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WORK AND ONE’S WORK

solving is really good for me, I really enjoy that part of it. I’m not necessarily an artist who does a whole lot of video, but I have recently—I guess this work has informed what I do. I did an installation with Claire Finneran at Waverley Library and if I had not known how to install screens we would never have made the work that we did. We hung a chandelier of televisions on a grill from the ceiling in the big open atrium of the lobby. I would never have made that had I not been an installer. I would’ve just had the same videos and just mounted the screens on the wall. sr: I’m quite interested in the ideas that come when you’re working together as a team of technicians, and there is a lot of chat. Has that been embryonic for something else, or changed the way that you approach your own practice? You know, just talking to someone else in a working relationship is different than talking to someone in general conversation because you’re working together. It’s kind of like this ongoing thing that’s stretched over the length of an install, and you pick up on stuff and you leave it off, and then you pick it up again a bit further down the track. ak: I love that. That’s what I like most about install work, but you don’t want to do that too much because there’s the side of it where you are stimulated by problem solving, and there’s the other end where you just put a podcast on and paint a wall for a day because you don’t feel like talking. 25

sr: I am also interested in the idea of being mentally agile when you’re working as a technician, for example, and you’ve got your practice and you’re managing more than one job at a time. pw: That’s definitely been my life the last four years, just constant juggling. ak: I just want to lock down. I don’t want to be installing while I’m working on my own show. I just like to have the one thing that I’m focusing on and that’s that. pw: So you’re more block-orientated? ak: Definitely so. I do my three weeks straight of install at two different places and then I’ve got two months to pull a show together and that’s all I do. pw: I try and look at installing as a necessary distraction. If I had all the time in the world I’d probably just be in the studio making lots of different paintings. Maybe there’d be a continuity there, but in a way being taken away from your work is like someone intervening and having a conversation and asking: “Have you thought about it this way?” Being away from your artwork gives you time to have conversations or form a new perception that might find its way into what you’re doing in a way that you hadn’t anticipated.

Sturgeon Issue 6  

Australian art, culture, etc.

Sturgeon Issue 6  

Australian art, culture, etc.

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