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Winter 2012 Quarterly Publication of the Arkansas Pharmacists Association

Senator

Percy Malone

SWIMMING UPSTREAM

Innovative Pharmacy Practices


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AR•Rx

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THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST


Dear Arkansas Pharm

acist,

The Arkansas Pharmac ists Association’s more than 2,400 members in Arkansas. Are you help shape the future one of us? of pharmacy There is an old saying that, “In politics, if yo u’re not at the table, especially true at the then you’re on the pla state level. te.” This is APA’s work with the sta te legislature in 2011 led to a number of law confident that, with s that benefited pharm your help and memb acists. We’re ership, we will conti professional practice nue to make strides scope, address onero to ex pand your us PBM practices, wo regulate pharmacy, en rk closely with the sta sure pharmacists’ involv te ag encies that ement in healthcare ref the best healthcare an orm implementation d business environme an d maintain nt for ph that pharmacy remain armacists here in Arka nsas. Simply put, it is at the table during thi s time of great change vital in healthcare. In order to do that, we need your support. Yo ur APA membership the profession and pr helps to determine the otects your livelihood direction of regardless of practice pharmacists before the se tting. In addition to ad Arkansas legislature, vo cating for APA provides weekly and changes, the quart communications on erly journal AR•Rx Th industry trends e Arkansas Pharmacist Continuing Education , more than 20 hour and plenty of networ s annually of king opportunities. Ph and Dr. Scott Pace, are arm acists on staff, includ always here to help ad ing myself dress your profession al challenges. If you haven’t already , please renew your me mbership for the comi is to go online to ww ng year. The easiest w.arrx.org and comp way to renew lete the information the label of this magazin re. Your username is on e. Or, please call ou the mailing r office and staff will the phone. take your credit card information over Membership is a small investment in the futur e of our great professi on. If you are one of those individuals who hasn ’t gotten around to ren years, we look forwa ewing your members rd to serving you again hip for several ! Sincerely,

Mark S. Riley, Pharm .D. Executive Vice Preside nt 417 South Victory Stree t

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Contents

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Inside APA: Why Do You Need Advocacy?

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From the President: Pharmacists as Fighters

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2012 APA Annual Convention in Rogers

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COVER: Senator Percy Malone Swimming Upstream as Advocate for Pharmacists and Children

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RX and the Law: Recordkeeping Isn’t That Important, Is It?

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Safety Nets: Imitrex® and Optivar®

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2012 APA Awards Solicitation

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Member Spotlight: Marita Nazarian, Arkansas Children’s Hospital

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FEATURE: Innovative Pharmacy Practices

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Legislator Profile: Representative Linda Tyler

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Health Care Reform Law to Impact Arkansans

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UAMS College of Pharmacy Report

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Harding University College of Pharmacy Report

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Arkansas Association of Health-System Pharmacists

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APA Compounding Academy

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Call for Nominations

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APA 2011-2012 Board of Directors

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Pharmacy History: I Remember the Globe Drug Store

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Member Classifieds

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APA Calendar of Events

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In Memoriam

Directory of Advertisers

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Renew Your APA Membership . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Pace Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 UAMS Alumni Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Arkansas Pharmacy Support Group . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Pharmacy in Arkansas Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Pharmacists Life Insurance Company . . . . . . . . . . .20 Law Offices of Darren O’Quinn, PLLC . . . . . . . . . . 22 EPIC Pharmacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 APF Brick Walkway of Honor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Pharmacy Quality Commitment . . . . . . . . Inside Back APA Honors Smith Drug . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover Cover photo by Amy Malone Norcross

THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST

APA Staff Mark S. Riley, Pharm.D. Executive Vice President Mark@arrx.org Scott Pace, Pharm.D., J.D. Associate Executive Vice President Scott@arrx.org Barbara McMillan Director of Administrative Services & Meetings Barbara@arrx.org Debra Wolfe Director of Government Relations Debra@arrx.org Eileen Denne Director of Communications Eileen@arrx.org Celeste Reid Administrative Assistant Celeste@arrx.org Eric Crumbaugh, Pharm.D. Immunization Grant Coordinator Eric@arrx.org Office E-mail Address Support@arrx.org Publisher: Mark Riley Editor: Eileen Denne Art & Design: Gwen Canfield - Creative Instinct Arkansas Pharmacists Association 417 South Victory Street Little Rock, AR 72201-2923 Phone 501-372-5250 | Fax 501-372-0546 AR•Rx The Arkansas Pharmacist © (ISSN 01993763) is published quarterly by the Arkansas Pharmacists Association, Inc. It is distributed to members as a regular service paid for through allocation of membership dues ($5.00). Nonmembers subscription rate is $30.00 annually. Periodical rate postage paid at Little Rock, AR 72201. Current edition issue number 57. © 2012 Arkansas Pharmacists Association. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to AR•Rx The Arkansas Pharmacist 417 South Victory Little Rock, AR 72201 Opinions and statements made by contributors, cartoonists or columnists do not necessarily reflect the attitude of the Association, nor is it responsible for them. All advertisements placed in this publication are subject to the approval of the APA Executive Committee. Visit us on the web at www.arrx.org

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APA Board of Directors 2011 - 2012 Officers President - Gary Bass, Pharm.D., Little Rock President-Elect - Dennis Moore, Pharm.D., Batesville Vice President - Dana Woods, P.D., Mountain View Past-President - Mike Smets, P.D., Fort Smith

Area Representatives Area I (Northwest) Michael Butler, Pharm.D., Hot Springs Village Area II (Northeast) Brandon Cooper, Pharm.D., Jonesboro Area III (Central) Kenny Harrison, Pharm.D., Little Rock Area IV (Southwest/Southeast) Lynn Crouse, Pharm.D., Eudora

District Presidents District 1 - Eddie Glover, P.D., Conway District 2 - Brent Panneck, Pharm.D., Lake City District 3 - Danny Ponder, P.D., Mountain Home District 4 - Lise Liles, Pharm.D., Texarkana District 5 - Dean Watts, P.D., DeWitt District 6 - Stephen Carroll, Pharm.D., MBA, Arkadelphia District 7 - John Vinson, Pharm.D., Fort Smith District 8 - Christy Campbell, P.D., Searcy

Academy of Consultant Pharmacists President - Muncy Zuber, P.D., Heber Springs

Academy of Compounding Pharmacists President - Kristen Riddle, Pharm.D., Conway

Arkansas Association of Health-System Pharmacists President - Willie Capers, Pharm.D., Batesville

Ex-Officio APA Executive Vice President Mark Riley, Pharm.D., Little Rock Board of Health Member John Page, P.D. Fayetteville AR State Board of Pharmacy Representative John Clay Kirtley, Pharm.D., Little Rock UAMS College of Pharmacy Representative (Dean) Stephanie Gardner, Pharm.D., Ed.D., Little Rock Harding College of Pharmacy Representative (Dean) Julie Hixson-Wallace, Pharm.D., BCPS, Searcy UAMS College of Pharmacy Student Representative Allison Hollis, Little Rock Harding College of Pharmacy Student Representative Ankita Desai, Searcy

Find the APA on Facebook, or visitourwebsiteatwww.arrx.org

INSIDE APA

Inside APA WHY DO YOU NEED ADVOCACY?

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hen you read Mark Riley, Pharm.D. this, another Executive Vice President New Year will have come and gone and you will have broken the habit of writing 2011 when you date something. The end of the old year and the beginning of the new always puts me in a contemplative frame of mind about life and work; whether I am doing the right things and if the results have been what I had hoped for. On the life side, all of the important pieces are going well – home, family, friends, and health (both physical and spiritual). On the work side, challenges and opportunities abound at both the state and federal levels. I am often asked, “How are things going at the APA?” and I generally answer “No shortage of issues.” And, I have come to realize that there always have been and always will be issues for pharmacy and pharmacists that can only be addressed through a process called advocacy. The Arkansas Pharmacists Association exists primarily for the purpose of advocacy for this profession and its members. Dr. Charles West, former APA Executive Vice President, once told me when I was a young member of APA’s Board of Directors, “Boy, never forget who you represent.” I still live by that principle and constantly remind myself of its importance. Advocacy takes on many forms, but the simple explanation is that when there is any issue that is of importance to you, our members, we will be there fighting on behalf of you and your patients. Pharmacy concerns lead to legislative positions that ask for fairness and are designed to help take care of our patients. In short, most

of our “asks” qualify us as patient advocates. The areas of need in this profession are two-fold: professional and business-related. Therefore, we advocate on both fronts. Some of you might ask, “Why do I need advocacy?” Michael Jackson, Executive Vice President of the Florida Pharmacists Association, said it best. Michael wrote: ‘• If you asked yourself whether or not what you are doing is at risk for obsolescence, then you need advocacy. • If someone or something else is in control of what you get paid, what professional services that you provide and what you are permitted to do with your profession and your business practice, then you need advocacy. • If you cannot identify at least 100 consumers of your services willing to take a bullet or go to the wall to ensure that you remain their provider, then you need a lot of advocacy. • If you are disenchanted with what you do and want a change, then you need advocacy. • If your perception of quality services and positive outcomes is considered overrated by others, then you need advocacy. • If you do not know who your state legislator or Congressman is, then you need to know about advocacy. • If your Congressman or your state legislator does not know who you are, then you are at serious risk and you must have advocacy. • I f you are just beginning your professional career, then you need some serious advocacy. • I f you are at the end of your professional career, then do you believe that advocacy is important to you?

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THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST


FROM THE PRESIDENT

want to have control of theoflifetime Well, sad sadtotosay, say,if you if you want to have control the of wealth youthat created during during your labor-intensive lifetime of that wealth you created your laboryears thenyears you better findbetter out how be how an advocate intensive then you findtoout to be anand advocate with our young practitioners. If our work withand ourwork young practitioners. If our new practitioner new practitioner are not successful then advocacy effortsadvocacy are not efforts successful then those making those health policy areyou.’ coming after you.’ healthmaking care policy arecare coming after Well said, Michael. I want to thank all of you who are involved in and supportive of the Arkansas Pharmacists Association. Many of you have served in a leadership capacity (i.e. Board of Directors, committees, legislative action, etc.) and that is extremely important. But the real strength of any association lies in the broad-based membership that the organization represents. People who we interact with in politics, business, and social settings

are more influenced when they know that we singularly represent an involved, cohesive group. I am proud to represent the pharmacists of Arkansas and thank each of you who are members of this organization and I thank you for your support. If you are not a member, please join. We need you and you need us. If you know a pharmacist that is not a member, please ask him or her to join. A personal invitation from a member is our strongest recruiting tool. As we start this new year, rest assured that the staff at the Arkansas Pharmacists Association are working hard for you,... and, Charlie, we will not forget who we represent. §

From the President PHARMACISTS AS FIGHTERS

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fter practicing pharmacy for almost thirty years, I have come to the realization that in addition to being medication experts, problem-solvers and health care professionals, pharmacists are fighters as well. Before you conjure up movie star fighters like Sylvester Stallone as Rocky, or Sam Worthington as Jake in Avatar, what I mean is that the challenges we face require us to be flexible, nimble and quick to respond. And, there are times when we need to be forceful and aggressive to get the best outcome for our patients. We fight to get the right medications at the right prices to our patients. We fight to be reimbursed for services, including patient counseling and medication therapy management. We fight against the pharmacy benefit managers that threaten to take OUR money if we neglect to dot our i’s or cross our t’s. We fight to ensure that our patients get what they need quickly and efficiently in the way that best suits their needs. We are fortunate to be part of an organization that fights for us as well. The Arkansas Pharmacists Association fights to give us the greatest opportunities by helping to pass state and federal laws that support our profession. Just as importantly, APA steps up to strike down unfavorable legislation to pharmacists. The staff works with the State Board of Pharmacy as it introduces new regulations and is not afraid to take contrary views. APA gives pharmacy students a fighting chance at success by offering valuable connections to pharmacists who can be preceptors and future employers. In its Continuing Education programs APA aims to arm us with the right tools to address new pharmacy practices.

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We get the information we need to challenge third parties through the APA’s e-newsletter InteRxActions and quarterly journal AR•Rx The Gary Bass, Pharm.D. Arkansas Pharmacist prepare us for President the future. Wise counsel from our two pharmacists on staff helps us combat third parties. In short, our association gives us the weapons to win our everyday battles. As we recognize our challenges, we can also acknowledge the good things that have happened. Our battles have produced victories with such things as durable medical equipment accreditation, medication therapy management, vaccinations, specialty drugs, compounding, and many other services. Now more than ever our patients depend on us to help them manage their health care needs and they are recognizing the value of our many services. We are still regarded as one of the most trusted professions and are blessed with the opportunity to improve the physical and emotional well-being of our patients. So I am thankful to be a pharmacist and a fighter for this profession. There will always be issues but pharmacists are survivors and will continue to dedicate themselves to enhancing the profession and the health of our patients. As former President Dwight D. Eisenhower once observed, “What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight – it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” Thank you for your support of our association that truly fights hard to improve pharmacy in Arkansas. May God bless you in 2012! §

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APA 2012 Annual Convention Coming Up June 20-23 in Rogers Join your colleagues at the 130th Annual Arkansas Pharmacists Association Convention in Rogers. The APA Annual Convention will be held June 20-23 at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Rogers. Convention programs will promote the professional development of pharmacists through educational sessions and networking. Participants will have the opportunity to meet with exhibitors showcasing new products to potential customers while working to maintain and strengthen relationships with existing customers. Social events will help members reconnect and renew old friendships, including the annual golf tournament on Wednesday, June 20, 2012. The spouse program will be a trip to the fabulous Crystal Bridges Museum on June 22 followed by a Friday night party. Check www.arrx.org to register online soon.

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THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST


Senator Percy Malone: Swimming Upstream as an Advocate for Pharmacists and Children

“I have been a strong supporter of pharmacy [at the state legislature]; no one has carried the torch higher.”

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rkansas State Senator Percy Malone (D-Arkadelphia) is a man who will always fight for the underdog. “My biggest fulfillment comes if someone has been unfairly treated or fired and I can step in and help. I will fight just as hard for that person who has no one to go to. I want people to know that when Percy Malone takes on something, he is not going to let go of it.” Malone has been helping Arkansans, in particular pharmacists and abused children, since being elected to the Arkansas House of Representatives in 1995. He currently serves as the chairman of the Senate Public Health, Welfare and Labor committee. He also serves on the influential Arkansas Legislative Council, Insurance and Commerce committee and Joint Budget committee, which he previously co-chaired. The 69-year old Democrat served six years in the Arkansas House from 1995-2001 and has served in the Senate since then. This is his final year serving in the state legislature due to Arkansas’s term limits. His tireless work at the Capitol has earned Malone praise for his service. On several occasions Malone has been listed as one of the top ten legislators. He has won awards from the Arkansas Health Care Association, the Arkansas Prosecuting Attorneys Association, advocates for Human Development Centers, Arkansas Counseling Association and the Arkansas Teachers Association. “Percy has always been a knowledgeable legislator, one who was easy for me to work alongside during my time in the Senate. His dedication to constituent work and dogged pursuit of issues he cared about showed, time and again, his continual commitment to serving his district and serving Arkansas,” said Governor Mike Beebe. The Arkansas Pharmacist Association honored Malone in 2009 by presenting him with the first Percy Malone Public Service Award. To win the award the recipient must have made a contribution to public service by being elected to any public office and by displaying an interest in the people of Arkansas. AR•Rx

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THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST

Senator Percy Malone stands in front of the Senate doors at the state Capitol.

Humble beginnings Malone’s own humble beginnings offer clues as to why he champions his constituents, especially “the poorest of the poor.” He grew up in Rosedale, Mississippi, across the Mississippi River from Lake Village. His parents had very limited means and education.

Photos courtesy of Amy Malone Norcross

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SENATOR PERCY MALONE

By the time he was a kid, Malone said, he had two to three jobs: working at a soda fountain; hauling wood; and delivering newspapers in Rosedale for the Memphis PressScimitar and the Delta Democrat Times. If there was any kind of odd job available, he had it. When he was in ninth grade, working at a pharmacy, Malone decided that he wanted to be a “druggist.” “My mind was made up that it was what I wanted to do.” Becoming a pharmacist In 1962, Malone attended the University of Mississippi in Oxford to get a degree in pharmacy. He describes his experience in pharmacy school as positive but he was driven to get in and out in three years. During his last semester he worked almost 40 hours per week. “I wanted badly to be a pharmacist and badly to own my own store someday so the sacrifice was worth it,” Malone said. From Ole Miss, Malone was recruited to work at a pharmacy in Bridge City, Texas, between Orange and Port Arthur. “I went there because I could make $3.60 per hour -- more money than I could make in Mississippi,” Malone said. In 1967, a friend in Fordyce told him about a possible job opportunity in Arkadelphia. The store owner was Ira Butler (I.B.) Fuller and Malone was hired that afternoon. “I.B. was a very well-loved, popular guy,” Malone said. “He let me sign a note without any money to have a part-interest in his store. I worked with him until 1975.”

This launched his career as a pharmacy owner. Today, W.P. Malone, Inc. owns 14 AllCare Pharmacy stores in Arkadelphia, Fort Smith, Hope, Jonesboro, Little Rock, Magnolia, Mountain Home, Prescott, Rogers, Texarkana and Trumann. Meeting Bill Clinton As he was expanding his stores in the mid-1970s, Malone became friends with another Arkansas politician, Bill Clinton. Malone asked his state representative to introduce him to then Attorney General Clinton at an Arkadelphia Rotary meeting. “Clinton was very aggressive and very consumeroriented. He was like a rock star. So I asked if we could be introduced in 1976. He helped me address an important issue. “After Rotary, I got my time to speak to him and tried to tell him my story in 35-40 seconds. He had lots of people around him and I finally said, ‘You don’t have time to listen to my story.’ Clinton put his arm around me, pushed me into a corner and told me, ‘What you’ve got to say is as important as anyone in this room. You have your lawyer call Barbara to make an appointment with me and I will listen to both sides.’ The next call from Clinton’s office was that the issue was resolved.” Malone still carries Bill Clinton’s Attorney General business card in his wallet with Barbara’s name written on the back. Malone went on to develop Attorney General Clinton’s computer system when Clinton ran for governor. After Clinton was Governor, Malone developed software for the Governor’s office and the system that was used to run Governor Clinton’s presidential campaign. He worked with President Clinton during his tenure in office, and afterwards. “Percy Malone has been my friend for 35 years,” said President Bill Clinton. “He took a leading role in my campaign and in helping pass my programs in the Legislature. Now, for almost 20 years, Senator Percy Malone has served as a champion for progressive education and public health policies. I’m very proud of him.” Then Governor Clinton also appointed Malone to the State Board of Pharmacy where Malone said he built great relationships with the State Board’s Lester Hosto, Sheila Castin and Charlie Campbell. Campbell continues to be a fan: “Percy Malone is one of the greatest men I’ve ever known. I have depended on him in so many ways both professionally and personally. His work for pharmacy in the legislature has been amazing and he will be sorely missed after terming out.”

W.P. Malone, Inc. owns 14 AllCare Pharmacy stores. This is one of four in Arkadelphia.

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Legacy as a legislator Malone resigned from the State Board in 1995 so he could

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THE ARKANSAS PHARMACIST


SENATOR PERCY MALONE

run for the Arkansas House of Representatives. He felt compelled to get into politics because pharmacy needed a voice in the legislature. If you’re outside a group of power, Malone said, you don’t know what can happen to you. “The things that I have run for and worked so hard for is because I absolutely know how it is to be poor, have zero influence and to try to get help. There is not anything I won’t do for someone if they don’t have anyone to help them.” Malone served in the House for six years. His first day in the legislature influenced his political agenda for the remainder of his terms in the House and Senate. Champion for abused children “On my first day in the legislature, there was a newspaper that had a picture of a baby with cigarette burns on it,” Malone explained. “Before getting burned, the baby had been abused and then the Department of Human Services put the baby back in the home. I went upstream and got a law passed that said anytime a decision is made about a child who has been abused the first consideration needs to be the best interest of the child. “We now have a system in Arkansas in place to look at how our system works through the child’s eyes. We’re getting better. I’m really proud of what I was able to accomplish for them.” Until a few years ago, Malone said, abused children had few legislators to advocate on their behalf. Now he is their chief advocate.

APA Executive Vice President Mark Riley said of Malone’s work on behalf of pharmacists, “I cannot think of a single time in the last eight years that Senator Malone did not support APA’s position on a pharmacy issue. Since 2001, he has been the lead sponsor on at least 31 bills that passed and became Acts, such as expanding immunizations, creating a prescription drug monitoring program, fighting Pharmacy Benefit Managers or preventing internet prescribing of narcotics. This does not include all of the bills with different lead sponsors that Percy worked behind the scenes to help us pass. “And, on a personal note, it was evident to me that the more pressure I seemed to be under in a legislative fight, the more Percy got personally involved, and I will be eternally grateful for that. I love the guy.” Malone said that throughout Arkansas pharmacies are an integral part of our health care delivery system so pharmacists and the Arkansas Pharmacists Association are responsible for being effective advocates. “The APA has to get even more aggressive politically, work harder to have relationships with legislators, quit worrying about Uncle Sam, take a stand and get someone to look out for the profession because it is not just for pharmacists but it is for the public’s well-being,” Malone added. “Now, through Mark Riley’s leadership and others, this legislature is much more educated than it was 10 years ago and understands that pharmacists are part of the health care system; a few years ago they would talk about doctors and nurses but not pharmacists.

According to Max Snowden, MPH, LSW, Executive Director, Arkansas Commission on Child Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence, “Senator Malone, through a number of legislative initiatives, has enabled the state to address the untenable issue of child sexual and physical maltreatment at the three critical levels of prevention, intervention and treatment. The passionate efforts of Senator Malone and his wife Donna have enabled Arkansas to make on-going significant strides in providing services to abused children.” In May 2010, the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Arkansas honored Malone by creating the Percy Malone Child Protection Award which is presented annually to recognize people who work on behalf of abused and neglected children. Pharmacy advocate Not only has Malone changed the environment for abused children, he has been an unwavering supporter of pharmacists in Arkansas. Reflecting on his legislative service, Malone said, “I have been a strong supporter of pharmacy [at the state legislature]; no one has carried the torch higher.”

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Senators Stephanie Flowers and Joyce Elliott confer with Senator Malone in Senate chambers.

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SENATOR PERCY MALONE

“As long as [that understanding] is there, pharmacy will be alive and well, and from the Governor on down, legislators will recognize that pharmacy provides a valued service. It will be much more valuable in the next several years to do something besides count and pour. And more importantly, be paid for it. If pharmacy keeps doing what it is doing with Mark Riley as its spokesperson, pharmacy is going to do well. But pharmacy needs strong support for Mark from back home; you can’t just wave a magic wand and it happens,” Malone explained. After leaving the legislature next January, Malone does not expect to return to his ranch in Arkadelphia and simply relax. “The people of Arkansas have given me a tremendous opportunity to serve. I’ve been afforded all this opportunity to learn and participate so I hope to use that knowledge and experience to continue to help Arkansans.” Pharmacy opportunities Regarding his businesses, Malone said, “I still love practicing pharmacy. I’m enjoying it probably more than I ever have.

“The people of Arkansas have given me a tremendous opportunity to serve. I’ve been afforded all this opportunity to learn and participate so I hope to use that knowledge and experience to continue to help Arkansans.”

Senator Malone walks with grandson John Adam Norcross.

Malone said W.P. Malone, Inc. will continue to seek new opportunities as the health care industry changes. “I think pharmacists need to be prepared to change. We know the only human that wants to change is a baby with a wet diaper; however, we’re going to have to have more technology, we’ll have to learn to do more with less and take some risk. I think those that do will be just fine in the marketplace and those that don’t will be left out.” What will pharmacy be like in 10 years? “I think that we have to morph into something besides count and pour,” Malone said. “I think clinical services will evolve; there may be a robot dispensing the medicine, doing the same thing we call a technician today, but somebody’s got to help manage that person’s health or that disease state and that is going to become increasingly valuable to keep people well. Pharmacists have got to be innovative. “Pharmacy must be about promoting wellness and compliance. That’s my view. We just need to be smarter and let the consumers know that we’re interested in their health. All of this comes down to taking care of people,” Malone said. Next stage in life Malone plans to continue to spend as much time as he can with his family once he leaves office. “I am very fortunate that my wife Donna has allowed me to come home one day at 7:30 p.m. then the next day at 9:30 p.m. and not have any kind of schedule.”

Senator Malone discusses legislation at the Capitol. 11

Malone added, “I live out in the country and I love to be out there with my cats, dogs, chickens, horses and all the stuff that gets me away from the routine that I really like. If I were retired, I’d want to do exactly what I’m doing.

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SENATOR PERCY MALONE

In addition to spending time on the ranch, Malone enjoys being with his children and grandchildren. “My daughters and my grandchildren are the most important things in my life,” Malone said. Malone’s oldest daughter Amy Norcross lives in Jacksonville, Florida, and his youngest daughter Emily Ervin lives in Fayetteville. Malone’s five grandchildren include Amy’s three children, Kathryn, age 19, a sophomore at Wake Forest University; William Malone, age 17; a high school senior; and John Adam, age 13, in 7th grade. Daughter Emily’s children include Zoe, age 13, and Hudson, age 6. Regarding his next life stage, Malone said, “I am hopeful that when the last day [in the legislature] comes, I won’t be regretful, I’ll just be thankful that I had the opportunity to serve. I intend to stay involved, help folks and do all I can to help pharmacy through the contacts that I’ve made over the years. “I am not going to be a lobbyist and I am not looking for a job; I’m anxious to go back and be a volunteer. I don’t intend to seek any other office, but if there is anything I can do to help Governor Beebe when I’m out, I’m certainly going to help him.

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(L to R) Malone grandchildren Zoe Ervin, John Adam Norcross, Kathryn Norcross, Percy, and William Norcross holding Hudson Ervin.

“My cup runneth over,” Malone said. “I have had a wonderful, blessed life.” §

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PHARMACY MARKETING GROUP, INC

AND THE L AW By Don R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D.

Recordkeeping isn’t that important, is it? This series, Pharmacy and the Law, is presented by Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company and the Arkansas Pharmacists Association through Pharmacy Marketing Group, Inc., a company dedicated to providing quality products and services to the pharmacy community.

T

erry at Midtown Pharmacy was dealing with another recurring frustration. Their usual generic brand of atenolol was backordered again. Terry ordered in a couple of 100 count bottles to hold them over until their usual brand was available again. Terry didn’t bother to update their computer database to reflect this change because she would then just have to change it back again two days from now. The change isn’t really that important anyway, right? Wrong. Your documentation is the only thing you will have later to prove what you did today. We all forget things, especially when they come up weeks or months later. Consider the following claim scenario. A pharmacy was sued by a former patient over some faulty transdermal fentanyl patches. The patient alleged that he was injured due to the patch releasing the medication too quickly. The patient’s profile indicated that he received the patch manufactured by company A. Company A’s product had in fact been recalled due to this very problem. The patient was sure that the excessive dose delivered had caused him to be hospitalized. The pharmacy staff went through months of anxiety and expense while producing records and being deposed. What everyone learned at the end was that

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the patch received by the patient wasn’t manufactured by company A. He had received patches manufactured by company B. This was discovered when reviewing the invoices from the time period in question. Company B’s product had been purchased because of the recall of company A’s patches. However, the patient profile indicated that the patient had received company A’s patches. Proper recordkeeping would have most likely prevented this pharmacy from suffering through months of litigation. A second consideration is billing. In today’s world, it is more important than ever to bill for what was actually dispensed. Third party payers expect and demand that their customers receive the product that is billed to the third party payer. While the two different fentanyl patches discussed may be clinically interchangeable, they are probably not the same when it comes to acquisition cost or reimbursement rates. One of them may have been non-formulary, for example. This difference is multiplied if one product is the brand name one. Clinically, none of the differences are significant. However, we aren’t talking about therapeutics. We are talking finances and recordkeeping. This sort of discrepancy can lead to repayment demands, even penalties and interest, following an audit.

The importance of recordkeeping shouldn’t be overlooked. In litigation, documentation is everything. If it wasn’t documented, it wasn’t done. Many cases have turned on seemingly small documentation issues. Perpetual inventory totals, timecards, delivery records, pick-up logs, documentation of counseling (or refusal of counseling) are some other examples of records that have become key points in a case. The lesson here is that no record is too small or too trivial to be skipped over. Update those inventory changes as they come in. It may seem burdensome at the time, but there are potential benefits later. §

© Don R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D., is General Counsel at Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company. This article discusses general principles of law and risk management. It is not intended as legal advice. Pharmacists should consult their own attorneys and insurance companies for specific advice. Pharmacists should be familiar with policies and procedures of their employers and insurance companies, and act accordingly.

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UNIVERSIT Y OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

Beware of Electronic Prescriptions This issue of Safety Nets examines some potential hazards associated with electronic prescriptions. Each prescription was submitted by a pharmacist from Central Arkansas. We thank you for your continued support of this column.

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he electronic prescription illustrated in Figure One was transmitted from a prescriber’s office to a community pharmacy in Central Arkansas. The prescription was for a 9 y/o patient. After the pharmacist verified the E-Prescription for accuracy in the computer, the order was sent to the technician filling station. As the technician was filling the order, a second pharmacist arrived to staff the evening shift. While this second pharmacist was examining the filled prescription for accuracy, she began to question the directions to the patient. In her experience, she had never encountered an Figure 1 order that instructed a patient to administer two sprays of Imitrex® (sumatriptan) – one spray in each nostril – at the onset of a migraine headache. All the orders for Imitrex® intranasal solution she had received instructed patients to administer only one spray at headache onset. A telephone Figure 2 call to the prescriber’s office confirmed this 9 y/o patient was to administer only one spray in one nostril – not two sprays. After this, a corrected prescription label was generated and the filled prescription was placed in the will-call bin for patient pick-up. The electronic prescription illustrated in Figure Two was also transmitted to a community pharmacy in Central Arkansas. The prescription was for an adult female. As in the first case, the pharmacist verified the transmitted prescription information was accurate and sent the order to the technician filling station. The technician filled the prescription for Optivar® (azelastine) 0.05% Ophthalmic Solution and affixed the prescription label containing the following patient directions: “place one drop in each ear twice daily.” The filled prescription was placed in line for final pharmacist verification and patient counseling. During the counseling session, the patient remarked “I hope these drops help my eyes because they itch all the time.” At this point, the pharmacist realized the directions instructed the patient to administered these antihistamine eye drops indicated for allergic conjunctivitis into each ear (i.e. AU), rather than AR•Rx

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each eye (OU). After this, the pharmacist generated a corrected prescription label and appropriately counseled the patient. The prescriptions in these cases illustrate the potential hazards associated with electronic prescriptions. While E-Prescriptions may reduce the incidence of medication errors resulting from illegible prescriber handwriting, they do not guarantee the transmitted order is error-free. In fact, the legibility and neatness of electronic prescriptions may – in some cases – increase the risk of errors reaching patients compared to traditional handwritten prescriptions, which may be more carefully scrutinized by the pharmacist. All pharmacists must use the same care and diligence when verifying the accuracy of electronic prescriptions as they do with all other types of medication orders. The second case also illustrates the importance of patient counseling by the pharmacist. The error lurking in the sig of this perfectly legible electronic order was not discovered until the counseling session. Technology will continue to change the way pharmacy is practiced in this country. Electronic prescriptions have reduced the incidence of certain types of medication errors (i.e. look-alike, sound-alike mix-ups). Electronic prescriptions cannot, however, provide a patient safety net as effective as face-to-face patient counseling. Technology may enhance – but can never replace – patient counseling by the pharmacist. Finally, the second prescription provides clear evidence that electronic prescribing has not ended the use of hazardous prescription abbreviations (i.e. GTT, AU, etc.). Whatever time might be saved by using these abbreviations is done so at the expense of patient safety. Until the word processing systems of prescribing software catch up with appropriate nomenclature, the pharmacist will clearly remain the best safety net for patients. § 14


2012 APA AWARDS SOLICITATION Award Nominations

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ach year APA encourages members to submit the names of individuals who are deserving of special recognition for their professional activities during the past year. Any active APA member is eligible to nominate a person for the awards. Award recipients are chosen by an APA committee following a review of all nominees. Nominations are now being accepted for the following annual awards to be presented by the Association. Nominations will close at Noon, April 13, 2012. Please mark your nomination with an X. If you have more than one nomination, please feel free to copy this form. Pharmacist of the Year

Past Winners: 2011 Don Johnson - Little Rock, 2010 Richard Hanry - El Dorado, 2009 Tony Bari - Jonesboro

The Pharmacist of the Year Award is given to recognize the pharmacist for his/her outstanding contributions to the profession of pharmacy and activities in the advancement of pharmacy during the year. Young Pharmacist of the Year

Past Winners: 2011 Cheryl Bryant - Little Rock, 2010 Rob Christian - Little Rock, 2009 Sarah Frank - Jonesboro

Nominee must have an entry degree in Pharmacy, received nine or fewer years ago, and be a member of the APA. Nominee must be in the active practice of pharmacy in the year selected, and actively involved in the profession of pharmacy, displaying an interest in the future of the profession. APA Bowl of Hygeia Award Past Winners: 2011 Tom Warmack - Sheridan, 2010 Ronnie Norris - McGehee, 2009 Eddie Dunn - Little Rock

This award was established by the A.H. Robbins Company to honor pharmacists who have contributed to the progress of their community. Criteria include: 1) Pharmacist licensed in the State of Arkansas; 2) Recipient must be living and must not be a previous recipient of award; 3) Recipient must not be currently serving, nor has he/she served within the immediate past two years, as an officer of the APA in other than an ex-officio capacity or on its awards committee; 4) Recipient must have compiled an outstanding record of community service, which, apart from his/her specific identification as a pharmacist, reflects well on the profession. Percy Malone Public Service Award Past Winners: 2011 Gene Boeckmann - Wynne, 2009 Percy Malone - Arkadelphia

This award was established in 2009 by the Arkansas Pharmacists Association. The recipient must have made a contribution to public service by being elected to any public office and by displaying an interest in the people of Arkansas. Innovative Pharmacy Practice Award Past Winners: 2011 Eric Crumbaugh - Benton, 2010 Maggie Miller - Batesville, 2009 Michael Thames - Fort Smith

This award was established in 1993 by the APA in cooperation with the National Council of State Pharmacy Associations and DuPont Pharmaceuticals to recognize, annually, a pharmacist who has demonstrated a prominent spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship in the practice of pharmacy. Name of Nominee: ___________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________ City/State/Zip: _______________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________ Reasons for selecting nominee: Attach one page with a description of reasons and/or the individual nominee’s resume. Nominator’s Name: __________________________________ Phone: _________________________ Date: ______________

Fax or email written nomination form and material to: Awards Committee, Arkansas Pharmacists Association; barbara@arrx.org; Fax 501-372-0546. Please submit by Noon, April 13, 2012.

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Marita Nazarian

Director of Phar macy Ar kansas Children’s Hospital

Pharmacy practice: Hospital. Graduate pharmacy school and year: B.S. 1976; M.S. 1980, Residency in Pharmacy Practice 1978-1980, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. How long have your practiced: Since 1976. I worked for two years after graduation at Northside Pharmacy in Raleigh, N.C., before I went to graduate school. I came to Arkansas Children’s Hospital in 1985. Favorite part of the job: Working with amazing pharmacists. It’s a great group of people. Least favorite part of the job: Dealing with drug shortages. It feels like we shouldn’t have to do that in this day and age.

Oddest request: We used to supply leaches for micro surgery and kept cadaver skin for skin grafts. Recent reads: Books on archeology and ancient history. History of Ancient Egypt from The Earliest Times to the Persian Conquest by James Henry Breasted. Fun activities: I love to read, cook Middle Eastern food like baklava, restore our 1886 house in the Quapaw Quarter of Little Rock and travel to visit ancient historical sites. Ideal dinner guests: The heretic pharaoh of Egypt Akhenaten; Livia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus; and King Alfred of England. If not a pharmacist then: I would be an archeologist.

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DR. JOHN KIRTLEY

ARKANSAS PHARMACISTS

Drive Innovative Pharmacy Practices “We need to educate pharmacists to look for the opportunity to provide quality preventative care to patients”

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he variety of practice settings in which pharmacists currently work can be surprising to those who envision the old corner drugstore. While the corner drugstore is still alive and well in Arkansas, today’s pharmacy practice also includes compounding, long-term care, and work in hospitals, among others. Since 1993, the Arkansas Pharmacists Association (APA) has honored pharmacists for their innovative pharmacy practices. Here are the stories of two recent award recipients and the innovative ways they have expanded their practices. 2011 winner Eric Crumbaugh, Pharm.D., served as Patient Care Specialist at Kroger pharmacies for almost four years. He began working there following his graduation from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Pharmacy in 2008. Crumbaugh won the 2011 APA Innovative Pharmacy Practice award for helping start a community pharmacy residency program, initiating international travel clinics and expanding clinical services at Kroger pharmacies in Arkansas over the last several years. In July 2008, Crumbaugh became the first community pharmacy practice resident at an Arkansas Kroger. He originally thought about doing a residency at a hospital but had always worked in retail and wanted the experience to be more clinical. Kroger stores in other states had residency programs so Crumbaugh pressed for one to be created in

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Former Kroger Patient Care Specialist Dr. Eric Crumbaugh gives patient a vaccine.

Arkansas. In order to launch a residency in Arkansas, UAMS and Kroger split the funding. Crumbaugh was instrumental in refining the traditional residency model to fit Kroger and Arkansas state regulations. This was Kroger’s first attempt at a community pharmacy residency in Arkansas. Kroger Travel Clinic Crumbaugh’s real innovation came in launching Kroger’s travel clinics, and taking on other clinical services and expanding on those. He was passionate about immunizations, he said, and there were no Kroger pharmacists in Arkansas offering travel vaccines. Sanofi Pasteur shared with Kroger the financial impact for establishing a travel clinic; Kroger saw it as improving access to care, especially for last minute travelers. Kroger’s travel clinics charge a consulting fee and a fee for each vaccination. A patient will call and say they are going on an overseas trip. Once they make an appointment, the pharmacist will go through the vaccinations that are recommended and routine for the specific area of the world the patient will be visiting. For visits to some parts of the world, the consultation will be about malaria and general precautions relating to water and mosquitos. Crumbaugh said, “Vaccinations are a staple. It’s what gets people in the door but then the pharmacist can counsel

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ARKANSAS PHARMACISTS DRIVE INNOVATIVE PHARMACY PRACTICES

them regarding other things. We can show them other items they might need on their trip such as sunscreen, bug spray, etc. We then communicate all of that back to their primary care physician. The nice thing is that Kroger pharmacists can see patients that day or the next day.”

in a rural community hospital setting. At the time, Miller said, there was not another rural hospital residency in the state.

“What makes the WRMC residency unique,” Miller said, “is that we’ve been able to share our knowledge as pharmacists with physicians and nurses in settings that are not common, In additional to their travel vaccination niche, Kroger has at least at our hospital. We have been able to promote also added cholesterol testing and pharmacy in unique ways that they counseling. They do point-of-care wouldn’t see in a bigger hospital. testing which provides the results on The resident gets to experience all “[The resident] can have a the spot. The pharmacist can explain aspects of the hospital that they direct impact on patient care to a patient what their numbers mean wouldn’t see in bigger hospital. They with implementing protocols and what to do about it. can have a direct impact on patient care with implementing protocols and and services that are based Crumbaugh said his goal in services that are based on the ideas of on the ideas of pharmacists, establishing the travel clinic and pharmacists, students and residents. expanding to other services was to Their ideas can become part of our students and residents.” work with pharmacists and other practice in our institution.” health care professionals to improve immunization rates in Arkansas. He also wanted to increase The process of setting up the residency was a group effort that awareness of the need for vaccines. “Health care providers included collaboration with Miller’s co-director at the time, may not always think people with diabetes, for instance, Jody Smotherman, Pharm.D., and UAMS Northeast Area need a pneumonia shot, but we need to educate them to Health Education Center (AHEC) director Dennis Moore, look for the opportunity to provide quality preventative care Pharm.D., plus Paul Gubbins, Pharm.D., FCCP, professor to patients,” he said. and Director of Clinical Research at UAMS. Miller helped to develop the program and was the main preceptor. WRMC Crumbaugh’s next step is to work on immunizing adults on was the main source of funds for the resident with UAMS a statewide basis. He left Kroger at the end of January and assisting and AHEC providing travel reimbursement. joined the Arkansas Pharmacists Association to become Immunization Grant Coordinator of a $375,000 contract Miller said they jointly developed the resident experience awarded by the Arkansas Department of Health. The at the hospital, and set it up so the resident could do goal of the grant is to increase pharmacistadministered immunizations in Arkansas in adults by 10 percent. Crumbaugh hopes to exceed the goal. He was replaced at Kroger as Patient Care Specialist by Michelle Lang, Pharm.D., who helped conduct the travel clinic with Crumbaugh. For more information about this innovative pharmacy practice, Crumbaugh’s contact information is eric@arrx.org. Rural Hospital Residency Program 2010 Innovative Pharmacy Practice winner Maggie Miller, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy, White River Medical Center (WRMC) in Batesville, said her own experience doing a residency at the Regional Medical Center in Memphis (The MED) in 2002 led her to consider establishing a residency program at her hometown hospital in Batesville. Miller began working at WRMC as Clinical Coordinator in 2003 and in 2009 led the charge to establish a new residency program

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Dr. Maggie Miller demonstrates patient care for Dr. Erin Beth Hays and Dr. Melissa Shipp at White River Medical Center.

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ARKANSAS PHARMACISTS DRIVE INNOVATIVE PHARMACY PRACTICES

rounding with doctors, go into the intensive care unit, see the administrative side of the hospital and do other things that pharmacists had not done previously at WRMC. Their first resident was Erin Beth Hays, Pharm.D., a 2009 UAMS graduate, who was from the Batesville area and had spent a month with them as a student. “She was an excellent student and the perfect person to be the first resident,” Miller said. “Erin was very motivated and willing to do things that hadn’t been done before.” After her residency, Hays stayed on to become a WRMC clinical pharmacist. Miller said that the rural hospital residency program accomplishes several things. If they are able to get more pharmacists in clinical role, they can provide better patient care and decrease medication errors. She feels they can provide a unique setting for a resident because their rural hospital setting tends to be less specialized and more relational and the resident can learn on broader scale. They are able to get to know physicians and nurses and get to see behind the scenes in a way that they may not see in a bigger facility. “At WRMC,” Miller said, “ the advantage is that we can tailor the program to the resident’s interest.” UAMS, Arkansas

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Children’s Hospital and the Central Arkansas Veteran’s Administration Hospital already had residency programs. Before WRMC, there were limited opportunities outside Central Arkansas. She said that WRMC has been a model for other rural programs such as St. Bernard’s Medical Center in Jonesboro. Miller said part of the reason she wanted to establish a program was because of how valuable her residency program was to her. She and the planning group wanted to be able to offer more education within the state of Arkansas. UAMS and AHEC are still helping to pay for the WRMC residency. Miller hopes to continue the program as long as the residency is a good match for them and for a resident. It has to be a match both ways, she said. 2011 UAMS graduate Melissa Shipp, Pharm.D., is their current resident. When asked whether their practice is replicable for other rural hospitals, Miller said definitely, as long as there is administrative support and some pharmacy clinical services. She is willing to talk to either potential residents or other rural hospitals about the WRMC program. Miller’s contact information is mmiller@wrmc.com. §

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BEHIND THE SCENES: DISTRICT MEETINGS

LEGISL ATOR PROFILE

Representative Linda Tyler (D-Conway), District 45

Represents: East and South Conway and Lollie Bottoms area to Mayflower. Years in Office: Finishing 2nd Term in Arkansas House. Occupation: Retired Acxiom Corporation Senior Executive, owner of Red Mango Frozen Yogurt Franchise, Organizational Development Consultant. Your pharmacist: David Smith, The Medicine Shoppe, for more than 30 years. Like most about office: The ability to be engaged in policy development that makes a difference in the lives of others. Like least about office: The slow pace at which change takes place. Upcoming election: State Senate, District 35 - November 2012. Most admired politician: Ask me again next year. Since this past session, I began reading a biography on each of the U.S. Presidents (in chronological order). I am now to Zachary Taylor (11th President). I have gained a tremendous respect for these men and their families and reading this in such a way. I have learned not only about their Presidency, but how and why they served.

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Chair, House Public Healt h Committee

Advice for pharmacists about the political process and working with the AR Legislature: Know your legislators personally. Invite them to stop by your pharmacy. Discuss with them the policies that work well or work against your business. Invite your legislator to utilize your expertise in the medical field when faced with policy decisions. Your fantasy political gathering would include: Abigail Adams, Bill and Hillary Clinton, Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman and Abraham Lincoln. Just think about the era during which these men and women served and the major decisions that impacted our world. Toughest issue of the past Session: Because of term limits in Arkansas, we have significant turnover in the legislature. This past session, we had an unusually large freshman class. With all the new legislators, the session started off slowly and then built to a frenzy in the last few weeks. The last few weeks are also when the budget and the revenue stabilization process comes together. We were not only still considering substantive legislation, but trying to make sure we understood the impact of the decisions we were making on the budget. What do you do for fun: I love to read and travel with my family.

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HEALTH CARE REFORM LAW

Health Care Reform Law to Impact Providers and Recipients in Arkansas By John Charles Rose, Pharm.D. candidate, UAMS Class of 2012

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he Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was signed into law by President Obama in March 2010. Some phases of the law have already been established and the entire law is to be implemented by January 1, 2014. The purpose of the new law is to make health insurance more accessible and affordable for everyone. When the bill was signed, approximately 50 million Americans did not have health insurance. The new law will bring many changes to the delivery of health care, affecting both providers and recipients. One feature of health care reform that has been implemented is phasing out the coverage gap, or “doughnut hole,” for Medicare part D beneficiaries. In 2011, these patients began receiving a 50 percent discount on brand name drugs if they were in the “doughnut hole.” This discount will continue to get larger until the gap is completely phased out in 2020. Another feature of the law that has already been implemented is the availability of coverage for young adults on their parents’ insurance plan until they reach 26 years of age.

rates based on a person’s gender or health status. To transition into this phase, there is currently a program that provides options to patients who have been uninsured in the past because of a pre-existing condition. There are also measures in place to help facilitate the movement from a traditional fee-for-service type payment system to a payment system based on quality and outcomes. Health care reform has been extremely controversial and political. Since President Obama signed the PPACA into law, several lawsuits have challenged its constitutionality, including the ability of the federal government to mandate that individuals purchase insurance coverage. In November 2011, the United States Supreme Court made the decision to review the constitutionality of the health care reform law and will hear oral arguments in the case for an unprecedented three consecutive days, from March 26-28, 2012. A decision in the case is expected in June 2012. §

Other provisions scheduled to be fully implemented by January 1, 2014, include expansion of Medicaid, one of the more controversial aspects of the new law. Currently, patients must be at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level ($10,890 for an individual and $22,350 for a family of four) to be eligible for Arkansas Medicaid. In 2014, this number will increase to 133 percent of the federal poverty level (about $14,000 for an individual and $29,000 for a family of four) which means approximately 250,000 more Arkansans will become Medicaid eligible. Also by the year 2014, businesses with 50 or more fulltime equivalent employees will be required to offer health insurance to its employees or pay a penalty. In addition, some small businesses will be eligible for tax credits to help them provide this coverage. Another feature requires that insurance companies spend at least 85 percent of the money that they receive from premiums for large business plans and 80 percent of what they receive from private and small business plans on health care and improving quality. This premium expenditure requirement seeks to reduce health care costs and increase quality by encouraging the coverage of additional preventative care services and requiring insurance companies to minimize their administrative expenses. New rules affecting pre-existing conditions will be fully implemented in 2014. Insurance companies will no longer be able to refuse coverage to a patient due to a pre-existing condition and they will not be able to charge higher premium AR•Rx

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COLLEGES OF PHARMACY

UAMS

Students Serve at Mexican Consulate

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he last few months at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Pharmacy have been a Stephanie Gardner time of remarkable progress. Our Pharm.D., Ed.D. research program has expanded with Dean the recruitment of new faculty and a multi-million dollar grant. In addition, our ability to work with other health care professionals at UAMS to reach out and serve our local community has suddenly taken shape in a way we could not imagine a few months ago. Giving takes many forms, each vital to the UAMS College of Pharmacy. Donors who partner with the college support excellent health care services for Arkansans, top-notch educational experiences for our students, and an example that encourages alumni and friends to give back to the College in turn.

260 have been screened for diabetes, about 250 have been tested for hypertension and 185 for osteoporosis. Our students and faculty thus advance the shared objectives of our partnership with the Consulate. They increase knowledge about and utilization of health care resources. These practices improve health and strengthen health promotion and disease prevention behaviors. At the same time, under faculty guidance, our students gain invaluable experience. They learn about establishing rapport, efficient screening techniques, disease management, and patient education. They also establish a model of interprofessional teamwork while they gain a fuller appreciation for the needs of culturally diverse populations. Students also fulfill part of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience curriculum when they volunteer. They make a crucial difference in community health while representing the UAMS College of Pharmacy.

Avenues for giving converged recently when Vicki and Karrol The AACP award will help Fowlkes of Salem, both alumni, sustain the existing program donated a building near campus. and promote additional community health efforts Their gift arose from the vision they share with this college. We our faculty and students have all see this as the future home of UAMS COP student, Trina Crigler, checks a patient’s blood pressure. under study. Current student a student-led health and wellness leaders of the project will center for uninsured patients. The be highlighted at the AACP building and its modification stand at the forefront of our efforts Annual Meeting this July in Kissimmee, Fla. They will make to serve our neighbors. a formal presentation about the successes of this program during a special session of that national meeting. This is novel, but it also is a natural continuation of other community-minded work for which our students and faculty The award also will allow students to expand services for have recently been recognized nationally. The American those visiting the Mexican Consulate. It helps pay for supplies Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Student such as glucose and cholesterol monitoring strips, lancets and Community Engaged Service Awards awarded a grant totaling patient education materials. Additional equipment purchased nearly $16,000 in support of our students’ dedicated work with award funds will allow students to screen multiple patients serving patients at the Mexican Consulate of Little Rock. Teva simultaneously. The students’ hard work has attracted other Pharmaceuticals funds this award. support, as well. The Target Campus Grant program recently provided $2,500 to will help pay for screening supplies. Our involvement at the Consulate began in October 2010 when many of our students volunteered at the annual “Binational We are very proud to have earned the AACP award for our Health Week.” That event, hosted by the Mexican Consulate in community outreach efforts. We look forward to expanding Little Rock, is part of an international effort by federal and state our services through the Consulate while we prepare to agencies, community-based organizations and volunteers in utilize the newly donated community health center. Our both the United States and Canada to improve the health and students have earned recognition that highlights our college well-being of the frequently underserved Latino population. in its efforts toward meeting the state’s pharmacy needs. The recognition emphasizes the importance of partnering with Since then, more than 725 underserved immigrant patients all communities. § have received flu immunization at the Consulate, more than 23

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COLLEGES OF PHARMACY

HARDING UNIVERSIT Y

U.S. Surgeon General Advocates for Advanced Pharmacy Practice

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ne of the goals of pharmacy education is to prepare pharmacists who are equipped with the knowledge to practice pharmacy in an ever changing environment and who are ready to meet the challenges that will occur as the role of the pharmacist evolves to fulfill a vital role in the American health care system. On December 14, 2011, Dr. Regina Benjamin, U.S. Surgeon General, wrote a letter of commendation to Rear Admiral Giberson, Chief Pharmacist of the U.S. Public Health Service, for the work he and his colleagues in the Commissioned Corps had done in preparing a report entitled Improving Patient and Health System Outcomes through Advanced Pharmacy Practice. The report included four focus points that I’d like to share with you as these are key to the general principles we embrace in educating student pharmacists at Harding University College of Pharmacy. The first focus point discusses the integration of pharmacists as health care providers that already exists through collaborative practice arrangements with physicians in many types of practice settings. The point is made that interprofessional support is currently in place for this model of care. Much evidence is provided that clearly demonstrates the vital role pharmacists can and do play in the health care system. The second focus point discusses the continuing need for pharmacists to be recognized as health care practitioners as defined in the Social Security Act and other health legislation and policy. The report says that precedent has been set in many states where primary care services (post-diagnosis) are successfully delivered within the current scope of pharmacy practice through collaborative practice agreements. This is certainly true in Arkansas and we should all be contending to see that the degree to which such services are provided continues to increase throughout our state.

keep this in front of our legislators Julie Hixson-Wallace and others who influence health Pharm.D., BCPS Dean care policy to ensure pharmacists receive recognition in the form of compensation for the valuable services we provide. The final focus point of the report is to me the most important as it outlines the overarching outcome that can be obtained through the implementation of patient-centered pharmacy services — improving the lives of our patients. “Through the delivery of patient care services, pharmacists improve outcomes, increase access to services for medically underserved and vulnerable populations, improve patient safety, shift time for physicians to focus on diagnosis and more critically ill patients, improve patient and provider satisfaction, enhance cost-effectiveness, and demonstrably improve the overall quality of health care through evidencebased practice.” I can’t imagine a more telling statement of the value we as pharmacists provide to the health care team and the individuals we serve. Pharmacists have been providing cognitive services for decades yet in the majority of settings compensation is tied to product delivery. The time has been coming and I believe we are closer now than ever to seeing pharmacists be recognized for the valuable services, rather than products, we provide. Harding University’s College of Pharmacy seeks to graduate pharmacists who accept the responsibility of improving the spiritual and physical wellness of the world by providing patient-centered care that ensures optimal medication therapy outcomes delivered through the highest standards of Christian service. I charge us all with this mission and encourage the use of the recently published Public Health Service report to help us make it a reality! §

Reference: Giberson S, Yoder S, Lee MP. Improving Patient and Health System Outcomes through Advanced Pharmacy Practice. A Report to the

The third focus point states, “Current compensation mechanisms for pharmacists in advanced practice roles need to expand and reflect the level of patient care services provided. The lack of compensation mechanisms is a current barrier for optimal health system outcomes, and the expansion and sustainability of pharmacist involvement.” I believe we would all agree with this point and need to

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U.S. Surgeon General. Office of the Chief Pharmacist. U.S. Public Health Service. Dec 2011.

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ACADEMY REPORTS

ARKANSAS ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH-SYSTEM PHARMACISTS REPORT

Students Place in ASHP Clinical Skills Competition

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fter a very successful 2011 Fall Seminar, many pharmacists, students, and technicians hit the road to New Orleans, the “Big Easy”, for the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists (ASHP) 46th Annual Midyear Clinical Meeting. This was the first time that the meeting was held in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina.

Willie Capers, Pharm.D. President

Prior to the start of the conference, representatives from several new and existing residency programs from across Arkansas attended the Residency Learning System pre-meeting workshop. This workshop is designed to help institutions design and deliver high quality residency programs that will meet ASHP accreditation standards. Also at the meeting, Janice McKean and Mallory Janice McKean Garfield, students at Harding University’s College of Pharmacy, placed second in the Clinical Skills Competition. Two hundred and thirty students, representing 115 colleges of pharmacy, participated in this national competition. The competition was a team-based exercise that challenges participants to analyze and solve a clinical case. Teams were given a scenario to address, and, within a certain amount of time, they must use resources that would be available to pharmacists to help patients make the best use Mallory Garfield of their medications. The top ten finalist teams received a $100 ASHP gift certificate, access to ASHP’s PharmPrep online (a case-based board preparatory tool), and an iPod Touch device preloaded with a one-year subscription to Lexi-Complete™ with AHFS Essentials™.

Congratulations to Brea Long, pharmacy technician at St. Bernards Medical Center, for receiving the AAHP Technician Scholarship for 2011. The value of the scholarship equals the cost of registration for one Pharmacy Technician Certification Board national certification exam and includes access to study materials. After receiving the scholarship, I am pleased to announce that Brea has taken the examination and she is now a Certified Pharmacy Technician! I want to invite all hospitals to complete the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) Hospital Self-Assessment (HSA) for your hospital at www.ppmiassessment.org. The tool consists of 106 questions assessing adoption of the PPMI recommendations at the hospital level. The HSA only takes 15-20 minutes to complete. Upon completing the questions, the tool will allow the user to develop a list of priorities (an “Action List”) individualized to their own hospital/health system. Hospitals will also have the opportunity to generate reports comparing their data with aggregated data collected from similar hospitals within and across their state. In the 2012 Fall Seminar, AAHP will use information gathered from the self-assessment to facilitate statewide PPMI discussions. In addition, information obtained from the survey and the statewide forum will be used to identify the practice gaps and develop a strategic plan to improve pharmacy practice throughout the state. §

Arkansas Association of Health-System Pharmacists Board Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Newton, Pharm.D., Russellville President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Willie Capers, Pharm.D., Batesville President-Elect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lanita Shaverd-White, Pharm.D., Little Rock Past President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rayanne Story, Pharm.D., Searcy Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharon Vire, Pharm.D., Jacksonville Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marsha Crader, Pharm.D., Jonesboro Member-at-Large . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maggie Miller, Pharm.D., Batesville Member-at-Large. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrea Donaldson, Pharm.D., Little Rock Member-at-Large. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .James Reed, Pharm.D., Conway Technician Representative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janet Liles, CPhT, Searcy

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ACADEMY REPORTS

COMPOUNDING AC ADEMY

Manufacturer Backorders: Many Compounding Opportunities

N

ational drug shortages are a critical topic in the U.S. at this time, as these shortages are affecting patient care across the nation. Recent shortages include chemotherapy drugs, TPN electrolytes, cyanocobalamin, dexamethasone sodium phosphate 4mg, lidocaine, midazolam, and Armour Thyriod™ (just to name a few).

At our pharmacy, a “print screen” Kristen Riddle, Pharm.D. President of the wholesaler showing unavailability of the manufactured drug is filed with the compounding log for each lot of medication. This quick and easy step documents the pharmacy’s compliance with the regulations.

This issue is a concern in all areas of our profession, from the community to health systems. Compounders are taking this opportunity to provide solutions, producing sterile and non-sterile compounded medications for practitioners and patients. In some cases these compounds are lifesaving drugs.

Clinics and hospitals often know of a coming shortage and will begin searching for alternatives. Compounders should be their “go to” resource when a drug is in short supply or manufacturer backordered. We as compounders have fantastic resources for formulations, such as the PCCA website or consultants. Often the manufacturer websites have the package Inserts which contain formulation and labeling information (IV, IM, dilute before administration, etc.). Sometimes this can be the fastest way to get a formulation. The International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists website, www.iacprx.com, is an excellent resource for current news. The American Society of Hospital Pharmacists has a Drug Shortage Resource Center, www. ashp.org/shortages, which is also very helpful.

Pharmacy Practice News, January 2012 issue, “Parenteral Nutrition Shortage Hits Patients, Providers Hard,” states “A nationwide shortage of virtually every component of IV nutrition—from multivitamins, IV fat emulsions and amino acids to concentrated electrolyte and mineral injections— has left hospitals and home parenteral nutrition providers scrambling to find enough of the needed nutrients to keep their patients alive and healthy.” The article goes on to explain, “The factors behind the shortage are similar to those that have led to the ongoing supply crisis involving chemotherapy drugs: consolidation of industry, a limited number of suppliers, low supplies of raw materials and low profit margins on many of the products involved.” When a drug is not commercially available, a compounding pharmacist may compound the drug for the patient or physician: Compounding a drug product that is commercially available in the marketplace or that is essentially a copy of a commercially available FDA-approved drug product is generally prohibited. However, in special circumstances a pharmacist may compound an appropriate quantity of a drug … if the drug product is not commercially available. The unavailability of such drug product must be documented prior to compounding. The recommended methodology for documenting unavailability is to print the screen of wholesalers showing back-ordered, discontinued, or out-of-stock items. This or similar documentation must be available when requested by the Board. (Arkansas Pharmacy Regulation 07-02-0001)

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In closing, I would like to congratulate my dad, Dr. Eddie Glover. In October he was named National Community Pharmacists Association’s Independent Pharmacist of the Year. I am so proud of him and thankful to have such a great mentor!! §

Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marilyn Sitzes, P.D., Hope Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ronnie Norris, P.D., McGehee Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steve Bryant, P.D., Batesville Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justin Boyd, Pharm.D., Fort Smith Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lenora Newsome, P.D., Smackover Member. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie O’Neal, P.D., Wynne Public Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Larry Ross, Sherwood Public Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joyce Palla, Arkadelphia Executive Director . . . . John Clay Kirtley, Pharm.D., Little Rock

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Call for Board Nominations in 2012-2013

PHARMACY HISTORY

Take advantage of the opportunity to give back by serving on the Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy or the APA Board of Directors. We are seeking nominations for enthusiastic and energetic individuals who want to make an important contribution to the pharmacy profession. Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy Elections

APA Bylaws: Article IV- Nominee and Delegates Section 1: BOARD OF PHARMACY NOMINEES. Only Arkansas registered pharmacists primarily engaged in an active practice of profession in Arkansas for the past five (5) years and who for the past five (5) years shall have been an active member in good standing in the Arkansas Pharmacists Association shall be eligible as a candidate for Association nomination to the Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy for a six (6)-year term. Candidates for the State Board election shall be nominated from the statewide APA membership and elections for each position shall be on a statewide basis. APA will submit the names of the three nominees receiving the most votes to the Governor for his consideration. Governor Beebe will evaluate the nominees recommended by APA and make the appointment to the Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy. If interested in nominating yourself or another individual, please contact APA Executive Vice President Mark Riley (mark@ arrx.org) at 501-372-5250. Nominations will close at Noon, March 16, 2012. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________

APA Board of Directors Call for Nominations

Nominations are invited for each of the following positions on the Arkansas Pharmacists Association Board of Directors. Vice President APA Statewide (One-year term as Vice President, four total years as Board Member) Area II Representative APA Board Member East and White River Districts - Districts 2 and 8 (Four-year term) Area II Counties: Clay, Cleburne, Craighead, Crittenden, Cross, Fulton, Greene, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Lawrence, Lee, Mississippi, Phillips, Poinsett, Randolph, St. Francis, Sharp, Stone, Van Buren, White and Woodruff. District 3 President Northwest District (Two-year term) Northwest Counties: Baxter, Boone, Benton, Carroll, Madison, Marion, Newton, Searcy and Washington. District 6 President West Central District (Two-year term) West Central Counties: Clark, Conway, Garland, Hot Spring, Johnson, Montgomery, Perry, Pike, Pope and Yell. District 7 President Western District (Two-year term) Western Counties: Crawford, Franklin, Logan, Polk, Scott and Sebastian. District 8 President White River District (Two-year term) White River Counties: Cleburne, Fulton, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Sharp, Stone, Van Buren, White and Woodruff.

APA Officers and Board of Directors

The requirements for nominees of the APA Officers are as follows: Arkansas licensed pharmacist who has been a member of this Association in good standing for the past three (3) consecutive years. No elected member of the APA Board of Directors shall serve for more than eight (8) consecutive years or more than two (2) consecutive terms in the same capacity. If interested in nominating yourself or another individual, please contact APA Executive Vice President Mark Riley (mark@arrx.org) at 501-372-5250. Nominations will close at noon, March 30, 2012.

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2011-2012 APA Board of Directors

PHARMACY HISTORY

President Gary Bass, Pharm.D. Little Rock

President-Elect Dennis Moore, Pharm.D. Batesville

Vice President Dana Woods, P.D. Mountain View

Past-President Mike Smets, P.D. Fort Smith

Area I Representative Michael Butler, Pharm.D. Hot Springs Village

Area II Representative Brandon Cooper, Pharm.D. Jonesboro

Area III Representative Kenny Harrison, Pharm.D. Little Rock

Area IV Representative Lynn Crouse, Pharm.D. Eudora

District 1 President Eddie Glover, P.D. Conway

District 2 President Brent Panneck, Pharm.D. Lake City

District 3 President Danny Ponder, P.D. Mountain Home

District 4 President Lise Liles, Pharm.D. Texarkana

District 5 President H. Dean Watts, P.D. DeWitt

District 6 President Stephen Carroll, Pharm.D., MBA Arkadelphia

District 7 President John Vinson, Pharm.D. Fort Smith

District 8 President Christy Campbell, P.D. Searcy

Hospital Academy President Willie Capers, Pharm.D. Jonesboro

Compounding Academy President Kristen Riddle, Pharm.D. Conway

Consulting Academy President Muncy Zuber,P.D. Heber Springs

Board of Health Member John Page, P.D. Fayetteville

Dean, UAMS College of Pharmacy Stephanie Gardner, Pharm.D., Ed.D. Little Rock

Dean, Harding College of Pharmacy Julie Hixson-Wallace, Pharm.D. Searcy

UAMS Student Member Allison Hollis Little Rock

Harding Student Member Ankita Desai Searcy

State Board of Pharmacy John Clay Kirtley, Pharm.D. Little Rock

Legal Counsel Harold Simpson, J.D. Little Rock

Treasurer Richard Hanry, P.D. El Dorado

Executive Vice President Mark Riley, Pharm.D. Little Rock

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I Remember the Globe Drug Store in Jonesboro

2011 129th Annual Convention Round-Up

By Bill Cox, P.D. Edited by Jon Wolfe, RPh, PhD

T

he Globe Drug Store was a Jonesboro landmark for over 60 years. Located at 300 South Main Street, the site later was home to an Otasco store and a Chinese restaurant. In its drugstore days, the building was home to two dental offices (Drs. Finch and Blackwood), a doctor’s office (for several physicians at different times (Drs. Barrett, Overstreet, Poole, Raney and Levine), and the Toler-Horn Dental Lab. Next door was Dr. E.R. Calame, the optometrist. My father, Stanley Cox, finished his Master’s degree in History in 1938 (he was never a pharmacist), moved us to Jonesboro to manage the Globe Drug Store for his father-inlaw, Gus Nash, Sr. I was only two then, and was practically raised on the counter of the Globe.

Globe Drug Store Manager Stanley Cox (L) with customer circa 1940.

There were two pharmacists — Roy Mounce, who had been a salesman for Nash Brothers Drug Co., and Garland Pinchback. At the time dad took over the store, it was primarily a “patent medicine” store that might fill 10 prescriptions a day. Until I was old enough to drive, I rode with the Globe Drug Store delivery boy on some calls. We made trips on H.E. Wingo’s bicycle, until the city got big enough to require a motorcycle. When we got a truck, we also had two delivery men. I never rode with A.D. Hunt because of that era’s strong racial feelings, but I rode often with Billy Mitchum. My dad had a fit when he found out I had gone to the Front Street red light district to make a delivery. That may have been the last time I was allowed to ride with Billy. When I finally could drive and we needed a delivery boy, I drove a 1950 Ford pick-up. Billy had put a rail road tie behind the front bumper. He told dad it was to protect the radiator, but he used it to “help” slow responders at stoplights. During the flu epidemic of 1953, I set the record for most deliveries in one day and the record for most money received on a day delivering. There were no breaks that day. We also set a record for prescriptions filled with only one pharmacist and one clerk well enough to work. I got off that night after normal closing time and went home to collapse. By the time I was in high school we were filling 120 or more prescriptions on Saturday, the best day for businesses on Main Street. This was before the Indian Mall was built.

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I remember the Globe for many reasons. One of my early recollections was that on cold winter days old timers would gather around the old potbellied stove and tell stories. We sold sporting goods, including Evenrude outboard motors. Our veterinary business was so huge that we had an icebox with two blocks of ice to hold hog cholera serum and penicillin injections. I remember dad running off ladies who stood on our corner giving out religious tracts. Although tolerant of other religions, he made an exception for them. He himself was a god-fearing Methodist, especially after returning from World War II. In those days we were visited weekly by salesmen from the major wholesale houses of the day including Ellis Bagwell in Memphis and Meyer Brothers in Little Rock. We also were called on by the major pharmaceutical companies, Eli Lilly, Parke-Davis, Upjohn and Merck Sharp & Dohme. It was the Lilly salesman, Al Lansdale, who inspired me to visit Ole Miss and to enter Pre-Pharmacy. Until we moved in 1959 there were two distinct differences between the Globe Drug Store and all its competitors. We never had a soda fountain and never would. And until we needed a pharmacist in the early 1960s, the Globe never had a female employee.

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Of all those early memories I most appreciate our great and loyal customers and our fantastic employees. I know I’ll miss a few but I very fondly remember pharmacists Roy Mounce, Garland Pinchback, Charles Huff and Jim Murphy. And I’ll never forget our clerk staff H.E. Wingo and Harry Duke and our deliverymen A.D. Hunt and Billy Mitchum. §

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Member Classifieds RELIEF PHARMACIST NEEDED Independent pharmacy in Van Buren/ Ft. Smith, AR area is seeking relief pharmacist for Saturdays. Hours on Saturday are 9am-1pm and I have excellent technicians who will be scheduled those hours. I would love to have someone work every Saturday, but need someone for at least one or two Saturdays, per month. If interested please call or text 479-414-7503 or send resume or email: kbarlow@pharmacyexpressvb.com. GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS IN PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY Rapidly expanding pharmaceutical manufacturer located in Central Arkansas is recruiting the best of the best hospital pharmacists with a background in sterile compounding and hospital pharmacy products. Candidates must have strong work ethic, good people and communication skills, work well with team members, and must be very organized and detail oriented. Minimum requirements are a Pharm.D. degree and two years of hospital pharmacy experience with an excellent working knowledge of hospital pharmacy including sterile compounding experience. All applications kept confidential. We are looking for hospital pharmacists who enjoy professional challenges and who like to be on the cutting edge of pharmaceutical services. Excellent salary, benefits, and potential financial growth. Monday through Friday, 8 am-5 pm. No weekends. Email resumes to pwike@sterilecompoundingusa.com. PHARMACIST WANTED IN BENTON COUNTY Growing Benton County Community Pharmacy needs to add another pharmacist to its staff. The position would start at 30+ hours per week with the opportunity to increase hours. The position offers excellent medical & dental benefits, SIMPLE IRA retirement plan, as well as paid vacations & holidays. Rotating Saturday work and limited call backs are required. Please submit resumes to: dbastian@cox-internet.com. Wanted: Old fashioned drug store ice cream table. Contact Tom Wood, thomas323@centurytel.net; 501-729-3712. Full Time Hospital Pharmacist Wanted in Mountain Home - $10,000 Sign-On Bonus Available Baxter Regional Medical Center is seeking a full time Hospital Pharmacist to rotate 31

through clinical staff and medication history duties. This position will work 10 hour shifts, predominantly days, with occasional evening and weekend shifts. BRMC has an integrated pharmacy practice model with significant automation to support drug distribution. Apply online at www.baxterregional.org, or call Sheila Wilson at 1-888-723-5673 for more information. Wanted: Good used rectal suppository mold. Contact Ponder Health/AllCare in Mountain Home at 870-425-5145 or danny.ponder@allcarepharmacy.com. Cantrell Drug Company Seeking FT and PT Technicians Cantrell Drug Company is now taking applications for full and part time technician positions for both day and evening. Responsibilities include sterile product production under GMP level processes for FDA registered products as well as other technician functions. Candidate should possess a propensity/desire for working in an industrial pharmacy practice. Send resume to dconaway@cantrelldrug.com. Seeking Part-Time Pharmacist Independent pharmacy seeking part-time pharmacist 2 days per week. Feasible driving distance from Conway, Morrilton or Little Rock area. Rotating Saturdays preferable and one other day per week. Hrs 9 am to 5:30 pm and 9 am til 3 pm on Saturday. 501-889-3510 or 501-889-4092 for more information. Looking for Relief Pharmacist Work Looking to serve as a relief pharmacist during the day within 2 hours of Pine Bluff. Was a licensed DMST educator; can handle MTM diabetic work; familiar with home packaging as well as LTC packaging. Would love to find an opportunity. Contact Robert Rosen, Pine Bluff at 870-536-4460 or rrnr66@att.net. Charitable Clinic Needs Service Minded Pharmacists Want to be thanked dozens of times a day? Tired of dealing with insurance? Join our team at River City Charitable Clinic in North Little Rock. We are looking for volunteer pharmacist to take an active role in the healthcare of low income, uninsured, unassisted patients. Volunteer(s) are needed specifically for a new “refill clinic”. You can pick your ideal clinic time on Monday, Wednesday, or Thursday. Staff it weekly or share with a friend. Interested pharmacists can contact Pam Rossi at PRRossi@uams.edu or call Anne Stafford,

RN Medical Manager at 501-376-6694. Seeking Relief Pharmacist work Booneville pharmacist looking for relief pharmacist work for independent pharmacists in Arkansas. Please contact Bill Carpenter 479-675-6246 or cripplec@magtel.com. Seeking Pharmacy Tech position I am looking for a Pharmacy Tech position. If anyone is hiring please call me at 501244-0319 or 501-912-7259 or email Allene at msallene@sbcglobal.net. Experienced Relief Pharmacist Available Experienced relief pharmacist (retail/ hospital/IV) available in Central Arkansas. Willing to travel reasonable distances. Fred Savage 501-350-1716;501-803-4940; fred.savage@sbcglobal.net. Pharmacy for Sale - West Central Arkansas Pharmacy for sale in West Central Arkansas, established in 1934, 20 miles from Fort Smith, Arkansas. Located in a small community with good schools, encompassing a large trade area. Solid prescription business, with a solid increase in annual sales and net income. Current store hours are M-F: 8 am to 6 pm, Saturday: 8 am to 4 pm. Owner wishes to retire after 34 years. Some owner financing available. Call 479-719-1750. Position Available Full or part-time position for residency trained pharmacist with BCPS or comparable experience. Contact Ramona McLean, Washington Regional Medical Center, 479-463-1102. Volunteer Pharmacists Needed at Hot Springs Charitable Clinic Wanted: VOLUNTEER pharmacists to assist in dispensing prescriptions, checking prescriptions, and counseling for low income and uninsured patients at a charitable clinic in Hot Springs. Volunteers are needed for bi-weekly evening clinics from 6 pm to 9 pm and daily clinics, Tuesday and Wednesdays from 9 am to 3 pm. Interested pharmacists should call or write Reita Currie (reitacurrie52@yahoo. com) at the Charitable Christian Medical Clinic, 133 Arbor Street, Hot Springs, AR 71901, 501-623-8850. Member Classifieds are free to APA members and $65 per issue of AR•Rx for non-members. Contact Eileen Denne Eileen@arrx.org for more information.

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2012 Calendar of Events MARCH March 9-12 APhA Annual Meeting & Exposition New Orleans, LA March 15 APA Board of Directors Meeting Lester E. Hosto Conference Center Little Rock, AR APRIL April 12 Arkansas Pharmacy Foundation Annual Golf Tournament Tannenbaum Golf Course Drasco, AR MAY May 5 Harding University College of Pharmacy Commencement Searcy, AR May 7-9 National Community Pharmacists Association Legislative Conference Washington, D.C. May 19 UAMS College of Pharmacy Commencement Little Rock, AR JUNE June 12-13 Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy Meeting Little Rock, AR June 20-23 APA 130th Annual Convention Embassy Suites Hotel Rogers, AR OCTOBER October 13-17 National Community Pharmacists Association Annual Convention San Diego, CA

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in memoriam

In Memoriam Gary Huckabee, age 52, of Jacksonville, formerly of Texarkana, passed away on November 19, 2011. He owned Marshall Road Pharmacy in Jacksonville with business partner Gary Benton. He graduated from the University of Arkansas College of Pharmacy in 1983. Gary was a life-long member of APA. Norman Joseph Strohsahl, age 75, passed away January 22, 2012. Norman owned and operated Louis Morgan Drug No. 3 in Longview, Texas, for over 30 years, until he retired in 2005. Norman graduated from Little Rock Central High School in 1953, and went on to get his Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in 1957, at the University of Arkansas. He completed his degree and Reciprocity to Louisiana and then was drafted. His tour of duty was at Brooke General Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. He came to Longview, Texas, in 1960 to work for Mr. Louis Morgan and eventually bought Louis Morgan Drug No. 3 which he maintained until his retirement in 2005. Norman received a certificate from the Arkansas School of Pharmacy for serving the community as an active pharmacist for over 50 years. Harrod Maurice Cobb, age 80, passed away January 23, 2012. He was born May 18, 1931, at Belleville to the late Eugene Jerrod and Hazel Harrod Cobb. He graduated as valedictorian from Ola High School in 1949 and graduated

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from the University of Arkansas College of Pharmacy in 1953. He worked at retail pharmacies in Morrilton, Conway and Pine Bluff. He went to work in 1958 for Parke-Davis Drug Co. as a sales representative calling on physicians, pharmacies and hospitals. He returned to Ola with Cobb Drug Store in 1971. He later took over the business and purchased the pharmacy from his father. He ran his business, working daily until he fell ill late in 2011. He was a member of the Ola United Methodist Church. He was a member of NARD/ NCPA, The Arkansas Pharmacists Association and received the 50 year Golden Certificate in 2005 from the Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy. George Wimberly, age 92, passed away Feb. 5, 2012 in Little Rock. George served for three years in WW II as a U.S. Navy Pharmacist Mate/Corpsman. He was elected to eight years on the Little Rock Board of Directors, four of them as Mayor. He served five terms in the Arkansas House of Representatives. For over fifty years, George was an employee and then owner of Buice Drug Store in Little Rock. In 1986 he received APA’s Pharmacist of the Year Award and in 2009 the Lifetime Achievement Award. His family requests donations be made to the Honorable George Wimberly Scholarship, UAMS College of Pharmacy, 4301 W. Markham #522, Little Rock AR 72205. §

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USPS STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP

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ARRx - The Arkansas Pharmacist Winter 2012  

ARRx - The Arkansas Pharmacist Winter 2012