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Weathervanes of the Sailing Boats on the Curonian Spit Kurėnai and other sailing boats started disappearing on the Curonian Spit after the Second World War. They were replaced by motorboats. The weathervanes sank into oblivion as well. The idea to build new kurėnai and to recreate the weathervanes came to the mind of the Curonian Spit’s researcher and artist Eduardas Jonušas, who moved to Nida in 1970. In 1972, he produced a composition including three oak sails with weathervanes even today welcoming Neringa’s guests on the left side of the road behind the second ferry harbour in Smiltynė. In the mid-1975s, Eduardas Jonušas together with graphics artist Rimantas Dichavičius compiled the album of weathervanes for printing. Unfortunately, the Soviet censorship found the weathervane elements (churches, crosses, or eagles) posing “danger” to its ideology and banned the publication. When renovating the quay of the Curonian Lagoon, the idea emerged to set up a weathervane exposition in Nida. The Ričardas and Rolanda Krištapavičiai, brother and sister architects from Nida, conceived the project of the open-air exposition of weathervanes. Following the drawings of Eduardas Jonušas stored in the History Museum based in Nida, the weathervanes and their masts were produced and erected by Vaidotas Bliūdžius, the weathervane master from Švėkšna, together with his wife Virginija. In 2004, the first weathervanes fixed on the masts of natural size were erected on the quay in Nida. Proceeding with the project of the Ričardas and Rolanda Krištapavičiai in 2005–2007, 60 different weathervanes were set up in groups on the Lagoon’s shores stretching from the Fisherman’s Ethnographic Homestead to the former hotel of Helmut Blode. Small compositions of weathervanes have been created in Preila and Juodkrantė.

Antanas Varanka

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Vėtrungės  

VĖTRUNGĖS, Leidykla ANVARA, 2008, 80 psl.

Vėtrungės  

VĖTRUNGĖS, Leidykla ANVARA, 2008, 80 psl.

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