilated spaces. This can cause serious health risks, especially if you consider that the actual ingredients are kept secret. As this market is relatively young, the time is now to introduce new materials and hand out alternatives. v ericklarenbeek.com


DDW | ART BY NATURE

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ART BY NATURE | CRAFT BY NATURE


IT'S A BUGS LIFE WITH EDDY STOLK Early in life, Eddy had a special love for rarities and collections, especially insects, skeletons and skulls. Here he discovered the beauty of shape and colour that he now uses in his work. In what way does nature play a role in your work? Nature plays a big part in both my life and my work. As human beings we try to influence nature. By using the organic shapes of nature combined with geometrical figures I create a dynamic quality to the work.  As a child, I tried to influence nature by digging small coves at the beach to influence the flow of water. Just to see what happens.  Nowadays I’m more an observer and don’t try to have an impact on the process. Like for instance just listening to the sound of birds communicating with each other at the break of dawn.

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The Beetle | 2010: 75 x 75 cm print on aluminium Charles Darwin [1809-1882] was an avid collector of beetles, which the following anecdote is known: He was on a bug hunt and had one beetles caught in each hand.

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When he saw a third beetle, he could think of nothing else than put one of the beetles his mouth. The beetle panicked and separated a dirty fluid on which Darwin spat

him out and lost all three of the beetles. According to Darwin, the beetle must be the favourite animal of God, otherwise he wouldn’t have made as much.


Craft by Nature

Karl Blossfeldt

"THE BELGIAN ARTIST PANAMARENKO INFLUENCED ME BIG TIME." What was your route on becoming an artist? After graduating at the University of the Arts (HKU) I founded the Graphic Design Studio Lawine with my partner Sylvia Wink. Graphic Design is all about ordering and arranging, which is important to my work as well as in my personal life. In addition to Graphic Design, I painted for a while and took pictures.  At one point I felt the need to experiment and explore new ways of working other than for clients. By making my own assignments, the only opinion I had to take into account was my own. Which was refreshing, but scary to. It took some getting use to,

but I wouldn’t want it any other way. I combined my love for curiosities with my collection of preserved objects for my artwork. Who and what inspires you ? The Belgian artist Panamarenko influenced me big time. His work is a wonderful combination of art and science. Much of his work is about flying and the influence of insects on this subject. I used the research Boeing conducted on the flying behaviour of bumblebees. Furthermore I like the work of Man Ray, Karl Blossfeldt. Blossfeldt’s book ‘Art Forms in Nature’ is the Bible when it comes to photography of CRAFT BY NATURE | ART BY NATURE

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"I SEARCHED FOR FUNNY OR EVEN ALIENATING STORIES. " the species of plant. Also I’m fasci­ nated by the work of the German painter Anselm Kiefer. The way he incorporates uncommon materials and typography in his work, really influenced me during my studies at Art School. Can you take us through your creative process? In my work I combine images and text. Both have the same quality. Most of the time I start with the subject and look for the right story. I searched for funny or even alienating stories that bring a smile or that amazes you for a short moment. A great example is the work of Darwin and the beetles. Then I start creating a compo­sition with the symmetry of the geometric shapes and asymmetrical forms of nature. After that I choose the material on which I print the image. This could be either aluminium or wood, depending on the expression I am looking for in the work. For instance when I use aluminium together with the transparent ink it

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ART BY NATURE | CRAFT BY NATURE

gives my work, like with some real insects, a metallic look.  Steel gives my work a more silk like appearance. For the leaf skele­tons I use wood, because the grain is still visible and therefor is a beautiful representation of the leaf. v  ddystolk.nl e Images: Norbert Waalboer

The Bumblebee | 2010: 75 x 75 cm | print on aluminium A bumblebee has a large body with relatively small wings [wing area about 0.7 cm and weight about 1.2 grams]. According to calculations from the Boeing design department, the bumblebee can’t fly. If you look at it from a steady state aerodynamics the bumblebee couldn’t come up. Due to the upward and downward movement of the wings, a vortex creates an upward force, which, Because of this, they can fly. The engineers could not imagine that it could be different. Biologist Torkel WeisFogh [1922-1975] described a number of alternative lift-generating techniques that use insects.


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ART BY NATURE | NATURE THROUGH THE EYES OF


"W E STAND AT THE EDGE, LOOKING OUT ONTO THE TALLEST SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAIN..." IRENA MURPHY

NATURE THROUGH NATURE'S THECOLUMN EYES OF | ART BY NATURE

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PRETTY IN THE SAND

WITH IRENA MURPHY I couldn’t breathe and my chest was tight. Is this what it’s like to have a heart attack? Here I was in my too expensive sneakers, five layers of flannel shirts, vintage ray bans and a beat-up straw hat, on top of a 16,000ft mountain, deep in the Andes of Peru.

I dragged myself up this mountain on an adventurous attempt at seeing the world . I planned on a victorious climb, followed by screaming off the top. I didn’t realize I’d lose so much air at that height. The idea was so much more romantic in my mind. But the wind is kicking like an ice tornado and I’m drowning in my tussled knotted red locks of hair. I pull myself up and grab my best friend’s hand. We stand at the edge, looking out onto the tallest snow-capped mountain, adorned by bright blue glacier lakes that mirror her glossy white pillar-like painting. We did it. We gathered whatever breath we had left and screamed into the wind. It’s the tallest mountain I’ve ever climbed but physically doable. If 30

ART BY NATURE | NATURE'S COLUMN

you asked me five years ago whether I would ever climb the Andes Mountains in Peru, I wouldn’t have imagined it. Especially the physical agony it would cause. Like most Americans, I never used to travel. I found out recently that only 45% of us even have passports. And only 5% of us travel overseas for vacations. It only took one trip to change my perspective on travelling. One booked flight. One booked hotel. One booked guided tour. And all of a sudden I’m a world traveller. Exhausted and screaming at the top of a mountain and hiding from the wind. v

by Nicole Pereira & Pavneet Kaur


Nature adventures

NATURE THROUGH THE EYES OF | ART BY NATURE

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A SAINT CA L L ED MOTHER NATURE BY MARQUE TODD Marque Todd, a self-taught artist and veterinarian, has a fundamental knowledge of animal anatomy, physiology, and psychology. Her studies proved to be vital to her work where she combines detailed animal and bird imagery with imaginative realism, allegory and symbolism.

Renaissance Jay, 14”x20”, oil and metal leaf on panel

INSPIRED BY NATURE | ART BY NATURE

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"I CONSIDER MYSELF LUCKY TO HAVE HAD EXCELLENT ARTISTS AS MY MENTORS"

How did you become an artist? I can’t remember a time when I did not think of myself as an artist. I am largely self-taught, and I use the knowledge and skills I acquired as a veterinarian and biologist to help me understand and render the animal form. Through private instruction, workshops, and extensive reading about the philosophies and techniques of my favorite historical artists I developed my current painting practices. I consider myself lucky to have had excellent artists as my mentors – including Koo Schadler, Pam Hawkes, and Vicki Walsh. They helped me improve my technical skills in composition and painting, and also encouraged me to authentically express

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ART BY NATURE | INSPIRED BY NATURE

myself and my world view through my paintings. What role did creativity play during your childhood? My earliest memories are of drawing animals. My mother and grandmother were both artists and always had animals around. As a child, my mother would let me sit at her drafting table and use the “grown up” art supplies. I was drawing using pen and ink, and coloured pencils when most kids were using crayons. Who or what inspires you and in what ways? Mother Nature inspires me in so many ways - the variations of animals, birds, insects, and plants with their array of colours and sounds. My representational narratives, painting techniques, and use of color all reflect my love of the 14th to 16th century Flemish and Italian Masterworks and decorative techniques. I am particularly enamoured of the Flemish and Italian painters from that period, including Van Eyck, Memling, Gozzoli, Botticelli, and Fra Angelico – to name a few.


 rom top left clockwise: oil and metal leaf on panF el 10"x10" "Gothic Fox" Finished and stage in progress; skulls, decorative objects, and taxidermy specimen in the artist’s studio; the Brothers Van Eyck “Lamb of God” – one of the artworks that inspires the artist 35


"I HOPE TO FOSTER A SENSE OF REVERENCE AND RESPECT"

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Can you describe the steps of your creative process? My creative process is contemplative and spiritual in nature. I first choose an animal or bird along decorative objects that inspire me at the time.

Silverpoint drawing of a raven, 4”x4”

Can your artwork be seen as representations or reflections of Saint-like beings? In Western culture, spiritual essence has traditionally been beautifully represented by the use of Medieval and Renaissance iconography and classical symbols such as halos. In my art, I use such revered symbols to show the world the saintlike essence manifested through the spirits of all living things including animals and birds. I hope to foster a sense of reverence and respect for our fragile planet and all living things residing on it.

I make some very quick initial sketches to capture the idea and that idea sits in my subconscious for days to months before I proceed to transform it into a detailed composition using drawings, photographs, and digital art tools. After the design stage, I transfer the composition to a primed panel by rendering a detailed drawing of it in graphite or silver point. I then slowly build up thin transparent layers of colour in oils over the top of the drawing. These pure colour glazes give the painting a jewel-like quality, much like a beautiful stained glass window in a cathedral. v marquetodd.com

by Fatima Rao & Samia Azhar Naim

Photos of Marque, in the studio and inspiration: Mark Ross Photos of completed painting: Mark O’Donnell at Pixel 2 Creations.

INSPIRED BY NATURE | ART BY NATURE

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nature’s

wanna

haves

Mossy minutes Noktutu’s Rotterdam Design studios out­ shines the charm of contemporary wall clocks with its latest ‘natural work’. ‘The Moss Clock’ is a biodegradable design product that comes in a color palette of different mosses, each for a different season.

noktuku.com

Jack Rabbit A new sociable way to be anti-social? The Headphone Splitter enables you to plug in two pairs of headphones into the same device. Share your playlist with your friends in full stereo and not just in one ear. suck.uk.com

DandyLIGHT Add a touch of delicacy to your room decor with this design by Studio Drift. A night lamp inspired by a dandelion to brighten up your room! rockettstgeorge.co.uk

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ART BY NATURE | NATURE WANNAHAVE'S


Chemistry terrarium kit The most fashionable bottle from the chemistry lab is the Erlenmeyer. Make it extra decorative with the Suck UK Chemistry Terrarium Kit. With this kit, you transform the bottle into a small terrarium: the perfect place for mini cacti and fat plants! fonq.nl

Jewellery box Where do you put your most precious jewels when you take them off? Store your treasured possessions in one safe place, nuzzled by this bird skull jewelry box. until.com.au

by Nicole Pereira & Pavneet Kaur

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UP IN THE CLOUDS

WITH JESSICA VORHEIS

Jessica’s art explorations are symbolic of the emotional and spiritual aspects of her life. She creates dreamlike and colourful landscapes like “Hope In Him”, “Breathe” and “Light Unto My Path” that aid in processing what she’s going through and gives her the chance to escape her daily routine.

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ART BY NATURE | INSPIRED BY NATURE


er

aac Cart

Photo: Is


 rt work called:"Just A Kid" a

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"JUST FOLLOWING THE LANDSCAPE ALONG; THESE GET MY IMAGINATION GOING." What path did you take to become an artist? In both high school and college, I had art class, meaning I would have to work on projects in the evening. Due to my limited spare time, I could only do two or three artworks a year which led me to determine that I had to be my own boss in order to create my own art.

 essica working on her artwork together with J her daughter. Photo: Isaac Carter

Because I know I’m always working on different projects, I find myself scribbling down every idea I have and creating even when I don’t feel like it, trusting my intuition to guide me. In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? My mom used to paint and craft, so naturally I did the same. Paint, glue and paper were always around. My friends and I played outside, pretended our bicycles were horses and that rocks were food. Those two worlds of drawing and playing melded together and made me the artist I am today. Who and what inspires you and in what way? Artists like MJ Lindo, Ruth Speer and Scott Musgrove who are on the open road have always inspired me. When I look out of the window, the constant change of scenery keeps me captivated. Seeing trees rise up a mountain, or just following the landscape along; these get my imagination going and leads me down the rabbit hole of memories and visions, and eventually to inspiration. v jessica's website

Inspiration artist MJ Lindo

Sharvari Alape, Fizza Juddy & Aroma Kumar 

INSPIRED BY NATURE | ART BY NATURE

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HIGH UP IN THE SKY WITH JELTE KEUR Jelte Keur is a passionate drone pilot who loves nature. He takes the viewer on an amazing trip through beautiful landscapes. Getting up at the crack of dawn to capture the most spectacular aerial footage is no exception to this pro. Take a look in his world and be blown away by this new perspective on nature.

 hat was your route on becoming W an artist? There wasn’t a specific route to becoming what I am today. My parents always taught me to follow my heart. As a child I was very curious, and I’ll still am to this day. In what way does nature play a role in your work?
 Nature is my biggest inspiration. It’s pure poetry. You‘ve got to love it. I want to share this and give people of new perspective on nature. In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? As a child I was always very curious. Like a young Jules Verne, always wanting to know more and figure out how things work. From a need of experi-

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ART BY NATURE | NATURE THROUGH THE EYES OF

encing the world up close, came my interest for taking macro photos. Then I discovered slow motion video, which gave me a new perspective on filming. So when aerial photography and videography were introduced, I found totally new ways of working. You can see the world from so many different angles with a drone, it seems like the sky’s the limit. I took my first drone everywhere I went. Just to experiment. Some things were great; others were not really that appealing to me. Over time I learned which objects were striking to capture from above. Still, there are so many locations I want to film, I hope I can work with drones for a long time, since I still have the inquiring mind I had as a child.


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"I HOPE TO LIVE TO BE A HUNDRED TO GET EVERYTHING DONE."

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Who and what inspires you and in what way? Frans Lanting is a photographer who inspired me. The way he captures nature is simply amazing. Same goes for Manoj Shah. Looking at video­graphy I always loved Alfred Hitchcock way of filming. He experimented to create new angles of filming, such as in his movie Vertigo, where he used what is now called the vertigo shot. In general I get inspired by people who believe in who they are. I hope that one day, I can inspire other people.


Is there a difference when you work for a client in comparison to your own artwork? Yes, there is a difference. When I’m working for a client I have to listen to what he or she wants. Within that spectrum I can still do what I think is best, but there is always a boundary in what I can do. This varies between clients. Some give me all the space to create what I think is best, others know exactly what they want. When I create for myself then there are no boundaries and I can just follow all my impulses. Is there someone you would love to work with? Yes, I would love to work with the Coen brothers, or the Scott brothers. To experience what it is to make a big production, to see how they get inspired and how they translate that inspiration into their work. Who would be your favorite client? My favorite clients are the ones who have a clear vision of what they want and can explain this to me. That makes my work more efficient and brings good results for the customer.  hat would you really love to do or make if W you got the change? I hope to film the Northern Lights with a drone someday, or a volcano, or a vortex, or a geyser, or the earth. Actually there‘re so many things I’d like to film, I hope to live to be a hundred to get everything done. v keuroverview.nl

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GETTING IN TOUCH WITH NATURE

WITH GENEVIEVE MARIANI

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ART BY NATURE | NATURE THROUGH THE EYES OF


In this edition of the column I would like to pay tribute my hero, the savior of the American National Parks, the great John Muir. John Muir was injured badly as a youngster, and drawn to the mountains after his recovery. I, too, suffered a great injury that instilled wanderlust too strong to be ignored. I firmly believe that pain is the touchstone to growth. It is this wanderlust that gives Muir’s writings a dreamlike and spiritual energy, to which I feel a deep connection. The National Parks are, in my opinion, the greatest part of this country. Muir’s many battles to protect them are still recognized by myself and countless others. His historic trail and founding of The Sierra Club took place in order to “do something for wildness and make the mountains glad,”as he said. Muir was a rock climber, as well as an activist. I started climbing in February of 2017, and it has brought me closer to nature in a way that I never imagined possible. Muir was the first successful ascent of Cathedral Peak, which has become a famous and highly desirable destination for climbers. Cathedral Peak is an out­standing granite pinnacle in the Tuolumne Meadows area of Yosemite National Park. Yosemite itself became a great Mecca for climbers, holding some of the most influential and pivotal climbers and climbs in history. I imagine without Muir, this may not be the same story. Thank you for paving the way, John. v wilddogsco.com

I'm an Illustrator, motorcyclist and animal welfare advocate. I hail from Minnesota and grew up lonely and wild, relating to animals more than humans. At an early age I started to paint, draw, and explore the woods. Read all about how my adventures inspire my creativity in my column.

It stands to reason that the first design I am releasing for my new company is an illustration I made of John Muir. The mountain and forest is depicted as being part of him.

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by Megan Ward & Lubna Chania

More worldly cleverness to give you more nature-based inspiration in your life. <

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< Brush a way It's amazin g how mother ­ nature help s you to be creative. • Several tw igs •  String, twin e or a piec e of raffia •  Materials fo r bristles (pine needles, sp ruce needle s, cypress foliage, ev en tree buds , etc) • Optional: a rubber ba nd For more information check applegreenco ttage.com

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ART BY NATURE | DIY


< Ta bleto p Bio Create spher a fun e demons the ec tratio ologic n of al cyc us ali les th ve. at kee p • Gath er the aquari • Coll u ect th e pond m supplies. • Bott life. le it up. • Fill your j ar hal • Seal fway w and st ith... ore. For m or makez e informat ine.com ion ch eck

ern ant e air l h rb wl n t He • Bo p i < u p ure • Cu on rd ers Nat w o p S o or co fl • d pe sse e • Ta dle Pre leaves wir •  e ve e r i s N d e t t n • p a e a a cor she t P • De 1-2 sparen aste •  p n k tra paper hec c l s l tion • Wa alloon rma b o f 2 in • om ore ions.c m For agicon them 53


GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM 54

10 JUNE UNTIL 26 NOVEMBER 2017

ART BY NATURE | NATURE GALLERY SPECIAL


GALLERY SPECIAL EARTH MATTERS by Shimeion Benjamin & Caroline D’Souza

This Gallery Special, takes us to Tilburg’s Textiele Museum where, earlier this summer the exhibition, Earth Matters was opened. The Museum is a dynamic and creative place where past and present come together. The textiles on show have been crafted using different techniques, meaning that not only did I get a glimpse of the history of textiles and the processes of making them, but also witnessed the future of design. When I walked into the exhibition area, prominent pieces such as ‘Honouring Origins’, ‘Collecting Ingredients’, ‘Reinventing Materials’ and ‘Sustaining Production’ were presented in harmony. What they did well was not telling the visitor what is wrong with the world, but instead shows them the possibilities that come from implementing a sustainable cycle, and the importance of material studies. I saw experiments – from fashion to design – that contribute to a sustainable production process, either on a small or on a large scale.

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GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

HONOURING ORIGINS

SANNE VISSER, The New age of Trichology, foto: Tom Mannion

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With an extensive collection of new work from more than 40 international designers, artists and manufacturers, the curators have displayed innovatively designed objects, garments, textiles, yarns and materials into four exhibition themes namely

REINVENTING MATERIALS

Honouring origins The origins of a fibre, the name of the weaver, and the face of the artisan each are essential to understand an object’s identity and soul. A new generation of designers retrace their roots and research their history, sometimes going back to the beginning of time. Reinventing materials Material is the message in today’s design world, with designers looking at both low and high tech ways to reinvent the elements with which they work, all the while staying connected to the earth.

JÓLAN VAN DER WIEL in samenwerking met Iris van Herpen, Magnetic Shoe, foto: JVDW Studio

Sustaining production Designers aim for a more sustainable production process and make us aware of the damaging ways we make textiles today. They seek to use little or no chemicals and water, work as energy-efficient as possible, and manufacture locally, often experimenting with recycled or upcycled materials.

SUSTAINING PRODUCTION

DOSA, Light blessings sorting marigold petals

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COLLECTING INGREDIENTS

GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

Collecting ingredients Like hunter/gatherers looking for food, ecologically conscious designers hunt and gather organic ingredients creating a colourful language tinted for today’s ‘greener’ times. They show us how manufacturing can avoid excessive pollution.

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BARKING UP THE RIGHT TREE WITH SARMITE POLAKOVA Sarmite grew up in Europe, in a country called Latvia. Living in the countryside, she was always surrounded by nature and enjoyed many of Latviaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich traditions that involved nature. As a result it became an important part of her life and, the focal point for her work.

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GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

For me nature is more than just walks in the park. It is affection, rituals as well as materials. I also approach it from that angle when I design – I not only design objects, but also try to convey the story that lies beneath a material or product. In some ways my work is similar to the The Latvian fashion brand, Mareunrols. The brand is inspired by the forest landscape and urban environment, which helps them create unique silhouettes. Like them I choose an aspect of nature and use it to draw a story that takes shape over the course of the project. What lead you to become an artist? I began my journey by studying architecture, followed by attending the product design school in Latvia. I then decided to study Social Design at the Design Academy Eindhoven. Over time I learned that design cannot always solve all the problems in the world. Instead, it can be a tool to reflect and that makes us think of alternative design systems. Above all I learnt that we should consider the impact design has on society. With the use of storytelling I combine function, research and conceptual art in my designs. In what way did creativity play a role in your childhood? As a child, I never imagined myself to ever become a designer. I couldn’t draw pretty bunnies nor had I a nice penmanship (I still don’t). My playgrounds were our garden and the little nearby forest. So, instead

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ART BY NATURE | NATURE GALLERY SPECIAL

" I GET CARRIED AWAY BY OBJECTS THAT CONVEY A MESSAGE."

inspiration and collage

of spending my time trying to draw something I could never perfect, I thought out of box and built my playroom on an apple tree and redesigned my clothes into new ones. Who or what inspires you and in what way?
 I get inspired by random things, whether it may be a single object,


design together through raw materials. They let the material decide the shape it will take, something that was very important for me while working on ‘Pineskins’. Writers are also a great source of inspiration; such as Juhani Pallasmaa and Victor Papanek who write about crafts, architecture and design from a very unique perspective. For instance “how does a craftsman experience working on a craft that he masters completely?”

Bark drying

Salinas de Maras - Cusco/Perú

Can you take us through your creative process? My ideas often start from a personal fascination. I research historical applications, traditions, shapes etc. I collect images of facts, shapes, colours, textures, products or anything that relates to my style of work. Then, through mixed media I create a story. Then I make scale models, tryouts and experiments. Those are followed by constant rewriting of the story and visual materials.

Inspiration

Harvesting

an old photo or a crafty object in a national museum. I get carried away by objects that convey a message. The works of artists like Roni Horn and Rachel Whiteread are on top of my list . Dunne & Raby build concepts on fact and fiction. Christien Meindertsma and Formafantasma bring story and

I also read about the subject I am working on. For example whilst working with “Pineskins” I read the book “The hidden life of Trees” by Peter Wohlleben. It helped me to look at trees as a living organism and therefore draw the analogy between wood and animal industries. v

by Lubna Chania

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THE ‘EXTRAODINHAIRY’ TALE GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

OF ALIX BIZET Hair has always played a significant role in the life of Alix Bizet. With her projects, she aims to make hair a more prominent, dare we say bouffant, part of the fashion industry.

Inspiration:

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Nature gallery special

At work

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GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

"I GET INSPIRED BY PEOPLE WHO DARED TO CHALLENGE THE MODELS OF SOCIETY..."

Describe your journey towards becoming an artist? Throughout my life, I have had the urge to be creative - whether that was through dance, drawing or sewing, and I was always motivated to express my emotions, opinions, and experiences through my art. Because of this, I began my journey at Central Saint Martins in London and then at the Design Academy Eindhoven. To gain more practical design experience, I have also been working for design studios across Europe.

At work

At Balmainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shoes and Accessories Studio, I learned more about different materials, and how being knowledgeable about the manufacturing process was essential if you are to be truly innovative. Later, at the BLESS studio in Paris and Berlin, I found that their products and clothes are part of a designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statement, as well as a reflection of their environment. I saw the influence that their designs have on their audience. And then, after graduating from the Design Academy in 2015, I decided to start my own studio. Did you know you were creative when you were younger? Being dyslexic, I had difficulties at school. Teachers complained that I lacked concentration and motivation. But playing, dancing or painting felt very natural. I found that I could express myself best through images and sounds rather than words.

Inspiration 64

ART BY NATURE | NATURE GALLERY SPECIAL


Who, and what inspires you, and in what way? People who dare to challenge the models of society. I’ve met someone just like that. Her name is Emma Tarlo. She’s done extensive research on human hair in society in her book Entanglement and how it is a multi-billion business. Her work inspires me and makes me think. It generates ideas for new projects.

The fashion brand VETEMENTS brings a new perspective because they design in a democratic way, and use real people as their inspiration. They also focus on on the clothes, not the designer. Can you take us through your creative process? I start with something like a fascination, or a problem that raises questions. Being of mixed race, the importance of hair has often been a subject of conversation within my family and the West Indies community within which my mum originates. From a young age I have been told that straight hair, which dominates Europe, was ‘good hair’, and then there was hair which needed fixing to become good hair. Although it frustrated me, it also intrigued me as a designer. I used my knowledge of the production of textile on human materials. To demonstrate its power as a versatile material. While collecting trimmed hair from hairdressers I learned about the structure and the resistance of hair, which helped me when felting or otherwise manipulating it into my designs. Now because of my collaboration with a supplier of wool expert on the raw fibers based in yorkshire, I have completed my collection which can be seen today across several galleries and exhibitions. v

alixmariebizet.com Juliette Delforge

by Afreen Khan, Shehla Momin

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PHILIP FIMMANO

MAKES THE “EARTH MATTER"

GALLERY SPECIAL ARTIST OF TEXTIELMUSEUM

Philip is a contemporary fashion and lifestyle specialist working closely as a business partner, and art director, with the renowned trend forecaster, Lidewij Edelkoort. Together, Philip and Lidewij have curated the exhibition ‘Earth Matters’.

How did your relationship with Lidewij begin? After 9/11 I moved to Paris from New York, for what was supposed to be only for a few months. We have been co-curators and partners in crime ever since. What has changed in the 16 years you have worked together? In the early years we had a lot of fun - travelling the world carefree and being inspired. Since the financial crisis it has been quite different; we’re lucky enough to still be able to travel and do interesting things, but the climate is much more challenging. How did the exhibition start? We always start with a concept, and this time we wanted to illustrate how there is an entirely new generation of creatives working towards a better future. We have been tracking contemporary design that is ‘organic’ since 2010, when we curated the Post-

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‘Steel Old Window’ by Piet Hein Eek Photo: Josefina Eikenaar/TextielMuseum

Fossil for 21_21 Design SIGHT in Tokyo. The exciting thing for the new exhibition in Tilburg is that most of the objects were made within the last two or three years. In what way do you see sustainability develop in the future? Sustainability has become ingrained in everything we do - from the way we consume food to the way we run our multinational businesses. Sustainability will become a given.


"THROUGH OUR TALKING TEXTILES INITIATIVE, WE HAVE ALSO BECOME TEXTILE ACTIVISTS!"

How do you see yourself most? I’m a design curator, a trend analyst, and an educator since I work closely with schools around the world. Through our ‘Talking Textiles’ initiative, we have also become textile activists!

Do you have any plans for new projects? This November we will be going deep into the Andes to learn about alpaca and experience a very special vicuña shearing ceremony. v Exhibition website by Shivani Mathur, Mehnaz Abdul & Simrin Gupta

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THIRSTY?

HERE’S A POPSICLE THAT YOU SHOULDN’T SUCK If you were to browse the Internet for articles on Taiwan’s environment, you would likely find lots of problems. How would you bring these issues to the attention of a larger audience, and how could you make them interested to act? The built urban area of Taiwan has increased from 24% of its total area in 1955 to 78% in 2017, creating a number of visible environmental problems in the process. Because of this, three students from the National Taiwan University of Arts in Taipei became inspired to make a statement on the impact this has had on their environment. They took a playful yet confrontational approach, aiming to show what the inhabitants and nature have to endure from the ceaseless urban sprawl. They designed 100 popsicles, just like those you can make yourself with a silicon mould and filled them with water from lakes, rivers, beaches and ports around Taiwan. With even such a tiny amount of water they were able to highlight the massive contamination created from the plastic, metal, arsenic, mercury, and other harmful materials dumped in the river. As a result of their innovative eco-activism they were nominated for the ‘Young Pin Design Award’, and featured in the New Generation of Design Exhibition last May at the Taipei World Trade Center. v

by Suzanne Hart & Will Fewtrell

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Number 7 Art by Nature Magazine  

Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.

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