Page 1

1


This catalog provides basic information for students enrolling in the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s (AAC) academic programs. All students must read it carefully to become familiar with its content and discuss any questions with a faculty advisor, program advisor, or the Academic Dean. Consult the catalog regularly, particularly for policy and procedural matters and/or program requirements.

Catalog of Entry Philosophy

Graduation requirements of the Art Academy of Cincinnati may change while a student is enrolled. It is expected that each student will meet the graduation requirements outlined in the Academic Catalog that is in effect at the time he or she entered the Art Academy. The “catalog of entry� philosophy is considered applicable to students who leave the college and whose interrupted course of study is no longer than five years. Students may choose to adopt a more recent catalog but may not adopt a catalog that predates their catalog of entry.

Catalog Changes

The Academic Catalog is a general summary of programs, rules, policies, and procedures for academic and student life and is provided to students as a resource for guidance. However, the catalog is not a complete statement of all programs, rules, policies, and procedures in effect at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Moreover, the Art Academy of Cincinnati reserves the right to change, without notice, any programs, rules, policies, and procedures that appear in this catalog. The 2015-2016 edition of the Academic Catalog was published August 1, 2015. Anyone seeking clarification on any of the information appearing herein should consult with the Academic Dean.

Non-Discrimination Statement

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is committed to policies of equal opportunity and non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability, as protected by law, in all educational programs and activities, admission of students, and conditions of employment. This policy is consistent with relevant governmental statutes and regulations, including those pursuant to Title IX of the Education Amendment Act of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Students who have learning disabilities should contact the Director of Student Services for assistance.

Publicity Waiver

Unless otherwise specified, enrollment indicates that students and/or parents of students grant permission for use of any visual record of students and/or their artwork for educational or publicity purposes with attribution whenever possible.


Table of Contents

Letters from the President and Academic Dean.....................4 History of the Art Academy of Cincinnati................................6 Mission & Vision, Core Values ...............................................7 Academic Calendar...............................................................8 BFA Admission Requirements................................................9 Advanced Placement Equivalents........................................10 College-Level Examination Program (CLEP).........................12 International Baccalaureate..................................................13 Sample BFA Degree Schedules...........................................13 Associate of Science in Graphic Design...............................26 Minors and Double Majors...................................................27 Additional Studio Art Course Descriptions...........................28 Liberal Arts Course Descriptions..........................................32 Purchasing Art Supplies.......................................................38 End of the Year Reviews......................................................38 +B Distinction......................................................................38 Enrollment and Registration Policies....................................39 Course Load Limitations......................................................39 Matriculation Agreement......................................................39 Transient Student Status......................................................39 Veterans Readmission Policy...............................................40 Registration.........................................................................40 Auditing a Course................................................................40 Drop or Add a Course.........................................................40 Incomplete..........................................................................40 Faculty Advisors..................................................................40 Guidelines for Independent Study........................................41 Leave of Absence................................................................41 Withdrawal from the Art Academy.......................................41 Satisfactory Academic Progress..........................................41 Review Process...................................................................41 Additional Information on Satisfactory Academic Progress...42 College Transcripts..............................................................43 Meaning of the Letter Grades..............................................43 Appeal a Grade...................................................................44 Class Attendance................................................................44 Early Alert Procedure...........................................................45 Academic Honors................................................................45 Bachelor of Fine Arts Graduation Requirements...................45 Academic Integrity and Appeals..........................................46 Academic Honesty Policy....................................................46 Fair Use and Copyright Infringement....................................47 Mobility and Study Abroad Programs...................................47 Information Technology Services..........................................48 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act...........................49 Tuition, Fees, Refunds and Financial Aid..............................49 Finance Withdrawal Policy...................................................50 Monthly Tuition Payment Plan..............................................50 Unpaid Accounts and Finance Charges ..............................50 Filing your FASFA.................................................................50 Verification Procedure..........................................................50 Federal Financial Aid Programs............................................51 Return of Federal Title IV Funds Policy.................................51 State of Ohio Financial Aid Programs...................................55 Scholarships and Awards for Continuing Students...............55 Scholarship Programs and Information................................57 Student Services.................................................................57

Community as Campus.......................................................57 The Commons.....................................................................57 Student Clubs and Organizations........................................58 Student Ambassadors.........................................................58 Galleries and Public Exhibition Spaces.................................58 Clean Cubes........................................................................58 Employment Opportunities..................................................58 Learning Assistance............................................................59 Disability Services................................................................59 Confidentiality......................................................................59 Resources for Learning and Research.................................59 Resources for Accessibility and Accommodations...............59 Counseling Services............................................................59 Student Health Records......................................................60 Student Rights and Responsibilities.....................................60 Student Code of Conduct and Procedures..........................61 Sexual Misconduct Policies and Procedures........................67 Facilities, Safety, and Building Use Policies..........................70 Modeling Policies.................................................................70 Building and Office Hours....................................................71 Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures..............71 Alcohol and Drug Policy.......................................................71 Substance Abuse Education................................................72 Fire Drills..............................................................................72 Reporting A Fire...................................................................72 Fire Log...............................................................................73 Timely Warnings..................................................................73 Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics...................................73 Daily Crime Log...................................................................73 Reporting of Criminal Offenses............................................73 Voluntary and Confidential Reporting...................................73 Campus Safety Enforcement...............................................74 Security Awareness and Crime Prevention...........................74 Criminal Activity off Campus................................................74 Sex Offender Registration....................................................74 Annual Security Report Availability.......................................75 Missing Persons..................................................................75 Crime Statistics Table..........................................................75 Disciplinary Actions and Judicial Referrals............................76 Safety and Health Hazards Policy........................................76 Additional Policies................................................................76 Geography..........................................................................77 Campus Security ................................................................78 Student ID and Security Cards ...........................................78 Visitors to Main Building.......................................................78 Campus Student Parking.....................................................78 Lockers...............................................................................78 Student Campus Mail Policy................................................78 Bulletin Boards....................................................................78 Lost and Found...................................................................78 Removal of Personal Property or Artwork............................79 Residence Hall Regulations.................................................79 Medical Information.............................................................79 Urgent Communications......................................................79 Faculty Directory..................................................................80 Staff Directory......................................................................82 General Contact and Mailing Address..................................84 Motto..................................................................................84


Welcome to the Art Academy of Cincinnati! If you are a new student, I congratulate you for making the choices that brought you to the Art Academy. First, I cannot overemphasize the importance of attending college. As our world changes, the value of a college education grows greater every day. It may not be easy to acquire, but your college diploma will become one of your most valuable possessions, once you have earned it. I also believe that you have made a good choice to prepare for a life as a professional artist or designer. Day-byday, more attention is given to the fact that the creative people in the world are the true innovators. Not only do artists and designers make the world more visually exciting, we also create solutions to the problems of the world, including those of the world of commerce. Finally, you have made an excellent choice to attend the Art Academy of Cincinnati. For almost 150 years, the Art Academy has been a primary destination as the place where aspiring artists and designers come to acquire the necessary skills and experiences that will help them become successful professionals. Now, you are poised to take your place in that long history. If you are continuing your studies at the Art Academy, you already know about the intensive experience of being a student here. With that experience, you are also learning that the professional world of art and design is highly competitive and rigorous. Now is the time for you to discipline yourself to work hard, to study diligently, and to live in the world of art and design. Those of us who succeed in this world invariably become “art junkies� to whom art and design are the primary forces driving our lives. Now is your time to enter that world and begin to make a place for yourself. You bring the talent and enthusiasm. We provide the place and the resources you will need to complete the picture. The faculty and staff are here to provide instruction, guidance, and advice to help you achieve success. John M Sullivan

4

President


The Art Academy is a special place. It is a confluence of beginning artists with master artists, ideas with materials, desires with the energies to make them real. It is a place where significant conversations shape and nurture the creative spirit and where uncertainty and risk are celebrated. You are now an active member of this extraordinary creative community. For the Art Academy to thrive and continue as this region’s preeminent school of art and design, we must come together to help each other grow and learn. The Art Academy is more than a building. It is all of us. We each have a responsibility to embrace the possibilities and pay attention to our individual and collective imaginations. The poet and art critic Peter Schjeldahl was once asked the secret to being a great art student. He said Show up Speak up Clean up

Everything else takes care of itself.

This catalog contains information about the courses you will need to take and the requirements you will need to fulfill to earn your Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (BFA). There are also academic policies and procedures to keep everything running smoothly. I strongly recommend that you take a few minutes to read it over and then periodically check the AAC website for any corrections or updates of important information you will need to know to help you get the most out of your education.

Kim Krause

Academic Dean

5


The Art Academy of Cincinnati’s roots are in the McMicken School of Drawing and Design, founded in 1869 for the “promotion of taste and design in the industrial arts.” The McMicken School became one of the first established departments of the University of Cincinnati. In 1884, Joseph Longworth, a Cincinnati philanthropist was instrumental in the founding of the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Art Academy of Cincinnati. The McMicken School separated from the University of Cincinnati and became part of the Cincinnati Museum Association. The change of association culminated in an official name change to the Art Academy of Cincinnati and a move to a new facility built adjacent to the Cincinnati Art Museum in Eden Park in November of 1887. Between 1884 and 1998, the Art Academy operated as a museum school, providing quality education to students. The Art Academy became a charter member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) in 1948. In 1950, a four-year curriculum was introduced, and students earned Certificates. In 1979, the Art Academy established a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program approved by the Ohio Board of Regents and NASAD. In 1998, the Art Academy separated from the Cincinnati Museum Association, and the Art Academy became a fully independent college of art and design. In 2005 the Art Academy moved from its Eden Park and Mount Adams locations to its current campus in historic Over-the-Rhine, a move that enabled the college to provide 24-hour access to over 100 student studio spaces, improved instructional studios, and other updated campus facilities. The Art Academy was awarded numerous awards for the development, design and construction of the new facility and achieved LEED Certification by the US Green Building Council in 2008.

6

The Art Academy of Cincinnati has a rich heritage spanning nearly 150 years of great art and great art instruction. Since its earliest beginnings, the Art Academy has educated many accomplished artists and designers, has provided personalized attention to students, and has touched Cincinnatians’ lives through community education programming. Now located in the Over-the-Rhine, this private not-for-profit institution of higher education is well positioned to become an anchor for the creative artistic community in a vibrant and growing arts district.


Mission & Vision

Education

Mission Statement

To create and sustain radical, forward-thinking, contemporary visual artists and designers whose creative contributions make a substantial difference in all the lives they touch.

Vision Statement

To be the most celebrated, relentless, rebellious, cutting-edge and radiant community of artists and designers anywhere, at any time—the seers, the radicals, the innovators, and creative professionals who establish the rules that the future will follow.

Core Values radical

CREATIVITY

relentless

CURIOSITY

rebellious

INDIVIDUALITY

cutting-edge EDUCATION celebrated radiant

HISTORY COMMUNITY

imagination, invention, risktaking, unpredictability, openness, surprise, research, inquiry, exploration, experimentation, commitment, originality, uniqueness, independence, vision, entrepreneurship, DIY work ethic, collaboration, contemporary practice, scholarship, interactivity, student-centered learning, visual literacy, outreach, stewardship, involvement, partnership, contribution, connection

AAC Educational Goal

To empower students with the intellectual and technical tools they will need to navigate a life of creativity, curiosity, individuality, education, history, and community.

Universal Educational Objectives Creativity

Students engage their imagination, invent new forms, take risks, and solve visual problems in unpredictable, surprising ways.

Students employ and integrate the technical skills, strategies, and critical thinking necessary to create cutting-edge works of art and design.

History

Students determine and defend the role of art and design history in relation to their work and contemporary culture.

Community

Through their creative practice, students make meaningful connections with the diverse communities in which they live and work.

Affiliations and Authorizations

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is a private, not-for profit, independent college of art and design. The Art Academy of Cincinnati is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) of which it is a charter member. The Art Academy has been issued a certificate by the Ohio Board of Regents under sect 1713.03, Ohio Revised Code to grant a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, a Master of Arts degree in Art Education, and an Associate of Science degree in Graphic Design. It is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant/alien students and is approved for the training of veterans. The Art Academy of Cincinnati is also a charter member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), a consortium of over 40 professional colleges of art and design, dedicated to the exchange of information and programs beneficial to students, faculty, and staff. The Art Academy is a member of the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities (GCCCU).

Curiosity

Through their commitment to inquiry, research, and experimentation, students define the formal and conceptual interests related to their own artistic process and vision.

Individuality

Students articulate a unique and rebellious voice in their work in relation to the past, present, and future of art and design. 7


Academic Calendar

Art Academy of Cincinnati | Academic Calendar 2015-2016

Fall 2015 Semester

Spring 2016 Semester

September 8 – December 18, 2015

January 12 – May 9, 2016

September 3 Residence Hall Move-in

January 7 Residence Hall Move-in

September 4 Orientation

January 8 Orientation

September 8 Classes Begin

January 11 Classes begin

October 23 Midterm Grades Due at Noon

January 18 Martin Luther King Holiday January 21 Senior Winter Expo

October 26-November 6 Advising for Spring Semester November 9-20 Online Registration for Spring Semester November 20 Last Day to Withdraw or Drop a class November 25-27 Thanksgiving Break

February 15 Presidents Day Holiday February 26 Midterm Grades Due @ Noon March 14-18 Spring Break March 21-April 1 Advising for Fall Semester

December 18 Classes End

April 1 Last Day to Withdraw or Drop a Class

December 19 Final Grades Due @ 5:00 p.m.

April 4-15 Online Registration for Fall Semester

December 19-January 10 Winter Break

April 29 Classes End May 2-5 Reviews April 30 Final Grades Due @ 5:00 p.m. May 6 Commencement Rehearsal

Labor Day Thanksgiving Martin Luther King Day Presidents Day Memorial Day Independence Day

8

September 7, 2015 November 25-27, 2015 January 18, 2016 February 16, 2016 May 30, 2016 July 4, 2016

May 7 Commencement Ceremony


BFA Program Admission Requirements Application for Admission

High school transcript and ACT/SAT test scores Portfolio of 8-10 pieces of artwork

Portfolio

Your portfolio demonstrates your potential to succeed as an artist in our program. The portfolio should contain 8-10 pieces of your strongest artwork. Portfolios can be uploaded at www. aac.slideroom.com or submitted on CD or DVD and mailed to:

Admissions

Art Academy of Cincinnati 1212 Jackson Street Cincinnati OH, 45202 To schedule an appointment for a personal review call the Admissions Office at 513-562-8740, or send an email to admissions@artacademy.edu.

Transcript and Test Scores

Any and all official transcripts must be mailed directly to the Art Academy of Cincinnati by the issuing educational institutions. Test scores must be mailed directly from the testing service. Applicants must have a minimum high school grade point average (GPA of 2.0) and a score of at least 400 on each of the three subsections of the SAT, or have a composite score of 18 or higher on the ACT.

Optional

Student Essay

Your 250 to 500-word personal statement should describe your creative process as an artist/designer, your artistic goals, and what you hope to achieve in your studies at the Art Academy.

Letter of Recommendation

Your letter of recommendation can be mailed or emailed directly from your art teacher to the Art Academy’s Admissions Office. It should describe your artistic talent, your habits as a student, and your ability to succeed at the college level.

Conditional Acceptance

Students may be accepted conditionally to help ensure academic success. Applicants who meet portfolio requirements can be admitted on a conditional basis if they have a GPA below 2.0, or if they have a score below 400 on any subsection of the SAT, or a composite score below 18 on the ACT. If a student who has been accepted conditionally earns a GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of the first semester, the conditional status is lifted. With receipt of their acceptance letter, students who have been accepted conditionally are notified of the conditional status by the Admissions Department. This status is in effect throughout the first semester of enrollment at the Art Academy. Students who have a “Conditional Acceptance” status will have an initial mandatory meeting with the Academic Dean or Associate Dean. The Director of Student Services may also attend this meeting. Additional meetings may be recommended based on the student’s performance during his or her first semester. If the student has any questions regarding “Conditional Acceptance” or the requirements listed, please contact the Admissions Office at 513-562-8740.

International Students

International students must follow the full admission procedure and provide an official high school transcript evaluation from an accredited evaluation service (e.g. World Education Service, International Research Foundation, or Educational Credential Evaluators) demonstrating successful completion of high school. Additionally, a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is required if English is not a student’s first language. A TOEFL score of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 80 (internet-based) must be achieved. International students living and studying in the United States may qualify to have the TOEFL requirement waived if the Admissions staff determines that the international student’s facility with the English language is sufficient for success in a college-level environment. After being accepted to the Art Academy, an international student must provide notarized bank documentation affirming that he or she has funds in US Dollars (USD) sufficient to support one year of expenses for living and studying at the Art Academy before an I-20 Form will be issued.

9


Transfer Credit Policy for the Bachelor of Fine Arts Program

A maximum of 90 credits may be transferred to the BFA degree program, provided that the institution where those credits were earned is accredited by the appropriate regional accreditation body. The transferable credits must represent coursework that is compatible with the Art Academy’s BFA curriculum, as determined by the Departmental Chairs after an evaluation of the credits and courses to be transferred. In order for credits to be accepted for transfer to an Art Academy degree program, the student must have achieved a grade of at least “C” or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Acceptance of credits earned more than 10 years ago will be at the discretion of the appropriate Department Chair and the Academic Dean. The student must complete the final 30 credits required for his or her degree program in residence at the Art Academy of Cincinnati.

Life Credit

The Art Academy of Cincinnati recognizes that not all college-level learning takes place in the classroom. In addition to our Transfer Credit Policy, we provide the opportunity to earn college credit, as appropriate for prior learning experiences. Students can earn credit for learning achieved through life experience by submitting portfolios and corroborating documentation to the Department Chairs and Associate Dean for credit evaluation. The exact nature of academic requirements that must be met in order for credits to be awarded through portfolio completion varies depending on departmental requirements. Life Credit will not be evaluated as part of the admission process and will be awarded after acceptance into the program.

Evaluating Previous Credit for Readmission

Students who leave the Art Academy of Cincinnati for a period of one year or longer will be required to follow the current catalog for degree completion. A full re-evaluation of previously earned credits will be conducted by the appropriate Department Chair to determine applicability to the current curriculum. Credit for discontinued courses may be applied toward the student’s degree program if the content of such courses is consistent with current degree requirements and contemporary practices in art.

Fresh Start Policy

Undergraduate students who have been readmitted to the college after an absence of five years or longer may petition the Academic Dean to have credit for courses completed prior to the student’s extended absence treated in accordance with the Fresh Start Policy. Upon approval of a Fresh Start, the student’s cumulative GPA will be initiated from the date of entry. A decision to permit credit for prior work will be made at the time of readmission. A request for a Fresh Start must be submitted in writing within one year of readmission and applies only to courses taken at the Art Academy of Cincinnati before readmission. Approval of the petition may be delayed until the end of the first year of return to evaluate current progress. Fresh Start is not automatic and is not guaranteed. The Fresh Start option may be effected only once during a student’s academic career.

Advanced Placement Equivalents

10

AP Test

Acceptable Score

AAC Equivalent

Credits

Art Studio (2D)

3 or higher

3

One Semester Studio Elective

Art Studio (3D)

3 or higher

3

One Semester Studio Elective

Art Studio (Drawing)

3 or higher

FO121

3

Analytical Drawing

Art (History)

3 or higher

6

One Semester Art History Elective

Biology

3 or higher

NS100 NS101

6

Two Semesters - Natural Science Electives

Calculus AB

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Calculus BC

3 or higher

NS101 NS102

6

Two Semesters - Natural Science Electives

Chemistry

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Course Title/Comments


Advanced Placement Equivalents continued Computer Science (A) AP Test

Does not apply at AAC Acceptable Score

AAC Equivalent

Credits

Course Title/Comments

Computer Science (A)

Does not apply at AAC

Computer Science (AB)

Does not apply at AAC

Economics (Macro)

3 or higher

SS100

3

One Semester - Social Science Elective

Economics (Micro)

3 or higher

SS100

3

One Semester - Social Science Elective

English (Language & Comp)

3 or higher

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

English (Literature & Comp)

3 or higher

HU101 HU102

3

Artist as Writer Workshop Artist as Reader Workshop

Environmental Science 4

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

French (Language)

3 or higher

HU100 AS100

6

Two Semesters - Humanities Electives

French (Literature)

3 or higher

HU100 AS100

6

Two Semesters - Humanities Electives

German (Language)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Government & Politics (U.S.)

3 or higher

SS100

3

One Semester - Social Science Elective

Government & Politics (Comp)

3 or higher

SS100

3

One Semester - Social Science Elective

History (European)

3 or higher

HU100 AS100

6

Two Semesters - Humanities Electives

History (U.S.)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

History (World)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Human Geography

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Italian Language and Culture

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Japanese Language and Culture

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Latin (Lit) or (Virgil)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Mathematics (AB) or (BC)

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Mathematics (Statistics)

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Music Theory

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Physics A

Does not apply at AAC

Physics B

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Physics C (Mechanics)

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Physics C (Elect & Magnetism)

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

Psychology

3 or higher

SS100

3

One Semester - Social Science Elective

Spanish (Language)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Spanish (Literature)

3 or higher

HU100

3

One Semester - Humanities Elective

Statistics

3 or higher

NS100

3

One Semester - Natural Science Elective

11


College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Acceptable Score

AAC Equivalent

American Government

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

American Literature

50

HU102

3

Artist as Reader Workshop

Analyzing and Interpreting Literature

50

HU102

3

Artist as Reader Workshop

Biology

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Calculus

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Chemistry

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

College Algebra

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

College Composition

50

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

College Composition Modular

50

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

College French-Level 1

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

College French-Level 2

60

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

College German-Level 1

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

College German-Level 2

60

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

College Mathematics

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

College Spanish-Level 1

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

College Spanish-Level 2

60

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

English Composition

50

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

English Composition with Essay

50

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

English Literature

50

HU102

3

Artist as Reader Workshop

Financial Accounting

50

Liberal Arts

3

Liberal Arts Elective

Freshman College Composition

50

HU101

3

Artist as Writer Workshop

History of the United States I

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

History of the United States II

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

Human Growth and Development

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

Humanities

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

Information Systems and Computer Applications

50

Liberal Arts

3

Liberal Arts Elective

Introductory Business Law

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

Introductory Educational Psychology

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Introductory Psychology

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Introductory Sociology

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Natural Sciences

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Precalculus

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Principles of Macroeconomics

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Principles of Management

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Principles of Marketing

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Principles of Microeconomics

50

Natural Science

3

Natural Science Elective

Social Sciences and History

50

Social Science

3

Social Science Elective

Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

Western Civilization II: 1648 to Present

50

Humanities

3

Humanities Elective

CLEP Test

12

Credit

Equivalent AAC Course


International Baccalaureate

Courses completed through the IB program may be eligible for college credit and will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

The Art Academy of Cincinnati grants a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with majors in Design, Illustration, Painting and Drawing, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture upon satisfactory completion of all studio and liberal arts requirements. All first-year BFA students begin with two semesters of studio arts courses. The intensive nature of these courses prepares students to move into a studio area of special interest unique to their specific discipline regardless of major. The first-year studio arts program provides sufficient breadth to allow students the opportunity to investigate various media and personal expression while providing depth in preparation for their chosen major beginning in the sophomore year. All students are required to successfully complete the Senior Thesis process as part of their chosen major in order to demonstrate that they have achieved the Universal Educational Objectives of the Art Academy of Cincinnati and may thereupon be awarded the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. The Senior Thesis is comprised of two components: 1.) a comprehensive written statement articulating pertinent issues and concerns in the respective body of work and 2.) a public exhibition.

13


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design

The Design program at the Art Academy integrates contemporary design education with fine art studio practices and liberal arts experience. In this program, Design is regarded as a process of inquiry that leads to creative solutions for a variety of visual communication challenges. We provide each student the intellectual and technical preparation needed to achieve success as professionals in the field. Our unique cross-disciplinary approach emphasizes the development of strong research skills, a broad knowledge of image-making tools, proficient verbal and writing skills, and individual voice and vision. These, in combination, prepare students to make a difference and a livelihood as visual artists. Students majoring in Design learn to manage ideas, artistic processes, audience expectations, composition, typography, and imagery to create sophisticated and transformative design solutions. Through professional and personal experiences, students encounter a range of challenges in areas such as brand identity, publication, environmental, product, promotional, interactive and Web design. Many of our graduates work at local, regional, national, and international design firms or in related fields such as architecture, fine arts, exhibit and display, marketing, film, and the entertainment industry.

Design Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing DESIGN MAJOR DS201 Typographic Design 3.0 DS202 Communication Design 3.0 DS301 Integration Design 3.0 DS302 Systems Design 3.0 DS303 Experience Design 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 2 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Design 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Design 6.0 Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. DS201 Typographic Design (3) This course examines type terminology, anatomy, hierarchy, composition, and typographic history in terms of the relationship between visual and verbal language. In the process, the communicative, expressive, and informative qualities of typography are explored in both personal and applied design contexts, while also addressing typogra)phy’s social and historical significance. (Prerequisite: FO101 DS202 Communication Design (3) This course explores basic communication theory; visual syntax, semantics, and semiotics with an eye towards the development and understanding of a range of design experiences from strategic to poetic. While students explore the relationships between communication, form, and content, they develop a visual vocabulary through both photographic and pictographic imagery. Students gain experience with image research, graphic reduction, and principles of composition in the generation of visual symbols and d metaphors. (Prerequisite: 1st Year Studio Program)

ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Issues and Ideas DSC301 Design Integration (3) AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design History: Media 3.0 In this course students explore a variety of visual One of the Following 3.0 communication design platforms. Students will delve AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History deeper into ideation and visualization to produce and AH214 History of Photography execute refined and sophisticated solutions to complex AH215 History of Illustration problems while exploring, investigating, and analyzing AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World greater conceptual considerations in both assigned and selfLIBERAL ARTS defined projects. The course includes 2D, 3D, and 4D design HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 components. (Prerequisite: DS202) HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 DS302 Systems Design (3) HU201 Aesthetics In this course, students explore and create design systems HU210 Introduction to Philosophy AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture within and across various platforms. Design expressions may Additional Liberal Arts include posters, promotional communication, corporate, and NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 brand identity. (Prerequisite: DS202) SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

14

Catalog Credits

120


DC303 Experience Design (3) This course serves as a bridge between intermediate design coursework and Advanced Tutorial and Senior Seminar coursework. Students will participate in a range of design experiences with an increasing focus on self-defined and self-directed work. In addition, students will research and

investigate modern and contemporary design practices and applications. As students move from external parameters to defining their own personal vision and voice, they begin the process of developing their own unique design philosophy. Course content includes client-based work. (Prerequisite: DS202)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing or Design: Typography 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Art History 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Drawing or Design: Typography 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Design: Communication 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 LIberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Design: Systems 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Design: Integration 3 Design: Experience Design 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

15


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration

Of all visual arts disciplines, Illustration provides the most opportunities for fusion and synthesis. Over the last 20 years, illustrators have integrated fine art, graphic design, illustration, and typography into their work. New media, expanded applications, and a sophisticated popular culture make Illustration a very exciting field. Students majoring in Illustration at the Art Academy have many opportunities to integrate design, digital media, painting, print media, drawing, 3D arts, and photography, allowing them to create a body of work that reflects their personal vision. The Art Academy’s Illustration program requires a rigorous studio thesis and professional practice experience both inside and outside the classroom. Graduates from the Art Academy’s Illustration program have pursued careers as freelance illustrators and full-time designers. Notable illustrators who have graduated from the AAC include Jim Flora, Charley Harper, Will Hillenbrand, Tara King, and Chris Sickels, among others.

Illustration Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing ILLUSTRATION MAJOR IL201 Illustration: Composition 3.0 IL203 Illustration: Process and Media 3.0 IL302 Illustration: Narrative 3.0 IL303 Illustration: Special Topics 3.0 IL304 Illustration: Communication 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 2 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Illustration 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Illustration 6.0 Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration

Course Descriptions Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. IL201 Illustration: Composition (3) This course is a continuation of Studio Arts 1, focusing on the study of compositional principles, formats, and visual elements as related to the art of illustration. Illustration will be studied in its broadest applications, including print and digital media. Students will be required to develop ideas through visual and academic research and demonstrate inventive, creative, and strategic thinking. Course content includes lectures, demonstrations, field work, guest designers, and studio work.(Prerequisite: FO101) IL203 Illustration: Process and Media (3) This course is designed to challenge the student to explore a broad range of medium applications as they execute figurative imagery by means of traditional professional materials and techniques. Students will be exposed new skills for producing images and will continue to develop these skills during the course. A combination of professional techniques will be used. Through a series of instructor demonstrations and studio assignments, lectures, class discussions, and critiques, we will study medium application and the processes of traditional, contemporary, and figurative imagery-making. Students will build on their previous experience as they are encouraged to utilize new methods to achieve technical proficiency. The emphasis will remain on the individual’s development of skill and creative and critical thinking. (Prerequisite: FO101)

ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Issues and Ideas AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design History: Media 3.0 Two of the following 6.0 AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History AH214 History of Photography AH215 History of Illustration AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World LIBERAL ARTS IL302 Illustration: Narrative (3) HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 A variety of strategies are explored to create illustrated HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 imagery for storybooks, storyboards, informational graphics, One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 and graphic novels. Students will develop a basic knowledge HU201 Aesthetics of technical processes required to produce finished art, HU210 Introduction to Philosophy AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture including work with graphic arts software to assemble and Additional Liberal Arts output digitally illustrated files for professionally printed and NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 publishable content. Emphasis is on narrative sequencing, SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 composition, and technical refinement. (Prerequisite: IL203) LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

16

Catalog Credits

120


IL303 Illustration: Special Topics (3) Students work individually to develop an interest area of illustration to produce work to build a portfolio and prepare for Advanced Tutorial. Students may propose assignments for faculty approval or work from assignments presented by faculty. Professional illustrators can serve as mentors for students. Students will study contemporary illustrators and illustration to further an understanding of the field. Students will also be expected to become knowledgeable of professional organizations that support the illustration industry. All assignments will be positioned in the context and expectations of “real-world� work and in preparation for thesis work, which may include client-based work. (Prerequisite: IL203)

IL304 Illustration: Communication (3) Through a series of studio assignments, lectures, studio visits, and class discussions, students will explore, develop, and execute visual solutions to a variety of visual communication challenges. Communication categories include promotional, editorial, enhancive, and narrative. This course will also include analyzing the relationship among media, visual aesthetics, and communication. Students will be required to develop ideas through visual and academic research and demonstrate inventive, creative, and strategic thinking. The use of conventional and digital media will be demonstrated. (Prerequisite: IL203)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Illustration: Composition 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Illustration: Process and Media 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Illustration: Narrative 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Illustration: Special Topics 3 Illustration: Communication 3 Art History Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Arts 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

17


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing

The Painting and Drawing program is an integrated major that provides students the resources to explore the dynamic, eclectic practice of contemporary drawing and painting. Students are exposed to traditional, abstract, objective, and non-objective methods in both disciplines while pursuing technical and conceptual mastery. Painting and Drawing majors learn from professional artists who maintain active studio practices, significant depth of engagement, and passion for the visual arts. Upon graduation, students are prepared to begin their careers as exhibiting artists or continue their education in graduate school.

Painting and Drawing Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing PAINTING AND DRAWING MAJORS PD201 Painting: Methods and Concepts 3.0 PD302 Painting and Drawing: Contemporary Practices 3.0 PA303 Painting and Drawing: Voice and Vision 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Painting and Drawing 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Painting and Drawing 6.0 Two of the following 6.0 DR201 Drawing: Space and Meaning DR202 Drawing: Strategies and Media DR308 Drawing as Inquiry PA202 Painting: Skills and Strategies PA203 Painting: Subject and Structure Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. DR201 Drawing: Space and Meaning (3) This course investigates a variety of approaches to describe and communicate spatial information. Students work from direct observation of landscape, still life, interior space, and the human figure, investigating expressive and narrative possibilities. Complex compositional, spatial, and lighting situations, and multiple figure poses will challenge students’ technical and conceptual drawing abilities. They also explore the implications of the artist’s choice of spatial structures and introduce students to non-Western spatial conventions, as well as mapping, gridding, and patterning. (Prerequisite: FO101) DR202 Drawing: Strategies and Media (3) Students explore a range of strategies and processes and experiment with traditional and contemporary media in solving problems that deal with space, time, narrative, and abstraction. This course supports the student in broadening drawing strategies, taking risks, experimenting with materials and surfaces, expanding subject matter, and thinking critically about content. (Prerequisite: FO101) DR308 Drawing as Inquiry (3) This course places strong and consistent emphasis on research as a basis for the development and sophistication of drawing, both product and process. As implied in the course title, Drawing as Inquiry focuses on drawing as a means of intentional research and investigation in the context of strategy, process, and concept. Varied approaches to drawing are all built around preliminary and substantial research leading to drawing solutions to issues or ideas independently chosen by the student. (Prerequisite: DR202)

ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Issues and Ideas AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design Media 3.0 One of the following 3.0 AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History AH214 History of Photography DR313 Individual Investigations in Drawing (3) AH215 History of Illustration This course allows the student to make a sustained commitment AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World Additional Art History Elective 3.0 to a concept, theme, or issue of his or her choosing through drawing. This course is dependent on individual development, LIBERAL ARTS and it encourages attention to individual needs. “Drawing” in HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 this course is interpreted broadly and could incorporate collage, HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 digital processes, photography, and the use of traditional and One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 non-traditional surfaces and formats. Since much of the course is HU201 Aesthetics self-directed, students are expected to take initiative in their work HU210 Introduction to Philosophy and move beyond comfortable levels of achievement. (Prerequisite: AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture DR202) Additional Liberal Arts NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 PA201 Painting: Methods and Concepts (3) HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 This is an introduction to oil painting. Students will explore LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

18

Catalog Credits

120

perceptually based painting skills through still life, interior space, and the figure and will explore the possibilities for expression


through abstraction. Instruction includes building stretchers and preparing paint surfaces. Students will be directed to artists related to their personal interests as well as contemporary and art historical sources relative to the course assignments. (Prerequisite: FO101) PA202 Painting: Skills and Strategies (3) Students continue to work in oil paint from observation among the figure, still-life, environments, and art historical sources. Instruction includes alla prima painting, under-painting, and glazing techniques. Alternative and non-traditional paint, tools, and surfaces are introduced. In this course, students make personal choices concerning subject, form, and content. (Prerequisite: FO101) PA203 Painting: Subject and Structure (3) This course is a continuation of PA201 with an introduction to personalized imagery, issues, and concerns, reinforced by continued growth of technical skills and conceptual development. This course also focuses on non-traditional aspects of painting display and material use. (Prerequisite: PA202)

PD302 Painting and Drawing: Contemporary Practices (3) This is a team-taught course that prepares the student to better understand issues of content and subject matter in his or her work in conjunction with an exploration of contemporary concepts and practices in painting and drawing. This may include contemporary uses of traditional materials, as well as an introduction to new materials and the use of alternative media and application methods as they apply to the student’s work. Topical seminars are used to discuss current issues in contemporary painting and drawing. Students will do self-directed work while utilizing a multiplicity of viewpoints through lectures, discussions, and critiques. (Prerequisite: PA201) PD303 Painting and Drawing: Voice and Vision (3) This course continues to emphasize personal growth, technical skills, appropriate craft and execution, and conceptual development. Students choose areas of investigation that could include working non-objectively or from source material. Students continue the transition to self-directed work to prepare for Advanced Tutorial in their senior year. (Prerequisites: 1st Year Studio Arts, PA201 and two of the following: DR201, DR202, DR308, PA202, PA303. Exceptional and highly motivated students may petition the Studio Program Chair to enroll in this course.)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Painting: Methods & Concepts 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Painting and Drawing selection 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Painting and Drawing selection 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Painting and Drawing: Voice & Vision 3 Painting and Drawing selection 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 19


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography

The Photography program’s breadth of traditional and innovative processes is unique to the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Students majoring in Photography are introduced to 35mm, digital, medium-and large-format cameras, black and white printing, digital output, color shooting, experimental photography, and digital video. They have opportunities to link photographic theory and practice to other artistic disciplines. The Photography major provides a blend of theoretical and applied instruction that enables students to build careers as commercial photographers, professional artists, photojournalists, and professionals in other disciplines. Many alumni enroll in graduate school or pursue careers in the gallery or museum sectors, communication fields, or fine art photography.

Photography Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing PHOTOGRAPHY MAJOR PH201 Digital Photography 3.0 PH202 Darkroom Photography 3.0 PH301 Medium and Large Format Photography 3.0 PH302 Experimental Photography 3.0 PH303 Color Photography 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 2 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Photography 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Photography 6.0 Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. PH201 Digital Photography (3) This course is an introduction to digital photography. Students will learn fundamental camera operations, basic use of photo manipulation software, image storage, input, output, and image quality. Issues of color, image storage, image compression, resolution, and image quality are covered. Students will be challenged to understand digital photography within the larger context of photography. Students are required to have a digital camera with manual aperture, shutter, and color options. A limited number of school cameras are available for student use. (Prerequisite: FO101) PH202 Darkroom Photography (3) A course in black and white photography that explores the limits and allure of this medium as a means for personal expression. Students will learn darkroom procedures, including developing film and printing photographs. The aesthetics of photography will be studied historically in relation to important trends of the 20th century, including post-modern installation work and current image-making. Students must have their own 35mm single lens reflex camera with adjustable apertures and shutters. A limited number of school cameras are available for student use. (Prerequisite: FO101)

ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Issues and Ideas AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design HIstory: Media 3.0 One of the following 3.0 AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History AH214 History of Photography AH215 History of Illustration PH301 Medium and Large Format Photography (3) AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World Additional Art History Elective 3.0 This course focuses on photography as an expressive art form and the development of critical thinking. The course LIBERAL ARTS will cover technical information on: negative and printing HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 controls, bleaching and toning, medium-format cameras, the LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 4x5 camera, and studio lighting. (Prerequisite: PH202) One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 HU201 Aesthetics HU210 Introduction to Philosophy PH302 Experimental Photography (3) AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture This is a course in experimental photography and mixed Additional Liberal Arts media approaches to photography. Emphasis is placed NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 on the development of a unique vision and portfolio of HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 work. Processes covered may include, but are not limited LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

20

Catalog Credits

120

to: pinhole cameras, matte medium lifts, Liquid Light, and installations. Painterly and sculptural approaches


to photography, and moving images are explored. This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to employ a single experimental method or a combination of experimental approaches in the development of a significant, original body of work. (Prerequisite: PH202) PH303 Color Photography (3) This studio-based course explores the creative use of color in contemporary photography using analog and digital

techniques. The course covers shooting, processing, and scanning color negative film using 35mm, medium, and large-format cameras. The course also covers studio lighting and mixed lighting situations. There is a significant digital component to this course, as students learn to color-manage, color-correct, scan, manipulate, and print digital prints at an advanced level. Emphasis is placed on original creative vision. (Prerequisite: PH202)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Photography: Digital 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Photography: Darkroom 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Photography: Medium & Large Format 3 Photography: Color 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Photography: Experimental 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

21


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Print Media

The Art Academy provides opportunities for Print Media majors and non-majors to explore both traditional and contemporary printmaking techniques, while developing a distinct, creative voice. The Print Media program emphasizes traditional approaches invigorated by new technologies supported by a large, well-equipped facility. Students are introduced to a full range of techniques, including monoprints, relief, lithography, intaglio, screen printing, letterpress, and book arts. Students employ both digital and manual approaches to making prints. Art Academy graduates in Print Media pursue a variety of career paths, including making prints at a cooperative press, working as a master printer in a professional print workshop, opening an independent press, screen printing at a professional design firm, and pursuing a graduate degree.

Print Media Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing PRINT MEDIA MAJOR PR201 Print Media: Etching, Lithography 3.0 Monoprint and Relief PR202 Print Media: Screen Printing 3.0 PR203 Print Media: Applied Processes 3.0 PR302 Print Media: Contemporary Practices 3.0 PR303 Print Media: Concepts 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 2 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Print Media 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Print Media 6.0 Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Print Media Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. PR201 Print Media: Etching, Lithography, Monoprint, and Relief (3) Students create multiples of potentially layered multimedia images with a variety of outcomes. Students will explore painterly monotypes, relief prints, lithographs, and intaglio methods of etching and aquatint. Imagery is developed based on assignments, as well as personal concepts. Basic principles of design and drawing are strengthened and reinforced, supplemented by regional print exhibitions as important learning resources. (Prerequisite: FO101) PR202 Print Media: Screen Printing (3) This course offers an opportunity to pursue personal interests in drawing, design, color, and painting through screen printing. Students investigate unique aspects of printmaking such as layering of color, transparency, and the production of multiples. Choice of subject matter and concept allows students to continue to develop a voice through their work. (Prerequisite: FO101)

PR203 Print Media: Applied Processes (3) ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Students learn to make lithographic images printed from Issues and Ideas stones or plates using photocopy transfers, hand-drawing AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design History: Media 3.0 and digital imagery. Relief prints are developed by cutting One of the following 3.0 AH201 Art of the 20th Century into wood using subtractive techniques and printing with AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History multi-colored layering. Multimedia print approaches are AH214 History of Photography explored, including stamping, letterpress, and alternative AH215 History of Illustration AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World approaches. Development of personal imagery and concepts Additional Art History Elective 3.0 is encouraged. (Prerequisite: PR202) LIBERAL ARTS HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 PR302 Print Media: Contemporary Practices (3) HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 Students will develop images using intaglio techniques on LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 metal and collaged cardboard plates. Solar plates are used One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 HU201 Aesthetics to create digital and photographic imagery. Monoprinting, HU210 Introduction to Philosophy the most experimental and spontaneous print method, will AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture also be explored. Growth of individual ideas and imagery is Additional Liberal Arts NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 encouraged. (Prerequisite: PR202) SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

22

Catalog Credits

120


PR303 Print Media: Concepts (3) Hand-drawn and photographic techniques of screen printing are developed at an advanced level. Emphasis is placed on photomechanical techniques using computerized applications and digital output methods. The course is designed to promote individual expression using the unique qualities of screen printing and large-scale imagery. Guest critics and the Cincinnati Art Museum print collection support the course content. (Prerequisite: PR202)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Print Media Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Print Media: Etching, Lithography, Relief 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Critical Thinking Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Print Media: Screen Printing 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Print Media: Applied Processes 3 Print Media: Concepts 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Print Media: Contemporary Practices 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

23


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture

In today’s world, Sculpture defines a diverse range of objects and practices. The Sculpture program at the Art Academy of Cincinnati provides a strong foundation in traditional and contemporary 3D processes, enabling students to explore the full spectrum of possibilities. With guidance and individual attention from instructors, sculpture majors fuse traditional, contemporary, and emerging strategies into their own art-making process. The sculpture major has many exciting career paths. Many recent Art Academy graduates in Sculpture exhibit their art and speak about their work on the local, regional, and national levels. Many Art Academy Sculpture majors have completed graduate degrees in top programs and have landed teaching positions. Many others work for prominent designers, foundries, fabricators, display firms, and interior design firms.

Sculpture Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing SCULPTURE MAJOR SC201 Sculpture: Form and Space 3.0 SC202 Sculpture: Construction 3.0 SC203 Sculpture: Nature and Kinetics 3.0 SC302 Sculpture: Installation 3.0 SC303 Sculpture: Contemporary Practices 3.0 SA482 Senior Seminar 2 3.0 SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1: Sculpture 6.0 SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2: Sculpture 6.0 Studio Electives 24.0 One of the following: Digital Experience 3.0 CA201 Introduction to Animation CA202 Animation: Maya DA303 Web Design FA201 Film, Video, and Audio: Intermediate (Field) Production FA202 Film, Video, and Audio: Advanced (Studio) Production FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: Experimental and New Media FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics, Authoring & Special FX FA303 Film, Video, and Audio: Making and Marketing the Indie Film FO123 Digital Drawing PH201 Digital Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for SA491 Advanced Tutorial 1, SA492 Advanced Tutorial 2, and SA482 Senior Seminar 2 are located in the Studio Course Descriptions portion of the catalog. SC201 Sculpture: Form and Space (3) This course is an introduction to mold making, and casting processes. Assignments focus on 3D material substitution using traditional and contemporary materials and techniques. Throughout the course students will produce original 3D designs, select an appropriate mold material, then produce the object in multiples using compatible materials. Materials explored include: Silicone rubber, urethane rubber, latex, plaster, Hydro-Stone, wax, and clay slip. Through independent research and class field trips, students will learn how contemporary artists and designers employ casting principles and techniques. (Prerequisite: FO101) SC202 Sculpture: 3D Construction (3) This course offers an introduction to understanding 3D structure through various planar and linear constructions, using different media and technical methods. The concept of a working model is introduced. An introduction to welding steel provides the means for skeletal, volumetric, and planar works, both representational and abstract. Mixed-media construction projects with other materials, including fibers and fabric, will focus on methods for sourcing materials for facsimile replication and appropriate assemblage techniques. The course also introduces selecting and manipulating found objects for a potential kinetic sculptural end. (Prerequisite: FO101)

ART HISTORY AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: 3.0 Issues and Ideas AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design History: Media 3.0 One of the following 3.0 AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History AH214 History of Photography AH215 History of Illustration AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World Additional Art History Elective 3.0 SC203 Sculpture: Nature and Kinetics (3) This rigorous studio experience challenges students to select LIBERAL ARTS media and processes appropriate to the development of their HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 individual vision/voice. Students will engage in a variety of LA481 Senior Seminar 1 3.0 material investigations through research and manipulation. One of the following: Critical Thinking Experience 3.0 Natural processes, kinetics, light, and sound are presented HU201 Aesthetics HU210 Introduction to Philosophy as sculptural elements. A study of contemporary sculptural AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture practices supports the studio experience. (Prerequisite: Additional Liberal Arts SC202) NS100 Natural Science Elective 3.0 SS100 Social Science Elective 3.0 HU100 Humanities Elective 3.0 LA100 Liberal Arts Electives 12.0

24

Catalog Credits

120


SC302 Sculpture: Installation (3) This studio course focuses on open forms, arrangement of elements in space, interaction with an audience, and issues of context. Students may create immersive environments, intervene in public settings, and/or invite participation. Concepts of the public, privacy, boundaries, scale, and place are addressed. A study of contemporary 3D practices supports the studio experience. (Prerequisite: SC202)

SC304 Sculpture: Contemporary Practices (3) This course is divided into three distinct units, each covering a relevant contemporary topic in sculpture. Each unit is taught by a guest artist with professional expertise in the defined topic area. Students are challenged to use their developing vision and voice to address topics at the forefront of contemporary sculptural discourse. Topic areas and guest artists change each semester that the course is offered. (Prerequisite: SC202)

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Sculpture: Form and Space 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Critical Thinking Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Sculpture: Construction 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Third Year Fall Semester Sculpture: Nature and Kinetics 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Sculpture: Installation 3 Sculpture: Contemporary Practices 3 Studio Elective 3 Art History Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Fourth Year Fall Semester Advanced Tutorial 1 6 Senior Seminar 1 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Advanced Tutorial 2 6 Senior Seminar 2 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

25


Associate of Science in Graphic Design

The Art Academy of Cincinnati grants an Associate of Science in Graphic Design. This two-year program provides students with a combination of Liberal Arts and Studio courses to become confident in the practice of graphic design. Acceptance into the program involves the same requirements as the BFA. Students have the opportunity to continue seamlessly beyond the Associate of Science in Graphic Design into the BFA in Design (two additional years) to further their design foundation and competitive advantage in the field. This degree is ideal for students who hold a bachelor’s degree or have studied in related fields such as marketing, psychology, humanities, business, or natural sciences. During the two-year period, students working toward the A.S. in Graphic Design study in the same classes with our students in the BFA program. Graphic Design Curriculum

STUDIO ARTS FO101 Studio Arts 1: Core 6.0 FO102 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3.0 FO103 Studio Arts 3: Color 3.0 Two of the Following 6.0 FO121 Analytical Drawing FO122 Observational Drawing FO123 Digital Drawing CA211 Letterpress 3.0

Design

DS201 Typographic Design DS202 Communication Design Studio Electives

3.0 3.0 9.0

Academics AH105 AH110 AH202 HU101 HU102 HU201 LA100 LA101

20th & 21st Century Art & Design 3.0 History: Issues and Ideas 20th & 21st Century Art & Design 3.0 History: Media 20th & 21st Century Design History 3.0 Artist as Writer Workshop 3.0 Artist as Reader Workshop 3.0 Liberal Arts or 3.0 Critical Thinking Elective Liberal Arts Elective 3.0 Liberal Arts Elective 3.0

Catalog Credits

Associate of Science in Graphic Design Sample Schedule First Year Fall Semester Studio Arts 1: Core 6 Drawing 3 Artist as Writer Workshop 3 Art History 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Drawing 3 Studio Arts 2: Creative Processes 3 Studio Arts 3: Color 3 Art History 3 Artist as Reader Workshop 3 Total 15

Second Year Fall Semester Typographic Design 3 Studio Elective 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts or Critical Thinking Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Total 15

Spring Semester Communication Design 3 Letterpress Design 3 Studio Elective 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Art History 3 Total 15

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

26

60.0


Master of Arts in Art Education (MAAE)

The Art Academy of Cincinnati offers a Master of Arts in Art Education degree that is unique among graduatelevel art programs because of its strong emphasis on studio achievement. The MAAE integrates studio courses with seminars in educational theories, current practices in curriculum and assessment. Each candidate must have a final thesis exhibition as a graduation requirement. For course listings and program information, see the MAAE Catalog.

Minors and Double Majors

Students who wish to combine any two studio majors (Design, Illustration, Painting and Drawing, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture), will complete 120 hours for the first major, 15 semester studio credits in the second major, plus take 18 additional credits in Advanced Tutorial 1 and 2 and Senior Seminar 1 and 2 for the second major. A minimum of 138 hours is required. A double major requires additional study beyond four years. Minor in Art History AH105 20th & 21st Century Art & Design History: Issues and Ideas AH110 20th & 21st Cent. Art & Design History: Media AH110 Approaches to Art History Art History Elective One of the following AH201 Art of the 20th Century AH202 20th and 21st Century Design History AH214 History of Photography AH215 History of Illustration AH301 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World Minor in Creative Writing HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop HU213 Creative Writing: Multi-Genre HUxxx 300/400 level Writing/ Literature Elective One of the following HU211 Creative Writing: Poetry HU212 Creative Writing: Short Story HU313 Advanced Creative Writing TBA Advanced Essay Writing Minor in Design DS201 Typographic Design DS202 Communication Design DS301 Integration Design DS302 Systems Design DS303 Experience Design Minor in Drawing DR201 Drawing: Space & Meaning DR202 Drawing: Strategies and Media DR301 Drawing: Contemporary Practices DR308 Drawing as Inquiry DR313 Individual Investigations in Drawing Minor in Film, Video and Audio FA201 Film, Video & Audio: Field Production FA202 Film, Video & Audio: Advanced Studio Producton FA301 Film, Video & Audio: Experimental Media FA302 Film, Video & Audio: Motion Graphics FA303 Film, Video & Audio: Indie Film

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

15.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

15.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Minor in Illustration IL201 Illustration: Composition IL203 Illustration: Process and Media IL302 Illustration: Narrative IL303 Illustration: Special Topics IL304 Illustration: Communication

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0

Minor in Painting *Choose five of the following PA201 Painting: Methods & Concepts 3.0 PA202 Painting: Skills and Strategies 3.0 PA203 Painting: Subject and Structure 3.0 PA204 Painting: Materials and Techniques 3.0 PA303 Painting: Voice and Vision 3.0 PA304 Painting: Contemporary Practices 3.0 15.0 Minor in Photography PH201 Digital Photography 3.0 PH202 Darkroom Photography 3.0 PH301 Medium and Large Format Photography 3.0 PH302 Experimental Photography 3.0 PH303 Color Photography 3.0 15.0 Minor in Print Media *Choose five of the following CA211 Letterpress 3.0 FA312 Artist Books 3.0 PR201 Print Media: Litho Relief/Etching 3.0 PR202 Print Media: Screen Printing 3.0 PR203 Print Media: Applied Processes 3.0 PR303 Print Media: Concepts 3.0 PR304 Print Media: Contemporary Practices 3.0 15.0 Minor in Sculpture *Choose five of the following SC201 Sculpture: Form and Space 3.0 SC202 Sculpture: Construction 3.0 SC203 Sculpture: Nature and Kinetics 3.0 SC302 Sculpture: Installation 3.0 SC303 Sculpture: Figure 3.0 SC304 Sculpture: Contemporary Practices 3.0 15.0

Please note: Availability of minors is subject to course availability, course schedules and the student’s choice of major. The AAC does not guarantee that all minors will be available to all students.

3.0 3.0 15.0

27


Additional Studio Art Course Descriptions CA201 Introduction to Animation (3)

This course explores the introductory use of a variety of moving picture media including but not limited to flip books, simple flash animation, stop motion, After Effects and other CS software. Students can take this course as a studio elective. Students will produce short motion graphic sequences and vignettes. (Prerequisite: 1st Year Studio Program) CA202 Animation: Maya (3)

Students learn the mechanics of sequential storytelling, and apply them to storyboards, character development and design, short animated sequences and motion graphics. Students use traditional and digital media to create their images and learn digital editing techniques and processes. (Prerequisite: CA201) CA211 Letterpress Design (3)

This course explores technical processes, visual aesthetics and design strategies in letterpress printing through individual printing and publishing projects, as well as a final collaborative project. Students acquire a working knowledge of letterpress operation and design as a historic perspective on printing and as a supplement to their knowledge of offset and digital printing technologies. DA303 Web Design (3)

This course explores various interactive digital media venues including interactive art, computer-based training, instructional design methodologies and, Internet and intranet. Students will learn the art of utilizing multimedia and mixed-media approaches to creating dynamic interactive digital art and design. Students will be encouraged to incorporate ideas and media from photography, printmaking, 3D, and drawing. Assignments may include imagery that is projected, viewed on a monitor, comprised of cell phone graphics, or completed using output media such as CD, DVD, and television. Software may include Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, Strata CX, and other previously presented software. (Prerequisite: Junior Status. Recommended Prerequisites: DS201, DS202, DS301) DR301 Drawing: Contemporary Practices (3)

In the process of encouraging more freedom, responsibility, and personal decision-making in each student, this course introduces students to concepts, roles, processes, and practices that characterize contemporary drawing. Through research and 28

individual practice, the student gains an understanding of the place and value of drawing in contemporary art and in their own art-making. (Prerequisite: DR202) DR302 Figuration (3)

This course allows the student to explore the figure from a variety of points of view and for a variety of purposes, including formal, descriptive, portrait, expressive, social, cultural, iconic, metaphorical, symbolic, and narrative. There is attention to both traditional and contemporary approaches to meet individual student needs. (Prerequisite: DR202 or permission of the instructor) DR305 Perceptual Drawing (3)

Students develop artwork through observation and visual consideration using a combination of varied materials, color, and perceptual manipulation. The course investigates representational methods of drawing, as well as inventive ways of creating line, shape, texture, and space. Students are encouraged to explore the emotional possibilities of representation and to bring their own concerns and issues to the process of drawing. (Prerequisite: DR202 or permission of the instructor) DR306 Intermediate Drawing: Color and Figure (3)

A goal of this course is for students to learn to draw expressively from the figure. Work consists of representational drawings of the figure in space, as a compositional design element, and as an expressive agent. Color is explored as a means of enhancing form, light, and space. A survey of artists’ approaches to the human figure accompanies the studio work. (Prerequisite: DR202 or permission of the instructor) DR307 Intermediate Drawing: Experimental Drawing (3)

In this course, students are encouraged by the instructor and the working atmosphere to take substantial risks in their drawing. Students experiment with materials, media, format, approach, and subject matter. While the work is largely student-directed, the instructor supports and guides the student in the form, direction, and nature of the experimentation. Students are introduced to a wide range of investigations and expressions happening in contemporary drawing. (Prerequisite: DR202)


DR309 Intermediate: Drawing Collage (3)

Students will be exposed to a variety of collage techniques – both historical and contemporary. Collage will be utilized as a tool for drawing, as well as a means of juxtaposing images to create content. (Prerequisite: DR202 or permission of the instructor) DR310 Intermediate: Quantity, Scale, Surface in Drawing (3)

This course will explore varied approaches to quantity, scale, and surface choices and the implications of these and other formal decisions on content and conceptual ideas. Projects will include monumental drawing, minumental drawing, varied formats, and working in multiples. Media, subject, and content are student-driven with certain parameters provided by the instructor to encourage risk-taking and growth in the student’s chosen direction. (Prerequisite: DR202) FA201: Film, Video, and Audio: Field Production (3)

This course will explore the multiple uses in all types of film-making of “Field Recording,” a technique that is essential to the controlled capture of live, on-location video and audio that is accomplished with a variety of professional and portable equipment. Students will apply this understanding to two completed short-form film projects from a genre of their choice following the three-step pre-production, production, and postproduction process. Students will learn a variety of software applications and will develop skills on a variety of equipment platforms. In addition, students will view several feature films, and then engage in critical thinking beyond the classroom by deconstructing these films. Software Taught: Adobe Premiere Pro (Video Editing, FX and Mastering), Audition (Audio Sequencing, FX and Mastering) After Effects (Motion Graphics). (Prerequisite: FO101, or permission of instructor) FA202: Film, Video, and Audio: Studio Production (3)

Students will be introduced to studio production, utilizing an on-site “black-box” and/or “soundstage” room that can be isolated for sound, lighting, background, and special FX such as Green Screen. In this context, “painting with light” becomes an essential skill, involving the use of directional lighting sources to achieve mood and effect. Students will explore indepth pre-production and post-production processes, basic set construction, makeup, and prosthetics. Recording dialogue, monologue, narration, and the use of “Foley” sound will also be taught. Students will learn a variety of software applications and will

develop skills on a variety of equipment platforms. In addition, students will view several feature films, and then engage in critical thinking beyond the classroom by deconstructing these films. Software Taught: Adobe Premiere Pro (Video Editing, FX and Mastering), Audition (Audio Sequencing, FX and Mastering) and After Effects (Motion Graphics). (Prerequisite: FA201 or permission of instructor) FA301 Film, Video, and Audio: New Media (3)

Students will explore the relationship between traditional filmmaking and New Media Art. Emphasis is placed on a strong grounding in the “Language of Film” and a basic technical knowledge of Digital Video Production. This course is geared towards the exploration of these skills in the context of a wide variety of New Media Arts: Performance, Video, Sound, Intermedia, Interactive, and Internet Art. The course covers specific collaborative uses not only in the gallery space but also in “video jockeying” for live music, theater, and dance. Special attention will be given to deconstructing the aesthetics and techniques of New Media Artists who have successfully crossed over into Feature Film, Performance Arts, and Music Video Direction. The entire Adobe Creative Suite will likely be utilized during the course of this class, with a particular emphasis on Adobe Premiere, Audition, and After Effects. (Prerequisites: FA201, FA202 or permission of instructor) FA302 Film, Video, and Audio: Motion Graphics (3)

Students will learn the use of Motion Graphics along with Special Audio and Visual Effects as a vital skill set used across a variety of industries. Cutting-edge software will help provide a professional finish to any video students wish to commit to a final mastered form. Animating raster and vector designs, titling, tracking, layer compositing and advanced visual and audio correction will be covered as students re-master and upgrade previous projects, as well as create a single new project of their choosing. Software Taught: Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, Audition, Media Encoder, and Encore. (Prerequisites: FA201, FA202 or permission of instructor) FA303: Film, Video, and Audio: Indie Films (3)

Students will carry a single project of their choice to fruition from storyboard to relevant mastered output and packaging (DVD, Poster, Website. etc.), taking into consideration all the demands of the marketplace beyond the classroom including legal releases, copyright infractions, production budgets, and raising funds through crowd-sourcing websites, grants, and private donors. Students will learn a variety of software 29


applications and will develop skills on a variety of equipment platforms. In addition, students will view and deconstruct various independent and awardwinning short film examples. Software Taught: Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, Audition, Media Encode, and Encore. (Prerequisites: FA201, FA202 or permission of instructor) FA312 Artist Books (3)

This course includes a study of book forms and basic bookbinding approaches through demonstration, research, and investigation of contemporary artists’ books. Students explore the relationship between text and image and book design using letterpress, digital output, xerography, photography, and additional print and drawing media. In addition, the course covers experimentation with altered and deconstructed books. Students will work from a technical base to create books, one-of-a kind works and limited editions, which reflect personal subject matter, and exploration of contemporary and historical directions in artists’ books. Classes will consist of demonstrations, discussions, book projects, studio time, in-progress and group critiques, field trips, and/or visiting artists. (Prerequisite: 1st-Year Studio Art) FO101 Studio Art 1: Core (6)

This course introduces fundamentals of art and design appropriate to all studio majors at the Art Academy (Design, Illustration, Painting and Drawing, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture) through a sequence of interrelated assignments and visual thinking exercises involving two and three-dimensional design and some drawing. Students develop their ability to manipulate and organize ideas to communicate, solve problems, and express themselves through concepts, materials, techniques, tools and vocabulary, a visual language common to all studio areas. Important technical components include safe use of hand and power tools in the woodshop. Stress on self-discipline, risk-taking, and craftsmanship help develop the student’s positive self-image and facility with media in relation to the visual arts. FO102 Studio Art 2: Creative Processes (3)

30

This studio course introduces students to visual thinking strategies and methods that assist in creating works of art and design. The focus is on managing visual problems in order to develop a personal creative process. Methods such as the Five-Minute Think, idea sketching, identifying blocks and aids to creativity, brainstorming, lateral thinking, and the Seven Stage Creative Process help students to approach any problem regardless of subject matter, concept, or medium with greater confidence.

FO103 Studio Art 3: Color (3)

Color perception is relevant to all students of art and design, and it has broader implications in visual culture. This course examines both theoretical and practical applications of color through investigations using a variety of media, including but not limited to, paint media, photography, sculpture, and digital imaging. Projects include research from art historical and contemporary visual practice and will support students’ understanding of the use of color in their work and their sensitivity to the use of color. This course is a prerequisite for all Second-Year studio courses. FO121 Analytical Drawing (3)

This course is an introductory drawing experience for all BFA students. It takes the student through a variety of challenges in observational drawing using line and value. It includes the study of geometric simplification, one and two-point measured, freehand perspective, and techniques necessary to develop an illusion of form, light, and space. FO122 Observational Drawing (3)

Focus is on observational, descriptive, and formal aspects of objective drawing. The course focuses on the human skeleton, muscles, and figure. While the course continues the development of perceptual awareness and of objective and analytical drawing abilities, it gives the student a full semester to study the human figure in terms of basic proportions and anatomy. Working with the figure in an environment, students gain knowledge of interior structure to create integrated and unified form. Other course content includes foreshortening, freehand perspective, selecting spatial indicators, light, shadow, surface qualities and composition, using both wet and dry media. FO123 Digital Drawing

This course involves drawing with digital tablets, drawing in Illustrator, scanning hand drawings to finish digitally, and Google Sketch-up. Other drawing-based software may be introduced. Content includes a range of subjects including landscape, portrait, human figure, animals, perspective interiors, and objects. Observation, analysis, and drawing from imagination are also explored. PA204 Materials and Techniques (3)

This course introduces the student to the traditional media of metalpoint, egg tempera, encaustic, and buon fresco. History of each medium is covered, and the origins of color pigments are introduced in the beginning, as these are the same dry pigments used throughout the course. Once each medium is introduced and practiced, the class is introduced to


contemporary uses of media by visits to the Cincinnati Art Museum, reproductions, and student research and, possibly by visiting artists. (Prerequisite: 1st-Year Studio Art) PC406 Internship (3)

Internships are Pass/Fail and are designed to provide an educationally purposeful, professional experience. The goal is to have students explore opportunities that offer meaningful experiential learning in which current skills can be strengthened while new skills are attained. Students may also explore fields outside their areas of study in order to gain supplemental experience. Students are encouraged to seek opportunities that enhance their personal understanding of the type of work they may pursue. (Prerequisite: 39 studio credits)

print approaches are explored, including stamping, letterpress, and alternative approaches. This course encourages growth of personal imagery and concepts. Students participate in group study of prints in area museums and local print exhibitions. SA210/310 Open Studio/Advanced Open Studio (3)

Students work toward self-defined goals by engaging in studio activity that is not limited to their major course of study. Students will engage in an active process that includes research, media exploration, discussions, field trips, and class critiques. Students will establish a schedule of studio visits and discussions with the instructor and scheduled guests. SA482 Senior Seminar 2 (3)

This course emphasizes personal growth, technical skills, appropriate craft and execution, and concept development. Limited parameters encourage students to choose areas of investigation that address individual process and content. Students create work and do writing and research to prepare for the senior thesis experience. (Prerequisite: PA202)

Required of all seniors, Senior Seminar 2 is a teamtaught, multi-purpose course that connects a student’s undergraduate experience to his or her life beyond the Art Academy as a graduate student and/or as a practicing professional. The course is designed to initiate students in both conceptual and practical aspects of articulating a life as a practicing professional and an investigation, discussion, and evaluation of what it means to live and work as an artist/designer in the 21st century. In the process, students will explore the concepts, theories, influences, and experiences that inform and support the work they present for review in their senior thesis exhibition. Additionally, the course may cover such topics as establishing a professional presence in the community, the business of art, professional presentations, building a resume, and portfolio development, etc. (Prerequisite: LA481)

PA304 Painting: Contemporary Practices (3)

SA491/492 Advanced Tutorial (6)

PA301 Painting 3: Subject and Structure (3)

This course is a continuation of (PA202) Painting: Skills and Strategies with an introduction to personalized imagery, issues, and concerns, reinforced by continued growth of technical skills, and conceptual development. This course also focuses on non-traditional aspects of painting display and use of materials. PA303 Painting: Voice and Vision (3)

This is a team-taught course that prepares the student to better understand issues of content and subject matter in his or her work in conjunction with an exploration of contemporary concepts and practices in painting. This may include contemporary uses of traditional materials, as well as an introduction to new materials and the use of additional media, including new media, as they apply to the student’s own painting. Topical seminars are used to discuss current issues in contemporary painting. Students will do self-directed work while utilizing a multiplicity of viewpoints through lectures, discussions, and critiques. (Prerequisite: PA202) PR301 Print Media: Litho and Relief Prints (3)

Students learn to make lithographic images printed from stones or plates using photocopy transfers, handdrawing and digital imagery. Relief prints are developed by cutting into wood using subtractive techniques and printing with multi-colored layering. Multimedia

Advanced Tutorial 1 and Advanced Tutorial 2 meet four times per week and cover advanced-level coursework for each major area of study. As a team-taught course, Advanced Tutorial presents an opportunity for greater discussion across all disciplines, increasing a sense of community as a positive learning environment, blurring traditional territories, and opening possibilities in specific media and multi-disciplinary activity. This experience prepares students for the collaborative life as practicing professionals in the fields of art and design. In the spring semester students will complete their visual thesis in this course. (Prerequisites: 15 credits in the major discipline) SC204 Figure Sculpture (3)

Students in this course explore principles of threedimensional form through a study of the human figure. Students may work in terra cotta, a clay to be fired, plaster casting in Hydro-Stone, fiberglass, and plastics 31


or through other additive and subtractive construction techniques using wood, steel, direct plaster, or a variety of other materials. (Prerequisite: SC201) SC301 Sculpture: Movement: Nature and Kinetics (3)

This rigorous studio experience challenges students to select media and processes appropriate to the development of their individual voice and vision. Students will engage in a variety of material investigations through research and manipulation. Natural processes, kinetics, light, and sound are presented as sculptural elements. A study of contemporary sculptural practices supports the studio experience.

AH201 Art of the 20th and 21st Centuries (3)

The sources and influences of the major artists, styles, and movements of this period are closely examined. Emphasis is on discussion of pioneering attitudes, theories, and concepts of Modern and Postmodern artists. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)

SC403 Advanced Figure Sculpture (3)

AH202 20th Century Design History (3)

Liberal Arts Course Descriptions

AH211 Introduction to Visual Culture (3)

Individual investigation of sculpture elements, problems and media is encouraged for advanced sculpture students. This course is designed to allow individual growth in the student’s primary area of interest and to increase knowledge, skill and self-awareness. The welding studio and woodshop may accommodate sculpture majors who wish to produce large works. (Prerequisite: SC303)

Art History: AH Cross-Disciplinary: CR Humanities: HU Liberal Arts: LA Natural Science: NS Social Science: SS

AH105 20th and 21st Century Art and Design History: Issues and Ideas (3)

This course explores the wild and sometimes difficult plethora of issues and ideas employed (and deployed!) by artists and designers in the 20th and 21st centuries. Race, class, gender, sexuality, and socio-political trends and upheaval are some of the concepts and themes to be investigated. Class lectures and discussions establish connections between modern and contemporary art and design, while contextualizing them in terms of artwork created prior to the 20th century. (Required for freshmen) AH110 20th and 21st Century Art and Design History: Media (3)

This course surveys the exciting developments in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media in the 20th and 21st centuries, including developments in drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, film, video, sculpture, and installation. Emphasis is placed 32

on the investigation by artists and designers of the interrelationships between media and process, the development of new media, and the rejection of the past. Special attention is paid to the visual elements, including concerns with time and space as elements of art and design during these periods. (Required for freshmen)

This course surveys 20th and 21st Century design, including industrial design, decorative arts, architecture, typography, illustration, and fashion design. Students consider major designers, styles, trends, and historical influences, as well as the relationship between fine art and design. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)

This course explores the concepts and techniques of visual literacy and culture. Students will examine the full spectrum of man-made visual forms encountered by contemporary Americans and learn how to think critically about various aspects of our visual environment from architectural complexes to individual buildings, from graphic novels and cartoons to films and works of art, from still photos to streaming video. Although the main focus of the course is contemporary American visual culture, we will explore other cultures and other time periods considering the subtle and not so subtle effects of globalization on our lives, beliefs, and consuming and viewing habits. The class will consist of lectures, discussions, and guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to watch selected films throughout the semester via streaming services such as Netflix. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH214 History of Photography (3)

This course examines the history of photography in Europe and America, roughly from its inception in 1839 to the present day. From Louis Daguerre to Andreas Gursky, this course analyzes images, looking at aesthetic, technical, historical, and social issues with an emphasis on the role photography plays in shaping ideology and informing popular thought. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)


AH215 History of Illustration (3)

This course surveys the history of Illustration from its roots in Egyptian hieroglyphs and illuminated manuscripts up to the present, with a focus on modern and contemporary illustration. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH300 Artistic Practice in the Contemporary World (3)

This course considers how a global, technological, multicultural and politically and economically unstable world impacts serious art in the contemporary world. It looks at artistic strategies, materials, forms, activist stances, and new media in the face of the world as it is. The course will center upon lectures, class discussion, research, and field trips. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH302 Approaches to Art History (3)

The focus of this course is on the approaches and methodologies used in the discipline of art history. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of scholarly writings that reflect various perspectives in the history of art with particular emphasis on contemporary trends. The current state of the discipline and the new art history will be explored. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH303 Museum Studies (3)

This course presents an introduction to the history, functions, and purposes of art museums in the United States and Europe. The variety of types, missions, and structures of museums, along with contemporary issues in museum studies are covered. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH305 Art Criticism (3)

Art critic Clement Greenberg once stated, “You like it, that’s all, whether it’s a landscape or abstract. You like it. It hits you.” But just what is it about that landscape or abstraction that makes you “like” it? Art criticism is the process of describing, analyzing, interpreting, and judging a work of art. Students will discover (and respond to) multiple definitions of art. They will develop skills to describe, analyze, interpret, and judge a diverse array of art, through both written and oral expression. This course is designed to enable students to recognize different critical perspectives, evaluate the multiple factors that affect interpretation, and develop articulated and justified arguments about what they like, or do not like, and why. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)

AH316 History of African American Art (3)

This multi-part history of African American art surveys recent critical dialogues and philosophies of visual art and culture unique to the diasporic black community. The course also addresses: issues and evolution of black art aesthetics, the “souls of black folks,” the “new Negro” art in the Harlem Renaissance, the evolution from “new Negro to new deal,” and the search for freedom. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH317 Women in the Arts (3)

This course explores the work of women in the visual and literary arts (with occasional digressions into performance and music), as well as representations of women throughout history; emphasis will be placed on the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Specific discussion will include: historical factors regarding women’s works, whether or not there is a “female language,” how determinations of value and judgment take place, how women have participated in social and cultural change through their art, as well as acquaintance with numerous female artists and writers, and their works. While lecture will be a component of Women in the Arts, this course is designed to be participatory, with most of the time dedicated to classroom discussion. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) AH318 Experimental Music: A History of Sonic Discourse (3)

This course surveys current and historical trends in experimental music: music that asks questions. Through listening to a wide variety of types of music (including early electronic music, free jazz, Krautrock and glitch), students will develop an understanding of how musicians and artists can communicate through sound. Building on this historical framework, students will also be introduced to a variety of practical and hands-on approaches for incorporating sound into their artistic practices. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) CR310 Word/Image (3)

This team-taught, cross-disciplinary course investigates the correlation between language and visual art. Students employ and deploy a variety of writing and visual art strategies to explore in some depth a topic of substance of their own choice. (Prerequisite: 3rd-year student or permission of the instructor) CR311 Science/Religion Dialogue (3)

This survey of the historical and cultural interactions of science and religion prepares students to explore the dialogue between science and religion in the 21st century. In this context, students discuss and investigate 33


topics such as evolution, the Big Bang, the existence of God, and meaning and purpose through written, oral, and visual projects. (Prerequisite: 3rd-year student or permission of the instructor) CR312 Design and Nature (3)

This course investigates concepts such as systems, structure, function, pattern, and symmetry in nature as sources and resources for visual ideas and problemsolving. (Prerequisite: 3rd year student or permission of the instructor) CR313 Creativity and Criticism (3)

Through learning by doing, this course examines the mutual dependence of art-making and art criticism. Criticism will be investigated as a tool to understand art, stimulate the creative process, and provide a framework for making judgments. Students will explore viewing and criticizing art as creative acts parallel to making art. Students also learn to incorporate criticism as a feedback mechanism in the creative process, investigate the special promise of the artist as critic, and tackle the question of: Who is the audience of artist and critic? (Prerequisite: 3rd year student or permission of the instructor) CR314 Art Design and Social Practice (3)

Students explore creative solutions that promote and affect social engagement, social interaction, and community building within a range of social challenges. The course blends instructor presentations, class discussions, and creative practice while guiding students, or teams of students, through projects that address community needs. An overview of post-studio strategies for contemporary artists and designers will be exchanged. Meeting sessions focus on strategic planning, seminar topics, discussions and reporting. (Prerequisite: 3rd year student or permission of the instructor) HU101 Artist as Writer Workshop (3)

This course is designed to assist the developing visual artist through four major areas of writing pertinent to the field: 1) thinking and writing about art; 2) journaling; 3) argument and persuasion; and 4) selfanalysis and promotion. The rules of grammar and style are reviewed. HU102 Artist as Reader Workshop (3)

Students will read a variety of literary forms (short stories, poetry, plays, or a novel) as well as critical essays that reflect widely diverse cultures and time periods. During the process of this study, students will present an oral report, write reading response papers, and 34

review the MLA form of documentation in preparation for writing a research paper. HU201 Aesthetics (3)

Key philosophical questions regarding the nature and creation of art are examined. The views of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Tolstoy, Bell, Brecht, Lippard, Saito, Weitz, and others are explored. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) HU210 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

A survey of Western philosophical tradition provides a foundation for critical thinking and for personal engagement with important philosophical issues and everyday problems in living. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) HU211 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)

Fundamentals of poetry are presented. By writing their own poems and discussing others’ work, students develop the ability to express aesthetic ideas through written and spoken exercises. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) HU212 Creative Writing: Short Stories (3)

Fundamentals of the short story are presented. By writing their own stories and discussing others’ work, students develop the ability to express aesthetic ideas through written and spoken exercises. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) HU213 Creative Writing: Multi-Genre (Fiction, Poetry and Drama) (3)

Students will learn the fundamentals of writing in several genres in a workshop format. By reading and discussing established writers’ work, as well as writing by their peers, students will form their own aesthetic for creating in a variety of literary genres. It is suggested that three genres be chosen from the following: poetry, short stories, drama, screenplays, and creative nonfiction. Genres covered may vary based on the expertise of the instructor. A portfolio of writing created throughout the semester and the performance of a public reading are requirements for completion of the course. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) HU214 Mythology (3)

By considering the structure and function of myths from a range of cultures, this course explores the relevance of myth in life, society, the arts, and the role of myth in telling us where and how to find meaning in the world. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) HU217 Art of Film (3)


This introduction to the art of film from the photographic advances of the 19th century to American silent films, the Russian theory of montage, German films of the ‘20s and ‘30s, the influence of Hollywood, Italian and British New Realism of the ‘40s and ‘50s and French New Wave, culminates in contemporary international filmmaking. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) HU218 Fundamentals of Dance (3)

Students are introduced to the many facets of the art of modern dance. Technique, composition, improvisation, and dance history are explored, culminating in a final performance by the students. HU301 The Personal is Political (3)

The phrase “The Personal is Political” originated in Notes from the Second Year: Women’s Liberation in 1970. In this course, we will look at texts by a variety of contemporary authors who explore the intersection between one’s personal, everyday life and larger social and political issues of race, class, gender, the environment, and other issues. Some questions this course considers include: how do larger social and political issues impact our personal lives? How does (or how can) writing about the self create political change or empowerment? We will look at texts from the Women’s Movement and the Black Arts Movement, providing springboards for thinking about what it means to write about the larger world as we write about ourselves. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102,) HU315 Dueling Literary Avant-Gardes (3)

This course traces the roots and reverberations of two avant-garde movements in terms of their literary output. Emphasis is placed on comparing and contrasting the two movements against the backdrop of their historical and cultural moment(s). The avantgarde movements to be covered will vary with the expertise of the instructor. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) HU316 African American Studies in Literature, Music, and Art: 1965 to Present (3)

This course focuses on African American avant-garde jazz and literature, as well as art from the Black Arts Movement (1965-1974) to the present. (Prerequisite: junior status or permission of the instructor) HU317 GIANT Books (3)

of the epic as an artistic form of genesis, inclusion, and accumulation – one that makes and remakes the world, not only in our own image, but also in terms of transformation, exploration, and adventure. The course also seeks to compare and contrast the GIANT works discussed, while distilling common themes and modalities, images, strategies and parameters, pointing the way toward further creative and speculative writing/ art-making. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) HU321 Love (3)

This course explores the concept of love from a variety of perspectives – mythological, emotional, psychological, physical, cultural, and spiritual. A range of voices in literature, visual art, film, psychology, human development, music, dance, philosophy, and spirituality are considered. Some of these are selected by the instructor, but many are selected by the students. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) LA481 Senior Seminar 1 (3)

Required of all seniors, Senior Seminar 1 is a teamtaught, multi-purpose course that connects a student’s undergraduate experience to his or her life beyond the Art Academy as a graduate student and/or as a practicing professional. The course is designed to initiate students in both conceptual and practical aspects of articulating a life as a practicing professional. The course is not only a guided tour through the process of developing and writing the senior thesis, but also an investigation, discussion, and evaluation of what it means to live and work as an artist/designer in the 21st century. In the process, students will explore the concepts, theories, influences, and experiences that inform and support the work they present for review in their senior thesis exhibition. Additionally, the course may cover such topics as: goal-setting, the business of art, professional presentations, building a resume, and portfolio development, etc. (Prerequisite: Senior Standing) NS211 Topics in Geometry (3)

Students learn to see mathematics as a creative activity, a language, and a mode of thought, while gaining additional skills in mathematical reasoning and problem-solving. The course investigates geometry through the study of selected concepts from Euclidean, non-Euclidean and projective geometries, topology, and fractals. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102)

In this literature course, students read and discuss, as well as write and make art about, GIANT books. Emphasis is placed on exploring the Western tradition 35


NS213 Topics in Biology (3)

This is an introduction to current topics in biology. This course covers topics in cell physiology, anatomy and physiology, genetics, DNA, evolution, behavior, populations, and ecology. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS216 Astronomy (3)

Students investigate how fundamental principles of physics allow us to deduce what we know about the universe and our solar system’s place within it. Topics include solar system formation, the nature of planets, stars, galaxies, and black holes, as well as various cosmological theories and their predictions concerning the creation and the fate of the universe. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS217 Environmental Science (3)

Students study and become familiar with many aspects of environmental science. These include but are not limited to: a) the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships inherent in the natural world; b) identification and analysis of environmental problems both natural and human-made; c) evaluation of the risks associated with these problems; and d) examination and discussion of alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing these problems. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS219 Human Nutrition (3)

Topics covered in this course are human nutritional requirements, physiology of digestion and absorption, world food crises, food faddism, and miracle diets. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS220 Plant Identification (3)

Designed for the developing artist, this course offers students the opportunity to learn about the anatomy of plants, the identification of different types of plants, and the characteristics of different plant families. Students are expected to participate in Saturday field trips and to provide their own transportation to places such as Spring Grove Cemetery, Burnet Woods Park, Miami Whitewater Forest, Mt. Airy Forest, Shawnee Lookout, the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, and the Krohn Conservatory for the purpose of learning more about Cincinnati’s natural heritage (3-4 hours per week). Carpooling may be available. Some class meetings will be held one-two hours per week at the Art Academy as required by the instructor. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102)

36

NS221 Topics in Chemistry (3)

This course is designed to uncover similarities of art and science specifically chemistry. Principles of chemistry will be presented artistically and historically. Students will chemically synthesize a work of art and relate chemical principles to the creation of their work. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS222 Zoology (3)

This course explores the form, function, and roles of the great diversity of animal life on earth from the lowliest sponges to modern humans. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) NS312 Lives in Science (3)

This seminar-style course uses biographical sources of scientists, as well as original writings by scientists to present a realistic picture of scientists as creative, whole people. A look at the personalities and accomplishments of selected scientists sheds light on how science informs thinking and problem-solving to become an agent of change in society. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) SS211 Sociology (3)

How do public issues relate to the personal problems we encounter in everyday life? Drawing from the sociological tradition, students examine this question from the theoretical perspectives of conflict theory, functionalism, and interactionism. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) SS212 Topics in Anthropology (3)

Issues of social structure, cultural change, status, life cycles, kinship, economic organization, social control, and religion, among others, are examined from a multicultural perspective. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) SS213 Introduction to Psychology (3)

Students become acquainted with the principles of psychology and human interaction. Topics include behavior, perception, learning and cognition, abnormal psychology, and therapy. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) SS215 Islamic Civilization (3)

This course examines Islamic culture and society from the birth of Mohammed to the 21st century with special focus on current events. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)


SS216 Environmental Studies (3)

Students examine some of the major biological, social, and philosophical issues associated with the natural environment. Topics include bioregionalism, environmental impact of industry, resource conservation, sustainable agriculture, speciesism, and ecofeminism. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) SS218 Introduction to Archaeology (3)

This course presents the change and development of prehistoric culture from 3 million B.C.E. to early civilizations. Material includes the earliest humans, the rise of agriculture, and finally the great ancient civilizations, both in the Old and New Worlds from an archaeological perspective. This perspective is firmly grounded in basic archaeological concepts, methods, and interpretations. (Prerequisites: HU101, HU102) SS312 Technology and Utopia (3)

Do technological events threaten or enhance human imagination and creativity? Readings examine humankind’s ambivalence toward technology and explore the impact of various technologies on the environment, the home, the workplace, the community, and the state. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) SS314 Cultural Studies: Identity and Diversity (3)

This course looks at identity and diversity as contemporary phenomena. In the process it examines the function of identity, as well as the manifestation of diversity, as a socio-political mechanism for both the subversion and perpetuation of dominant ideologies and structures. Finally, the course explores intersectionality as a mode of reading identity, symbolic, and literal depictions of bodies, and the relationship between representation and power. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)

communications. In this context, students consider the signs and symbols of various cultures. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) SS318 Maps and Civilizations (3)

The course provides a sweeping survey of the role of cartography in culture and society and the impact of maps on consciousness, especially ideologies, worldviews, and travel plans. Global mappings of demographics and the clash of civilizations will be presented in the context of a critical sociology. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) SS320 Forensic Anthropology (3)

Forensic anthropologists play an essential role in diverse contexts where human skeletal remains are involved. TV shows in popular media such as Bones and CSI depict the contributions forensic anthropologists make in criminal investigations. In addition, forensic anthropologists are often called to the scene of mass disasters such as plane crashes or train wrecks and are increasingly involved in international human rights investigations. This course will explore the role of the forensic anthropologist in these scenarios through the use of case studies and discuss the responsibilities and ethical considerations of working with human skeletal remains. In addition, the methodologies used to extract information on the life history of an individual (age, sex, stature, ancestry, pathology, trauma etc.) from skeletal remains will be presented. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102)

SS315 Contemporary Global Studies (3)

This course examines global studies as a multidisciplinary discourse and includes a brisk and sweeping survey of 15 leading international problems. Theoretical emphasis will be placed on a critical examination of globalization and closely related concepts such as modernization and rationalization. (Prerequisites: AH105, AH110, HU101, HU102) SS316 Signs/Symbols/Semiotics (3)

Semioticians practice the art of interpreting signs and symbols with reference to mythology, history, philosophy, and current usage in human

37


Textbook Resources

The list of textbooks required for Art Academy courses is posted on the Art Academy’s website each semester. Visit www.artacademy.edu/registrar/pdf/textbooks. pdf.

Online Textbook Sources:

Amazon | www.amazon.com Barnes and Noble | www.barnesandnoble.com Biblio | www.biblio.com CourseSmart | www.coursesmart.com eBooks.com | www.ebooks.com Chegg | www.chegg.com

Purchasing Art Supplies

Several options are available for purchasing art supplies for studio classes. Suder’s Art Store 1309 Vine Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-241-0800 www.sudersartstore.com Ten percent off supplies is given when you show your Art Academy student ID. Plaza Artist Materials (Downtown) 701 Main Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-621-0726 www.plazaart.com (20% off non-sale items with Plaza Card) Plaza Artist Materials (Clifton) 230 West McMillian Street Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-861-0667 (20% off non-sale iteams with Plaza Card)

Online Art Supply Sources:

Art Supplies Direct | www.artsuppliesdirect.com Art Supplies Online | www.artsuppliesonline.com B and H Photo & Pro Audio | www.bhphotovideo.com CarpeDiem Store | www.carpediemstore.com Daniel Smith | www.danielsmith.com Dick Blick | www.dickblick.com

End of Year Student Reviews

Near the conclusion of each academic year every AAC student participates in an end of year student review. Reviews are designed to help students evaluate overall strengths and weaknesses in their studio work, discuss their learning in their academic courses, and determine whether the student is fulfilling the AAC Educational Objectives relative to their year level. Review formats differ depending on whether it is a First Year, Second Year, Third Year, or Thesis review. Completing an annual student review is a requirement for graduation and is an essential component of a student’s AAC learning experience. A faculty review team assigned to each student conducts the review. First, second, and third year students present their work for review at a designated time and location determined by the Studio Program Chair. Scheduling Thesis Reviews are the responsibility of the student.

+B Distinction

The +B program collects and synthesizes professional training that students receive at the Art Academy of Cincinnati in and beyond coursework. Participation in the +B program is a two-year volunteer experience that begins in the junior year, though students may enroll in the program at any time. Students must complete a minimum of 400 +B points in order to qualify for the +B Distinction upon graduation. The +B program supports students’ professional practice initiatives and provides them with increased confidence in their preparedness for career opportunities. This program raises their awareness of the professional world and the relationship between their practical and creative selves. The +B Distinction demonstrates students’ willingness to take advantage of the professional development resources of the Art Academy and Cincinnati community in preparing them for substantive and satisfying creative lives. Moreover, the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s active promotion of the +B Program demonstrates our commitment to preparing our students for life beyond art school. Enrollment in the program is initiated when the student completes and submits a +B registration form. The +B registration form includes a Goal-Setting Initiative. To remain enrolled in the program the student must complete the Goal-Setting component on a yearly basis. Students will be awarded points based on meeting the criteria provided. A list of potential +B experiences and corresponding points is provided to help students understand the various types of activities that could

38


qualify for the +B program. Fulfillment of the requirements may happen within, as well as outside of, required coursework. Students may propose additional experiences other than those suggested, which, upon approval, can count towards +B Distinction. Students enrolled in the program will submit a portfolio at the end of every year of participation. The portfolio must fulfill the criteria created by the Academic Management Team. Work submitted must have been completed during the designated academic year and must adhere to the Art Academy of Cincinnati Academic Honesty Policy. Written or photographic documentation is required by each +B student as evidence of attendance and participation in all events or experiences presented for consideration. Students who have earned at least 400 points by the published deadline will be awarded +B Distinction upon graduation, and the students’ transcripts will reflect the awarding of the +B Distinction.

Enrollment and Registration Policies

Classification of Students Based on Course Load The following classifications have been established based on unit load: Full-time student

Registered for 12.0 – 15.0 units

Three-quarter-time student

Registered for 9.0 – 11.5 units

Half-time student

Registered for 6.0 – 8.5 units

Course Load Limitations

The Art Academy charges a flat-rate tuition covering 12 -15 credit hours per semester for full-time undergraduate students. With his or her Advisor’s approval to register for up to 18 credits, a student may petition the Academic Dean to authorize registration for the additional three credits. The Academic Dean may authorize the student’s request pending registration availability; demonstrated need and/or desire to manage the increased course work; and the ability to successfully complete the additional course.

Matriculation Agreement

Matriculation is an agreement between the Art Academy and each student as to the steps both will take to help ensure that the student attains his or her educational goals. The matriculation process begins

when the student applies for admission and continues throughout the student’s tenure as a student. Enrollment, registration for courses, orientation, assessment, mandatory end-of-year reviews, senior thesis reviews, and class attendance are all components of matriculation. A matriculated student is one who enrolls in courses at the Art Academy and progresses toward a degree. The Art Academy agrees to provide each student the resources necessary to succeed as students in the visual arts, including an orientation to the practices and procedures of the college; academic advising; learning assistance; counseling services; assessment of artistic development; assessment of writing; quality instruction that provokes independent thought and development; career counseling, internships, exhibitions, and competitions; and studio spaces that are conducive to a wide range of art disciplines. The student agrees to abide by the policies and procedures of the Art Academy; attend classes on a regular basis; complete all assignments on time; participate in extra-curricular events that enhance the educational experience; seek support services to assist in comprehending and completing course work; seek counseling services, as needed; maintain steady progress toward his or her educational goals according to standards set by the Art Academy of Cincinnati; consult with his or her advisor; participate in all required assessment components, including, but not limited to annual studio reviews and writing assessments.

Transient Student Status

Students who wish to take any courses that are not part of the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s programs or consortium agreements must complete an application for Transient Student Status. The application can be obtained in the Office of the Registrar and must be submitted prior to the term of study at another institution. Students must be in good academic standing and must have completed all prerequisites for any similar courses at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the Art Academy’s Registrar receives any and all official transcripts documenting work completed at other institutions. All matriculated students are required to take their last 30 semester hours in residence at the Art Academy of Cincinnati.

39


Veterans Readmission Policy Under the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008

A student who is called to active duty in the United States Armed Forces or the National Guard or Reserve for a period of more than 30 days is entitled to re-enroll in the same program, with the same enrollment status, number of credits, and academic standing as when he or she was last in attendance. Readmission is permitted provided the student returns within a five-year period of time and not longer than three years from the last date of service, and was honorably discharged and provided the student left the Art Academy of Cincinnati in good academic standing. Service members are not exempted from the requirement that they must resolve any financial obligations prior to applying for readmission.

If withdrawal from the course takes place during the first four weeks of the semester, the course will not appear on the student’s academic record. A student who withdraws from a course will earn a grade of “W” for the course, and his or her transcript will reflect this grade if the withdrawal occurs after the fourth week of the semester. A grade of “W” is non-punitive and does not affect the student’s grade point average. However, it may affect satisfactory academic progress. See the “Satisfactory Academic Progress” policy. After the 11th week of class, a student may no longer withdraw, and a grade must be recorded for the course.

Registration

Incomplete

All matriculated students register for classes during the announced registration period. Students plan a program of study with approval of their advisors and then register using Sonisweb, a web-based registration system. Although each student is assigned an academic advisor, students are responsible for assuring that they meet all requirements for their degree. Credit is not given for a course for which a student has not registered. After the registration period, classes will be open to non-degree and consortium students, and class availability is contingent on space available.

Auditing a Course

To audit a course is to register for a credit course and attend regularly without earning any credits for the course. The cost of auditing a course is half the cost of regular tuition. Audited courses are not eligible for financial aid, and they do not apply towards a degree. A student who audits a course cannot petition the Art Academy at a later date to obtain college credit for the audited course. Students must obtain approval from their academic advisors to audit a course.

To Drop or Add a Course

Courses may be dropped and added through the online system: Sonisweb up to the first day of classes. Once classes begin, courses may not be added after the first day of the semester except with the consent of the instructor. A Drop/Add form may be obtained in the Faculty/Staff mail room or from the 40

Registrar (Room S265). Students must meet first with their academic advisor for approval, then obtain all necessary signatures. The form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office in order for the course to be added. Failure to properly complete and submit the required form will result in the course being deleted from the student’s academic record.

A grade of “I” (Incomplete) may be granted to a student who did not complete the requirements of the course when normally due. The granting of an Incomplete is at the discretion of the instructor. Adequate time to complete the requirements of the course will be provided, depending on the amount of work missed. A contract for an Incomplete must outline the instructor’s requirements for deadlines and successful fulfillment of course requirements, and this contract must be signed by both the instructor and the student. If the student does not execute a contract or meet the terms of the contract, the grade becomes an “F.” An Incomplete should not be granted if a student’s accumulated absences exceed 20% of the course length.

Faculty Advisors

The final responsibility for meeting all program or degree requirements and being informed of college regulations and procedures rests with each student. To assist with course planning, each degree-seeking student is assigned a faculty advisor. The advisor is available during office hours and will provide information on issues such as school philosophy and procedures, programs of study, course requirements, and registration. Each semester, advisors may counsel advisees on academic progress, short and long-term goals, and career goals. Personal problems, adjustment problems, and academic problems can be discussed with the advisor. Advisors of upper-class students are responsible for helping the student plan his or her program, counseling the student if academic problems


arise, and generally being available to provide their advisees with relevant information and advice.

Guidelines for Independent Study

Independent Study courses are available to students when a course necessary to fulfill a BFA requirement is not offered or available through the existing course schedule. The discussion for the appropriateness of an Independent Study must begin between the student and his or her advisor. Students complete an Independent Study Contract with their advisor for approval by the instructor, the advisor, the appropriate Department Chair, and the Academic Dean. Requests for Independent Study courses used to fulfill studio or liberal arts electives will be granted on a case-by-case basis with considerations to need, appropriateness, and timeliness.

Leave of Absence

Students who may need to interrupt their studies for a period of less than one year due to illness (documentation required), financial circumstances, or other reasons may request a leave of absence by completing an “Exit Interview Form” and obtaining the appropriate signatures. A leave of absence will allow students to maintain their academic standing and any Art Academy continuing scholarships during their leave. If a student does not return after the end of the approved leave, he or she will be withdrawn. Students receiving a student loan must also obtain approval from the Director of Financial Aid. Since loan regulations differ from the Art Academy’s internal Leave of Absence policy, students must meet with the Director of Financial Aid regarding the consequences in respect to the repayment of their student loans. Students who do not receive such approval will be considered withdrawn (see below) as of the last date of attendance.

Withdrawal from the Art Academy

Students who fully withdraw from the Art Academy must complete an “Exit Interview Form” obtained from the Registrar or the Faculty/Staff mail room. The form is also available online on the Registrar’s webpage. Signatures must be obtained from the Advisor, Finance Office, Director of Student Services, and Financial Aid Office. Students who stop attending classes but fail to officially withdraw will be assigned a grade of “UW” for

each applicable course. A grade of “UW” is the punitive equivalent to an “F.” Students who withdraw completely from the Art Academy may return within one calendar year at the beginning of a semester without loss of academic status. Students who receive student loans must also complete an exit interview with the Director of Financial Aid so that they may be informed of the consequences that a complete withdrawal will have on the repayment of their student loans. Refer to the Academic Calendar for exact withdrawal deadlines.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Students at the Art Academy of Cincinnati are expected to maintain good academic standing. In order to remain eligible to collect Title IV funding (federal student loans and grants) and other financial aid, students must achieve all components of the Academic Standards policy. 1. All students must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (CGPA). A minimum CGPA of 2.0 is required for graduation. 2. Students must pass at least 67% of all attempted credit hours. 3. Students must earn their degree within the maximum time frame allowed, which is 150% of the published length of the program. At full-time enrollment, the maximum would be 12 semesters or six years.

Review Process

Academic progress will be reviewed at the end of spring semester. All periods of enrollment are reviewed including semesters for which no financial aid was received. Transfer credits count towards the maximum time frame. At the time of review, if a student has completed less than 67% of attempted credit hours or have a cumulative GPA below 2.0, then his or her progress is unsatisfactory. Please note: if a student received a Fresh Start, then all credit hours attempted prior to the Fresh Start are considered in the SAP.

When Satisfactory Academic Progress is not Achieved

If at the end of a review period a student has not achieved the standards of academic progress, the student will be notified that his or her eligibility for federal student aid will be suspended. Institutional scholarships and/or tuition awards will also be suspended at this time. If extenuating circumstances prevented a student from making satisfactory progress, 41


the student can appeal the suspension to the Academic Dean in writing. The appeal should identify the circumstances contributing to the lack of academic progress and the solutions necessary to ensure a successful fulfillment of program requirements. Extenuating circumstances include: serious illness or injury that required extended recovery time, death or serious illness of a family member, significant trauma that impaired emotional or physical health, or other documented circumstances. If the appeal is approved, the student will be placed on probation and aid can be reinstated. The student will be provided with a plan to demonstrate the ability to successfully engage in college-level learning and to bring his or her academic standing into compliance with the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress at the termination of the specified probationary period. Students’ progress will be reviewed at the end of each term of the probationary period until progress is satisfactory. A student placed on probationary status with a specific SAP Plan may appeal the terms of that plan to the Academic Management Team (AMT) through the office of the Academic Dean. The AMT will then make a recommendation to the Dean for, or against the appeal. Should the student choose not to appeal the suspension, or should he or she fail to fulfill the terms of the plan, the student’s eligibility to receive federal student aid funds, institutional scholarships and tuition awards will terminate, thus requiring the student to complete coursework at his or her own expense until the student has completed 67% of attempted credit hours and has achieved the minimum GPA requirements within the maximum time frame, at which point aid may be reinstated. The student’s failure to fulfill the terms of the SAP Plan will result in his or her ineligibility to receive institutional scholarships and tuition awards and federal student aid funds. This circumstance could lead to dismissal from the Art Academy. Students may complete coursework at the Art Academy of Cincinnati or at another institution as long as the credits are transferrable to the Art Academy. Any credits earned and transferred to the Art Academy must have been earned after the AAC term in which federal financial aid was suspended. Under all circumstances, the final 30 credit hours must be earned at the Art Academy of Cincinnati.

42

Additional Information Regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress Change of Major

A student’s change of major can be taken into account if the student is appealing the Maximum Time Frame requirement. Appeals will be reviewed on a caseby-case basis, as change of major does not result in automatic appeal approval.

Incomplete Grades

Incomplete grades count as attempted credit hours, but not as earned credit hours and can affect a student’s federal aid eligibility. Once the terms of the Incomplete Grade Contract have been fulfilled and the grade has been changed officially, eligibility can be recalculated based on earned credit hours for a passing grade.

Repeated Coursework

Credit hours for repeated courses will be calculated as additional attempted credit hours. Furthermore, students may take a specific course and receive a passing grade for that course a maximum of two times and still receive federal aid toward the tuition for that course.

Grade Changes

In the event of a grade change, a student’s progress will be reviewed and recalculated.

Remedial Courses

Students can receive federal aid for up to 30 credit hours of remedial coursework. Students can retake remedial courses twice only while receiving aid.

Withdrawal from a Course

If a student officially drops a course within the first four weeks of the semester, no grade or designation will appear on the transcript. If a student drops a course after the 4th week, the student will earn a grade of “W.” Grades of “W, UW, or F” count toward attempted credit hours, but not as earned credit hours and can affect the GPA, the CGPA and federal financial aid eligibility.

Withdrawal from the College

If a student receives aid from federal programs, but officially withdraws during a semester, only a percentage of the aid awarded may be applied toward the bill for the portion of the semester attended. If a student does not complete the semester, then he or she would not have earned 100% of the federal aid awarded


for that term. A federal calculation will be completed to verify whether any of portion of the aid awarded must be returned to the U.S. Department of Education. If it is determined that any of the aid must be returned, then the student will owe the Art Academy all unpaid charges. If the student fails to achieve SAP, then his or her eligibility to receive future federal aid will be jeopardized.

Meaning of the Letter Grades

College Transcripts

The student displays in the required coursework exceptional growth, consistently higher performance beyond meeting course requirements, sophisticated reasoning and problem-solving skills, an understanding and mastery of subject matter and insight that goes beyond the course’s basic concepts and principles. The student meets course attendance and exceeds in participation and assignment expectations.

A student who wishes to request a copy of his or her academic record must submit a written and signed request to the Office of the Registrar. The request must bear the name (or names) under which the student enrolled in Art Academy courses, his or her Social Security Number, the number of transcript copies requested, and the name and address of the designated recipient. Transcripts are provided only in response to a written request signed by the student. Official transcripts will be mailed directly to the designated recipient. Transcript Request Forms are available online and in Faculty/Staff mail room. The Art Academy is not authorized to forward copies of transcripts issued from other colleges and universities to a third party. The recognized parties are the Art Academy and the institution that issued the transcripts to the Art Academy. The student is a third party. Students desiring such transcripts must request them directly from the issuing institution.

The numerical grade values are as follows: A

4.0

A-

3.7

B+

3.3

B

3.0

B-

2.7

C+

2.3

C

2.0

C-

1.7

D+

1.3

D

1.0

D-

0.7

F

0.0

UW

0.0

Grades are reported twice each semester: at midterm and at the close of the term. The midterm grade is a preliminary indication of the student’s progress to date. Only the final grade is entered into the student’s official academic record. Excellent:

A, A-

Proficient:

B+, B, B-

Adequate:

C+, C, C-

The student displays in the required coursework growth, good reasoning and problem-solving skills, proficiency in understanding course subject matter and basic concepts, and principles. The student meets course attendance, participation, and assignment requirements. The student demonstrates in the required coursework acceptable growth, acceptable thinking and problemsolving skills, a basic understanding of course subject matter and basic concepts and principles. The student demonstrates a willingness to comply with course attendance, participation, and assignment requirements, but is inconsistent in meeting these requirements. Unsatisfactory: D+, D, D-

The student demonstrates in the required coursework both a deficiency in growth and an inadequate understanding of course subject matter. The student is inconsistent and often fails to meet course attendance, participation, and assignment requirements. Failing: F

The student fails to demonstrate growth in the required coursework. The student is weak in reasoning and problem-solving skills and shows little to no understanding of course subject matter and basic concepts and principles. The student is unable to meet course attendance, participation, and assignment requirements.

43


Withdrawal: W

Does not affect cumulative grade point average. Unofficial Withdrawal: UW

Counts as an F in the cumulative grade point average. Incomplete: I

Extends time to complete coursework. Does not affect cumulative grade point average. The criteria in each grade range focus on quality, consistency, growth and effort. The use of a plus or minus grade suffix reflects judgment by faculty as to how the student meets criteria within the letter grade range. A minimum cumulative average of 2.0 must be reached in order to earn a degree. The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is determined by adding the total quality points earned divided by the credits attempted. Each student is responsible for knowing his or her cumulative average (CGPA) in any given year.

How to Calculate your Grade Point Average (GPA)

Your grade point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credit hours attempted. Example: A

4 grade points

B

3 grade points

C

2 grade points

D

1 grade point

F

0 grade points

U

0 grade points

I (Incompletes) and W (Withdrawals) do not affect the GPA because they earn no grade points and reflect no credit hours attempted. To calculate your GPA, divide the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credit hours attempted. Total Grade Points ÷ Total Credits Hours Attempted = GPA 43 ÷ 15 = 2.86 To calculate your Cumulative GPA (CGPA) add the 44

total number of grade points earned from all semesters. Then add the total number of credit hours attempted from all semesters. Divide the total grade points earned by the total credit hours attempted. The result is your CGPA. It is your responsibility to know and understand the formula for calculating both the GPA and the CGPA.

To Appeal a Grade

A student has a right to appeal any grade awarded. In making an appeal, the student should follow the grievance procedures as outlined in this catalog. Appeals may be made for the following reasons only: • The student believes that he or she met grade expectations for a higher grade as stated by the instructor in the course syllabus; and/or •The student believes that he or she received unfair treatment during the course of the semester. The grading standard is an important prerogative of the instructor and neither the Department Chairperson nor the Academic Dean will question an instructor’s judgment regarding the performance and quality of the student’s work. Appeals based on questioning the instructor’s evaluation will not be considered.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. An absence in no way relieves a student from the responsibility of making up work missed, regardless of the cause. Students are encouraged to notify the instructor if they are unable to attend classes due to severe illness, emergency or other serious circumstances. Each member of the Art Academy of Cincinnati faculty will provide all students enrolled in his or her courses a written statement on attendance policy for each particular course during the first week of the semester. This statement will specify what role, if any, class attendance plays in grading and the specific penalties for excessive absences and/or late arrivals as defined by the instructor. Each instructor will define in his or her syllabus how late arrivals will be handled and how they will affect the students’ grades. Students exceeding the instructor’s stated minimum attendance requirements may be withdrawn from the course.


Early Alert Procedure

In the event that a student shows inconsistent attendance or performance in a class, faculty will notify the Registrar and the Associate Dean or the Director of Student Services, who together will determine a course of action for the student. This may include receiving guidance from the Director of Student Services, contacting the advisor or scheduling appointments with tutors or counseling personnel. Subsequent absences will result in a review by the Academic Management Team and possible administrative withdrawal from the college and, as it applies, from college housing. Instructors may notify students of unsatisfactory work at any time during the semester.

Academic Honors Dean’s List

Undergraduate students who achieve a term grade point average of 3.50 or higher at the end of the semester will be placed on the Dean’s List provided that they are registered for at least 9 credit hours during the term and have completed all course work for the semester.

Graduation with Honors

Baccalaureate degrees are conferred with honors in accordance with the following cumulative grade point averages. Summa Cum Laude

GPA 3.9

Magna Cum Laude

GPA 3.7

Cum Laude

GPA 3.5

The achievement of these ranks is announced during commencement exercises.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Graduation Requirements

The following criteria must be met in order for students to be eligible for graduation: 1. All 120 credit hours must be completed in required areas. Students receiving grades of “incomplete” have a 25-day grace period to complete those requirements. If not completed within the grace period, the student’s graduation date will be postponed to the next graduation cycle. 2. A minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.00 must be achieved. 3. Tuition and fees must be paid in full. 4. Completed exit interview with the Financial Aid Office (student loan recipients only). 5. Official high school and college transcripts (if applicable) must be on file in the Registrar’s Office. 6. Complete and submit an application for graduation to the Registrar. Three graduation dates are available each year, occurring after the end of each semester. The application for graduation must be submitted by the published deadline occurring during the semester after which graduation is anticipated. The application is available from your advisor, the Registrar or the Registrar’s web page. 7. All BFA students are required to complete a written senior thesis and a thesis exhibition of visual art and/or design work. 8. Students should have completed reviews at each year level before graduation. If, for a legitimate, serious reason such as illness or death in the family, a student misses a review either during review week for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors or during a senior thesis exhibition, it is the student’s responsibility to coordinate with his or her Department Chair to schedule a make-up review as soon as possible. Students will be charged a fee to reschedule a team of faculty to conduct a makeup review. 9. Students should have completed all writing assesments, including Incoming Writing Diagnostics and Student Self-evaluations (SSE) required for reviews. 10. Degree candidates are required to take their final 30 credit hours in residence at the Art Academy of Cincinnati.

45


Students who do not meet the above criteria may petition the Academic Dean to participate in the commencement ceremony. The petition must include a clear plan showing how the student intends to complete graduation requirements. Petitions are accepted until January 15 only and will not be considered if the student needs more than 6 credit hours to fulfill requirements.

Academic Integrity and Appeals The Art Academy of Cincinnati endorses the American Association of University Professors statement on academic freedom including the following:

Academic Freedom in Artistic Expression

Faculty members and students engaged in the creation and presentation of works of the visual and the performing arts are as much engaged in pursuing the mission of the college or university as are those who write, teach, and study in other academic disciplines. Works of the visual and the performing arts are important both in their own right and because they can enhance our understanding of social institutions and the human condition. Artistic expression in the classroom, the studio, and the workshop therefore merits the same assurance of academic freedom that is accorded to other scholarly and teaching activities. Since faculty and student artistic presentations to the public are integral to their teaching, learning, and scholarship, these presentations merit no less protection. Educational and artistic criteria should be used by all who participate in the selection and presentation of artistic works. Reasonable contentneutral regulation of the “time, place, and manner” of presentations should be developed and maintained. Academic institutions are obliged to ensure that regulations and procedures do not impair freedom of expression or discourage creativity by subjecting artistic work to tests of propriety or ideology.

Academic Honesty Policy

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is a community of faculty, staff, and students committed to the exchange of ideas contributing to intellectual growth and artistic development. A shared commitment to scholarly values, intellectual integrity, and respect for the ideas and work of others is essential to the college’s mission. The Art Academy insists upon academic integrity at all times. Violations of academic integrity threaten the atmosphere of trust, fairness, and respect essential to 46

artistic, scholastic, and professional development, and they undermine the quality of a college education. In situations involving suspected violations of academic integrity, procedures and sanctions established by the Council of Adjudication shall be followed. Students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, staff, and fellow students in all circumstances. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of a student’s own efforts is considered dishonest whether it is studio work or academic work. Academic honesty includes, but is not limited to, the following: »» The submission of any work not actually produced by the student submitting the work. »» Submission of the same work for two or more courses unless previously approved by all faculty members concerned. »» Failure to cite the words or ideas of another in a work submitted for evaluation. »» Obtaining answers to an examination, test or quiz either within or outside of the class in which the examination or other assessment tool is administered. If a faculty member suspects a student of academic dishonesty, the following procedure shall be followed: 1. The faculty member discusses the concern with the student and collects relevant information. 2. The subsequent steps apply only if, after this meeting, the faculty member believes academic dishonesty has occurred. 3. The faculty member notifies the Academic Dean and submits proof of academic dishonesty. 4. The Academic Dean consults with appropriate parties, as deemed necessary, including but not limited to the instructor, student, academic advisor, and Department Chair before reaching a decision. 5. If it is determined that academic dishonesty has occurred, the student automatically receives an “F” for the project. Faculty members have the further option of assigning a grade of “F” for the entire course. 6. The Academic Dean notifies the student in writing that the penalty may include the loss of scholarship


monies or dismissal from the Art Academy. 7. The student has the right to appeal these decisions and must submit a written appeal to the Council of Adjudication.

Fair Use and Copyright Infringement

The Art Academy of Cincinnati adheres to all the covenants provided by Title 17 of the U.S. Code concerning fair use and infringement of copyrighted materials. Students and all Art Academy employees are expected to respect these laws, and any violation thereof constitutes a serious breach of the terms of enrollment or employment.

Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials

One of the rights accorded to the copyright owner is the right to reproduce or to authorize others to reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords. This right is subject to certain limitations found in sections 107 through 118 of the US Copyright Act (title 17, U. S. Code). One of the more important limitations is the doctrine of “fair use.” The doctrine of fair use has developed through a substantial number of court decisions over the years and has been codified in section 107 of the United States Copyright Act of 1976. Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 also sets out four factors to be considered in determining whether or not a particular use is fair. 1. The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes 2. The nature of the copyrighted work 3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole 4. The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work The distinction between what is fair use and what is infringement in a particular case will not always be clear or easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or notes that may safely be used without permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission. The 1961 Report of the Register of Copyrights on

the General Revision of the U.S. Copyright Law cites examples of activities that courts have regarded as fair use: “quotation of excerpts in a review or criticism for purposes of illustration or comment; quotation of short passages in a scholarly or technical work, for illustration or clarification of the author’s observations; use in a parody of some of the content of the work parodied; summary of an address or article, with brief quotations, in a news report; reproduction by a library of a portion of a work to replace part of a damaged copy; reproduction by a teacher or student of a small part of a work to illustrate a lesson; reproduction of a work in legislative or judicial proceedings or reports; incidental and fortuitous reproduction, in a newsreel or broadcast, of a work located in the scene of an event being reported.” Copyright protects the particular way authors have expressed themselves. It does not extend to any ideas, systems, or factual information conveyed in a work. The safest course is to obtain permission from the copyright owner before using copyrighted material. The Copyright Office cannot grant such permission. When it is impracticable to obtain permission, you should consider avoiding the use of copyrighted material unless you are confident that the doctrine of fair use would apply to the situation. The Copyright Office can neither determine whether a particular use may be considered fair nor advise on possible copyright violations. If there is any doubt, it is advisable to consult an attorney.

Mobility and Study Abroad Programs

The New York Studio Residency Program, AICAD Mobility Program and study abroad programs are study options during a student’s third year of enrollment at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Each program has its own guidelines, procedures, and financial expectations. The application deadlines for these programs are April 1 for the fall semester and Nov. 1 for the spring semester.

New York Studio Residency Program

Through its membership in the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), the Art Academy offers one student per semester the opportunity to pursue study in New York City for one semester and to earn 15 semester credits. The program includes critiques, weekly seminars, lectures, visiting artists, and faculty evaluation of student progress. 47


Internship opportunities also are available. Contact nysp@aicad.org for information on internships. Contact Paige Williams at pwilliams@artacademy.edu or Mark Thomas at mthomas@artacademy.edu for the information on the application process.

AICAD Mobility Program

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. AICAD is a consortium of over 40 leading art schools in the United States and Canada. In addition, three international affiliates are in Israel, Ireland and Japan. The AICAD mobility program provides the opportunity for juniors to participate in a one-semester program of study at other AICAD member institutions. Credits earned are transferred to the Art Academy. At the end of the mobility semester, a transcript from the AICAD institution must be sent to the Art Academy’s Registrar. Contact the Registrar at shutchens@artacademy.edu or 513-562-8749 for transcript procedures. Contact the Academic Dean for information on the application process. For more information about the program and for a complete list of member schools, visit www.aicad. org. Contact: Kim Krause at kkrause@artacademy.edu or Mark Thomas at mthomas@artacademy.edu.

Study Abroad

The Art Academy encourages students to pursue opportunities to study abroad during their enrollment. Students are responsible for making the arrangements for their study abroad program, including contacting the program director; arranging travel and room and board; obtaining passports; and other related matters. Suggested programs to review: Studio Art Centers International Florence (SACI) and the Butler Institute for Study Abroad. Art Academy Portfolio Awards do not apply toward tuition and costs for study abroad. Contact: Kim Krause at kkrause@artacademy.edu or Mark Thomas at mthomas@artacademy.edu.

Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities (GCCCU)

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is a member of the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities (GCCCU), which was established in 1974 to develop cooperative programs for educational enrichment in the Greater Cincinnati area. While attending the Art Academy, students may take courses not available at the Art Academy through consortium member colleges and universities. During the fall and spring semesters, there is no charge for attending a 48

consortium institution, as the credits are applied and included in your Art Academy tuition. The Art Academy of Cincinnati’s tuition rate applies for the summer term. Students must pay their tuition bill to the Art Academy. The Art Academy then pays the consortium school. Full-time students may take no more than six credits per semester through the consortium during the fall and spring semesters. However, there is no limit during the summer. Comprised of 17 public and private institutions, the consortium plans and implements a wide range of inter-institutional programs. Students may contact the Registrar for additional information.

Information Technology Services

The mission of Information Technology Services is to provide quality infrastructure and support, in the delivery of information technology products and services to facilitate and advance the Art Academy’s mission. The Art Academy provides members of its community with access to a wide range of information and electronic services. The Art Academy’s electronic environment includes the use of computers, digital printing, computer networks, electronic communication, Internet, telecommunications, and voice mail systems. These services are essential for instruction, research, and administration. Access to these resources is a privilege. Using the Art Academy’s computing resources carries with it certain responsibilities and should reflect the academic honesty and discipline appropriate for the shared community of network and computer resources. Prior to the beginning of each academic year, each student is assigned an email address and log-on access to the Macintosh network system. Élan Technologies, an information technology firm headquartered in Cincinnati, provides the Art Academy’s information technology services. One of Élan’s Lead Systems Engineers works full-time at the Art Academy Monday – Friday from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. For assistance with technical issues, questions, or concerns, please contact the Help Desk via the phone or the email address below. If the Help Desk technician is unable to resolve the issue remotely, he or she will dispatch the Lead Systems Engineer to the campus location where direct assistance is needed. The Help Desk is available 24 hours per day Monday-Friday.


Élan Technologies Kyle Grizzell Lead Systems Engineer Room: S358

Élan Technologies Help Desk Support 513-322-0463 helpdesk@elantech.net Monday-Friday, 24 hours

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Art Academy of Cincinnati complies with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, (FERPA) a federal law enacted to protect the privacy of educational records. If a student submits a written, signed request to review his or her educational records, the request will be honored. All requests must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. FERPA provides students the right to inspect and review information contained in their educational records, to amend incorrect records, to challenge the content of their records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if the decisions of the hearing panels are unacceptable to the student. Students have the right to consent to disclose their educational records to a third party. Each request must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A written signature is required prior to releasing any information except “directory information.” This information may include the student’s name, address, phone number, field of study, dates of attendance, and degrees and honors awarded. If the student does not wish for the Art Academy to release his or her “directory information,” the student must notify the Registrar in writing by September 30 for students entering during the fall term and January 31 for students entering during the spring term. Such notification must be renewed annually. FERPA permits a school to disclose personally identifiable information without a student’s consent to the following parties: School officials with legitimate educational interests, U.S. Comptroller General, U.S. Attorney General, United States Department of Education, state and local officials, authorized organizations conducting education research, accrediting agencies, alleged victims of crime, parent

of a dependent student as defined by the IRS, parent of a student under 21 regarding the violation of a law regarding alcohol and drug abuse. Students have the right to file a complaint with U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the Art Academy to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Contact information for the office that administers FERPA is below: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20202-5920 Phone: 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) Visit www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/index.html for more information.

Tuition, Fees, Refunds and Financial Aid

A regular full-time student registers for 12-18 credit hours per semester and is expected to remain enrolled in at least 12 credit hours per semester. The Art Academy charges a flat-rate tuition for full time undergraduate students covering 12-15 credit hours per semester. Students may petition the Academic Dean, with their advisor’s approval to enroll for up to 18 credits at no additional charge, providing registration availability, demonstration of need, desire to do so, and the ability to successfully complete the additional course load. Tuition and fees are due and must be paid in full one week prior to the start of classes each semester. International students must pay tuition in full at registration as required by the US federal government. An unpaid balance will void your registration, and you will not be permitted to attend class until your account is paid in full. Tuition and fees may be paid by check, Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover Card or by cash. Online payment of your balance due is available and is strongly encouraged. Alternatively, payments may be mailed to the Art Academy of Cincinnati, Attn: Student Billing, 1212 Jackson Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or delivered to the Business Office, Room S257 between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. If you have questions regarding your account, call 513-562-8752. The Academy reserves the right to adjust tuition and fees without notice. Annual adjustments should be anticipated. 49


Tuition Costs for Fall and Spring Semesters 2015-2016 Full-time tuition for academic year 2015-2016

$ 26,908

Full-time tuition per semester 2015-2016

$ 13,454

Part-time tuition per credit hour 2015-2016

$ 1,121

Fees

Annual Student Activities Fee (Full-Time and Part-Time)

$ 880

Per Semester Student Activities Fee (Full-Time and Part-Time)

$ 440

Transcript fee

$ 5.00

Residence Hall Fee

$ 6,100 $ 6,500

Residence Hall Deposit

$ 250

Damage Deposit

$ 500

Finance Withdrawal Policy

If a student withdraws from the Art Academy or drops below full-time status (12 credit hours), tuition will be credited and computed from the date of withdrawal as officially recorded by the Registrar. Only tuition is refunded; fees are nonrefundable. The Business Office calculates and determines all amounts credited to an account and will return any financial aid, grants, loans or scholarship funds as required by those programs. An open balance is due immediately.

Fall and Spring Semester Refund Policy Before the end of the first week

100%

Before the end of the second week

75%

Before the end of the third week

50%

Before the end of the fourth week

25%

After the fourth week

No refund given

Summer Session Refund Policy for BFA Students

50

Before and on the first day

100%

Before the end of the first week

50%

After first week

No refund given

Monthly Tuition Payment Plan

The Art Academy offers a monthly installment payment plan through the Sallie Mae Tuition Pay Plan. There is an application fee per school year, but no interest is charged to your account. An unpaid student account balance is acceptable only when that amount is the enrolled budget amount with the Sallie Mae Tuition Pay Plan. The monthly installment payment plan is available for the fall and spring semesters only. For details or to enroll, please visit www.tuitionpay.com or call 1-800635-0120.

Unpaid Accounts and Finance Charges

The Art Academy of Cincinnati will not issue a diploma, transcripts, records, grade reports, or statements of recommendation to any student whose financial accounts with the Art Academy are not paid in full. All financial accounts must be paid in full prior to the start of classes. After the payment due date has passed, a finance charge may be assessed to any account with an unpaid balance and for every month following that the balance is not paid in full. Students with delinquent financial accounts lose their registration privileges, and their accounts will be referred to a collection agency.

Filing Your FAFSA

Financial Aid personnel assist students in obtaining federal and state aid in the form of grants and loans, as well as administer internal funds such as scholarships. Students must fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) so that eligibility for aid may be determined. Students are encouraged to complete this process electronically. There is no processing fee. The Art Academy of Cincinnati’s school code is 003011. We encourage early application of the FAFSA, which can be filed as soon as tax returns have been completed for the year prior to the academic year. This allows plenty of time to get funding in place before tuition is due. Direct questions to the Financial Aid Office at 513-562-8773. Send an email to financialaid@artacademy.edu or visit the website: www.artacademy.edu. Note: Students applying for Financial Aid should read the “Return of Title IV Funds Policy.”

Verification Procedure

If students are selected for a process called “Verification” either by the U.S. Department of Education or the Financial Aid Office*, the student will


be required to provide the Art Academy with copies of their own financial documents, as well as those of their parents or spouse, as applicable. Financial documents may include but are not limited to: official IRS Tax Return Transcripts and the Verification Worksheet**. This information must be provided before state and federal aid can be awarded. If we do not receive requested information from you by the end of the enrollment term, we will assume that you do not want grants or loans. The Financial Aid Office will compare your documents to the information provided on your FAFSA and will make any necessary corrections electronically. Please allow 4-6 weeks for processing.

Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP)

*The Art Academy of Cincinnati reserves the right to select anyone for whom we determine that there are questionable issues that require resolution. The presence of conflicting information is an example of a questionable issue. **This will be sent by mail to the student and is also available on the website.

Federal regulations require Title IV financial aid funds to be awarded under the assumption that a student will attend the institution for the entire period during which federal assistance was awarded. When a student withdraws from all courses for any reason, including medical withdrawals, he or she may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV funds that he or she was originally scheduled to receive. The return of funds is based upon the premise that students earn their financial aid in proportion to the amount of time they are enrolled. A pro-rated schedule is used to determine the amount of federal student aid funds the student will have earned at the time of the withdrawal. Thus, a student who withdraws in the second week of classes has earned less of his or her financial aid than a student who withdraws in the seventh week. Once a student completes at least 60% of his or her courses for the semester, the student is considered to have earned all of his or her financial aid and will not be required to return any of these funds.

Federal Financial Aid Programs Federal Pell Grant

This is a federal grant program available to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. It is available to both full-time and part-time students exhibiting financial need as determined by the U.S. Department of Education. The FAFSA determines a student’s eligibility for a Pell Grant.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)

This is a federal grant program designed to assist students who have received Pell Grants and who exhibit exceptional need. Awards are made at the school’s discretion based on a pre-determined formula. Early submission of a FAFSA application is highly recommended.

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)

A student must demonstrate financial need, as determined by the FAFSA, before Federal Work-Study can be awarded. Students who are interested must verify their eligibility with the Financial Aid Office before a Work-Study position will be offered. If a student is eligible, he or she may be employed on campus. This program is ideal for students who wish to obtain flexible working hours.

Eligible first-time borrowers must sign a Master Promissory Note and complete Loan Entrance Counseling before loans can be disbursed. Students must be enrolled at least half time. All students who apply for institutional scholarships, as well as federal loans and grants must fill out the FAFSA.

Return of Federal Title IV Funds Policy

How a Withdrawal Affects Financial Aid

Federal law requires schools to calculate the amount of federal financial aid a student has earned if that student: • Completely withdraws, or • Stops attending before completeing the semester Based on this calculation, Art Academy of Cincinnati students who receive federal financial aid and do not complete their classes during a semester or term for which aid was awarded could be responsible for repaying a portion of the aid they received. Students who do not begin attendance must repay all financial aid disbursed for the term. The following policies will help clarify the potential academic and financial consequences a withdrawal can have on students. Students are encouraged to read all the information below prior to making a final decision.

51


Important: • Academic policies on leaving the AAC are available in the Academic Catalog. • The Art Academy of Cincinnati’s tuition/fee refund policy is separate from the federal regulations to repay unearned aid. Whether or not a student receives a tuition/fee refund has no bearing on the amount he or she must repay to the federal aid programs. Contact the Finance Office for further inquiries regarding the AAC’s tuition/fee refund policy, or visit the Art Academy’s website at www.artacademy.edu. • Students should review the AAC website and visit the Registrar’s Office for information and policies on Withdrawal from the Art Academy.

How Earned Financial Aid is Calculated

Students who receive federal financial aid must “earn” such aid by remaining enrolled in classes. Students earn federal financial aid on a pro-rated basis. Students who withdraw or who are determined to have not completed all courses for which they registered for the semester may be required to return a portion of the financial aid they were awarded. The calculation process and the return of funds are completed by the Financial Aid Office (FAO). Institutions are required to determine the percentage of Title IV aid “earned” by the student and to return the unearned portion to the appropriate aid programs. Regulations require schools to perform calculations within 30 days of the date the school determines that a student’s withdrawal is a Complete Withdrawal. The institution must return the funds within 45 days of the calculation. For example, if a student completes 30% of the payment period, then he or she earns 30% of the aid the student was originally scheduled to receive. Therefore, 70% of the scheduled awards remain “unearned” and must be returned to the federal government if the student withdraws at this point. Once a student completes 60% of the semester, he or she is determined to have earned all of his or her financial aid for the term and will not be required to return any of these federal funds. The following formula is used to determine the percentage of unearned aid that must be returned to the federal government: • The percent earned is equal to the number of calendar days completed up to the Date of Withdrawal, divided by the total calendar days in the payment period (less 52

any scheduled breaks that are at least 5 days long). • The payment period for most students is the entire semester. The percent unearned is equal to 100% minus the percent earned.

Steps in the Return of Title IV Funds Policy

Step 1: Student’s Title IV Information The FAO will determine: A. The total amount of Title IV aid disbursed for the semester in which the student withdrew. A student’s Title IV aid is counted as aid disbursed in the calculation if it has been applied to the student’s account on or before the student’s Date of Withdrawal. B. The total amount of Title IV aid disbursed plus the Title IV aid that could have been disbursed for the semester in which the student withdrew. Step 2: Percentage of Title IV Aid Earned The FAO will use the following method to calculate the percentage of Title IV aid earned: The number of calendar days completed by the student divided by the total number of calendar days in the semester during which the student withdrew. The total number of calendar days in a semester shall exclude any scheduled breaks of more than five days. Days Attended ÷ Days in Enrollment Period = Percentage Completed If the calculated percentage completed is at least 60%, then the student is considered to have “earned” all the Title IV aid scheduled for disbursement toward this student’s eligible expenses during the enrollment period. Step 3: Amount of Title IV Aid Earned by the Student The FAO will use the following formula to calculate the amount of Title IV aid earned: The percentage of Title IV aid earned (Step 2) multiplied by the total amount of Title IV aid disbursed or that could have been disbursed for the term during which the student withdrew (Step 1A). Total Aid Disbursed x Percentage Completed = Earned Aid Step 4: Amount of Title IV Aid to be Disbursed or Returned • If the aid already disbursed equals the amount of the aid earned, no further action is required.


• If the aid already disbursed is greater than the amount of the aid earned, the difference must be returned to the appropriate Title IV aid program. Total Disbursed Aid – Earned Aid = Unearned Aid to be Returned • If the aid already disbursed is less than the amount of the aid earned, then the FAO will calculate a PostWithdrawal Disbursement.

Types of Withdrawals

For financial aid purposes, there are two types of withdrawals: Complete and Unofficial. Complete The student’s official withdrawal from the Art Academy of Cincinnati. The current academic year’s policy for a Complete Withdrawal can be found in the Academic Catalog and on the AAC Website. Unofficial In accordance with federal financial aid regulations, a student’s withdrawal is considered to be an unofficial withdrawal if the student receives all failing (UW/F) grades or a combination of all failing (F) and withdraw (W) grades for the term.

Determination of the Date of Withdrawal

The actual date indicated on the completed withdrawal form is the official Date of Withdrawal. This date is used to calculate the portion of a student’s federal financial aid that must be returned. If a student stops attending classes without notifying the AAC, the Date of Withdrawal shall be the midpoint of the semester or the last date of academic activity, as determined by the AAC. Additional documentation supporting the last date of academic activity may be provided by the student if he or she can verify a later date of attendance than that determined by the AAC.

Withdrawing Prior to Completing 60% of the Semester Unless a student completes at least 60% of the term in which federal aid was disbursed, the student will be required to return all or part of the financial aid disbursed for that term. This applies to students who have withdrawn officially (including medical), or unofficially.

When a Student Fails to Begin Attendance

If a student receives financial aid, but never attends classes, the Art Academy of Cincinnati must return all funds disbursed toward that student’s eligible expenses to the respective federal and institutional aid programs.

Definition of an Academic Activity

Examples of Art Academy of Cincinnati academic activities include, but are not limited to, physically attending a class that provides an opportunity for direct interaction between the instructor and students.

Acceptable Proof of Participation: »» »» »» »»

Exams or quizzes Tutorials Computer-assisted instruction Completion of an academic assignment, paper, or project »» Participating in an online discussion about academic matters »» Initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course »» AAC required study group for which attendance is taken

Documentation not Acceptable as Proof of Participation:

»» Student’s self-certification of attendance that is not supported by school documentation »» Verification of Enrollment form issued by the Registrar’s Office »» Residing in AAC housing »» Participating in academic counseling or advising

Repayment Calculation of Unearned Aid as a Result of a Withdrawal

As a result of a withdrawal, students who have received federal funds will be required to repay “unearned” aid. The repayment calculation is performed utilizing the federal government’s repayment worksheet: “Treatment of Title IV Funds When a Student Withdraws from a Credit-Hour Program.” The amount of the assistance earned is determined on a pro-rated basis. For example, if a student completed 30% of the term, this student has earned 30% of the assistance he or she was originally scheduled to receive. Once a student has completed at least 60% of the term, the student earns all of the assistance he or she was originally scheduled to receive for that term. 53


Student Notification of Repayment

A notification letter outlining the amount returned to the federal and institutional program(s), accompanied by the federal government’s repayment worksheet, will be mailed to the student’s permanent address. On the student’s behalf, the AAC will return funds to the appropriate federal and institutional aid program(s). Subsequently, the AAC will bill the student’s Bursar Account. A statement reflecting the billable charges will be sent to the student. The student is responsible for all charges and overpayments resulting from a Return of Title IV calculation.

Repayment to Federal and Institutional Aid Programs

Federal regulations and Art Academy of Cincinnati institutional policies require that the following aid programs be subject to the repayment calculation if the student did not complete at least 60% of the term: »» Federal Direct Loan: Unsubsidized and Subsidized »» Federal Direct Grad PLUS Loans »» Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans »» Federal Pell Grant »» Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) »» Institutional Grants and Scholarships

Repayment of Unearned Funds

The Financial Aid Office will notify students if they must repay federal funds to the U.S. Department of Education. Amounts that the student must return will be applied to federal loans first. The student/parent will be permitted to repay loans based on the terms of the Master Promissory Note (MPN) which usually consists of scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any grant overpayment that the student must return to the federal government must be repaid within 45 days after the student receives notification of such requirement from the FAO. If the grant overpayment cannot be paid in full, a repayment plan may be arranged with the U.S. Department of Education. Students will also receive notice from the FAO regarding repayment of institutional funds. If the student owes any funds to the AAC as a result of the return of federal or institutional funds, the AAC Finance Office will bill the student accordingly.

54

Consequences of Non-Payment

If a student does not repay the grant funds owed to the federal government within 45 days, the account will be turned over to the U.S. Department of Education as an overpayment of federal funds. Students who owe an overpayment of Title IV funds are ineligible for further disbursements from federal financial aid programs at any institution until the overpayment is paid in full or until acceptable payment arrangements are made with the U.S. Department of Education. If a student does not pay funds due to AAC to cover his or her Bursar Account balance, a financial hold will be placed on the student’s records. Consequently, he or she will not be permitted to register for classes or to cause transcripts to be released to the student or to any other party until the balance is satisfied.

School and Student Responsibilities Regarding the Return of Title IV Funds Policy and Process

Both the student and the school are responsible for returning unearned federal financial aid to the federal government. The student will be billed for any amount due as a result of the return of federal aid funds calculation.

Art Academy of Cincinnati Responsibilities in Regard to the Return of Title IV Funds

1. Providing each student with the information given in this policy; 2. Identifying students affected by this policy and completing the Return of Title IV Funds calculation; 3. Informing any student so identified of the result of the calculation and any balance owed to the AAC as a result of a required return of funds; 4. Returning any unearned Title IV aid that is owed to Title IV programs, and (if applicable) notifying the borrower’s holder of federal loan funds of the student’s Date of Withdrawal; 5. Notifying the student and/or Plus borrower of eligibility for a Post-Withdrawal Disbursement, if applicable.

The Student’s Responsibilities in Regard to the Return of Title IV Funds

1. Becoming familiar with the Return of Title IV Funds policy and how withdrawing from all courses affects eligibility for Title IV aid; 2. Resolving any outstanding balance owed to the AAC resulting from a required return of unearned Title IV aid;


3. Resolving any repayment to the U.S. Department of Education as a result of an overpayment of Title IV grant funds.

How Institutional Aid is Affected by a Withdrawal

All institutional aid provided by the Art Academy of Cincinnati is based on need and academic achievement. Any change in enrollment status may cause the amount of the award to be recalculated. A drop in enrollment to 0 units requires the funds to be repaid up to 100% of the disbursed amount. Credit balances will not be released to a student until institutional aid has been repaid.

Loan Information to Consider When Withdrawing

The federal repayment calculation also includes additional loan amounts that the student and/or parent may be responsible to return directly to the U.S. Department of Education (see step 8 of the federal government’s repayment worksheet). Important: Any time a student is enrolled less than part-time, the grace period begins. The student’s grace period for loan repayments for Federal Direct Unsubsidized and Subsidized Loans will begin on the Date of Withdrawal from the school. If the student is not enrolled part-time for more than 6 months, the loans will go into repayment status. The student must contact the U.S. Department of Education (ED) or his or her lender(s) to make payment arrangements. Loans must be repaid by the loan borrower (student/parent) as outlined in the terms of the borrower’s promissory note. The student should contact the lender if he or she has questions regarding his or her grace period or repayment status.

How a Withdrawal Affects Future Financial Aid Eligibility

Refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy to determine how a withdrawal will impact future financial aid eligibility. Note: The procedures and policies listed above are subject to change without advance notice based on changes to federal laws, federal regulations, or school policies. If changes are made, students must abide by the most current policy. The Federal Refund Policy is encompassing and conclusive, and the foregoing information is intended only to be an overview of the policies and procedures that govern regulations pertaining to the Title IV Refund process. For further guidance on these policies and procedures, please see the reference material on Withdrawals, found in Volume 5 of the Federal Student Aid Handbook. You may access a copy in the AAC Financial Aid Office.

State of Ohio Financial Aid Programs

The U.S. Department of Education forwards pertinent information to the State of Ohio for state-administered need-based programs. The Art Academy of Cincinnati requires a separate History of Residence / Selective Service Form in order to determine eligiblity for state funds. The Ohio College Opportunity Grant Program (OCOG) provides need-based tuition assistance to Ohio students from low to moderate-income families. The Financial Aid Office receives eligibility rosters directly from the state and notifies eligible students. Students are encouraged to apply to outside sources for financial assistance.

Scholarships & Awards for Continuing Students

Each year the Art Academy of Cincinnati administers several categories of awards, briefly described below. Details about each of them and times of informational meetings and application deadlines will be communicated via Art Academy email, during the spring semester. The Scholarship Committee has compiled these brief descriptions to help ensure that all students are aware of these opportunities. (Note: Any award amounts listed are for last year only and may vary this year due to the number of qualifying applicants and funds available.)

Stephen H. Wilder Traveling Scholarship

In 1943, Edith C. Wilder bequeathed an endowment in the name of her late son to the Art Academy to be used for traveling scholarships. Winners must be Art Academy graduating seniors who desire to travel to continue their education in art. Each applicant must submit a proposal that includes a budget, itinerary, senior thesis, visual documentation of his or her work, and a description of how the proposed travel experience will benefit their art/design goals. Full-time faculty members, the Academic Dean, and the President vote to select the winners.

Mary Coulter Clark Scholarships

Only Master of Arts in Art Education students may apply for this tuition scholarship. The Chair of the Master of Arts in Art Education program and Director of Financial Aid select the winners. 55


Bertha Langhorst Werner Scholarships

Winners are chosen based on financial need, a written essay and seriousness of the applicants, as based on faculty recommendation and GPA. The Scholarship Committee and the Director of Financial Aid select the winners.

The Cincinnati Woman’s Club Scholarships

The Cincinnati Woman’s Club was founded in 1911 by a group of women “to provide financial aid by making scholarship grants and loans available to young women in achieving a career in their chosen art.”

Cincinnati Art Club Scholarship

This tuition scholarship goes to a sophomore or junior majoring in either 1.) Painting and Drawing or 2.) Sculpture. The Full-Time Faculty members select the recipient. The Cincinnati Art Club is located in Eden Park and has been in existence for over 200 years. The Club continues to thrive with a variety of classes and frequent opening receptions.

Three Arts Club Scholarship Fund

This scholarship, founded in 1911, ranges from $700$1600 per winner. The Three Arts Club celebrates over 100 years of providing financial aid to junior and senior college women who are exceptionally talented in art, music, or drama/musical theater.

The John E. and Mary Ann Roach Butkovich Scholarship

The Director of Financial Aid selects the recipient of this tuition scholarship. Funded by an alumna, this scholarship is awarded to the highest-scoring Bertha Langhorst Werner Scholarship applicant.

The Art Academy Alumni Scholarship

Full-time faculty members select the winner of this tuition scholarship, which is supported by a fundraising initiative during the Beaux Arts Ball event. The recipient must be a full-time sophomore entering his or her junior year.

Carolyn and Julian Magnus Family Scholarship

The Scholarship Committee and the Director of Financial Aid select the recipient of this scholarship. This need-based award goes to an independent student who is working his or her way through college.

56

Judy and John Ruthven Scholarship

This $500 tuition scholarship is awarded to a student for representational or realistic painting, preferably of nature. Contact the Scholarship Committee for more information.

John Fischer / Leonard Sive Traditional Painting Scholarship This $500 scholarship is awarded to a student who paints in a realistic or representational style. The Painting and Drawing faculty members choose the recipient. The scholarship began in 2005 in honor of alumni John Fischer and Leonard Sive.

Gary Gaffney and Jacqueline Wollman Scholarship Fund

This fund is supported by a contribution from Suder’s Art Store to provide art supplies to students majoring in Painting and Drawing. The Painting and Drawing faculty members choose the winner.

Hyde Park Square Art Show Scholarship

The largest one-day art show in Greater Cincinnati awards scholarships to area students majoring in the arts at local colleges and universities. Scholarship recipients then have the opportunity to exhibit their work in the juried show, which takes place annually.

Art Academy of Cincinnati Faculty Portfolio Awards

At the end of the academic year, freshmen, sophomores, and juniors who have a minimum GPA of 3.0 qualify for consideration for Faculty Portfolio Awards respective to their year levels. Full-time faculty members select the winners by majority vote.

Art History Colloquium Award

At least one AAC student is chosen each year to participate in this colloquium, which includes presentations by a number of schools in the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities (GCCCU).

The AICAD New York Studio Residency Program Award

The AICAD New York Studio Residency Program is a unique opportunity for students entering their junior year. Sophomores apply, and full-time faculty members select the winners. This residency award allows one student per semester to relocate to New York


City to create his or her art in a studio environment in conjunction with the School of Visual Arts (SVA). This program is organized by the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD.)

The Art Academy Writer’s Award

This award is a gift certificate and cash to acknowledge students who excel in writing. The Art Academy of Cincinnati Liberal Arts professors choose the recipient.

The Liberal Arts Department Book Award

This award is a gift certificate to a local bookstore to acknowledge a student who loves to read. The Art Academy of Cincinnati Liberal Arts professors choose the recipient.

Folger Memorial Trust Purchase Awards

The Folger Memorial Trust Purchase Awards permit the Art Academy of Cincinnati to acquire student art for its permanent collection, while giving students the opportunity to compete for cash awards. Students compete during the annual Student Juried Exhibition.

Helms Trust Purchase Awards

The Helms Trust purchase awards permit the Art Academy of Cincinnati to acquire student art for its permanent collection, while giving students the opportunity to compete for cash awards. The Helms Trust awards four cash prizes for realistic or representational two and three-dimensional works. No minimum GPA is required. Leonard Weakley, the representative of the Helms Trust, and two Art Academy representatives select the winners.

Additional Scholarship Programs and Information Scholarship and Financial Aid Scams www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/scholarship/index. shtml

Fast Web

www.fastweb.monster.com

Federal Student Aid www.studentaid.ed.gov

Art Academy’s Financial Aid Web Page www.artacademy.edu/admissions/undergraduate/ financial_aid

U.S. Department of Education www.fafsa.ed.gov

Ohio Higher Education Ohio Board of Regents www.regents.state.oh.us

KHEAA, Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority www.kheaa.com

Students must check their Art Academy email accounts for information about internal and external scholarship opportunities, as campus email is the official means of communication.

Student Services

The Department of Student Services supports the development of AAC students by managing Residence Life, Student Activities, Career Services, Internships, Counseling Services, Tutoring, Student Orientation, and Student Advocacy.

Community as Campus

Over-The-Rhine is essential to the Art Academy of Cincinnati campus experience. Throughout the year, community events are tailored toward students to increase student knowledge of neighborhood activity and to encourage ongoing campus involvement. Announcements of community events, including Final Friday happenings, Second Sunday events, Washington Park programming, and the many music venues and businesses in the area are communicated by the Director of Student Services, the Marketing and Communications Specialist, and by the Website Administrator via the events calendar on the Art Academy website: www.artacademy.edu.

The Commons

The Commons is located on the first floor of the north building, where students may purchase and enjoy lunch at Kaldi’s, meet with guests, study in groups, and socialize. A microwave oven is located on the north wall near the food service area, and another is in the vending machine room nearby.

57


Student Clubs and Organizations The following is a list of student clubs and organizations. Please contact the faculty or staff members listed below to learn how to become involved. Poetry Workshop

Matt Hart

mhart @artacademy.edu

AAC Comic Makers Association

Ken Henson

khenson @artacademy.edu

Art Academy Book Club

Paige Williams

pwilliams @artacademy.edu

In addition to AAC Galleries, there are two public exhibition spaces maintained by the Art Academy. The 13th Street window space and Exposure/13 Gallery are available for students to install and showcase their work to the public. Contact Director of Student Services, Galen Crawford for more information - gcrawford@ artacademy.edu, and his phone number is 513-562-6273.

Student Programming Committee

Galen Crawford

gcrawford @artacademy.edu

Clean Cubes

AIGA Cincinnati

Mark Thomas

mthomas @artacademy.edu

Student Gallery Committee

Galen Crawford

gcrawford @artacademy.edu

Student Ambassadors

Students who are committed to promoting the culture of the Art Academy community, reaching out to prospective students, and working at Art Academy events are encouraged to become Student Ambassadors. This is an opportunity to be part of a select group of students, to enhance your educational experience, to assist others in developing their goals, and to earn money as a student employee. You are encouraged to engage in dialogue with other students, faculty, staff, visitors, and guests about innovative ways to promote the social life of the Art Academy. Contact Anissa Lewis in Admissions (alewis@ artacademy.edu or 513-562-8766) to learn more about the Student Ambassador program.

Campus Galleries and Public Exhibition Spaces

Located on the first floor north, the Ruthe G. Pearlman Gallery features rotating exhibitions by regional and national artists; it is open to the public free of charge. The Exhibitions Committee selects artists who show in this gallery. Located on the lower level, the Chidlaw Gallery showcases primarily student work. The Convergys Gallery is located in the lobby of the Art Academy. Students who are interested in gaining hands-on experience in gallery administration are encouraged to contact Assistant Professor Matthew Dayler, the Chair of the Exhibitions Committee for possible student employment. He is available at mdayler@artacademy. 58

edu. Students may also sign up to manage the Chidlaw Gallery, a student-run gallery. Such work could be the basis of an internship, a work-study job, or other venture, based on the needs of the student, the Exhibitions Committee, and the Art Academy.

Clean Cubes are spaces available for exhibition of visual art or performance art and are located on the sixth floor and the Lower Level respectively. They are available on a first-come, first-served basis, and students must reserve them with Professor Keith Benjamin, who manages both spaces. Contact him at kbenjamin@artacademy.edu or 513-562-6272. Please reserve these spaces with him, as Professor Benjamin must approve the content, duration of the reservation, and other factors. You must fill out and sign a Clean Cube Contract, which must be signed by the designated faculty contact. Provide a copy of the completed form to the Universal Protection Service Post Commander, located at the Front Desk. Unless a properly executed contract is on file with Universal Protection Service, you will not be permitted access to the space.

Employment Opportunities

The Art Academy employs students through the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program. If you are interested in employment through the FWS program, verify eligibility through the Financial Aid Office (513-562-8773) and then seek campus placement through the Office of the Registrar (513-562-8749.) Students fill out and sign time sheets weekly and submit them to their supervisors, who will sign them and turn them in to the Finance Office each Friday. Campus work-study positions pay the Minimum Wage as established by the State of Ohio. Freelance, part-time, full-time and work-study positions are available. Job listings are posted on the student Facebook page and are distributed through the Art Academy’s email system.


Resources for Learning and Research Library:

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County (PCLC) is the official library for Art Academy of Cincinnati, and students are expected to use the library for out-of-class research. Located at 9th and Walnut Streets, it is only three blocks from campus. Full-time Art Academy students may apply for borrowing privileges.

appropriate accommodations to be made on an individual basis. Reasonable accommodations will be made after the student provides a completed “Request for Special Accommodations” form. Proper completion includes a signature from a licensed physician or mental health specialist. Forms are located in the first floor hallway across from Room N112. Once documentation is received, the student’s request for special accommodations will be granted, and his or her instructors will be notified of this.

To Apply For a Library Card:

To receive a PCLC library card, students must present a picture ID and provide their residential address and date of birth. Visit www.cincinnatilibrary.org/account/ application.asp for more information. Each student is responsible for obtaining his or her own library card. Only the person named on the library card may check materials out with the card. You may not permit others to use your library card to check out materials. You are responsible for library materials while such materials are charged out to you, as well as for their return to the library and their condition upon return. Materials may not be transferred or lent to any other person after they have been checked out. Do not leave library materials in unsecured places. Materials that are not in use should be secured in your locker. Students will be held responsible for lost, damaged, or stolen library materials and will have to reimburse PCLC for the loss.

Quiet Study Area:

Located on the second floor North, just beyond the Dezignery (the Senior Design Studio), the Quiet Study Area is furnished with study carrels, books, comfortable seating and pleasant, natural light for students who wish to escape from the sights and sounds of the main activities of the campus.

Resources for Accessibility and Accommodation Disability Services

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Art Academy of Cincinnati provides a range of services to students who have documented chronic medical, physical, psychological, or learning disabilities. To be eligible for disability accommodations, students must first complete a Request for Special Accommodations Form and meet with the Director of Student Services. Even students who have received special accommodations in the past must meet with the Director of Student Services to discuss and document

Confidentiality of Disability Matters

Any and all information from medical records discussed during the course of granted disability accommodations is confidential. However, if those who seek such information in order to carry out their job functions in respect to providing the requested accommodations, then access will be granted to such personnel on a needto-know basis. Faculty members will not have access to diagnostic information. Any information that faculty members need to know in order to provide necessary accommodations will be shared on the Request for Special Accommodations Form, which is signed by the student giving consent to release only the information that is needed to arrange the requested accommodations.

Counseling Services

The Art Academy of Cincinnati has onsite counseling services located in the Administrative Suite, room S255. Email counselor@artacademy.edu or call 513-562-6270 to schedule an appointment. Confidentiality will be strictly enforced except in the following events: • Student expresses suicidal ideation. • Student expresses an intent to commit physical harm to others. In the event that the student expresses suicidal ideation, only the information that is relevant to the situation will be shared with a third party in order to provide safety to the student.

Counselors and Confidentiality

Counselors do not report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. However, as a matter of school policy, they are encouraged if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures for reporting crimes confidentially on an anonymous and voluntary basis for inclusion in the annual crime statistics, which could help reveal a 59


crime pattern and thus alert the campus community to a potential danger.

should be brought to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Student Health Records

The Art Academy makes a clear delineation between formal and informal student complaints:

All students born after January 1, 1957 must have immunizations for measles, mumps and rubella. Health forms documenting this information are kept in students’ permanent files.

1. Informal complaints are recommended when the matter is not severe in nature. These complaints are verbal and initiate an investigation into the complaint and merited advocacy for the student or students. 2. In cases in which the complaint is severe in nature, requiring administrative action, students are encouraged to file a formal complaint. Formal complaints must be submitted in writing to clearly define a complainant, an accused party, and a succinct record of grievances. The date of complaint and signature(s) of the complainant(s) must appear on the document in order to be treated as a formal complaint. Once a formal complaint is received, the Art Academy shall follow the Student Conduct Policies and Procedures. If the grievance is in reference to harassment or discrimination under Title IX, Galen Crawford, the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s Title IX Coordinator, will follow applicable federal laws and processes. Student Conduct Procedures will be utilized to investigate Title IX incidents. 3. The administration has the right and ability to reclassify an informal complaint as a formal complaint, an action that requires that the complaint be handled in accordance with the processes and procedures of formal complaints. 4. Students who bring legitimate concerns to the attention of Art Academy faculty or administrators should not fear retaliation. If students perceive that retaliation has occurred, they should report this immediately to the Director of Student Services.

College Immunizations Policy

Medical or Mental Health Emergency Resources

The Christ Hospital Emergency Room 2139 Auburn Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2235

Mobile Crisis Unit at University of Cincinnati Medical Center

Respondent will evaluate the situation in person to determine whether action is needed. Immediate response is not available. 513-584-8577

Talbert House Crisis Hotline Service available 24/7 513-281-2273 (281 CARE)

Mount Auburn Urgent Care

Open Monday – Saturday 9am-7pm 2230 Auburn Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-621-2200

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Bringing a Concern to the Attention of the Art Academy of Cincinnati

Any student who has a serious concern or complaint should first present his or her concern to Galen Crawford, the Director of Student Services, who serves as the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s Title IX Coordinator. If the complaint is of sexual misconduct, Galen Crawford will be contacted to initiate an investigation consistent with all relevant federal guidelines. Academic issues pertaining to a specific department, including complaints about faculty members should be brought to the Department Chair who supervises the faculty member in question. If the complaint is regarding the Director of Student Services or a Department Chair, said complaint 60

Policies and Procedures for Student Conduct

The Art Academy of Cincinnati has established standards of student conduct and procedures for enforcement. The standards of conduct are published in this Catalog, the Residence Life License Agreement, and the Student Studio Space and Rules Contract. All applicable policies will be referred to as the Code hereafter. The violation or attempted violation of any of the acts outlined in the Code will be considered violations of accepted conduct. In the enforcement of the Art Academy policies, all students minimally will have the right to receive notice of the alleged violation(s) and the time, date, and location of the opportunity to respond to the alleged violation(s).


A student shall be responsible for his or her conduct from the time of application for admission through the awarding of a degree. Student conduct policies and procedures are substantially secondary to the use of example, guidance, advising, mentoring, and admonition in the development of responsible student conduct. When these preferred means fail to prevent, resolve, or deter problems of student conduct, procedural safeguards allow for the imposition of appropriate sanctions designed to aid in students’ moral and ethical development, while protecting students from undue imposition of serious penalties.

Definitions

Absolved – A result of the conduct process in which the student is held blameless and not in violation of the Code. Appeal – A student’s right to have his or her case reviewed by the President in order to determine the fairness of the decision. Bullying – Includes physical, verbal (oral or written), electronically transmitted (cyber or high-tech), and psychological abuse of another person. Conduct Hearing – A process in which the facts of an alleged violation of the Code are presented to the appropriate Conduct Officer to determine whether a violation(s) took place and which sanction(s) are appropriate. Conduct Officers – Art Academy administrators and staff members who have been trained and authorized by the College to hear cases of student misconduct. Conduct Review Panel – A body whose sole purpose is to hear cases of alleged misconduct in order to reach a determination of responsibility and to assign appropriate sanctions. Discrimination – Consists of conduct of any type (e.g., oral, written, graphic, or physical) directed against a person (or group of persons) because of his or her (or their) race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, marital or familial status, sexual orientation, veteran or military status, gender identity, or any protected characteristic, which is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive as to limit or deny a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from an educational program or an employee’s ability to perform or participate in a work environment.

Disruption – The act of interrupting or impeding the academic and/or social environment of the Art Academy, including, but not limited to, violations of any written policies or procedures approved by the Art Academy. Harassment – an unwelcome interaction that creates an intimidating, hostile, or demeaning work, living, and/or educational environment. Preponderance of the Evidence – A standard of proof utilized in accordance with the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s conduct and grievance processes. Preponderance of the Evidence requires that the accusing party present evidence sufficient to prove his or her case by at least 51% likelihood of probability. Under this standard, the accusing party must persuade the hearing panel by a measure of no less than 51% that a student accused of violating the Code is culpable. If this standard of proof is not met, the student will be absolved of the charge or charges. Sanction – An outcome imposed for the violation of the Code. Generally, sanctions are educational in nature and are intended to modify the student’s behavior as well as build an awareness of personal responsibility and community standards. Student Advocate – Any person the student would like to accompany him or her during a conduct hearing. The advocate is not permitted to speak on the student’s behalf, but may provide moral support and individual counsel.

Student Code of Conduct

The Code of Student Conduct, hereinafter referred to as the Code, is established to foster and protect the Art Academy’s mission, vision and educational goal; to foster the scholarly, artistic, and civic development of our students in a safe and secure learning environment; and to protect the people, facilities, and environments that support the Art Academy’s students, staff, faculty, and visitors. Student conduct that adversely affects the Art Academy community may be cause for disciplinary action. Alleged violations of the Code and/or infractions of applicable federal, state, and/or local laws will initiate the disciplinary process. Such conduct undermines trust, arouses fear and suspicion, and restricts freedom of access to the Art Academy’s resources. Therefore, such conduct will not be tolerated. Students who allegedly violate the Code must have a hearing with a Conduct Officer to determine responsibility and sanctions. 61


In addition to being bound by the Code, students are subject to municipal, state, and federal laws while enrolled at the Art Academy. Violations of applicable laws may also constitute violations of the Code, and in such instances, the Art Academy may proceed with its own disciplinary processes under the policy independently of any criminal proceeding involving the same conduct and may impose sanctions for violation of the Code even if such criminal proceeding is not yet resolved or is resolved in the student’s favor. Any student found responsible for misconduct is subject to appropriate disciplinary sanctions. Misconduct is defined by the Art Academy of Cincinnati as: 1. Violation of the Residence Life License Agreement. 2. Violation of the Student Studio Space & Rules Contract. 3. Violation of any written Art Academy policy. 4. Violation of applicable local, state, or federal law. 5. Dishonesty: cheating, plagiarizing, furnishing false information to the Art Academy, forgery, or the use of Art Academy documents or identification to defraud. 6. Disruption of teaching, administration, or any authorized Art Academy function. 7. Behavior that injures or endangers the safety, health, or well-being of another person. This may include: threats or implied threats of physical harm; actions or statements that demean, degrade, or disgrace another person, attempts to inflict mental or bodily harm upon oneself or another person. 8. Possession, distribution, or sale of alcohol, or alcohol containers in unauthorized locations during any events held on campus. 9. Unlawful use, administration, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of illegal drugs, prescription or over-the-counter medications, drug paraphernalia, or alcoholic beverages on campus. Additionally, no product or substance may be used in a manner that is unsafe or inconsistent with the product’s stated guidelines for use or consumption. 10. Attempted or actual theft, damage, or vandalism to the property of others, or to Art Academy property or property under the control of the Art Academy. 11. Unauthorized entry into college facilities or unauthorized use of Art Academy property or the property of others. This includes unsupervised use of power tools and removal of any Art Academy 62

property from its proper campus location. For authorization, see the Director of Facilities. 12. Failure to comply with directions of officials of the Art Academy of Cincinnati acting in the performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so. 13. Misuse of Art Academy computers and computer services such as the Internet in an illegal manner or in a manner inconsistent with the Art Academy Mission. This includes the use of email or other forms of electronic communication in a manner that is threatening, malicious, or invasive of another individual’s privacy. 14. Possession of any firearms, weapons, fireworks, explosives, ammunition, or abuse of flammable substances on Art Academy property or replicas of such items that may reasonably be mistaken for any items listed above. 15. False report of an emergency, including tampering with fire safety equipment and causing, making or circulating a false report or warning of fire, explosion, crime, or other catastrophe. 16. Use of spray paint, aerosols, or resins outside of a spray-booth. 17. Gambling for money or other items of value. 18. Any and all hostile, threatening, or intimidating behavior that by its very nature would be interpreted by a reasonable person to threaten or endanger the health, safety or well being of any person is contradictory to the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s Core Values and therefore not acceptable. Examples of such behavior may include, but are not limited to: »» An act(s) that alarms or seriously disrupts another person’s ability to participate in any aspect of AAC life is prohibited; »» Communicating verbally either directly or indirectly through another party, by telephone, regular or electronic mail, voice mail or any verbal, mechanical, electronic or written communication in a manner that causes or is likely to cause injury, distress, or emotional or physical discomfort is also prohibited. »» Any form of harassment, including sexual harassment or harassment based on perceived or actual identities. 19. Bias Related Incidents: Any violation of the Code motivated by a consideration of race, sex (including gender identity), color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, or sexual orientation may subject the student to the imposition


of a sanction more severe than would be imposed in the absence of such motivation. 20. Violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction. 21. Failure to exercise reasonable care toward any person(s) or their property. 22. Attempting to commit and/or complicity with any prohibited act(s) of the Code of Student Conduct. 23. Invasion of Privacy: The recording, filming, photographing, viewing, transmitting or producing the image or voice of another person without his or her knowledge and expressed consent while such person is in an environment that is considered private or where there is an expectation of privacy are actions that are strictly prohibited. In such circumstances, the use of undisclosed and/or hidden recording devices is prohibited, as is the storing, transmission and/or distribution of any such recordings. This policy does not pertain to the recording of public events or discussions or recordings made for law enforcement purposes.

Conduct Administrators Conduct Officers

The Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Director of Student Services, or their designees, are the only individuals authorized to act as Conduct Officers, conduct hearings to determine responsibility and impose appropriate sanctions. Conduct Officers are responsible for following Student Conduct procedures and may impose any sanction outlined in the Code.

Conduct Review Panel

Based on the severity of a case or at the student’s request, a Conduct Officer may refer cases of alleged violations to the Conduct Review Panel. The Panel is, at minimum, comprised of one full-time faculty member, one student and one staff member. The Conduct Review Panel is responsible for following all applicable policies and procedures within the Academic Catalog. 1. Formation of the Conduct Review Panel An ad-hoc Conduct Review Panel shall be formed as necessary. 2. Assembling the Panel In order to encourage a fair and balanced hearing in which the community and its constituents are represented, the Conduct Review Panel shall be composed of: »» The staff representative »» Two faculty representatives selected by the Vice President of Academic Affairs

»» One student representative selected by the Director of Student Services »» The student against whom charges have been made has the right to invite, at any point during the disciplinary process, an advocate in any or all related meetings/discussions where the student would be present or engaged. The advocate may not partake in any discussion as part of the conduct process, but may be present to provide moral support and individual counsel to the accused. 3. Panel Officers The Conduct Review Panel shall elect a Chair by majority vote when the Panel is first assembled. The Chair has the responsibility to ensure that the Panel is timely, unbiased, and productive in its work. This includes scheduling, managing, and documenting the Panel’s processes and determinations. 4. Replacement of the Conduct Review Panel Chair In cases in which the Chair steps down or resigns from the Panel, a vote for a new Chair will be coordinated by the Director of Student Services within a two-week period of receiving the Chair’s resignation. Should members of the Panel wish to replace the sitting Chair, the concerned member(s) should communicate directly with the Director of Student Services. Should the Director of Student Services determine that the Chair should be replaced, a new Chair will be selected as set forth in Section 3 above. All members of the Conduct Review Panel are expected to maintain absolute confidentiality with regard to all matters related to the Panel’s work and in relation to the student or students involved in the case. Panel members who compromise confidentiality in respect to the case may be asked to resign from the Panel and may be subject to disciplinary action themselves. 5. Disqualification of Panel Members A member of the Conduct Review Panel will be disqualified from serving on the Panel if the member in question »» is filing the charge(s) against the accused student, »» is related to the accused student, or »» has another conflict of interest as determined by the Conduct Review Panel or the Director of Student Services. Any such member of the Conduct Review Panel must disqualify himself or herself from sitting on the Panel with respect to any portion of the disciplinary proceeding, including any hearings regarding 63


responsibility, discipline, or any other matter related to the case. If that member of the Panel fails to disqualify himself or herself, then the Director of Student Services reserves the right to disqualify that Panel member. If a member of the Panel is disqualified from further review of a case, then that member shall be replaced in the following manner: »» The President of the College shall appoint a replacement staff member. »» The Vice President of Academic Affairs shall appoint a replacement faculty member. »» The Director of Student Services shall appoint a replacement member of the student body.

If the student(s) or any member of the Conduct Review Panel has a concern regarding the composition of the Conduct Review Panel as it relates to the scheduled proceedings, the concern shall be brought to the Director of Student Services for consideration. If the Director of Student Services determines that the composition of the Panel should be changed, the procedure outlined above shall be followed. 6. Conduct Review Panel Procedures Within the context of the policies and procedures stated herein, the Chair of the Conduct Review Panel shall be responsible for the Panel’s procedures and must ensure that the accused student(s) are provided fair and thorough opportunities to present information and to respond to the information presented by others during the hearing.

The Conduct Conference

The purpose of the Conduct Conference is to provide the Art Academy a means of making findings of fact and to arrive at a decision regarding student behavior. Students alleged to be in violation of the Code are provided the opportunity to have a hearing to ensure fairness, truth, and justice. Individual Conduct Officers or the Conduct Review Panel may adjudicate Conduct Conferences. These Conduct Officers must adhere to the following procedures: 1. The hearing is closed to the public. At the request of the charged student, an advocate may be admitted. 2. The Conduct Officers shall advise the student of the allegations against him/her. 3. The Conduct Officers shall allow only information pertinent to the case to be introduced at the hearing. 4. In hearings involving more than one charged student, the Conduct Officers may permit or require the hearings concerning each student to be 64

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

conducted separately. The Conduct Officers have both the responsibility and the right to determine involvement of Art Academy community members. An audio recording of the proceedings may be made at the hearing. In addition, notes on the proceedings shall be kept for each hearing. If the student is found in violation of the Code, these records will be maintained in a file in the office of the Director of Student Services until the accused graduates from the Art Academy or is no longer a matriculated student of the Art Academy of Cincinnati. The Conduct Officers hear evidence, make findings of fact, and impose appropriate sanctions. Culpability for violating the Code shall be assigned using a preponderance of the evidence standard. Conduct Officers are responsible for informing a student of his/her right to appeal. Appeals can be lodged by the accused only, and they must be received by the President within five business days from the time the student is given the determination from the Conduct Officers. A record of the appeal shall be made, and the appeals process will be initiated upon receipt of a written appeal. The student will be notified of the appeal result within five business days of receipt of said appeal. Each appeal will be treated with seriousness, and the President is responsible for determining whether the Conduct Officers followed the appropriate procedures and imposed appropriate discipline. If the President finds that the Conduct Officers came to an incorrect determination, or if the discipline is grossly inappropriate based upon the severity of the case, the President may change the recommendation and/or discipline accordingly.

Failure to Appear or Present Evidence

If the accused student is unable to appear before the assigned Conduct Officers on the date specified in the notice, he or she should notify the Chair of the Conduct Review Panel, or a Conduct Officer in writing at least 24 hours prior to the scheduled date and time. A compelling reason should be provided, with documentation as appropriate. The Conduct Officer, or Conduct Review Panel Chair, in consultation with Panel members, as needed, will consider the request and determine its outcome, including a new date and time for the hearing in cases in which the request is approved. In cases in which the request is denied, or when the accused student fails to appear before the Conduct Officers or Conduct Review Panel without giving proper


notice prior to the date and time specified in the notice, the Conduct Officers may consider all information at their disposal and may determine the appropriate course of action, to include ruling on the case. No student, however, may be found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct solely because the student failed to appear. Guided by the values and practices of excellent scholarship and a responsible, ethical community, the Conduct Officers and Conduct Review Panel shall conduct the research necessary to come to a reasonable conclusion, and in doing so, may request and review pertinent records and/or files, or meet with individuals and groups as needed.

Student Rights

Rights of the Accused 1. The right to receive notification of the section(s) of the Code allegedly violated and the date, time, and place of any conference or hearing on the alleged violation. 2. The right to challenge the objectivity or fairness of any of the persons serving as a Conduct Officer. The decision to uphold any challenge made by the accused rests with the Panel Chair or Conduct Officer. 3. The right to consult an advisor before, during, and after any conference or hearing. 4. The right to review a copy of each document pertinent to the alleged violation upon request. 5. The right to be notified of the name of each person expected to testify at any conference or hearing upon request. 6. The right to introduce documents, to call witnesses, add to present other evidence. The right to call witnesses is accompanied by the obligation to provide the name of each witness, in writing, two business days in advance of a Conduct Conference to the appropriate Conduct Officer. 7. The right to be present at Conduct Conferences on the alleged violation and to make or refrain from making statements. 8. The right to ask questions of any person participating in or providing information at a hearing. All questions asked by the accused are to be directed to the chair of the proceedings. In certain circumstances, questioning may be done outside the physical presence of those participating in the hearing.

9. The right to receive written notification of any decision made. 10. The right to appeal the decision of a hearing or conference in accordance with AAC procedures. 11. The right to review existing records of any pertinent hearing in accordance with all state laws and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. 12. The right to request postponement of a hearing for good cause shown. In most cases, a postponement will only be granted due to an academically related commitment. The decision to postpone a hearing rests with the Conduct Officers.

Rights of the Complainant 1. The right to be kept informed of the status of proceedings throughout the process. 2. The right, in all disciplinary proceedings, to have the presence of an advisor. An advisor may consult with the student, but not address the Conduct Officers or participate directly in the hearing. 3. The right to request to answer questions posed by the accused outside of the physical presence of the accused. The Conduct Officers will determine whether such a request will be granted. 4. The right to submit, orally or in writing, an impact statement to any Conduct Officer. 5. The right to receive timely notification of any decision made (only in cases involving sexual assault and/or physical assault). 6. The right to be granted, if these changes are reasonably available, a change in living assignment, academic arrangement, or other steps essential to preventing unnecessary or unwanted contact.

Student Sanctioning Guidelines

Following the adjudication process, if it is determined that a student has violated the Code, the student will be sanctioned according to the nature and severity by which he or she violated the Code. It is expected that a repeat violation would result in a sanction(s) of increasingly severe nature, up to and including expulsion.

Disciplinary sanctions will be based on: »» The nature and severity of the violation. »» The damage incurred to a person and/or property.

65


»» The past record of violations: i.e. the number, the frequency, and severity. »» The cooperativeness and forthrightness of the student in remedying or making restitution in regards to the violation will be taken into consideration. Infractions of a very serious nature may result in immediate expulsion. Any student expelled by the Art Academy of Cincinnati will have the right to appeal. Each Conduct Officer may propose appropriate sanctions based on a student’s degree of culpability in violating the Code and the severity of the incident. The following sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct: 1. Loss of Privileges Specified privileges may be withheld for a designated period of time, such as loss of studio space, among other privileges. 2. Restitution Students found to have violated the Code may be required to make compensatory payment for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement. 3. Fines Students deemed to be in violation of the Code may be charged a fine not to exceed $50 per case. Fines may be assessed as: »» $25 fine for a finding of responsibility for a violation of the Code during an incident. »» $25 fine due to failure to attend a meeting/ conduct conference or satisfy a sanction by the required date. 4. Warning A written reprimand that identifies the student’s violation (or violations) of the Code. 5. Probation If a student is found to be in violation of the Code, a designated probationary period of time during which more severe disciplinary sanctions may be imposed. 6. Parental Notification A Conduct Officer may notify a parent or guardian of a student who is under 21 years of age (at the time of communication) that the student has committed a violation of law or college policy pertaining to drugs and/or alcohol. 66

7.

8. Order of No-Contact An Order of No-Contact prohibits interaction between or among students who are involved in a conduct dispute. Such an order is designed to help minimize further altercations between those involved. Students who are subject to Orders of No-Contact shall not contact each other using any means whatsoever. This includes, but is not limited to comments, words or gestures in person, through postal mail, email, social networking sites, or by having others (friends, acquaintances, family members etc.) act on behalf of the students involved. 9. Suspension from the College Separation of the student from the College may be imposed for a definite period of time as determined by the Conduct Officers. In such an event, the Conduct Officers will notify the student of the suspension via a written letter, which states 1.) the time period during which the suspension is in effect; 2.) the terms of the suspension; and 3.) the conditions under which eligibility to return may be satisfied. Students who are suspended during the semester will be withdrawn from all courses and noted as withdrawn from the College. Conditions for readmission will be specified at the time of suspension. 10. Expulsion In the event that a student is expelled from the College during a semester, the student will be withdrawn from all courses, and his or her transcript will include a notation stating that the student was expelled. Students who are expelled may reapply after one (1) year with the presentation of a new portfolio. 11. Educational Sanctioning An order requiring the student to perform mandated service or to participate in an education program or activity, including, but not limited to, an educational seminar, a treatment program for alcohol or drug abuse, psychological counseling, or other program/ task designed to assist the student in learning more about how their behavior impacted themselves and/ or the community. 12. Other Sanctions The Conduct Officers may suggest other sanctions that are suitable in light of the student’s offense.

Multiple Sanctions

Multiple sanctions may be applied based on the nature and severity of the responsibility ascribed to a student for Code violation(s). The presiding Conduct Officer has the sole discretion in applying appropriate sanctions for each case.


Voting on Sanctions

The Conduct Review Panel shall determine, by majority vote, the sanction(s) for each violation. Any or all of sanctions 1-3 may be imposed for any single violation, in addition to any of the sanctions listed as 4-11.

Sexual Misconduct Policies and Procedures

Due to the particular nature of sexual misconduct, as well as federal requirements, the following policies and procedures pertain specifically to matters involving sexual misconduct. The Art Academy of Cincinnati strictly prohibits sexual misconduct of any kind. Incoming students and employees are informed of ways to prevent sexual misconduct, including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, through orientation programs for new students and employees. Additionally, ongoing campus-wide programs to prevent such incidents are conducted during the academic year through informational campaigns and workshop opportunities.

What is Sexual Misconduct?

Actions that fall under the category of sexual misconduct include sexual assault; unwelcomed sexual advances; coercion for sexual favors; non-consensual sexual touching or contact; domestic or dating violence; stalking; actions committed through exploitation of another’s mental or physical condition, for example, impairment due to alcohol or drugs, of which the assailant was aware or should have been aware; sexual harassment; gender-based discrimination; or any other sexual activity done without the consent of both parties. Sexual assault involves sexual contact with a party whose ability to resist or to consent is substantially impaired due to an administered substance or a mental or physical condition, or when the act is compelled through force or the threat of force. Domestic violence is defined as knowingly causing, attempting, or threatening to cause physical harm to a member of a family or household. Dating violence refers to violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. Stalking means engaging in action directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress. See US Code 42, CH. 136, Sec.

13925 and Ohio Revised Code Title 29, Ch. 2907.01 and 2919.25 for legal definitions of these terms. Sexual harassment is a form of sexual misconduct and includes unwelcomed verbal, visual, and/or physical sexual behavior that is severe, persistent, or pervasive and that occurs under the following circumstances: 1. When submission to such conduct is made an explicit or implicit term or condition of employment, enrollment, status, or service; 2. When submission to—or rejection of—such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for a decision affecting such an individual; or 3. When such conduct has the purpose or the effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.

Requirement of Consent

Consent for sexual contact must be unambiguously obtained prior to any sexual activity, including the continuance or escalation of any ongoing sexual activity. Consent for sexual contact requires a deliberate avowal characterized by an active state that is informed, knowing, and voluntary. Silence, in and of itself, does not constitute consent and cannot be interpreted as such. Additionally, the consumption of alcohol by any involved individuals is never a justification for, nor an excuse for, sexual misconduct.

Evidence Collection

Victims of sexual violence can have evidence collected up to 96 hours after a sexual assault. All Cincinnati-area hospital emergency departments can provide evidence collection and can request that a survivor advocate be available for the victim. The collection of evidence does not require the victim to file a report or press charges. It does, however, secure any evidence in the event that the victim considers filing or pressing charges in the future. Hospital Emergency Room personnel must call law enforcement services to file a report. However, the victim has the option to remain completely anonymous or to decline to speak with law enforcement officials at all. Victims should be aware that brushing teeth, bathroomrelated wiping, showering, shampooing, laundering, shaving, smoking, drinking, and/or eating can contaminate, undermine, or even remove evidence. It 67


is recommended that the victim present for evidence collection any article of clothing or other personal effect that had been present during the assault, as such articles may retain retrievable evidence.

coordinating investigator determines that extenuating circumstances require an earlier meeting or hearing date. The notice will include a general description of the alleged policy violation(s) and the time, date, and location of the meeting or hearing.

Filing a Report

After conducting the investigation, the coordinating investigator will present the case file to the Director of Student Services. The Director will make an administrative decision based on the evidence presented or convene the Student Conduct Committee to serve as a Conduct Review Panel, which will hear the case. The college reserves the right to add or change administrators to the Conduct Review Panel at its discretion.

Victims have the option to file a report with the Cincinnati Police Department. This could lead to a criminal investigation and legal proceedings. Victims can file a report while at the Emergency Room or later. The statute of limitations for filing reports of rape is 20 years.

Duty to Investigate and Limits of Confidentiality

When an allegation of sexual misconduct comes to the attention of any school official, the college will investigate the incident. The AAC is required by law to investigate credible allegations of sexual misconduct, whether communicated verbally, in writing, or through hearsay. This obligation may exist whether or not the alleged victim chooses to pursue charges or to participate in the investigatory process. Through incidents involving sexual assault will be reported to local law enforcement authorities, the Art Academy will disclose the name of the alleged victim to law enforcement authorities only with that person’s permission. The alleged victim or any other reporting individual may choose not to participate in any action taken by the Art Academy. Requests for anonymity, while not automatically upheld, will be accommodated to the greatest extent possible. However, a request for anonymity may result in conditions that make it difficult for the school to conduct a full and proper investigation. Students who desire strict confidentiality may discuss their concerns with a licensed counselor, who is exempt from legal requirements to report the incident to other college administrators or law enforcement personnel, except in cases where the individual or others are at significant risk of harm.

Sexual Misconduct Investigation and Hearing Procedures

When an allegation of sexual misconduct comes to the attention of any school official, that official will report the allegation to the Vice President for Academic Affairs who will assign a coordinating investigator. The coordinating investigator will conduct a fact-finding investigation with involved individuals and those who may have relevant information to share about the case. The respondent will be notified at least two calendar days prior to the date of any investigatory meeting or hearing, unless the 68

During any meetings or hearings, the college may separate the complainant and respondent, or any witnesses, from the other party in order to provide an orderly and emotionally safe environment for the proceedings. The complainant and the respondent each have the right to have witnesses speak to the coordinating investigator on behalf of the respective parties. In the event that a hearing is held, witnesses or other individuals may be invited to address the panel during the hearing, at the discretion of the hearing officer or panel. The complainant and the respondent each have the respective right to have legal counsel with them during any portion of the investigation, including a hearing. However, individuals from outside the college community, including legal representation, will not be permitted to speak except to give private advice to their respective clients unless asked a direct question by the investigator, the Director of Student Services, or the hearing panel. At its discretion, the college may impose immediate and temporary remedies to protect any individuals involved during the time that the investigation and hearing are underway. In particular, the complainant or the respondent may receive assistance from the Director of Student Services in changing academic schedules and oncampus living arrangements, among other remedies. Campus investigations and hearings conform to basic rules of fairness and are conducted by individuals who receive annual training on conducting such processes. A campus hearing is not a court trial. The main purpose of any investigation or hearing is to consider allegations and to determine the likeliness that a violation of the Student Code of Conduct has occurred by considering the evidence presented. The hearing officer or panel will use a preponderance of the evidence procedure to determine


whether a student has or has not violated a provision of the Code.

bias, or the presentation of new evidence that was not available at the time the initial finding was made.

In the absence of an involved party at a meeting or hearing, the hearing officer or panel will decide whether to continue without the absent individual. Failure to attend a meeting or hearing may affect the outcome and the sanctions imposed. An accused student’s absence, without sufficient reason, may be grounds for disciplinary action as well.

The Vice President for Academic Affairs may make direct decision on the appeal, convene a new hearing panel, or remand the case over to an investigator for further consideration. The decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs is final.

A record of any meetings or hearings may be made either by audio or video recording at the discretion of the coordinating investigator or hearing panel. All persons present will be notified if a meeting is to be recorded. Both the complainant and the respondent will be informed of the outcome of any investigation and hearing, including the finding and any sanctions imposed that directly impact the complainant, within a reasonable timeframe (typically within five business days) by email sent to their AAC email addresses and/or by postal mail. In some cases, the victim or his or her next of kin will be notified when the law requires it or when such notification is permitted by law and with the alleged victim’s consent.

Prohibition Against Retaliation

Retaliation of any kind in response to an individual’s participation in the investigation or hearing is strictly prohibited and will result in an immediate response from the college, which may involve temporarily separating the responsible individual from the campus community. Any concerns about retaliation should be addressed promptly with the Director of Student Services.

Right to Appeal

Complainant’s Rights

Those who bring forward complaints of sexual misconduct maintain the following rights: »» To decide whether or not they wish to participate in any part of the investigation or hearing process, and to change that decision at any point in the process. »» To deny the use of their names if a report must be made to a local law enforcement agency. »» To be informed of any limits of confidentiality that may pertain to the allegation. »» To be informed of the options of services available to them and any time limits associated with each option. »» To have an advocate or other support person assist them during the process. »» To request a change in their on-campus housing assignment or academic schedule if they feel unsafe. »» To bring witnesses in person to present witness statements during an investigation. »» To have advice of their own legal counsel. (although legal counsel may not represent any individuals involved during the process or hearing) »» To be informed of the outcome of the investigation and finding. »» To appeal the outcome of the initial finding.

Both the complainant and the respondent may appeal the initial findings and/or sanctions from a sexual misconduct investigation process. The appeal must be made in writing to the Vice President for Academic Affairs within five business days of having received notice of the initial findings, unless otherwise notified in the findings letter. Generally, findings and sanctions remain in effect during the appeal process. The written appeal must be based on a factual disagreement surrounding the violation, a perceived violation of fundamental fairness, a demonstration of

69


Respondent’s Rights

Those responding to complaints of sexual misconduct maintain the following rights: »» To be clearly informed of the allegations made against them. The complainant’s identity may need to remain confidential. »» To have an opportunity to respond to the allegations. »» To have an advocate or other support person assist them during the process. »» To request a change in their on-campus housing assignment or academic schedule if they feel unsafe. »» To bring witnesses in person to present witness statements during an investigation. »» To have advice of their own legal counsel. However, legal counsel may not represent any indviduals involved during the proceeding/s or hearing/s. »» To be informed of the outcome of the investigation and finding. »» To appeal the outcome of the initial finding.

Resources and Options for Victims of Sexual Violence

Numerous on-campus and off-campus resources are available to those who have been victimized by sexual misconduct or violence. On-campus resources include mental health counseling located in room S255. Contact the Director of Student Services to arrange necessary accommodations and the Safety and Security office for immediate assistance with safety concerns. Professional resources are available in the community. Victims can contact Women Helping Women, an organization that provides services to both male and female victims of sexual assault. Women Helping Women is located at 215 E. 9th St. Floor 7, Cincinnati, OH 45202 and can be reached at 513-381-5610 or through the website: www.womenhelpingwomen.org. Those concerned about specific individuals who may pose a threat to their safety may request a protection order through the Hamilton County Clerk of Courts, which establishes legal restrictions on the ability of the accused individual to be in close proximity to the complainant. An “Order of No-Contact” can also be requested through the Director of Student Services at the Art Academy. 70

Though such an order is not legally enforceable, noncompliance with an “Order of No-Contact” constitutes a violation of the Student Code of Conduct or other college policy, thus subjecting the non-compliant party to campus disciplinary action.

Facilities, Safety, and Building Use Policies

On a daily basis, the Department of Facilities and Security makes the personal safety and security of all students, faculty, staff and visitors a top priority by providing: »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

24/7 private security Card access for admittance to facilities A well-lit campus Emergency phones in hallways Security escort service Crime prevention workshops Cameras on the exterior of the building

Every member of the Art Academy community should take responsibility for his or her own personal safety. Here are some important actions you can take: »» Be aware of your surroundings. »» Lock your room door. »» Do not leave valuables unattended. »» Secure electronics, art supplies and books. »» “Put Your Junk in the Trunk.” »» Use the escort service. »» See it, hear it, report it to Security at 513-5626279. »» Do not abuse drugs or alcohol. »» Use common sense.

Modeling Policies

Pursuant to the Art Academy’s commitment to providing an environment free of harassment, conflicts of interest, and situations that may give the appearance of improper conduct, no Art Academy student or employee may model nude for Art Academy classes or programming. Only designated Art Academy administrative staff may engage the services of models on behalf of the college. Further, only the BFA Model Coordinator, the Community Education Model Coordinator, and/or those delegated by the Director of Community Education may schedule models for any Art Academy class. Models’ personal information is kept confidential and is not disclosed to students, faculty, staff, or the public. Models’ phone numbers, email addresses, mailing addresses, web sites, and social media sites can be released only with written and signed consent of the models or as


required by law. In respect to matters pertaining to services provided by figure models, the Art Academy of Cincinnati abides by the rules and regulations set forth in the administrative procedures of the college. The minimum age of Art Academy models is 21 years.

Building and Office Hours

The Art Academy’s main building at 1212 Jackson Street is open 24/7 during the fall and spring semesters. Students must be fully matriculated to gain access to instructional and recreational areas of the campus. Holiday and summer hours will be posted ahead of time to communicate when the campus will be closed. The campus phone number for Universal Protection Service is 513-562-6279, and the security cell phone number is 513-616-4802. The Art Academy’s main phone number is 513-562-6262. The administrative offices are open Monday - Friday from 9:00 am - 5:00 pm, or as otherwise posted.

Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

Upon the notification of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on campus or in the adjacent neighborhood, the Art Academy Safety Committee will diligently and swiftly evaluate said notification in order to verify the content and source, and upon confirmation, proceed with notifying our campus community by way of emergency alarms, 24/7 radioequipped Security Officers and radio-equipped facility personnel, unless such notification will compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency, as determined in accordance with the professional judgement of the Safety Committee. The Safety Committee is comprised of the institution’s President, Vice President for Finance and Operations, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Director of Facilities and Security, and Director of Student Services. Once the initial notification of the campus community has been made, the larger community, including the appropriate public safety agencies, will be notified through the local 911 Call Center and an email announcement. In addition, all activated emergency alarms are electronically monitored off-site by licensed security companies, who are authorized to notify the appropriate safety agency or agencies on behalf of the college.

In anticipation of a true emergency, procedures for emergencies have been posted throughout the buildings, including inside every classroom and housing suite next to the exit doorway. These posted procedures elaborate on which actions to take in case of fire, illness, serious injury, power outage, tornado, severe weather, shooting, and missing persons. In addition, unannounced emergency drills are conducted and monitored yearly by the Cincinnati Fire Department, and a log is kept of the dates and notations. Emergency phones are located throughout hallways of the school building, and emergency pull station alarms are located throughout the hallways of the campus building and residence hall.

Alcohol and Drug Policy

The Art Academy of Cincinnati prohibits the irresponsible or unlawful possession and use of alcohol and the possession or use of illegal drugs or controlled substances by students, faculty, and staff on campus premises or in relation to any of its events or activities, regardless of location. The Art Academy of Cincinnati prohibits the unlawful manufacture, dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substance and alcohol on the Art Academy property. The Academy observes and enforces all state and federal regulations regarding the consumption of alcoholic beverages. In compliance with federal laws, which mandate sanctions and policing of substance abuse at the nation’s institutions of higher education, the Art Academy provides a safe work and educational environment. The Art Academy considers the abuse of drugs and alcohol by its faculty, staff and students to be unsafe and counterproductive to the educational process. Illegal substances are prohibited on the Art Academy’s premises at any time. State law prohibits the sale to and the consumption or possession of alcoholic beverages by persons younger than 21 years of age. This policy is in effect whether an Art Academy event is held on or off campus. In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the following policy will govern the conduct of all Art Academy students, faculty, and staff. The following standards of conduct in relation to the Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus Policy shall be observed at all times.

71


»» Whenever alcohol is served on the Art Academy campus, a bartender must manage and control the serving of the alcohol. The bartender must determine legal age, and make sure individuals in attendance do not exceed a 2-drink limit. Whoever is sponsoring or hosting the event will pay for the bartender’s services. A bartender will be provided for Senior Thesis Exhibition receptions. »» No alcoholic beverages may be brought into the Art Academy facility unless pre-approved on a case-by-case basis by appropriate personnel. »» No student may enter the premises or attend Art Academy events while inebriated. »» Consumption of marijuana, narcotics, or other illegal substances on the Art Academy’s premises or while attending Art Academy events is prohibited. »» The Art Academy observes and enforces all state and federal regulations regarding the consumption of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs. The Art Academy may discipline students, faculty, and staff who violate the Alcohol and Drug-Free Campus Policy. »» No hard liquor or kegs shall be present at Art Academy student events.

Substance Abuse Education

The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the DrugFree Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989 require all federal contractors, federal grant recipients and recipients of any federal funds whatsoever to implement a comprehensive substance and alcohol use and abuse policy. The Art Academy of Cincinnati complies with all provisions of these Acts and has developed a program to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. The program provides services related to drug use and abuse, which include informational brochures, educational videos, counseling services, referrals to outside programs, and disciplinary sanctions for violations. Referrals to outside programs include but are not limited to the following: Alcoholism Council of the Cincinna- 513-281-7880 ti Area

72

Central Psychiatric Clinic

513-558-5804 513-558-5823

Cincinnati Central Office of Alcoholics Anonymous

513-861-9966

Information, referral, and outpatient

24 hour service

CCAT: Center for Comprehensive Alcoholism Treatment

513-381-6660

Detox, inpatient

Talbert House

513-751-7747

Outpatient, inpatient, DUI

CCHB: Central Community Health Board

513-559-2048

Drug services intake

Narcotics Anonymous

513-820-2947

Family Services of Cincinnati

513-345-8555

The Christ Hospital Alcohol and Drug Center

513-585-8500

Bethesda Alcohol and Drug Treatment Program

513-569-6116 513-569-6014

University of Cincinnati Alcoholism Clinic

513-475-5300

University of Cincinnati Psychological Services

513-556-0648

University of Cincinnati Drug and Poison Center

513-558-1111

Outpatient

Walk-in clinic

Fire Drills

Fire drills are held without advance notice. All students, faculty, and staff must exit immediately when the siren sounds and the lights flash. The front doors will unlock, and the hallway doors will close automatically to ensure that the HVAC system effectively evacuates any smoke, if present. One Residence Hall fire drill is held during the fall semester. This drill is a mandatory supervised evacuation of the building and is scheduled with, and monitored by, the Cincinnati Fire Department. The Director of Facilities and Security schedules this unannounced fire drill, and the Director of Student Services and the Resident Advisors assist in implementing the drill.

Reporting a Fire

The Art Academy is required to annually disclose statistical data on all fires that occur in our Residence Hall. Listed below are the numbers to call to report fires that have already been extinguished and if you are uncertain whether they have been reported or not. Please provide LOCATION/ DATE AND TIME/ and NATURE OF THE FIRE.


Director of Facilities and Security

(513) 562-8769

Director of Student Services

(513) 562-6273

Fire Log

A Fire Log is maintained in the Office of Facilities and Security and records all reported fires, including arson, in the Residence Hall. The log details the date/time, location and nature of all fires reported. This log is available for inspection during regular business hours by students, staff and general public.

Timely Warnings

In the event that a situation arises in our school building, adjacent housing facility or in the surrounding neighborhood that, in the judgment of the Safety Committee, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a “Timely Warning” will be issued through the campus email and text system. In addition, the posting of fliers, in-class announcements or other appropriate means may be used.

Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The Art Academy prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act. Our statistics are comprised of reports of criminal activity on school property and on adjacent public property as filed with our security officers, campus officials (including but not limited to the Director of Facilities and Security, Academic Dean, and Director of Student Services) and the Cincinnati Police Department. The Director of Student Services then compiles this information and combines it with the Fire Statistics from the Residence Hall and submits the combined contents by the 1st of October to the U.S. Department of Education, where the full text of this report can be viewed at ope.ed.gov/security. A hard copy of this report may be inspected and/or acquired at the Office of Student Services during regular business hours or by calling 513-562-6262.

Daily Crime Log

The Art Academy maintains a “Daily Crime Log” for the purpose of recording criminal incidents, alleged criminal incidents and disciplinary referrals that are reported to the Art Academy Security Officers in order to disclose crime information to our students, employees and the general public on a more timely basis than the annual statistical disclosures (see: Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics). The log discloses the nature of the crime, case number, date and time reported, date and

time occurred, general location, and the disposition of the incident (open, closed, pending, arrest, criminal referral, disciplinary referral). Classifications include, but are not limited to: murder, negligent and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible and non-forcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, simple assault, burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft, arson, vandalism, intimidation, weapons, drugs, and alcohol violations. The Director Student Services maintains the “Daily Crime Log,” and a hard copy ONLY is available for inspection during regular business hours in Room N112.

Reporting of Criminal Offenses To report a crime, contact: Cincinnati Police Department

911 Emergencies 513-765-1212 Non-emergencies

Art Academy Security

513-616-4802 Cell Phone 513-562-6279 Security Desk

Director of Facilities 513-562-8769, and Security Room S281 Vice President for Academic Affairs

513-562-8767, Room N212

Director of Student Services

513-562-6273, Room N112

Voluntary and Confidential Reporting

If you are a victim of a crime and do not wish to pursue action within the school system or the criminal justice system, you may consider making a confidential report. With your permission, the school can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, the school can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine a pattern of crime if revealed and alert the campus community to any potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. The Art Academy encourages anyone who is a victim or witness to any crime to promptly report the incident to the police. In the case of voluntary confidential reporting, information that the victim or witness wishes to be withheld will not be disclosed to law enforcement officals. 73


Campus Safety Enforcement

The Art Academy Security Officers provided by Universal Protection Service are a uniformed and unarmed authority that maintains a highly visible and vigilant presence as a proactive measure to deter potential criminal activity and other unacceptable behaviors. When necessary, Universal Protection Service provides rapid communications to the appropriate public safety agency through the local 911 call center to ensure that appropriate help has been summoned. The Art Academy Security Officers have the authority to ask persons for identification to determine whether or not individuals have lawful business on campus property. HOWEVER, THEY ARE NOT POLICE OFFICERS AND DO NOT POSSESS ARREST AUTHORITY. Our security department maintains a highly professional working relationship with the Cincinnati Police Department, meeting with them and other local organizations and businesses monthly to discuss recent crime and safety statistics compiled from neighborhood reports. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report the crime to our security officers, school officials and the Cincinnati Police Department. Prompt reporting will assure timely warning notices on campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics, which will help determine the existence of patterns of crime with regard to particular locations, methods, or assailants and thus alert the school community to potential danger. Prompt reporting is important in matters of public safety. The Art Academy of Cincinnati will report to the appropriate authorities all incidents of criminal activity brought to its attention.

Security Awareness and Crime Prevention

Each year, the Cincinnati Police Department informs incoming students and their parents of potential crime on campus and in the adjacent neighborhood. A common theme is one of awareness: that of one’s surroundings and the responsibility for personal safety and the safety of others.

74

Throughout the year the Art Academy outlines ways to maintain personal safety, prevent theft, and assist in crime prevention through posted alerts, brochures, seminars, programs, videos and discussions. Some examples include: »» Universal Protection Service, a 24/7 campus security presence provides escorts to and from parked cars, apartments, and the Residence Hall. This service reinforces the idea of walking in numbers.

»» Over-the-Rhine Chamber of Commerce Safe and Clean Program, which promotes the anonymous reporting of ongoing “Hot Spots” for crime and drug activity through the use of “Hot Spot” cards and the “Hotline” 513-588-6909. »» Monthly Safety Sector meetings sponsored by the Over-the-Rhine Chamber of Commerce, where the police and the community come together to share and discuss safety and crime issues. The Director of Facilities and Security attends these meetings. »» “Put Your Junk in the Trunk” program, sponsored by the Cincinnati Police Department, a program that encourages keeping your valuables out of sight. Posters are on display. »» Brochures in the Commons addressing topics of rape, sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence, college-age drinking, Policy for a Drug-Free Campus, thefts from autos and Citizens on Patrol program. »» Crime Victim Compensation Program visit the following for the Ohio Attorney General: www.ag.state.oh.us/victim/compensation »» Resident Advisors conduct frequent meetings with housing students to provide tips on prevention, robbery, theft, the neighborhood, and walking in numbers.

Criminal Activity off Campus

The Art Academy does not use the Cincinnati Police Department to monitor off-campus student organizations for criminal activity because the school does not officially recognize any such organizations.

Sex Offender Registration

In accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act” of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, the Art Academy of Cincinnati is providing links to the State of Ohio Sex Offender Registry and the Hamilton County Sex Offender Registry. This Act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a state concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in Ohio to notify each Ohio institution of higher education at which the offender is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. The State of Ohio is responsible for maintaining this registry. Follow the links below to access each website, then click on the sexual offender database link.


Missing student notification procedures shall be posted inside each housing unit near the entrance. In addition, each housing resident is given the option to provide the school a confidential contact person by simply filling out, signing and dating the contact form.

Sex Offenses, Forcible Sex Offenses, Non-Forcible

Robbery

Aggravated Assault

Burglary

Motor Vehicle Theft

Arson

Hate Crimes

Arrests

Weapons Violations

Liquor Law Violations

Drug Abuse Violations

Fires

Optional Total

In the event that anyone is aware that an Art Academy housing resident has been missing for 24 hours (or less than 24 hours if circumstances warrant an expedited implementation), he or she shall notify the Housing Resident Advisor and/or the 24/7 Security Desk of this situation. Upon notification, the missing student’s voluntary registered confidential contact person will be notified, and if the situation is confirmed, an investigation will be initiated by way of interviews of roommates, residents, students and faculty. If still warranted, the Cincinnati Police Department will be notified and any collected data will be turned over at that time. Only authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers in furtherance of a missing person investigation may have access to this information. If said housing student is less than 18 years of age and is not emancipated, then his or her parent or guardian will be notified.

Negligent Manslaughter

Public Property***

Missing Persons

Murder / Non-Negligent Manslaughter

Residential Facilities **

The Art Academy of Cincinnati’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus (the academic building and residence hall) and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also includes institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning Emergency Response and Evacuation and other matters. You can obtain a copy of this report by contacting the office of the Director of Student Services at 513-562-6262 or by visiting the school web site: www.artacademy.edu.

Offense

On- Campus Property*

Annual Security Report Availability

Crime Statistics Table Year

www.ag.state.oh.us www.hcso.org or call 513-946-6222 or visit the Hamilton County Sheriff ’s Office Hamilton County Justice Center 1000 Sycamore, Rm. 101 Cincinnati, OH 45202

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

2

0

1

3

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

1

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

1

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

75


Simple Assault

Vandalism

Larceny

Intimidation

Other Crimes Involving Bodily Injury

Optional Total

Illegal Weapons Possessions

Public Property***

Drug Law Violations

Residential Facilities **

Liquor Law Violations

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2012

0

0

0

0

2013

0

0

0

0

Year

Offense

Safety and Health Hazards Policy

On- Campus Property*

Disciplinary Actions and Judicial Referrals

* Includes all Art Academy-owned or controlled property contiguous to campus or used by students. ** These statistics are also included in the on-campus category. *** This category includes crimes on public streets, sidewalks, and parking lots adjacent to campus property. These statistics are not included in the on-campus category. The Art Academy does not recognize off-campus student organizations and therefore has no policy for monitoring the activity of such organizations off campus. The Art Academy does not have any non-campus buildings or property.

76

Regulations for use of materials are distributed at each studio class. Students are responsible for reading, understanding and applying the Art Academy’s safety and health hazard regulations. It is advisable to work with someone else in studios; avoid working alone. Freshmen are provided health and safety information in first-year classes. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are available in the appropriate faculty offices and labs in designated studio areas.

Smoking Policy

In accordance with Chapter 3794 of the Ohio Revised Code, the Art Academy of Cincinnati prohibits smoking in all facilities that it owns, leases, rents, or otherwise controls. This policy is meant to ensure that students, faculty, staff, and visitors are guaranteed smoke-free air. It also lessens the opportunity for fires, ignition of toxic chemicals and other damage resulting from exposure to heat. The Ohio Revised Code defines smoking as “inhaling, exhaling, burning, or carrying any lighted cigar, cigarette, pipe, or other lighted smoking device for burning tobacco or any other plant.� In accordance with Art Academy policies, students, faculty, staff, and visitors are entitled to live, study, and work in areas that are free of tobacco smoke. Recognizing that secondhand smoke from tobacco has direct adverse effects on the health of smokers and non-smokers, the Art Academy expressly enforces this policy. Failure to comply with this policy may result in disciplinary action against those who violate the policy. This regulation is in compliance with Ohio state law and Cincinnati fire codes. When smoking do so outside; completely extinguish the fire from your cigarettes and then dispose of all smoking related items properly in the receptacles provided for that purpose. Do not leave cigarette butts on the ground or pavement or any place other than the designated receptacles. Intentionally starting a fire, whether in an approved cigarette disposal receptacle or not, constitutes arson, a felony punishable by law.

Woodshop

All new students must complete a woodshop orientation session and pass a test that demonstrates competency regarding safe and proper use of the equipment before they may use the woodshop. The woodshop and all power equipment are to be used under direct


supervision of the instructor, the Woodshop Technician, or the Woodshop Monitor. Tools in locked cupboards are restricted for use in the Woodshop only. At their discretion, the Woodshop Technician and the Director of Facilities and Security may designate other tools as restricted for use in the Woodshop only. Work areas should be cleaned after use. Woodshop hours are posted outside the door of the shop.

Art Exhibition Policy

Students must complete the Art Academy Exhibition Reservation Form when they wish to install any artwork in the building. The map of designated exhibition areas and reservation form are located in the student and employee copy rooms.

Geography

In order to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act, the Art Academy is required to disclose statistics for reported crimes based not only on the type of crime reported, but also on where the crime occurred. For this reason, the geography of the institution needs to be defined, and Clery geography is comprised of three locations: On Campus, Public Property and Non-Campus. The Art Academy neither owns nor controls any noncampus property. Public Property consists of segments of the following Streets:

Service Animals Policy

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), service animals shall not be excluded from Art Academy facilities. The ADA defines a service animal as “... any... animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing, providing minimal rescue or protection, work, pulling a wheelchair or fetching dropped items.”

»» »» »» »» »» »» »»

12th Street 13th Street Walnut Street Jackson Street Vine Street Main Street Central Parkway

**All areas outside of the orange boxes indicated above are either public property or property that is privately owned, and is thereby outside of the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s control.

5

Washington Park

4

< > 13TH STREET < > < < MAIN STREET

1

WALNUT STREET >>

< > JACKSON STREET < >

< > VINE STREET < >

REPUBLIC STREET >>

RACE STREET >>

2

3

< > 12TH STREET < >

Public Property

<< CENTRAL PARKWAY (WEST BOUND)

1. Main Building | 1212 Jackson Street 2. Residence Hall | 5 W. 12th Street 3. Parking Lot | 1217-1227 Walnut Street

4. Residence Hall | 126 E. 13th Street 5. Exposure/13 Student Gallery | 126 E. 13th Street

77


Campus Security

Universal Protection Service personnel monitor the 1212 Jackson Street building 24 hours daily, 7 days per week. Security officers are on site for the safety of students, faculty, and staff. One officer is present from 2:00 am4:00 pm Monday through Friday. At least two security officers are on duty for your safety from 4:00 pm-2:00 am Monday through Friday, and during all Saturday and Sunday hours. One of these two officers is responsible for escorting students to and from their cars, bus stops, apartments and other destinations in the immediate vicinity, as well as making rounds inside and outside the building. Students are encouraged to call Universal Protection Service at 513-562-6279 or 513-616-4802 to request an escort. Security officers monitor the security cameras and watch for solicitors and other unwanted persons near the campus. Security officers will ask unwanted persons to leave the premises, and they will call authorities if necessary. If a student has an urgent matter, he or she may contact the security officers at the front desk, who will provide assistance. In instances of emergency, the Emergency Procedures listed above shall be followed.

Student ID and Security Cards

During Student Orientation, students will be issued a student photo identification card, which functions as a security pass to access the main building and also the residence hall if the student is a campus resident. If you lose your security pass, you may obtain a replacement card for a fee of $15.00. Students registered for current or subsequent semesters may retain their security passes. Students not registered for classes and those who have graduated must relinquish their security passes to the Director of Student Services or to Universal Protection Service. All students and employees must show their Art Academy ID when requested by security personnel.

Visitors to Main Building

Art Academy students must escort their visitors at all times and are responsible for the actions and behavior of their guests. Visitors must sign in at the Art Academy Security Desk and wear a visitor lanyard issued to them by the security officer on duty. If a student anticipates having a visitor in the main building after business hours, he or she must list the visitor’s name with Universal Protection Service at the Security Desk between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm on weekdays only. This policy applies to visitors expected after 5:00 pm on any weekday or at any time during the weekend. Only visitors on the list will be permitted to enter the building after hours. The policy for visitors to the Residence Hall has additional restrictions. 78

Campus Student Parking

Parking passes are available for the Art Academy’s Walnut Street Lot. Students may contact Jean Marie Baines in the Finance Office at 513-562-8753 for more information.

Lockers

All freshmen and sophomores may sign up to have use of a locker. Lockers are located on the lower level of the building and are assigned at no cost. Students may select a locker during Orientation and place their own lock on it for security. Please inform the Director of Student Services of your locker number immediately and ensure that you have secured your chosen locker with your own lock prior to selecting a locker. Freshmen and sophomores have priority. However, juniors and seniors are allowed to use the lockers if available.

Student Campus Mail Policy

The administration, faculty and staff will communicate with students via email, SonisWeb and telephone. Residential students will use the mailboxes in their residence hall for personal mail. No student, whether living on campus or not, may have personal mail (paychecks, letters, debit cards, bills, etc.) delivered to the Art Academy of Cincinnati’s mailing address. Nonresidential students must have all personal mail sent to their local home addresses. All students are permitted to have packages delivered to the Art Academy’s mailing address. These packages may be retrieved from the Security staff at the Front Desk.

Bulletin Boards

Galen Crawford, Director of Student Services, is in charge of posting signs on the bulletin boards and removing them. All signage must be pre-approved by Galen Crawford. Students are not permitted to post signs on these boards or to remove them. Unauthorized signs will be removed. Contact the Office of Student Services (N112) at gcrawford@artacademy.edu or 513-562-6273 to submit sign-posting requests.

Lost and Found

If you have lost any property in the Art Academy building, please check at the Front Desk to find out whether it has been turned in. If you find property on campus please turn it in to the Front Desk. The Art Academy is not responsible for any loss of or damage to personal property resulting from fire, theft or other causes. Items will be retained until one week after the last


scheduled day of final exams of each semester. Students will be notified of the exact date via email, bulletin boards, and digital signage in the lobby.

Removal of Personal Property or Artwork

Each student is responsible for removing his or her personal property or artwork from Art Academy facilities no later than one week after the last scheduled day of final exams of each semester. Students will be notified of the exact date via the means listed above. Materials remaining on the Art Academy’s premises after such time will immediately and automatically become the property of the Art Academy by default. Pursuant to this automatic transfer of property ownership, such items will be removed, destroyed, reclaimed, repurposed, liquidated, sold, donated, lent or recycled by the Art Academy’s staff without further notice to the student, the former owner. The Art Academy accepts no liability for materials left on its premises after such time as stated above, as the Art Academy has no liability to any outside party in respect to its own property, whether acquired by default or by other means.

Student Studio Policies

Seniors and juniors are usually guaranteed studio spaces. Sophomores with a GPA of 2.5 or above may receive studio spaces, depending on availability. All students who receive studio spaces are required to sign the Student Studio Space and Rules Contract with Galen Crawford, Director of Student Services, located at N112. All studio regulations are outlined within the Student Studio Space and Rules Contract.

Residence Hall Regulations

All policies pertaining to residential students are contained within the Residence Life License Agreement. Each resident must sign the agreement before moving into Art Academy Housing.

Medical Information

All students must provide the Art Academy a completed Medical Health Form that includes all medical information that may impact their activity and/or residency on campus. There are no exceptions to this requirement. This form should be submitted to the Director of Student Services, located in room N112.

Urgent Communications Telephone Messages

Students will be called from classes only in the event of an urgent situation. In cases of emergency, staff will make every effort to reach students. Students may make local calls from the Commons phone in the first-floor hallway. Students should contact their professors directly to report illnesses, car trouble, family emergencies or other urgent matters that will result in absences or late arrivals. Students should NOT contact staff members about these matters.

Board of Trustees

Ronald T. Bates Tysonn Betts Catherine O. Bradford Robert Chavez Susan Crabtree, Chair Harry J. Finke, IV Richard E. Friedman Jack H. Goodwin Mark Grote, Past Chair Theresa Hannah Tamara Harkavy George N. Hensler, III Lisa Mather, Treasurer Howard H. Mcllvain R. Warner Off, Vice Chair Mark Patsfall Carole Register Tony Reiss Craig Sarembock Abby Schwartz Deborah Emont Scott, Secretary Gregory Stanforth Dani Téllez, AAC Student Representative Harvey Cohen, Legal Counsel John M Sullivan, Art Academy President

79


Faculty Directory Name

Position

Phone

Email

Location

Jimmy Baker, MFA

Assistant Professor (Full-time)

513-5628762

jbaker @artacademy.edu

S053

David Michael Beck

Adjunct Professor

Keith Benjamin, BFA ‘89, MFA

513-5626272

kbenjamin @artacademy.edu

Regan Brown, MFA

Adjunct Professor

rbrown @artacademy.edu

Ellina Chetverikova, BFA ‘12, MFA

Adjunct Professor

echetverikova @artacademy.edu

Stephanie Cooper, MFA

Adjunct Professor

scooper @artacademy.edu

Claire Darley, MFA

Adjunct Professor, Writing Tutor

Matthew Dayler, BFA ‘96, MFA Kathryn DiMartino, BFA ’12

513-5628763

Assistant Professor (Full-time) Exhibition Committee Chair

S053

cdarley @artacademy.edu

S654

mdayler @artacademy.edu

S462

Adjunct Professor

kdimartino @artacademy.edu

Poppy Evans, MA

Adjunct Professor

pevans @artacademy.edu

Emily Everhart, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

eeverhart @artacademy.edu

Millie Ferguson, BFA ‘15

Post-Undergraduate Teaching Fellow

cferguson @artacademy.edu

Gary Gaffney, MFA

Professor Emeritus, Adjunct Professor

ggaffney @artacademy.edu

Jerry Gaines, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Terence Hammonds, BFA

Adjunct Professor

513-5628768

thammonds @artacademy.edu

Matt Hart, MFA

Liberal Arts Chair, 513-562Associate Professor (Full-time) 6277

mhart @artacademy.edu

Judi Haynes, Ed.D.

Adjunct Professor

jhaynes @artacademy.edu

Kristine Hehn, MGS

Adjunct Professor

khehn @artacademy.edu

Ken Henson, MFA

Head of Illustration, 513-562Associate Professor (Full-time) 6294

khenson @artacademy.edu

Andrew Hill, Ph.D.

80

MAAE Chair, Professor (Full-time)

dbeck@artacademy.edu

S654

jgaines @artacademy.edu

Adjunct Professor

N211

S355

ahill@artacdemy.edu

Woodrow Hinton III, MFA

Adjunct Professor

whinton @artacademy.edu

Sarah Hollis, BFA ’04, MFA

Adjunct Professor, Studio Tutor

shollis @artacademy.edu

Jennifer Howe, MA

Adjunct Professor

Will Knipscher, MFA

Head of Photography, Assistant Professor (Full-time)

Denise Knisely, MA

Adjunct Professor

S555

jhowe @artacademy.edu 513-5626291

wknipscher @artacademy.edu dknisely@artacademy.edu

N315


Kim Krause, Cert. ‘77, BFA ’91, MFA

Vice President for Academic Affairs, Academic Dean

513-5628767

kkrause @artacademy.edu

Tony Luensman, BA

Adjunct Professor

tluensman @artacademy.edu

Lauren Mancini, BFA ‘15

Post-Undergraduate Teaching Fellow

lmancini @artacademy.edu

Andy Marko, MFA

Adjunct Professor

David Martin, MFA

Adjunct Professor

dmartin @artacademy.edu

Megan Martin, MFA

Adjunct Professor

mmartin @artacademy.edu

Constance McClure, MFA

Professor Emerita, Adjunct Professor

cmcclure @artacademy.edu

Lisa McKenzie, MFA

Adjunct Professor

lmckenzie @artacademy.edu

Casey Riordan Millard, MFA Adjunct Professor

cmillard @artacademy.edu

Sandra Millward, RN, MS

Adjunct Professor

smillward @artacademy.edu

Elizabeth Neal, BFA ‘00, MFA

Adjunct Professor

eneal @artacademy.edu

Amanda Parker-Wolery, MFA

Adjunct Professor

aparker @artacademy.edu

Nathan Perry, MFA

Adjunct Professor

nperry @artacademy.edu

Joshua Pfeifer, BFA ‘03, MAAE, MFA

Adjunct Professor

jpfeiffer @artacademy.edu

Kim Popa, BFA

Adjunct Professor

kpopa @artacademy.edu

Dean Regas, MA

Adjunct Professor

dregas @artacademy.edu

Rachel Reisert, MFA

Adjunct Professor

rreisert @artacademy.edu

Andrew Ruffner, MA

Adjunct Professor

aruffner @artacademy.edu

Darlene Samuelson, RN, MSN, MSEd

Adjunct Professor

dsamuelson @artacademy.edu

Christian Schmit, MFA

Adjunct Professor

cschmit @artacademy.edu

Paul Schuette, DMA

Adjunct Professor

pschuette @artacademy.edu

Rebecca Seeman, MFA

Adjunct Professor

rseeman @artacademy.edu

Melony Stambaugh, MA

Adjunct Professor

mstambaugh @artacademy.edu

David Steinbrunner, BS

Adjunct Professor

dsteinbrunner @artacademy.edu

Jennifer Tausch, MFA

Adjunct Professor

jtausch @artacademy.edu

Mark Thomas, Cert. ‘74, MFA

Associate Dean Professor (Full-time)

N212

amarko@artacademy.edu

513-5626295

mthomas @artacademy.edu

S654

S654

S554 81


Althea Thompson, MA

Adjunct Professor

athompson @artacademy.edu

Shawnee Turner, MA

Adjunct Professor

sturner @artacademy.edu

David Umbenhour, MFA

Adjunct Professor

dumbenhour @artacademy.edu

Jenny Ustick, BFA ‘00, MFA Adjunct Professor

justick @artacademy.edu

Joey Versoza, BFA ‘00

Adjunct Professor

jversoza @artacademy.edu

Paige Williams, MFA

Studio Program Chair, Professor

Tyrone Williams, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

twilliams @artacademy.edu

Jack Wirth, BFA ‘15

Post-Undergraduate Teaching Fellow

jwirth@artacademy.edu

Taylor Woolwine, MFA

Adjunct Professor

Jay Zumeta, MA

Professor Emeritus, Adjunct Professor

Nancy Zwick, RD, LD

Adjunct Professor

Staff Directory

pwilliams @artacademy.edu

N413

twoolwine@artacademy.edu 513-5626278

jzumeta@artacademy.edu

N211

nzwick@artacademy.edu

Name

Position

Phone

Email

Location

Jean Marie Baines, BA

Assistant to the Director of Finance

513-562-8753

jmbaines @artacademy.edu

S256

Jimmy Baker, MFA

Website Adminstrator

513-562-8762

jbaker @artacademy.edu

S053

Tanner Browne, BFA ‘15

Admissions Counselor

513-562-8774

tbrowne @artacademy.edu

S268

Lydia Collins, BFA ‘12

Community Education Programs Coordinator

513-562-6261

lydia.collins @artacademy.edu

S254

513-562-6270

counseling @artacademy.edu

Counseling Services

82

513-5626292

S255

Galen Crawford, MA

Director of Student Services

513-562-6273

gcrawford @artacademy.edu

N112

Kris Ebeling, BFA ‘08

Admissions Counselor

513-562-8758

kebeling @artacademy.edu

S267

Kyle Grizzell, MFA

Lead Systems Engineer (Élan Technologies)

513-322-0463

helpdesk @elantech.net

S358

Jack Hennen, BFA ‘89

Director of Facilities and Security

513-562-6262

jhennen @artacademy.edu

S281

Sue Hutchens, B.A.B.S

Registrar

513-562-8749

shutchens @artacademy.edu

S265

Joan Kaup, MBA

Vice President of Institutional Advancement

513-562-8745

jkaup @artacademy.edu

S258

Kris Killen, BA

Director of Financial Aid

513-562-8773

kkillen @artacademy.edu

S266


Kristin Klein

Receptionist, Admissions Staff

Kim Krause, Cert. ‘77, BFA Vice President for Academic ‘91, MFA Affairs, Academic Dean

513-562-6262

kklein @artacademy.edu

Front Desk

513-562-8767

kkrause @artacademy.edu

N212

Anissa Lewis, MFA

Assistant Director of Admissions

513-562-8766

alewis @artacademy.edu

S264

Thomas Pack, CPA, CGMA

Vice President of Finance and Operations

513-562-8779

tpack @artacademy.edu

S261

Nick Paddock, BFA

Admissions Counselor

513-562-8772

npaddock @artacademy.edu

S268

Amanda Parker-Wolery, MFA

Marketing and Communications Specialist

513-562-6267

aparker @artacademy.edu

S263

Joy Payton Roe, BFA

Financial Aid Assistant

513-562-8751

jproe @artacademy.edu

S266

Brad Schwass, BFA ‘06

Assistant Director of Facilities

513-562-8769

bschwass @artacademy.edu

S281

J.K. Smith, BFA ‘04

Woodshop Technician

513-562-6263

jksmith @artacademy.edu

N002

Jean Spohr

Director of Finance

513-562-8752

jspohr @artacademy.edu

S256

Jennifer Spurlock

Director of Community Education

513-562-8771

jspurlock @artacademy.edu

S254

Paul Stephens

Maintenance Technician

513-562-6274

pstephens @artacademy.edu

S060

John M Sullivan, MFA

President

513-562-8743

president @artacademy.edu

S262

Alexandria Téllez

Community Education Coordinator

513-562-8748

atellez @artacademy.edu

CE & Admissions Lobby

Jeremy Thompson

Kaldi’s Catering & Concessions Proprietor

562-6264

Jeremy @KaldisCatering.com

Commons

Ramona Toussaint, BA

Associate Director for CE Initiatives

513-562-6265

rtoussaint @artacademy.edu

S254

Denise Brennan Watson, MA

Executive Assistant to the Academic Dean

513-562-8777

dwatson @artacademy.edu

S253

Kim Wheeler, AAS

Universal Protection Service Post Commander

513-562-6279

security @artacademy.edu

Front Desk Security

Desk: 513-562-6279 Cell: 513-616-4802

security @artacademy.edu

Front Desk Security

Security Escort

83


General Contact Information Main Number

513-562-6262

Admissions, Direct

513-562-8740

Admissions, Toll-Free

800-323-5692

Counseling Services

513-562-6270

Fax Number

513-562-8778

Security Desk

513-562-6279

Security Mobile

513-616-4802

Web

www.artacademy.edu

Mailing Address

Art Academy of Cincinnati 1212 Jackson Street Cincinnati, OH 45202-7106

Motto

84


85


2015-16 Art Academy of Cincinnati Academic Catalog