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arroyo M O N T H L Y

OCTOBER 2007

James Turrell brings his first public “skyspace” to SoCal

Chinese

Power Dressing Delving Beneath the Surface of Surfaces at Pasadena’s “Skin” Festival

CalTech’s new fund-raising honcho on academia’s hottest gender controversy Best places to get a running fix


ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 3


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ARROYO VOLUME 3 ~ NUMBER 8

M O N T H LY

12 PHILANTHROPY “Woman of the Year”: Caltech’s new Board of Associates chief Kathy Wiltsey talks about her new gig and the controversy that brought down the president of Harvard. –By Irene Lacher

16 ART “Following the Light”: Internationally acclaimed light-and-space artist James Turrell brings his first public “skyspace” to Southern California. –By Bliss

43 CULTURE “The Ultimate Merit Badge”: The Pacific Asia Museum’s new exhibition, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing in Imperial China,” explores how emblems on court dress reflected the wearer’s status. –By Jenine Baines

44 DEJA VU “From Telephones to Hula Hoops”: A history of Pasadena’s financial and professional community –By Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History

46 DESIGN “People who live in glass houses...live here.”: A home’s modernist past co-exists comfortably with its environmentally sustainable future. –By Arlene Schindler

Passion combined with experience results in perfection. For over

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DEPARTMENTS 8 FESTIVITIES The Pasadena Museum of History, Los Angeles Opera, Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services, Kiwanis Club of La Cañada Flintridge

22 THE ART OF SCIENCE Mark Davis proves that big advances come in small packages.

three decades Dr. Dustin Nelson has earned a

reputation of excellence when it comes to creating

beautiful smiles and comprehensive care for the mouth.

48 OBJECTS OF DESIRE Palm-size pleasures 52 THE LIST Pasadena ArtWeekend, former Mexican President Vicente Fox comes to Caltech and more

56 FITNESS There are many roads to bliss for Pasadena-area runners. 60 MERRIMENT Singing the praises of Syrah 62 TASTE TEST Marty’s brings Kobe beef and valets to a humble stretch of Highland Park. ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 5


E D I TO R’ S N OT E

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ou know fall is truly here when the mercury dips to a pleasant plateau below, say, 90 degrees, and the streets of the San Gabriel Valley bloom with offerings for every cultural taste. That’s particularly true this October, when two major arts festivals spread their wings around Pasadena: The Pasadena Arts Weekend (Oct. 12 through 14) serves up an eclectic array of events, as John Sollenberger explains in the List, and the Pasadena Arts Council’s triennial festival returns under the new rubric, Art & Ideas (Oct. 10 through 31), with an invitation to its cultural partners to consider the word “skin.” Jenine Baines takes a closer look at what the idea of skin hath wrought in her festival wrapup as well as in the Pacific Asia Museum’s new show, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing in Imperial China.” Something else to mark on your cultural calendar is an important exhibition at the Pomona College Museum of Art by John Turrell, who brings his first public “skyspace” in Southern California to his former school. In this issue, Bliss talks to the Pasadena-bred light-and-space artist about what drives him to harness the heavens in his work. This month, we draw your attention to yet another form of art–the Art of Science, a new column by Steve Coulter exploring the wonders coming out of San Gabriel’s research goldmines—the California Institute of Technology (including Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and the City of Hope—as well as the men and women behind them. “Lots of time is spent covering the entertainment industry in SoCal,” Coulter says, “but the scientific discoveries coming out of this region are actually much more interesting.” Finally, we engage in one of my favorite pastimes—peering behind fabulous closed doors. Arlene Schindler enters a fascinating mid-century modern home that's part of the 21st annual Pasadena ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) Home and Kitchen Tour, but you don't have to wait until Oct. 7 to make a home inspection. Just turn the pages and open wide. –Irene Lacher

ARROYO MONTHLY • EDITOR IN CHIEF Irene Lacher • ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Piechowski • PRODUCTION MANAGER Yvonne Guerrero CONTROLLER Michael Nagami • HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Andrea Baker • OFFICE MANAGER Joe Beauvais CONTRIBUTORS Jenine Baines, Joe Beauvais, Steve Coulter, Bob Ecker, Mandalit del Barco, Noela Hueso, Carl Kozlowski, Arlene Schindler, John Sollenberger • COPY EDITOR John Seeley PHOTOGRAPHERS Michael Germana, Christopher Rainone, Evans Vestal Ward ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Fred Bankston, Dana Bonner, Hilary Chen, Gladys Campanile Andrea Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Guzman, Leslie Lamm, Rochelle Reiff, Cynthia Wagner, Noelle Watkins ADVERTISING DESIGNERS Maricela Estrada, Carla Marroquin, George Ozuna, Aaron Piña, Duke Raul TRAFFIC MANAGER Jake Belcher • jakeb@pasadenaweekly.com ACCOUNTING SUPERVISOR Angela Wang ACCOUNTING Archie Iskaq, Tracy Lowe, Ginger Wang ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Roylin Downs PUBLISHER Jon Guynn

CONTACT US ADVERTISING publisher@arroyomonthly.com • EDITORIAL editor@arroyomonthly.com PHONE (626) 584-1500 • FAX (626) 795-0149 MAILING ADDRESS 50 S. De Lacey Ave., Ste. 200, Pasadena, CA 91105 www.ArroyoMonthly.com ©2005 Southland Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

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festivities THE PASADENA MUSEUM OF HISTORY CELEBRATED THE OPENING OF ITS NEW EXHIBITION, “PROSPEROUS PASADENA— BUSINESS IN THE CROWN CITY AND BEYOND,“ with a garden party on Sept. 14. The evening doubled as a publication soirée for the exhibition’s companion volume, “Pasadena: A Business History,” by Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History (Arcadia Publishing) [see excerpt page 44]. While the keepers of the city’s historical flame were 3 tipping their hat to Pasadena’s heritage, they also acknowledged their own. The exhibition and book were dedicated to the memory of late museum board member Victor Ell, in recognition of a donation made by his son, Robert, a Pasadena native. “When I come into the city every day—I live here too—but when I leave it to go to work and come back, I feel my father,” Ell said. “Pasadena was my father. His spirit is here.” Guests dined on a spread of Bon Appetit’s roast beef and salad and danced to the historical tunes of Ian Whitcomb & His Bungalow Boys.

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1. Robert Ell's remarks focused on his father's legacy; 2. Regina and Ian Whitcomb duet with The Bungalow Boys; 3. Restaurateur Robin Salzer and Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard; 4. John McAustin and Councilwoman Margaret McAustin

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NO ONE EVER ACCUSED OPERA FANS OF BEING WUSSES. To kick off its fall season, the Los Angeles Opera hosted an intense weekend of back-toback performances of Beethoven’s only opera, “Fidelio,” and Verdi’s “Requiem” on Sept. 8 and 9. The Saturday evening opening of “Fidelio” was followed by a black-tie dinner on the Music Center Plaza designed by Mary Hayley, the opera board’s opening weekend chair, and her staff. In tune with “Fidelio’s” love story set in a Spanish jail, the gala dinner decor hinted at a prison theme–but an elegant one–with white roses adorning the iron gate opening onto the party and other stylish, rustic touches. The next day, opera supporters, including Pasadena’s Carol 2 and Warner Henry, opera board president and vice chairman, respectively, gathered on the plaza for a Tuscan-style lunch before the opening of Verdi’s “Requiem.” The gala weekend featured the LA Opera debut of its chorus master, Eagle Rock resident Grant Gershon.

8 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

1. Warner and Carol Henry; 2.Alyssa and Grant Gershon; 3. Anja Kampe with Milan and Milena Kitic Panic


ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 9


festivities 1

2 1. David and Julie Battaglia receive a gift from Hathaway-Sycamores in appreciation for hosting the Longest Day of Golf; 2. Jennifer Leal Gowen (center) with husband Thomas Gowen (left) and Bill Martone, President & CEO, Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services; 3. (Left to right) Pat Fant, Peggy and John Franklin, Linda McGrath, Margaret and Elton Chatfield and Bernice Williams. Photos credit Amy Thelig

SUPPORTERS OF HATHAWAY-SYCAMORES CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES HIT THE LINKS AT PASADENA’S BROOKSIDE GOLF COURSE ON AUG. 23 and gathered that evening at the La Cañada home of David and Julie Battaglia to celebrate the 11th annual Longest Day of Golf. The organization’s signature fund-raiser inspired 36 golfers to play 2,335 holes that day, raising nearly $180,000 in pledges and sponsorships in the process. Event co-chairs Jennifer Leal Gowen and Jack MacKenzie hosted the event with William P. Martone, the president and CEO of Hathaway-Sycamores, and Lawry’s the Prime Rib fed the hungry horde. Also contributing to the festivities was KIIS-FM and KTLATV traffic reporter Chuck Street.

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FESTIVE PHILANTHROPISTS GATHERED AT MEMORIAL PARK FOR THE FIFTH ANNUAL LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE WINE AND GOURMET FOOD TASTING ON SEPT. 9. The event, sponsored by the local Kiwanis Club chapter, teamed Le Petit Vendome Wine & Spirits with a group of restaurants that 3 included Twin Palms, Madeleine’s, Dish, El Cholo, California Pizza Kitchen, Craftsman Brewery, Green Street, Frank’s Famous Kitchen & Bakery, Le Pain, Gourmet a Go Go, Masis Bakery, Los Gringos Locos, New Moon, Ralph’s and the Crepe Vine Bistro & Wine Bar. The afternoon event benefited local public schools and children’s programs supported by the Kiwanis Club.

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1. Daryal Gant, Kiwanis Lt. Governor of Division 3; Mary Gant, Kiwanis Club of La Cañada and event co-director; Richard Granados, Kiwanis Club of Upland; Herbie Monterosa, Spanish wine specialist; Nelson Tucker, Kiwanis International President; 2. Guests sample Undiscovered Wines; 3. Wine lovers with Ty Ritter of Protect Child Save; 4. Crowd tasting wines from the Maddalena Vineyard Brands; 5. Wilton & John Paton of La Cañada Imports & Liquors

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 11


{

PHILANTHROPY

Woman of the Year BY IRENE L ACHER

Kathleen Wiltsey discusses her one-year stint leading Caltech’s Board of Associates and answers one of the most controversial questions to rile academic circles in recent years: Are women as innately capable of scientific achievement as men?

W

HEN BIOTECH EXEC KATHLEEN WILTSEY EARNED HER B.S. IN chemical and petroleum refining engineering at the Colorado School of Mines in 1977, she was setting out on a distinguished career not duplicated by many women–or men, for that matter. After adding a Harvard MBA to her arsenal, she went on to executive positions at Proctor & Gamble and Amgen Inc., where she helped bring Epogen, the first billion-dollar biotech drug, to market. Last year, she joined the X Prize Foundation as executive director to launch the Archon X Prize for Genomics, designed to foster the development of personalized medicine. This month, Wiltsey, starts her one-year term as president of the California Institute of Technology’s Board of Associates, a group of science aficionados–1,400 alumni faculty, entrepreneurs, community leaders and philanthropists in the U.S. and abroad—who raise money for the school and have fun while they’re doing it, gathering for lectures, dinners and trips with scientific themes. The 80-year-old organization has donated millions to help fund more than 37 campus buildings, 52 endowed professorships and numerous fellowships and scholarships. Wiltsey, 52, is such a Caltech enthusiast that she commutes frequently—and intrepidly—to the school from Westlake Village, where she lives with her entrepreneur husband John La Valle and their two daughters.

12 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

During a recent interview at the Athaneum, Caltech’s historic faculty club which is open to members of the associates, Wiltsey talked about her passion for Caltech, her experiences as a woman in science and the controversy that led to the rise of Harvard’s first female president in July. What are your goals as president of the Board of Associates?

To bring more biology into their programs, evolutionary biology. We want to attract a broader audience. There's a lot being done here in trying to understand the mechanisms of cancer and what mechanisms break down at the molecular level. I'd like to see that work be illuminated at our events, and I'd like to get the content from this fabulous institution more broadly disseminated, to have it more broadly appreciated. We're going to have a satellite at the Regency Club, because it's hard for people [on the west side] to get over here. And we're bringing in younger folks. We do have a membership level for people under 40. People who are here love it and thrive on it, and we just want to be able to share that more broadly in our geography, even though it's a challenge. It’s worth coming over here for people who like technology, who like invention, who like discovery in all of the sciences. — continued on page 14


ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 13


WO M A N O F THE YEAR —Continued from page 12

Speaking of your interest in evolutionary biology, it surprises me that it's still an issue for women in science. What was your reaction to then-Harvard President Larry Summers' remarks a couple of years ago that innate differences between the sexes explained why there were fewer successful women in science?

I guess I was surprised that he would say something like that because I don’t think we really have a definitive answer on gender capability in math or science. Maybe there are cultural influences, and people don’t expect their daughters to become physicists. And we have some traditional family values in our culture, that men will be the wage earner. But certainly everyone is an individual with certain strengths and gifts. I don’t think we can categorize people that way. It’s really an individual thing, like your genome is individual—it may have great advantages for you, and it may have issues also. I just thought it didn’t need to be said. It certainly didn’t advance anything. Do you think there might be any truth to his beliefs?

No, I don't. Look at JPL. There's a wonderful example. They have program heads who are women, who have no problem figuring out how to launch and land a rover. I think it's really the individual and what kind of encouragement they’ve had and what kind of environment and expectations they’ve had. It’s amazing what people can do with coaching and confidence. I don’t think there’s a gender bias in terms of capability. Is he a fluke or is it still an issue?

I think for women in business and in science, you just have to be very good to move ahead. You have to be at least as good as other people. And you also have to be measured and predictable. You have to perform and be a steady player and have valuable contributions, and you have to keep doing that. And I think you have to not be too shy because you might have done everything that was expected but maybe you didn’t ask when you could expect a promotion. You have to advocate for yourself. And women don't?

Stanley Cribs Supersale

It seems pushy and maybe not polite. But it’s changing now quite a bit because you can see incredible contributions being made by women in science and technology and entrepreneurship. I think this is on a continuing track of acceptance. What was your experience as a young women in science?

I went to an almost completely male engineering school, and I did great there. I was friends with everybody in my class. I was treated like one of them, not like a girl. And in business, you just have to be providing value. You have to be reliable, steady and persistent, and you won't have any problem. You have to be a contributor, come up with new ideas, which is what Caltech is all about. It’s an institute of magnificent imagination. Caltech has been called a national treasure because it can attract these people with unprecedented ideas, and they can advance these ideas and make things happen that are totally unique. That's why it’s fun to hang out here. You feel like you’re learning all the time and appreciating what people are doing. They’re happy to talk about their work. It’s a blast to be with them. AM 14 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO


ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 15


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A RT

Following the

Light Internationally acclaimed light-andspace artist James Turrell brings his first public “skyspace” to Southern California BY BLISS

I

magine you are in a dream state: The air around you seems alive with ghostly, blueish particles of light from some ambient source you cannot fathom. A portal of light looms ahead, but you can neither enter it nor detect quite where it begins. Likewise, it is not possible to gauge the distance of walls or ceilings. All you can feel, see or trust is the ground beneath your feet and the radiant light all around you. Such is the stunning effect of visual artist James Turrell’s “End Around,” a “sensing space” from his Ganzfeld series currently housed at the Pomona College Museum of Art. It’s named after a German perceptual psychology term: “‘Ganz’ is all — all field, all one,” Turrell says during a recent visit to the museum. The structure, which holds no more than five visitors at a time, is designed to challenge and alter viewers’ perceptions by completely immersing them in an environment of dense neon and fluorescent light and space. The work is the thematic centerpiece of the exhibit “James Turrell at Pomona College,” the artist’s alma mater, on display through May 17, 2008. The show also includes numerous models sculpted from plaster, wood and polystyrene. Some are unmistakably influenced by celestial visions, such as “Missed Approach,” which looks like a space disc atop a Mayan temple. Others, like “Milarepa’s Helmet,” are curiously militaristic yet whimsical. On Oct. 13, the exhibit will be augmented by the dedication of a

16 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

new skyspace for the Pomona campus’ Draper Courtyard. Bridges Hall of Music will also host a free symposium, “James Turrell: Knowing Light,” featuring the artist discussing his work with Pomona College English professor Arden Reed. Turrell, 64, has created several other skyspaces for private display, but this will be the first one open to the public in Southern California. His precisely calibrated, architectural skyspaces have become his signature works: carefully sculpted frameworks of metal whose canopies open to the sky above and provide seating for a limited number of viewers below. The culmination of Turrell’s studies of perceptual psychology, art and science, they offer viewers the experience of perceiving sky in new ways--shape, form and nothingness. Now living near Flagstaff, Arizona, Turrell is probably best known for his 30-year excavation of the Roden Crater, a dead volcano he’s painstakingly refashioning as a celestial light observatory. The project reflects his interest in “geologic time” as well as his philosophy that art “has to do with how we form our reality.” He predicts it will be open to the public … someday. (“It’s scheduled to open in 2000 and I’m holding to that,” he says with a laugh.) Turrell was profoundly influenced by his Quaker upbringing in Pasadena — particularly the grandmother who encouraged him to go into their meeting house and “greet the light” —Continued on page 18


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—Continued from page 16

— as well as his experiences as a pilot. After majoring in perceptual psychology at Pomona College, he earned an MFA from Claremont Graduate School in 1973. He has been the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship and numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. His work has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco and the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan. In the early 1980s, he inadvertently made headlines when he was sued by a visitor to his installation at the Whitney Museum of American Art who’d leaned against a wall and fallen — because the wall in question was really just light. (Overseers of the current exhibit at Pomona are understandably vigilant about ensuring no visitors lean on anything.) In 1990, the University of California Press celebrated Turrell’s oeuvre by publishing Craig Adcock’s 272-page tome “James Turrell: The Art of Light and Space.” Turell’s work reflects his lifelong fascination with light as a metaphysical as well as physical entity. The Pomona exhibit brings his career full circle by presenting key pieces at the school where he first formally explored questions that have since become defining characteristics of his art. “The exhibit is an opportunity to show more of his work and represent someone who’s a favorite son here and a distinguished alum18 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

nus,” explains Kathleen Stewart Howe, director of the Pomona College Museum of Art. “Viewing spaces are tightly controlled so you aren’t distracted from anything outside of your own perception.” Turrell manipulates sensory signals to make viewers perceive light as a form with substance. Using intricate engineering, he synchronizes the pattern of lighting in the skyspace with the sunset. As the color of the metal canopy framing a chunk of sky changes, viewers beneath it are tricked by the context into thinking that the evening sky has changed color as well, even though simple logic dictates otherwise. Within the indoor exhibit, the Ganzfeld work is his most multidimensional expression, as the enclosed installation impacts viewers intellectually, emotionally and on multiple sensory levels. “I’m dealing with tangibility,” he says. “A lot of other artists assume tangibility. I’m actually taking something we feel not to be tangible and making it felt in that manner. So it deals more with physicality and tangibility than many works that are made of things.” Turrell’s powerfully meditative and spiritual art invites silence. Asked what he would choose if he were to introduce a soundtrack to complement it, he mentions the wall-size wooden drums he helped kinetic artist Charlie Maddox fashion in the 1960s and ’70s, which created “huge, deep, deep tones” for Harry Partch’s microtonal compositions. “But basically everything is composed of sound and light in the

entire universe,” he says. “Everything of truth, everything is in light.” “There’s a big difference between belief and knowing,” he points out. “And part of that is your business, that is what you bring to it. Art is not quite the same as performance; you don’t feel the same response from your audience as you do with performance… But I want people to treasure light.” In “Gathered Light” and “Silent Leading,” from Turrell’s Tall Glass series, LEDs are programmed to change color subtly over two-hour cycles. Watching the gradual shifts of light is similar to perceiving objects in clouds or wood grain: Did you really just see that, or was it a “trick of the light”? “It’s like seeing this light that we’re not unfamiliar with, because we know about this light, but we rarely see it with the eyes open,” says Turrell. “It’s more seen in a dream state — light that seems to be physical and that infuses everything and has the quality of being physical. Because I like to treat light as a physical material, and use this material to, in some way, affect or influence perception. The physicality of light. That’s because generally we use light to illuminate things, or objects.” The artist reaches over to tilt an object under a nearby desk lamp. “I’m more interested in the ‘thingness’ of light, than in illuminating something else other than what it is. So I am interested in the revelation of light itself, rather than what light reveals about other things. “Darkness really only exists when you make it. There never is no light.” AM


it. There never is no light.”

AM

—Continued on page 20 ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 19


New Baby? Toddler? Juniors? MySpace is the place.

C U LT U R E

when Tibetan monasteries offered theirs for sale in the 1980s. “Unfortunately, silk is fragile,” Hall says. “Very little has survived.” Ming-era badges are more rare than those from the later Qing period (1644-1911). Unlike their Ming counterparts, Qing badges were often embroidered on or woven into the robe. They were also discrete, like patches, and could be more easily changed and stored when the wearer was promoted. The section titled, “Peacocks and Orioles: Badges for Civil Officials,” illustrates the avian motif favored by court officials. The emblem for firstrank officials was the crane, followed in order of rank by the golden pheasant, the peacock, wild goose, silver pheasant, egret, mandarin duck, quail and paradise flycatcher. “The emperor was the son of heaven,” Gluckman

The

Ultimate

Merit Badge

The Pacific Asia Museum’s new exhibition, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing In Imperial China,” explores how emblems on court dress reflected the wearer’s status. BY JENINE BAINES

F

OR MOST CONTEMPORARY CELEBRITIES and power players, Manolo Blahniks and Versace ensembles take pride of place in their closets and hearts. For members of China’s imperial court during the Ming and Qing dynasties, the badges bedecking their official and ceremonial robes were the symbols of status, power and sartorial self-respect. A selection of important pieces goes on display at the Pacific Asia Museum, many on view for the first time in the U.S., in a new exhibition titled, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing In Imperial China.” The collection of more than 90 items, which will be exhibited from Oct. 12 through Jan. 27, 2008, also explores the role these emblems played in defining the imperial Chinese court’s complex system of social order. “The desire to achieve status through garments and their decoration is as old as mankind,” says guest curator Dale Gluckman,

20 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

a former costumes curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. “But in imperial China, it was especially codified and rigid.” As evidenced by the opening section of the exhibition, “Dragons and Phoenixes: Badges for the Imperial Household,” the emblem that was de rigueur for the emperor and his family was the dragon -- but not just any dragon. The emperor’s dragons sported five claws and faced forward, as did those of first-rank princes, while badges worn by lower-ranking princes and dukes could only display dragons in profile with four claws. To make matters even more complicated, the crown prince could also wear a dragon facing front, but his dragons had to be fewer in number than his father’s. The emperor and empress would also sometimes sport dragons in profile, although the emblems would never appear on the chest or back area of their robes. The empress was allowed a bit more

flexibility, in that she could embellish her robes with a five-clawed dragon and a phoenix. There was, however, one instance in which these fashion edicts were blithely cast aside. On their wedding day, any bride and groom in the kingdom– no matter how mighty or low their position – could don robes with the dragon or phoenix emblem. “The bride would wear a red robe with a phoenix,” explains Gluckman. “She was ‘empress for a day.’ Similarly, the groom was ‘emperor.’ ” In addition to emblems from the Pacific Asia Museum’s collection, “Rank and Style” displays several extremely rare Ming-period (1391-1644) badges from the Chris Hall Collection Trust, on loan from the Asian Civilisations Museum in Singapore. Items from Hall’s own personal collection of badges have been loaned as well. The Hong Kongbased businessman began collecting emblems

says, “and birds can fly up to heaven.” During the Qing period, the number of birds per badge was limited to one. It stood on one leg, with the other raised, on a rock coming out of waves. In the 18th century, artisans began to add landscape settings that were increasingly stylized and cluttered. That changed when the emperor, in a campaign against unnecessary extravagance, decreed that the badges could include only three items: the bird, the sun and clouds. Not surprisingly, the most ferocious members of the animal kingdom – both mythical and real – appeared on military badges, as shown in the section “Lions and Tigers: Badges for Military Officials.” Of particular note is the qilin – a horned creature with a scaly body, the hooves of a deer, the head of a dragon and a bushy tail. A symbol of virtue and perfection, the qilin was reserved for first-rank officers —Continued on page 22

New

%

25 -50

Parents-to-Be

%

bring in this ad and %

take10 Off

Off

some floor models

TOTAL PURCHASE

CONTINUES!

for month of October!

Strollers Bugaboo ~ Peg Prégo ~ Combi ~ Graco Bumbelride ~ Stokke ~ Baby Jogger MacLaren ~ Snap-n-Go ~ Silver Cross BritaxStrollers&Carseats

Furniture P a l i ~ Stokke ~ M u n i r é Dutailer Glider Chairs ~ Berg Young America ~ Arms Reach ducduc ~ Nurseryworks

Trendyy Diaperr Bags OiOi ~ Fleurville ~ Skip Hop Bags

Bedding Banana Fish ~ Lambs and Ivy ~ Cocala Kellyouture Luxury Line ~ Kids Line • Baby Registry • • Open 7 days a week • • • • • • •

Quality Simmons & Sealy Mattresses Avent Breast Pumps Mustela Care Products for Baby & Mom Madela Breast Pumps Variety of Feeding Products Special Financing Available

NEW In Stock NOW

Bugaboo Bee Fun & Lightweight!

WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED PRICE! SIMPLY SHOW US THE COMPETITOR’S AD.

401 North Central Ave, Glendale

(Corner of Central & Lexington)

818-246-KIDS (5437) Kids Furniture and Accessories

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 21


New Baby? Toddler? Juniors? MySpace is the place.

C U LT U R E

when Tibetan monasteries offered theirs for sale in the 1980s. “Unfortunately, silk is fragile,” Hall says. “Very little has survived.” Ming-era badges are more rare than those from the later Qing period (1644-1911). Unlike their Ming counterparts, Qing badges were often embroidered on or woven into the robe. They were also discrete, like patches, and could be more easily changed and stored when the wearer was promoted. The section titled, “Peacocks and Orioles: Badges for Civil Officials,” illustrates the avian motif favored by court officials. The emblem for firstrank officials was the crane, followed in order of rank by the golden pheasant, the peacock, wild goose, silver pheasant, egret, mandarin duck, quail and paradise flycatcher. “The emperor was the son of heaven,” Gluckman

The

Ultimate

Merit Badge

The Pacific Asia Museum’s new exhibition, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing In Imperial China,” explores how emblems on court dress reflected the wearer’s status. BY JENINE BAINES

F

OR MOST CONTEMPORARY CELEBRITIES and power players, Manolo Blahniks and Versace ensembles take pride of place in their closets and hearts. For members of China’s imperial court during the Ming and Qing dynasties, the badges bedecking their official and ceremonial robes were the symbols of status, power and sartorial self-respect. A selection of important pieces goes on display at the Pacific Asia Museum, many on view for the first time in the U.S., in a new exhibition titled, “Rank and Style: Power Dressing In Imperial China.” The collection of more than 90 items, which will be exhibited from Oct. 12 through Jan. 27, 2008, also explores the role these emblems played in defining the imperial Chinese court’s complex system of social order. “The desire to achieve status through garments and their decoration is as old as mankind,” says guest curator Dale Gluckman,

20 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

a former costumes curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. “But in imperial China, it was especially codified and rigid.” As evidenced by the opening section of the exhibition, “Dragons and Phoenixes: Badges for the Imperial Household,” the emblem that was de rigueur for the emperor and his family was the dragon -- but not just any dragon. The emperor’s dragons sported five claws and faced forward, as did those of first-rank princes, while badges worn by lower-ranking princes and dukes could only display dragons in profile with four claws. To make matters even more complicated, the crown prince could also wear a dragon facing front, but his dragons had to be fewer in number than his father’s. The emperor and empress would also sometimes sport dragons in profile, although the emblems would never appear on the chest or back area of their robes. The empress was allowed a bit more

flexibility, in that she could embellish her robes with a five-clawed dragon and a phoenix. There was, however, one instance in which these fashion edicts were blithely cast aside. On their wedding day, any bride and groom in the kingdom– no matter how mighty or low their position – could don robes with the dragon or phoenix emblem. “The bride would wear a red robe with a phoenix,” explains Gluckman. “She was ‘empress for a day.’ Similarly, the groom was ‘emperor.’ ” In addition to emblems from the Pacific Asia Museum’s collection, “Rank and Style” displays several extremely rare Ming-period (1391-1644) badges from the Chris Hall Collection Trust, on loan from the Asian Civilisations Museum in Singapore. Items from Hall’s own personal collection of badges have been loaned as well. The Hong Kongbased businessman began collecting emblems

says, “and birds can fly up to heaven.” During the Qing period, the number of birds per badge was limited to one. It stood on one leg, with the other raised, on a rock coming out of waves. In the 18th century, artisans began to add landscape settings that were increasingly stylized and cluttered. That changed when the emperor, in a campaign against unnecessary extravagance, decreed that the badges could include only three items: the bird, the sun and clouds. Not surprisingly, the most ferocious members of the animal kingdom – both mythical and real – appeared on military badges, as shown in the section “Lions and Tigers: Badges for Military Officials.” Of particular note is the qilin – a horned creature with a scaly body, the hooves of a deer, the head of a dragon and a bushy tail. A symbol of virtue and perfection, the qilin was reserved for first-rank officers —Continued on page 22

New

%

25 -50

Parents-to-Be

%

bring in this ad and %

take10 Off

Off

some floor models

TOTAL PURCHASE

CONTINUES!

for month of October!

Strollers Bugaboo ~ Peg Prégo ~ Combi ~ Graco Bumbelride ~ Stokke ~ Baby Jogger MacLaren ~ Snap-n-Go ~ Silver Cross BritaxStrollers&Carseats

Furniture P a l i ~ Stokke ~ M u n i r é Dutailer Glider Chairs ~ Berg Young America ~ Arms Reach ducduc ~ Nurseryworks

Trendyy Diaperr Bags OiOi ~ Fleurville ~ Skip Hop Bags

Bedding Banana Fish ~ Lambs and Ivy ~ Cocala Kellyouture Luxury Line ~ Kids Line • Baby Registry • • Open 7 days a week • • • • • • •

Quality Simmons & Sealy Mattresses Avent Breast Pumps Mustela Care Products for Baby & Mom Madela Breast Pumps Variety of Feeding Products Special Financing Available

NEW In Stock NOW

Bugaboo Bee Fun & Lightweight!

WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED PRICE! SIMPLY SHOW US THE COMPETITOR’S AD.

401 North Central Ave, Glendale

(Corner of Central & Lexington)

818-246-KIDS (5437) Kids Furniture and Accessories

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 21


More Than

SKIN

Deep

Pasadena’s citywide arts festival, Art & Ideas, delves beneath the surface: interpreting the concept of SKIN through art, music, dance, theater and public discussion

On the top left corner of the Pasadena Arts Council’s website, there’s a ticker counting down the days, hours, minutes and even seconds until Oct. 10. No, the arts council isn’t keeping tabs on the end of the world. Oct. 10 is lift-off day for its popular citywide arts festival, which runs through Oct. 31.“Word is getting out about the extraordinary array of offerings we’re presenting this year,” says Terry LeMoncheck, executive director of the arts council. Art & Ideas, the festival’s new handle, follows a format that will be easily recognizable to those who attended its previous incarnations, which came every three years – “Radical Past” in 1999, “The Universe” in 2001 and “The Tender Land” in 2004. A consortium of 22 arts, cultural and science institutions throughout Pasadena will offer inquisitive Southern Californians nearly 250 opportunities to attend performances, exhibitions and public lectures exploring one multi-faceted, thoughtprovoking theme. This year, that theme is “SKIN.” “After our last collaboration, ‘The Tender Land,’ we decided we wanted to do something really interesting, something that would give our partners the chance to stretch their imaginations and take some risks,” LeMoncheck says. “Art & Ideas will encourage people to rethink the concept of ‘skin’–what it is, what it means, how it defines us, its impact upon our culture.” As the festival’s organizers had hoped when they began planning the event, this year’s offerings range from literal to more fanciful interpretations of the theme. Art Center College of Design will present “In the Dermisphere,” a study of the role of skin as camouflage, cultural symbol and organ; the Art Gallery at Pasadena City College will display photographs by Mary Beth Heffernan of memorial tattoos of U.S. Marines recently returned from Iraq in its exhibition, “The Soldier’s Skin”; and the historic Gamble House will explore “Architecture as Third Skin.” Performances inspired by Art & Ideas will include Lineage Dance’s exploration of what lies beneath the surface of our skin, as described in “The Book of Qualities” by J. Ruth Gendler, a fantasy exploring human emotions; the Pasadena Symphony’s presentation of Philip Glass’ “Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra,” a work with 14 drums that illustrates the sounds skin can make when stretched to form a musical instrument; and the Pasadena Playhouse’s premiere of “Ray Charles Live!”—a musical by Pulitzer Prize-winner Suzan-Lori Parks, which demonstrates how Charles’ music unified Americans of all races. Festival partners for Art & Ideas also include: Armory Center for the Arts, Furious Theatre Company, Huntington Library, Lineage Dance, NewTown, One Colorado, Pasadena Conservatory of Music, Pasadena Convention & Visitors Bureau, Pasadena Cultural Affairs, Pasadena Museum of California Art, Pasadena Public Library, Pasadena Weekly, Shumei Arts Council, Spitzer Science Center, the Theatre @ Boston Court and Xiem Clay Center. –Jenine Baines

—Continued from page 21

charged with protecting their emperor. To earn the right to wear one of these badges, one had to pass an extremely difficult series of tests on subjects ranging from Chinese intellectual history and Confucian philosophy to calligraphy. Although a young man could take the exams when he was 17 years old, some men were still trying to pass them in their 80s. Many 70 years of age and even older were still attempting to pass the tests for the first time. “In the exhibition, we have a hat for a little boy who is about 4 or 5 years old,” says Gluckman. “The design on it is a wish for success in the exams. That’s how important and how difficult they were.” Occasionally, a prominent family could “buy” an emblem by contributing money to a special project of the emperor, but exams were almost invariably the route candidates took. It was widely known which badges were purchased, and their prestige suffered accordingly. Chinese culture, then as now, placed a very high value on education. Yet as much as the Chinese valued hard work and achievement, they also found time to celebrate. “Peonies and Lanterns: Badges for Festivals and Ceremonies” displays special badges Ming court officials were required to wear for such festivals and ceremonies as the emperor’s birthday, the winter solstice and the new year, as well as the Mid-Autumn, Lantern and Dragon Boat festivals. “It was a way to break the monotony of court life,” Gluckman says.“Rank and Style” is itself part of a festival: the Pasadena Arts Council’s “Art & Ideas 2007, A Pasadena Festival,” which runs from Oct. 10 through Oct. 31. Events offered by 22 organizations will explore one subject from various vntage points: skin. “‘Rank and Style’ reveals how the garments worn by the elite members of the Chinese imperial court were so important to their sense of identity that they became virtually a second skin,” says Jennifer Caballero, marketing manager at Pacific Asia Museum. “As much as times have changed since the Ming and Qing periods, human nature really hasn’t changed all that much, has it?” AM

For more information, call 626.793.8171 or visit www.artideasfestival.org. The Pacific Asia Museum is located at 46 north Los Robles Ave., Pasadena. For more information, call (626) 449-2742 or visit www.pacificasiamuseum.org. 22 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO


Come Visit Us and See All of Our Halloween Treats!

s ’ e p o l e n Pe

CAFE • BOOKS • GALLERY 1029 Foothill Blvd, La Cañada (at Chevy Chase Drive)

818.790.4386 •

www.penelopescafe.com

La Canada Penelope’s Café has indoor or outdoor dining to suit the weather or your fancy. The soothing outdoor oasis offers a waterfall to make it the perfect setting for a quaint lunch, breakfast, or a great place to relax with a book and a mocha frappe to help beat the heat. Apple Cart is a wonderful little shop featuring beautiful Heather Moore jewelry, which you can personalize for THE perfect gift. Look for the striped awning on Foothill. Pamper yourself with a manicure and pedicure at Madame Jolie. Or if a waxing’s what you need look

OP NO EN W

Specializing in: • Nail care • Skincare • Waxing Ask about our V.I.P Card which gives the customer 5% back on all nailcare services Open Mon-Sat 9:30 – 7:00 707 Foothill Blvd #1., La Canada Ca, 91011 • 818.952.5591

no further. Book your appointment today and walk out rejuvenated and a Madame Jolie V.I.P! Triangle, a fashion lounge is the latest boutique in La Cañada. You’ll find chic clothing, occasional dresses, luxurious accessories like; Joie, trench coats by Trina Turk and silk trim t-shirts by Linq. Exclusives like Theory, Nicole Miller, Twisted Heart & True Religion. Handbags by Cuba, Botkier & Golden Bleu. Through Oct, the boutique is offering a store credit that matches your sales tax to be applied to any purchase in Nov.


Montrose Is it time for an update? Vacations are over and the kids are back in school. It’s a great time to see what’s new at Merle Norman. Let the girls at Merle Norman customize Skin care and makeup that is perfect for you. It’s your turn! On Honolulu west of Ocean View in Montrose, and in Old Town Monrovia by Library Park. Not only does Tender Treasures offer a complete line of Flax Designs clothing, but they also have a fantastic rack full of drastically reduced items for your perusal. Did you know Tender

Treasures also sells accessories and baby gifts? Quality goods at great prices, right in the heart of Montrose, and don’t forget to check out their website. Gianni Couture on Verdugo Blvd. gives expert personal attention for all your fashion desires. You’ll find new collections of Italian and French Couture, but don’t let that intimidate you - they have very fashionable, very quality items to suit every budget. Go on in and marvel at their gorgeous remodeled interior, complete with original exposed beams and accent lighting. Ooh la la!

A Storee forr Women n & Children Featuringg an n alll new w selection n off costumess from m Littlee Adventuress forr yourr littlee ghostss and d goblinss. Tenderr Treasures 2280 Honolulu Ave. Montrose, CA 91020 818-248-2260

www.tendertreasures.com

Old Town Monrovia 407 S. Myrtle Ave. (626)357-2299

Montrose 2341 Honolulu Ave. (818)249-1743


A RT,

A N T I Q U E S

John Moran Auctioneers — Expertly serving clients since 1969, John Moran Auctioneers is a full-service auction house offering quality objects and complete personalized dedication. Monthly estate and fine furniture auctions are where collectors, dealers, decorators and others gather to buy the finest antiques, silver, American Indian, oil and watercolor paintings, jewelry, unusual accessories and much more! They also hold an auction (three times per year) for exceptional California and American paintings. Consignment and the purchasing of estates. 735 W. Woodbury Road, Altadena. Call (626) 793-1833, or visit www.johnmoran.com. Lany’s Antiques & Fine Jewelry — The expression for Lany’s? “I dare you to go there just once!” This is the epitome of the addictive jewelry store. Lany acquires her jewelry and antiques from a variety of fascinating sources and sells at wholesale prices. There are a multitude of unusual pieces of every imaginable design, stone and setting. You’ll also find small “accessory” antiques and personal items that make thoughtful and very affordable gifts. So please come in — and don’t say I didn’t warn you!! 1009 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 578-7141 Open Tues-Sat 11-6. Whites Art, Framing & Restorations — Serving the community since 1944, Whites offers the most complete and comprehensive fine art framing and restoration services in the San Gabriel Valley. Nestled in the charming town of Montrose, Whites specializes in archival conservation and custom framing, sophisticated matting, shadow boxing and other creative display solutions for unique and unusual works of fine art.

Lany’s Antique

&FINE JEWELRY

LARGE selection of Fine & Antique Jewelry

&

J E W E L RY

Additionally, Whites offers custom finishing and the gilding of frames, elaborate frame design, stretching and mounting of fabric art (canvas, needlepoint, etc.), along with the restoration of fine art and antiques. You can also experience an exquisite collection of fine art on display. 2414 Honolulu Ave., Montrose. Call (818) 957-4071. Stephen Johnstone Photography — His work has been described as “edgy and fun” as well as “lovely” and has been featured in such diverse publications as Rolling Stone and Westways. It also can be seen in feature films, TV series and commercials where studios rent or purchase his art. His last show was at the Metro Gallery in Pasadena featuring Rock and Roll and Jazz artists from the 70’s as well as contemporary portraits. “Pasadena Autumn and Spring” may be viewed online at sjohnstonephoto.com. (818) 292-5014. Single Stone on Mission Street offers fine vintage and contemporary jewelry in a jewel box setting. Blending old time glamour and modern sophistication Single Stone carries a wonderful array of rings, eternity bands, earrings and pendants featuring diamonds and semi precious stones. Single Stone on Mission Street is proud to showcase such prominent designers as Gurhan, Pomellato, Monica Rich Kosan, Julie Baker, Arunashi and many more. Custom design is available to create your own signature piece. 2527 Mission Street, San Marino, CA 91108 t.626.799.3109 or 607 South Hill Street, Suite 204, Los Angeles CA 90014 t.213.892.0772. www.singlestone.com

Voted Second Best Jewelry Store Only to Tiffanys! Voted Best Antiques

Pasadena Weekly Readers Poll 2007

Come See What All The Fuss is About.

CASH for DIAMONDS Buy & Sell Estates

1009 E. Green St. Pasadena 626-578-7141 Tues-Sat 11:00 – 6:00

Fine Vintage & Contemporary Jewelry 2527 Mission Street, San Marino, CA 91108 t.626.799.3109 607 South Hill Street, Suite 204, Los Angeles CA 90014 t.213.892.0772 www.singlestone.com


A RT,

A N T I Q U E S

John Moran Auctioneers — Expertly serving clients since 1969, John Moran Auctioneers is a full-service auction house offering quality objects and complete personalized dedication. Monthly estate and fine furniture auctions are where collectors, dealers, decorators and others gather to buy the finest antiques, silver, American Indian, oil and watercolor paintings, jewelry, unusual accessories and much more! They also hold an auction (three times per year) for exceptional California and American paintings. Consignment and the purchasing of estates. 735 W. Woodbury Road, Altadena. Call (626) 793-1833, or visit www.johnmoran.com. Lany’s Antiques & Fine Jewelry — The expression for Lany’s? “I dare you to go there just once!” This is the epitome of the addictive jewelry store. Lany acquires her jewelry and antiques from a variety of fascinating sources and sells at wholesale prices. There are a multitude of unusual pieces of every imaginable design, stone and setting. You’ll also find small “accessory” antiques and personal items that make thoughtful and very affordable gifts. So please come in — and don’t say I didn’t warn you!! 1009 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 578-7141 Open Tues-Sat 11-6. Whites Art, Framing & Restorations — Serving the community since 1944, Whites offers the most complete and comprehensive fine art framing and restoration services in the San Gabriel Valley. Nestled in the charming town of Montrose, Whites specializes in archival conservation and custom framing, sophisticated matting, shadow boxing and other creative display solutions for unique and unusual works of fine art.

Lany’s Antique

&FINE JEWELRY

LARGE selection of Fine & Antique Jewelry

&

J E W E L RY

Additionally, Whites offers custom finishing and the gilding of frames, elaborate frame design, stretching and mounting of fabric art (canvas, needlepoint, etc.), along with the restoration of fine art and antiques. You can also experience an exquisite collection of fine art on display. 2414 Honolulu Ave., Montrose. Call (818) 957-4071. Stephen Johnstone Photography — His work has been described as “edgy and fun” as well as “lovely” and has been featured in such diverse publications as Rolling Stone and Westways. It also can be seen in feature films, TV series and commercials where studios rent or purchase his art. His last show was at the Metro Gallery in Pasadena featuring Rock and Roll and Jazz artists from the 70’s as well as contemporary portraits. “Pasadena Autumn and Spring” may be viewed online at sjohnstonephoto.com. (818) 292-5014. Single Stone on Mission Street offers fine vintage and contemporary jewelry in a jewel box setting. Blending old time glamour and modern sophistication Single Stone carries a wonderful array of rings, eternity bands, earrings and pendants featuring diamonds and semi precious stones. Single Stone on Mission Street is proud to showcase such prominent designers as Gurhan, Pomellato, Monica Rich Kosan, Julie Baker, Arunashi and many more. Custom design is available to create your own signature piece. 2527 Mission Street, San Marino, CA 91108 t.626.799.3109 or 607 South Hill Street, Suite 204, Los Angeles CA 90014 t.213.892.0772. www.singlestone.com

Voted Second Best Jewelry Store Only to Tiffanys! Voted Best Antiques

Pasadena Weekly Readers Poll 2007

Come See What All The Fuss is About.

CASH for DIAMONDS Buy & Sell Estates

1009 E. Green St. Pasadena 626-578-7141 Tues-Sat 11:00 – 6:00

Fine Vintage & Contemporary Jewelry 2527 Mission Street, San Marino, CA 91108 t.626.799.3109 607 South Hill Street, Suite 204, Los Angeles CA 90014 t.213.892.0772 www.singlestone.com


Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E

2007 Pasadena Showcase House of Design

residential remodeling and additions

Arte Diseno is owned by Paul and Lynne Butler. The collaboration of Paul's decades as an internationally acclaimed artist, and Lynne's import expertise have culminated in a company unlike any other in the industry. They have been providing major retailers with unique home furnishing, pottery, and landscape/building materials since 1997. Under Paul’s art direction you will find only the richest Flagstone, Clay Pavers, Decorative Rock, Cantera Fountains, Custom Forged Iron, as well as Authentic Mexican Furnishings, and Art. Paul is truly a master of the interior and exterior landscape. Visiting their location is an experience in color and texture that will inspire. If you are remodeling your interior or exterior landscape

this should be the first stop on your list. Wholesale to the Public. Trade Welcome. 626.359.0744

Carol Cobabe Design — With a philosophy of “good design resulting in the creation of harmony in one’s environment,” Carol’s goal is to enrich, inspire and instill feelings of comfort. With an extensive career since 1988, her disciplined usage of the basic elements of space, color, texture, light and nature succeeds in reflecting the unique style and purpose of each client. Carol’s work has been published in Designers West, Better Homes and Gardens, Window and Wall Ideas and F. Schumacher’s Classic Directions. She has participated in several showcase houses, the Los Angeles

Assistance League Design House, the Venice Family Clinic Design House and Little Company of Mary Design House in Palos Verdes. Carol is also the winner of the coveted First Place Award of the L.A. Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers. Call (626) 441-6052. Carousel Floors — This family-owned, 36-year-old company provides a superb selection along with remarkable service. For hardwood, select from all the top names, including Appalachian Hardwood Floors, pre-finished or finished by expert craftsman. For linoleum, Marmoleum is a natural, eco-friendly, stylish flooring with multiple patterns. Carousel is a Mohawk Color Center, carrying Fabrica, Karastan,

Masland and Schumacher to name a few. Free consultations; designers welcome. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat.; or by appointment. 676 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 795-8085. Carson-Magness Landscaping — From the overall exterior vision to the implementation and construction, this magnificent team makes a name for itself with its handcrafted, hands-on detailed approach. Complete exterior design services include horticulture to structures, such as pergolas, loggias, outdoor kitchens, pool house, bar and bath and even outdoor furnishings! In the —Continued on page 30

COME E SEE E OUR R NEW W ARRIVALS

new construction innovative kitchen and bath design 2007 Pasadena Showcase House of Design

Carol Cobabe Allied Member ASID

interior design

we take your project from concept through construction to complete interior design

170 0 S.. Lake e Ave. Pasadena 626.578.1137 www.worldcaravanstores.com

DECORATING SERVICES:

¡ Window treatments ¡ Floor coverings ¡ Upholstered furniture

KITCHEN DESIGN

501 fair oaks avenue south pasadena, ca 91030 626 799-9701 www.cynthiabennett.com gen. contractor lic. #676471 - cid #801

BATH DESIGH

626.441.6052 carolcobabedesign.com


Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E

2007 Pasadena Showcase House of Design

residential remodeling and additions

Arte Diseno is owned by Paul and Lynne Butler. The collaboration of Paul's decades as an internationally acclaimed artist, and Lynne's import expertise have culminated in a company unlike any other in the industry. They have been providing major retailers with unique home furnishing, pottery, and landscape/building materials since 1997. Under Paul’s art direction you will find only the richest Flagstone, Clay Pavers, Decorative Rock, Cantera Fountains, Custom Forged Iron, as well as Authentic Mexican Furnishings, and Art. Paul is truly a master of the interior and exterior landscape. Visiting their location is an experience in color and texture that will inspire. If you are remodeling your interior or exterior landscape

this should be the first stop on your list. Wholesale to the Public. Trade Welcome. 626.359.0744

Carol Cobabe Design — With a philosophy of “good design resulting in the creation of harmony in one’s environment,” Carol’s goal is to enrich, inspire and instill feelings of comfort. With an extensive career since 1988, her disciplined usage of the basic elements of space, color, texture, light and nature succeeds in reflecting the unique style and purpose of each client. Carol’s work has been published in Designers West, Better Homes and Gardens, Window and Wall Ideas and F. Schumacher’s Classic Directions. She has participated in several showcase houses, the Los Angeles

Assistance League Design House, the Venice Family Clinic Design House and Little Company of Mary Design House in Palos Verdes. Carol is also the winner of the coveted First Place Award of the L.A. Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers. Call (626) 441-6052. Carousel Floors — This family-owned, 36-year-old company provides a superb selection along with remarkable service. For hardwood, select from all the top names, including Appalachian Hardwood Floors, pre-finished or finished by expert craftsman. For linoleum, Marmoleum is a natural, eco-friendly, stylish flooring with multiple patterns. Carousel is a Mohawk Color Center, carrying Fabrica, Karastan,

Masland and Schumacher to name a few. Free consultations; designers welcome. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat.; or by appointment. 676 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 795-8085. Carson-Magness Landscaping — From the overall exterior vision to the implementation and construction, this magnificent team makes a name for itself with its handcrafted, hands-on detailed approach. Complete exterior design services include horticulture to structures, such as pergolas, loggias, outdoor kitchens, pool house, bar and bath and even outdoor furnishings! In the —Continued on page 30

COME E SEE E OUR R NEW W ARRIVALS

new construction innovative kitchen and bath design 2007 Pasadena Showcase House of Design

Carol Cobabe Allied Member ASID

interior design

we take your project from concept through construction to complete interior design

170 0 S.. Lake e Ave. Pasadena 626.578.1137 www.worldcaravanstores.com

DECORATING SERVICES:

¡ Window treatments ¡ Floor coverings ¡ Upholstered furniture

KITCHEN DESIGN

501 fair oaks avenue south pasadena, ca 91030 626 799-9701 www.cynthiabennett.com gen. contractor lic. #676471 - cid #801

BATH DESIGH

626.441.6052 carolcobabedesign.com


Fedde Furniture

Your home...

Since 1937, Y O U R

Quality Home Funishings, Exceptional Savings. Celebrating our 70th Anniversary!

Featuring the best selection of classic traditional home furnishings. Now save storewide on all furniture and upholstery. Many items available for immediate delivery for this holiday season.

—Continued from page 29

spirit of being commissioned to create a piece of artwork, Melissa Carson, Barry Magness and their team bring their rich and varied backgrounds in painting, sculpture, water design and lighting to each one-of-akind project. Barry specializes in the lusty organic with walkways, walls and original water features of metal, glass, wood and fire. The clean, understated elegance of Melissa’s artistic studies reflect her brilliantly placed foliage, flowers and trees for the deepest and most subtle impact. Together they create the most extraordinary masterpieces of mystery and romance. Barry Magness and

C A S T L E

Melissa Carson were selected as designer advisers at the 2006 Pasadena Showcase House of the Arts. Call (818) 241-2128, or visit www.carson-magness.com. Craypo's Pool & Spa — We have been in the swimming pool business for more than 16 years. We understand all phases of construction and maintenance. We also understand that your yard is an extension of yourself and we will treat your project with the dedication and attention to detail you deserve. Call our office — (626) 3556145 — to make an appointment. We look forward to making your backyard your own private oasis!

Something for every room in your home, from home theater to Frank Lloyd Wright.

You’ll be surprised at the selection and the savings!

fine homefurnishings since 1937 • interior design 2350 EAST COLORADO BLVD. PASADENA • 626-796-7103 Open Daily 10:00-6:00 Sunday 12:00-5:00

32 NORTH SIERRA MADRE BLVD. PASADENA • 626-844-1160 Open Daily 10:00-6:00 Sunday 12:00-5:00

Visit Our Website at www.Fedde.com

676 E. Green Street City of Pasadena

(626) 795-8085

M-F 10-5 SAT 10-4 OR BY APPT. CONTRACT LIC: 283612

Cynthia Bennett & Associates — This celebrated designer and general contractor, along with her staff of 11 designers, architects and project managers, brings both innovation and practicality to all your building, remodeling, restoration and renovation projects. They can take any project from concept, plans, construction and completion through interior design. The design and build focus of Cynthia Bennett’s team is the Southern California lifestyle of light, open spaces, accessible patios and garden areas and kitchen great rooms. With an emphasis on kitchen, bath, room additions and space planning, this 25-year-old design firm is one of the most sought after in the San Gabriel Valley. 501 S.

Fair Oaks Ave., South Pasadena. Call (626) 799-9701. Day of Design With Terri Julio — “My mission is to offer more people an opportunity to consult with a professional designer and afford them a service that fits into their budget.” Those words capture Terri Julio’s practical and thoughtful approach to her profession. A full day of design consultation (six hours for one flat fee) is a great way to begin any project. The job will run smoothly, and, most importantly, Terri will help you avoid costly mistakes. Terri’s philosophy also extends to “putting the client’s wants first.” She simply —Continued on page 32

MODERN LIGHTING QUALITY SINCE 1946

9034 East Las Tunas Drive, Temple City, CA 91780

(626) 286-3262 Fax (626) 286-0219 Largest Lighting Selection in the San Gabriel Valley Monday-Friday 8:30-5:00 Saturday 9:00-4:00


Fedde Furniture

Your home...

Since 1937, Y O U R

Quality Home Funishings, Exceptional Savings. Celebrating our 70th Anniversary!

Featuring the best selection of classic traditional home furnishings. Now save storewide on all furniture and upholstery. Many items available for immediate delivery for this holiday season.

—Continued from page 29

spirit of being commissioned to create a piece of artwork, Melissa Carson, Barry Magness and their team bring their rich and varied backgrounds in painting, sculpture, water design and lighting to each one-of-akind project. Barry specializes in the lusty organic with walkways, walls and original water features of metal, glass, wood and fire. The clean, understated elegance of Melissa’s artistic studies reflect her brilliantly placed foliage, flowers and trees for the deepest and most subtle impact. Together they create the most extraordinary masterpieces of mystery and romance. Barry Magness and

C A S T L E

Melissa Carson were selected as designer advisers at the 2006 Pasadena Showcase House of the Arts. Call (818) 241-2128, or visit www.carson-magness.com. Craypo's Pool & Spa — We have been in the swimming pool business for more than 16 years. We understand all phases of construction and maintenance. We also understand that your yard is an extension of yourself and we will treat your project with the dedication and attention to detail you deserve. Call our office — (626) 3556145 — to make an appointment. We look forward to making your backyard your own private oasis!

Something for every room in your home, from home theater to Frank Lloyd Wright.

You’ll be surprised at the selection and the savings!

fine homefurnishings since 1937 • interior design 2350 EAST COLORADO BLVD. PASADENA • 626-796-7103 Open Daily 10:00-6:00 Sunday 12:00-5:00

32 NORTH SIERRA MADRE BLVD. PASADENA • 626-844-1160 Open Daily 10:00-6:00 Sunday 12:00-5:00

Visit Our Website at www.Fedde.com

676 E. Green Street City of Pasadena

(626) 795-8085

M-F 10-5 SAT 10-4 OR BY APPT. CONTRACT LIC: 283612

Cynthia Bennett & Associates — This celebrated designer and general contractor, along with her staff of 11 designers, architects and project managers, brings both innovation and practicality to all your building, remodeling, restoration and renovation projects. They can take any project from concept, plans, construction and completion through interior design. The design and build focus of Cynthia Bennett’s team is the Southern California lifestyle of light, open spaces, accessible patios and garden areas and kitchen great rooms. With an emphasis on kitchen, bath, room additions and space planning, this 25-year-old design firm is one of the most sought after in the San Gabriel Valley. 501 S.

Fair Oaks Ave., South Pasadena. Call (626) 799-9701. Day of Design With Terri Julio — “My mission is to offer more people an opportunity to consult with a professional designer and afford them a service that fits into their budget.” Those words capture Terri Julio’s practical and thoughtful approach to her profession. A full day of design consultation (six hours for one flat fee) is a great way to begin any project. The job will run smoothly, and, most importantly, Terri will help you avoid costly mistakes. Terri’s philosophy also extends to “putting the client’s wants first.” She simply —Continued on page 32

MODERN LIGHTING QUALITY SINCE 1946

9034 East Las Tunas Drive, Temple City, CA 91780

(626) 286-3262 Fax (626) 286-0219 Largest Lighting Selection in the San Gabriel Valley Monday-Friday 8:30-5:00 Saturday 9:00-4:00


Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E —Continued from page 31

guides those desires to a beautiful conclusion. Call (626) 447-5370. Fedde Furniture — Fedde Furniture has been selling quality home furnishings at exceptional values for more than three generations in Pasadena. Since 1937, Fedde’s has featured some of the best names in classic traditional, transitional and Arts & Crafts style furniture and custom upholstery. Fedde Furniture features a large selection of home office, casual dining, entertainment systems, leather seating and children’s furniture for your home. Fedde’s complimentary Interior Design service and experienced staff will help you find exactly what you need for your home and office. Free

Your kitchen is not just a place where meals are prepared. It's the heart of your home, where your family comes together. It's a gathering place where a thousand memories will be made.

“Wee understand.” From m Design n to o Completion Our single location provides you with a product showroom, along with your designer and licensed contractor at your service.

~Ask about our 2 week completion guarantee~

Kitchens &Baths Custom

Cabinets Countertops

Flooring Fixtures & Tile

Visit our comprehensive showroom at: E. Foothill Blvd. S.. Myrtle

626)446-5956

E. Huntington Dr.

S.. Mayflowerr Ave.

Call now for in-home consultation

S.. 5th h Ave.

Next to Expo Design Center

S.. Santa a Anita a Ave

411 W. Maple Avenue, Monrovia, CA 91016

E. Duarte Rd. "CA Lic # 889326"

local delivery and full-service delivery staff will assure your furniture delivery. Come in today and visit their two showrooms in Pasadena, located at 2350 E. Colorado Blvd., (626) 796-7103, and 32 N. Sierra Madre Blvd., (626) 8441160. You’ll be surprised just how much money you will save on new furniture for your home. Historic Lighting-Our long dedication to the Arts & Crafts revival has been inspired by the original Craftsman movement centered in the Pasadena, area. Our showroom blends quality production home furnishings with representation of individual artisans. Our close relations with noted local craftsmen, allow us to offer individual pieces not readily avail-

able elsewhere. Lighting & interior design services available. Working from architectural plans and photographs or actual site visits, we can assist clients with their Craftsman and Bungalow style projects, both old and new. Historic Lighting - 114 East Lemon Avenue, Old Town Monrovia 626-303-4899

custom designed furniture, bedding and window treatments, as well as an offering of furniture from Europe, the United States and around the world. For your home remodel, office interior, vacation property or refurbishing, call Lee Mink & Associates at (626) 796-3900.

Lee Mink & Associates brings an experienced design team to your home to help your dreams become a reality. Their signature style is good taste — interpreted with your lifestyle in mind. Whether the project encompasses an entire property or one room, the designers seek out inspiring and varied design concepts. Clients also enjoy beautiful

Nott and Associates is the “Design Build” father-and-son team of Tom and Jeffrey Nott. This family team specializes in custom homes in Pasadena and the greater Los Angeles region. Tom Nott studied architecture at the University of Southern California, and since then has worked on major p ro j e c t s t h ro u g h o u t s o u t h e r n —Continued on page 34

Create Your Own Custom Upholstered Furniture 100’S S off frame e styless and d 1000’S S off designerr fabricss and d leatherss to o choose e from!

3 Wk.. Delivery

Custom Designed Sofas, Sectionals, Chairs, Sofa Beds Slip Covers Reupholstery Accessories Drapery & Bedding FAC CT TO ORY RY D DIIR RE EC CT T S SH HO OW WR RO OO OM MS S FA

PASADENA

GLENDALE

626.795.7099 818.502.1211 644 East Colorado 5406 San Fernando Rd.

www.sofainteriors.com

STUDIO CITY

VALENCIA

818.487.2708 12344 Ventura Blvd.

661.254.9090 27051 McBean Pkwy.

ASID

American Society Interior Design Industry Partner


Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E —Continued from page 31

guides those desires to a beautiful conclusion. Call (626) 447-5370. Fedde Furniture — Fedde Furniture has been selling quality home furnishings at exceptional values for more than three generations in Pasadena. Since 1937, Fedde’s has featured some of the best names in classic traditional, transitional and Arts & Crafts style furniture and custom upholstery. Fedde Furniture features a large selection of home office, casual dining, entertainment systems, leather seating and children’s furniture for your home. Fedde’s complimentary Interior Design service and experienced staff will help you find exactly what you need for your home and office. Free

Your kitchen is not just a place where meals are prepared. It's the heart of your home, where your family comes together. It's a gathering place where a thousand memories will be made.

“Wee understand.” From m Design n to o Completion Our single location provides you with a product showroom, along with your designer and licensed contractor at your service.

~Ask about our 2 week completion guarantee~

Kitchens &Baths Custom

Cabinets Countertops

Flooring Fixtures & Tile

Visit our comprehensive showroom at: E. Foothill Blvd. S.. Myrtle

626)446-5956

E. Huntington Dr.

S.. Mayflowerr Ave.

Call now for in-home consultation

S.. 5th h Ave.

Next to Expo Design Center

S.. Santa a Anita a Ave

411 W. Maple Avenue, Monrovia, CA 91016

E. Duarte Rd. "CA Lic # 889326"

local delivery and full-service delivery staff will assure your furniture delivery. Come in today and visit their two showrooms in Pasadena, located at 2350 E. Colorado Blvd., (626) 796-7103, and 32 N. Sierra Madre Blvd., (626) 8441160. You’ll be surprised just how much money you will save on new furniture for your home. Historic Lighting-Our long dedication to the Arts & Crafts revival has been inspired by the original Craftsman movement centered in the Pasadena, area. Our showroom blends quality production home furnishings with representation of individual artisans. Our close relations with noted local craftsmen, allow us to offer individual pieces not readily avail-

able elsewhere. Lighting & interior design services available. Working from architectural plans and photographs or actual site visits, we can assist clients with their Craftsman and Bungalow style projects, both old and new. Historic Lighting - 114 East Lemon Avenue, Old Town Monrovia 626-303-4899

custom designed furniture, bedding and window treatments, as well as an offering of furniture from Europe, the United States and around the world. For your home remodel, office interior, vacation property or refurbishing, call Lee Mink & Associates at (626) 796-3900.

Lee Mink & Associates brings an experienced design team to your home to help your dreams become a reality. Their signature style is good taste — interpreted with your lifestyle in mind. Whether the project encompasses an entire property or one room, the designers seek out inspiring and varied design concepts. Clients also enjoy beautiful

Nott and Associates is the “Design Build” father-and-son team of Tom and Jeffrey Nott. This family team specializes in custom homes in Pasadena and the greater Los Angeles region. Tom Nott studied architecture at the University of Southern California, and since then has worked on major p ro j e c t s t h ro u g h o u t s o u t h e r n —Continued on page 34

Create Your Own Custom Upholstered Furniture 100’S S off frame e styless and d 1000’S S off designerr fabricss and d leatherss to o choose e from!

3 Wk.. Delivery

Custom Designed Sofas, Sectionals, Chairs, Sofa Beds Slip Covers Reupholstery Accessories Drapery & Bedding FAC CT TO ORY RY D DIIR RE EC CT T S SH HO OW WR RO OO OM MS S FA

PASADENA

GLENDALE

626.795.7099 818.502.1211 644 East Colorado 5406 San Fernando Rd.

www.sofainteriors.com

STUDIO CITY

VALENCIA

818.487.2708 12344 Ventura Blvd.

661.254.9090 27051 McBean Pkwy.

ASID

American Society Interior Design Industry Partner


Building Fine Homes Is a Family Tradition.

Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E —Continued from page 33

California. His work spans decades, and includes projects for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, the L.A. Subway, and countless commercial parks. Jeff began working in the field at age 12, graduated from UCSB, and has worked with many well known designers in Beverly Hills and Bel-Air building custom homes. Together for 30 years, they have completed over 120 projects in South Pasadena alone. Nott and Associates provides complete design through construction services, caring for your vision and appreciating your budget. w w w. N OT TA S S O C I AT E S . c o m 626.403.0844.

Pashgian Brothers — To enter the gracious, two-story showroom of Pashgian Brothers is to enter the complete world of efficient contemporary resources, with the tradition of a “customer comes first” business. Pashgian Brothers was established in the United States in 1889, thus making it, legitimately, the oldest oriental rug company west of the Mississippi River. Their luxurious wares come from such countries as Iran, Pakistan, India, China and Afghanistan, to name a few. Also, because Pashgian Brothers own several factories around the world, they can custom order rugs, to your specifications, from traditional to contemporary designs. Cleaning and repair of

your treasures are also available. Designers and their clients welcome. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; 11 a.m. to 5p.m. Sat.; and by appt. Sun. 993 E. Colorado Blvd. Call (626) 7967888 or (323) 681-9253. Prime Building Materials is a family owned business that has been serving the Southern California building industry for over 20 years with pride and traditional values. Our experienced and knowledgeable staff work with homeowners, developers, landscape contractors, general contractors, designers and architects alike to achieve your exact goals, dreams and beyond. Our huge supply yard features acres of building materials for all phases of

building and home improvement, with a specialty showroom featuring a host of interior and exterior products. From formal residential landscapes and masonry to large, track home developments, Prime Building Materials can provide all the materials to create the perfect living environment. Call us for a free consultation or estimate on your next project. Three locations to serve you 7811 Lankershim Blvd., N. Hollywood – 11694 Sheldon St., Sun Valley – 2800 Teal Club Rd., Oxnard – Call 626-284-2222 Ro s e k a y Re m o d e l e r s — Yo u r kitchen is not just a place where meals are prepared. It's the heart of

Huge Selection Quality Products Competitive Prices Ferguson Bath & Kitchen serving Pasadena and surrounding communities for over 15 years takes pride in providing our customers with a huge selection of quality lines that include Kohler, Kallista and Rohl. Let our Ferguson showroom staff, Sarah and Antaya help you with your appliances, sinks, faucets, tools, accessories, environmentally safe tank-less water heaters, and commercial and residential lighting needs.

—Continued on page 36

$250 off any purchase-Minimum $2500. Mention this ad for discount- Expires 12/31/07

Over 35 years of residential design and construction.

Ferguson Bath & Kitchen Gallery is your ONE STOP SHOP - From Underground to Finish

JEFF NOTT TOM NOTT A.I.A General Contractor Architect B 746905 626-403-0844 626-403-2146

Visit Our Showroom Today! 157 Vista Ave, Pasadena

626.795.9551

1508 MISSION ST., SOUTH PASADENA nottassociates.com

Sierra M

NOTT & ASSOCIATES

Vista Ave.

(1 block E. of Sierra Madre Blvd & Walnut)

lvd. re B d a

E.Foothill Blvd E. Walnut St. E. Colorado Blvd.


Building Fine Homes Is a Family Tradition.

Your home...

Y O U R C A S T L E —Continued from page 33

California. His work spans decades, and includes projects for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, the L.A. Subway, and countless commercial parks. Jeff began working in the field at age 12, graduated from UCSB, and has worked with many well known designers in Beverly Hills and Bel-Air building custom homes. Together for 30 years, they have completed over 120 projects in South Pasadena alone. Nott and Associates provides complete design through construction services, caring for your vision and appreciating your budget. w w w. N OT TA S S O C I AT E S . c o m 626.403.0844.

Pashgian Brothers — To enter the gracious, two-story showroom of Pashgian Brothers is to enter the complete world of efficient contemporary resources, with the tradition of a “customer comes first” business. Pashgian Brothers was established in the United States in 1889, thus making it, legitimately, the oldest oriental rug company west of the Mississippi River. Their luxurious wares come from such countries as Iran, Pakistan, India, China and Afghanistan, to name a few. Also, because Pashgian Brothers own several factories around the world, they can custom order rugs, to your specifications, from traditional to contemporary designs. Cleaning and repair of

your treasures are also available. Designers and their clients welcome. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; 11 a.m. to 5p.m. Sat.; and by appt. Sun. 993 E. Colorado Blvd. Call (626) 7967888 or (323) 681-9253. Prime Building Materials is a family owned business that has been serving the Southern California building industry for over 20 years with pride and traditional values. Our experienced and knowledgeable staff work with homeowners, developers, landscape contractors, general contractors, designers and architects alike to achieve your exact goals, dreams and beyond. Our huge supply yard features acres of building materials for all phases of

building and home improvement, with a specialty showroom featuring a host of interior and exterior products. From formal residential landscapes and masonry to large, track home developments, Prime Building Materials can provide all the materials to create the perfect living environment. Call us for a free consultation or estimate on your next project. Three locations to serve you 7811 Lankershim Blvd., N. Hollywood – 11694 Sheldon St., Sun Valley – 2800 Teal Club Rd., Oxnard – Call 626-284-2222 Ro s e k a y Re m o d e l e r s — Yo u r kitchen is not just a place where meals are prepared. It's the heart of

Huge Selection Quality Products Competitive Prices Ferguson Bath & Kitchen serving Pasadena and surrounding communities for over 15 years takes pride in providing our customers with a huge selection of quality lines that include Kohler, Kallista and Rohl. Let our Ferguson showroom staff, Sarah and Antaya help you with your appliances, sinks, faucets, tools, accessories, environmentally safe tank-less water heaters, and commercial and residential lighting needs.

—Continued on page 36

$250 off any purchase-Minimum $2500. Mention this ad for discount- Expires 12/31/07

Over 35 years of residential design and construction.

Ferguson Bath & Kitchen Gallery is your ONE STOP SHOP - From Underground to Finish

JEFF NOTT TOM NOTT A.I.A General Contractor Architect B 746905 626-403-0844 626-403-2146

Visit Our Showroom Today! 157 Vista Ave, Pasadena

626.795.9551

1508 MISSION ST., SOUTH PASADENA nottassociates.com

Sierra M

NOTT & ASSOCIATES

Vista Ave.

(1 block E. of Sierra Madre Blvd & Walnut)

lvd. re B d a

E.Foothill Blvd E. Walnut St. E. Colorado Blvd.


PASHGIAN BROTHERS Gallery of Fine Oriental Rugs ESTABLISHED 1889

ANTIQUE, TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY RUGS

YOUR HOME...

Y O U R —Continued from page 35

your home, where your family comes together. It's a gathering place where a thousand memories will be made. Visit our comprehensive showroom at 411 W. Maple Avenue, Monrovia, CA 91016. Next to Expo Design Center. Call now for in-home consultation. Ask About our 2 week completion guarantee. 626-446-5956. Sofa Interiors — Creating your own custom upholstered furniture can be an exhilarating experience at Sofa Interiors. You can choose from a wide variety of frame styles, designer fabrics, leathers, drapery and bedding. Here is custom-crafted furniture of

C A S T L E

exceptional quality at unbeatable prices with your complete satisfaction guaranteed. The potential is limitless! Before you buy a sofa or have one reupholstered, stop by one of the Sofa Interiors showrooms first. Whatever your taste, Sofa Interiors can help you achieve your dreams. Experience the difference! There are a number of locations in the Southland, including Studio City, Valencia and Pasadena (see ad for exact locations). Call for a free consultation with this ad. Courtesy to the trade. For more information, visit www.sofainteriors.com.

World Caravan offers eclectic furniture and accessories from every corner of the globe. The choices are endless! Handknotted rugs and unique accent pieces

• Kitchen Design • Bath Design

are arranged in artful vignettes that make it easier to visualize. Reasonable prices. 170 S. Lake Ave. Call (626) 578-1137.

• Space Planning • Accessorizing • Color Selection • Material & Fabric Selection

Your project. Your needs. Six hours of design. 321 Magellan Road Arcadia, CA 91007 ph 626.447.5370 fax 626.446.0066 tajdesigns@aol.com Allied Member ASID

World Caravan — Enter this magnificent store and discover another world.

Make Your Backyard An Oasis

Sales • Purchases • Consignments Cleaning • Repairs • Certified Appraisals

993 East Colorado Blvd. Pasadena 626.796.7888

323.681.9253

Craypo’s Pool & Spa Call For an Estimate: 626.355.6145

C53-801805


PASHGIAN BROTHERS Gallery of Fine Oriental Rugs ESTABLISHED 1889

ANTIQUE, TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY RUGS

YOUR HOME...

Y O U R —Continued from page 35

your home, where your family comes together. It's a gathering place where a thousand memories will be made. Visit our comprehensive showroom at 411 W. Maple Avenue, Monrovia, CA 91016. Next to Expo Design Center. Call now for in-home consultation. Ask About our 2 week completion guarantee. 626-446-5956. Sofa Interiors — Creating your own custom upholstered furniture can be an exhilarating experience at Sofa Interiors. You can choose from a wide variety of frame styles, designer fabrics, leathers, drapery and bedding. Here is custom-crafted furniture of

C A S T L E

exceptional quality at unbeatable prices with your complete satisfaction guaranteed. The potential is limitless! Before you buy a sofa or have one reupholstered, stop by one of the Sofa Interiors showrooms first. Whatever your taste, Sofa Interiors can help you achieve your dreams. Experience the difference! There are a number of locations in the Southland, including Studio City, Valencia and Pasadena (see ad for exact locations). Call for a free consultation with this ad. Courtesy to the trade. For more information, visit www.sofainteriors.com.

World Caravan offers eclectic furniture and accessories from every corner of the globe. The choices are endless! Handknotted rugs and unique accent pieces

• Kitchen Design • Bath Design

are arranged in artful vignettes that make it easier to visualize. Reasonable prices. 170 S. Lake Ave. Call (626) 578-1137.

• Space Planning • Accessorizing • Color Selection • Material & Fabric Selection

Your project. Your needs. Six hours of design. 321 Magellan Road Arcadia, CA 91007 ph 626.447.5370 fax 626.446.0066 tajdesigns@aol.com Allied Member ASID

World Caravan — Enter this magnificent store and discover another world.

Make Your Backyard An Oasis

Sales • Purchases • Consignments Cleaning • Repairs • Certified Appraisals

993 East Colorado Blvd. Pasadena 626.796.7888

323.681.9253

Craypo’s Pool & Spa Call For an Estimate: 626.355.6145

C53-801805


Health&Beauty Mary Konyalian, RN, of Glendale Laser Center has THE best hands in the business for laser treatment. She even offers evening and Saturday appointments for your convenience. Glendale Laser Center is located inside the office of Dr. Bardakjian’s Plastic Surgery Center, right next to Glendale Memorial Hospital. Buy a session in advance and she’ll give you a sweet discount. Warmth and professionalism is what you’ll find in Mary’s caring hands! “From the moment they walk in, “says owner Marian Gotanian; I want my clients to know they’re going to receive a beauty experience unlike any other. She cites “pampering” as a major component of the Hair Profile Experience. “If they’re coming in for an evening appointment and want to relax with a cocktail or glass

of wine absolutely! If they want champagne, we’ll have it chilled and ready for them. Everyone wants to be treated special and feel like they’re a celebrity. Hair Profile will be hosting a soiree on Oct 4 from 4-8 p.m. Join us for a fabulous evening and enjoy a bubbly glass of champagne and chocolate truffles. Enter Tuscany Spa Skin and Body Clinic…the marvelous Old World Tuscan ambience draws you in, the caring and tender personal care you receive keeps you coming back for more. You’ll feel like a million bucks when you leave, after you’ve received any of their very specialized beauty or health treatments. Check out their website for photos, testimonials, and to see what featured brands and products they use and sell at this truly lovely beautification destination.

Discover a Ne w

10%

Y

! ou

ad hist t on ge nti Me and FF

O

Full Service Salon Offering: Hair Design Services Eyelash extensions Hair Extensions Skin care & Make up

Got real skin problems? Get real results!

* Ask about our Beauty Boot Camp

Tuscany Spa offers individually customized state-of-the-art skin care as you luxuriate in the Old World Tuscan ambience. Enjoy complimentary tea and biscuits at the end of each service. Tuscany Spa Offers: • Chromolite IPL Laser Hair Removal • Tuscany Signature Apothecary Facial • Tuscany Diagnostic Facial • Non-Surgical Face Lift with Epicuren

• Full Hour Swedish Body Massage • Jade Stone Massage • Aqua Detox Ionic Foot Treatment • Healing Infrared Sauna

(818) 790-1392

Hermina Lathe, CEO, proudly serving her community for over 23 years

Tuscany Spa Skin and Body Clinic 2210 Florencita Ave., Montrose (818) 248-5500 www.tuscanyskinspa.com

Now open Sundays, 10 – 3

711 Foothill Blvd, Suite H La Canada-Flintridge, CA 91011 www.hairprofile.com

—Continued from page 25


Gifts and Shopping Lula Mae At Lula Mae, the gifts of style, wit and whimsy are fabulous forces of fun. The selection of items that dance together on the crowded shelves is second to none. Lula Mae has the perfect gift for those who have everything, from baby clothes to bath and body, from paper goods to books, handbags, jewelry, accessories, candles, and special holiday treats. Yes, literally the coolest gifts in Pasadena…Nay, the West Coast…Better yet, the Northern Hemisphere. The treat that is Lula Mae, is not measured in the amazing gifts purchased, but in the spiritual journey that your inner child takes while you browse the displays. There are gifts and goodies for every taste and palate, and nostalgia is served up by the truckload. Take the trip, and find yourself stepping inside Lula Mae, at 100 N. Fair Oaks, Old Towne Pasadena. (626) 304-9996. www.lulamae.com.

WWW.LULAMAE.COM

WE THINK SIMPLE, SIMPLE; BUT WE ALWAYS END UP OVERDOING IT.

MORE IS MORE!

100 NORTH FAIR OAKS AVENUE PASADENA, CA 91103 626.304.9996

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: MONDAY - SATURDAY 11-7; SUNDAYS 12-5

Savor the Flavor It’s hard to believe, but Savor the Flavor has entered their 10th Holiday Season, providing new food and festive gifts to customers in Southern California and beyond. But for the Keegan’s, it remains as fresh as the day they opened their doors. They revel when hearing how delighted someone is to receive a gift from STF. And broad smiles appear when customers shout “OMIGOD” when tasting something new.

Savor The Flavor 11 Kersting Court, Sierra Madre, CA 91024 (626)) 355-5153 FAX: 355-7781 www.savortheflavor.net

But the Keegan’s claim that most important is the opportunity they had to share in their customers’ enjoyment. “We cannot count the number of great friends we have who were our customers first. Perhaps this is the most important measure of Savor the Flavor’s success.”

...where good clothes go when they're passed on!

Clothes Heaven “Where good clothes go when they’re passed on”, is the motto of this high quality, high fashion, gently worn designer women’s clothes resale boutique. Clothes Heaven has top-end name brands like: Gucci, Chanel, Donna Karan, Helmut Lang, Narcisco Rodriguez, and Jean Paul Gautier. The fabulous selections of current styles are cultivated from the best closets in New York, Santa Barbara, La Jolla, Malibu, Beverly Hills, Arizona, and Texas. Many of the pieces are consigned from couture representatives, studio wardrobe departments, celebrities, models and CEOs closets. All items are meticulously chosen, many are ahead of season designer samples, and many of the pieces are new with original price tags. If you appreciate the best quality and style of contemporary designs, but prefer to get them at a fraction of the retail price, then come see Larayne Brannon, and enjoy an incomparable shopping experience. 111 E. Union St. Old Towne Pasadena. (626) 440-0929. www.clothesheaven.com.

111 East Union Street Pasadena, CA 91103

(626) 440-0929 www.clothesheaven.com

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Attend the VIP Closing Night Event - Oct. 31, 8:00 p.m. RAY CHARLES LIVE - A New Musical performance and after party at the Pasadena Playhouse. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.pasadenaplayhouse.org

40 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO


GET YOUR CAR REPAIRED RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!! - FULL CONCIERGE SERVICE - FAST LANE FOR SMALL REPAIRS - BMW & MERCEDES CERTIFIED - LIFETIME GUARANTEE

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SAN GABRIEL VALLEYS FIRST GREEN AUTO BODY SHOP. WE CARE ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT....WE USE WATER BASE PAINTS, RECYCLE PAPER, PARTS PACKAGING, SCRAP METAL AND WE CLARIFY ALL WASTE WATER

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CALL US FOR DETAILS - OFFER EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 30 - 2007

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NORTH HOLLYWOOD 6827 VINELAND AVE

(626) 309-9100 (626) 795-7500

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(626) 441-0171

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ELAINE – COMPANY OPERATIONS MANAGER

(818) 506-8000

SATELLITE DROP OFF LOCATIONS

ARCADIA MERCEDES RUSNAK NEW CENTURY BMW ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 41


T H E A RT O F S C I E N C E

Mark Davis

proves that big

advances come in

small packages BY STE VE COULTER

T

HERE ARE WORSE THINGS IN the world than nausea, diarrhea or chronic fatigue. Believe it or not, there are fates worse than hair loss. In fact, most of us find that any one of those indignities – or even a couple at once – is something we are quite capable of enduring. Surviving all four at once in the face of a life-threatening illness? That’s something else completely. Cancer chemotherapy has long been a double-edged sword, offering the hope of remission but with the steep price of some serious side effects. It is a day-to-day horror that Dr. Mark Davis experienced personally when his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. “The motivation of seeing it first hand, and seeing how devastating it can be, has been high for me,” said Davis, the Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. Davis set out a decade ago to develop nanoparticles specifically designed to deliver

42 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

chemotherapeutic drugs without the adverse side effects. Describing his design as “a sort of ‘FedEx’ for cancer treatment,” Davis’ nanomedical cancer therapy is currently being tested on patients at City of Hope in Duarte. Early results have been extremely promising, and plans are already in motion for more extensive phase II trials. “There was a laundry list of things we knew we would have to overcome in order to have dramatic improvements in cancer therapeutics,” Davis said. “This is the first time we are seeing information coming from the patients to let us know if we did what we hoped to do. We are really happy that the people in the trial are not having the typical side effects [of chemo].” In order to understand how Davis’ nanomedical therapy works, it is important to have a cursory understanding of current cancer treatments. Picture a tumor, a word derived from the Latin word for “swelling.”


The basic idea of chemotherapy is to stop cancerous cells in that swollen mass from dividing at such a rapid rate by introducing chemicals into the bloodstream that kills them. The subsequent side effects occur because some healthy cells – such as those related to hair growth and the intestinal lining – are also fast dividing and therefore vulnerable to the very same chemo chemicals as the cancerous cells. Now, picture the same tumor as a toddler’s shape-sorting toy – only pieces of precisely the right size can move freely though the puzzle. With a diameter that is one thousandth that of a strand of human hair, Davis’ nanoparticles are too big to exit normal blood vessels but can pass through the immature blood vessels in tumors and move throughout the cancerous mass. The result is that the healthy tissue is spared the

that we understand what’s going on in a patient.” Davis, who founded the start-up company Insert Therapeutics to get his nanoparticle designs into the clinic, is featured in the upcoming publictelevision documentary “Curious.” The twoepisode film was produced by Thirteen/WNET and is scheduled to debut in October. His wife remains in remission to this day. “[My wife] had breast cancer and went through all kinds of holy hell with normal chemo. She was the one that encouraged us to get into this area, but we didn’t have any experience prior to that so we just kind of jumped into it blind,” Davis said. Proving that necessity truly is the mother of invention. AM

Davis set out a decade ago to develop nanoparticles specifically designed to

deliver chemotherapeutic drugs without the

adverse side effects. The result was “a sort of ‘FedEx’ for cancer treatment,” as he puts it. bombardment of the chemo chemicals. In addition, these nanoparticles are proving to circulate in the bloodstream for a longer period of time than originally anticipated, which might ultimately reduce the frequency with which the treatment has to be given. “That part of it is really intriguing,” Davis said. “We think we have something that hasn’t existed before so we are trying to make sure

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 43


DÉJÀ VU

PHOTOGRAPH BY HILLER

{

From

Telephones to Hula Hoops A history of Pasadena’s financial and professional community By Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History

P

Reprinted with permission from “Pasadena: A Business History,” by Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History. Available from the publisher online at www.arcadiapublishing.com or by calling (888) 313-2665.

44 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

New Home Telephone Company manager “Hap” Norris (center) is pictured here in 1931 being congratulated on the installation of Pasadena’s 40,000th telephone. By 1943, there were more than 50,000 phones in service for the city’s 88,500 residents.

PHOTO COURTESY CHRISTIE, PARKER AND HALE

asadena’s business and professional community has long consisted of a large number of bankers, attorneys, investment brokers, insurance agents and other men and women willing to help the area’s residents protect their money and resources. These businesses helped provide the resources for Pasadena’s businesses to flourish and, as such, played an integral role in the growth and development of the city throughout the years. With all the money flowing through a quickly developing Pasadena, it was only a matter of time before a broad range of banks and investment firms opened their doors. Pasadena has a long and rich banking history, and today the city’s many banks remain an integral part of the city’s business life. Palermo, Barbaro, Chinen and Pitzer, LLP, was a Pasadena law firm that opened up in town (although then under a different name), quickly followed by many other attorneys who set up offices in their homes and in Pasadena’s many new business buildings. Hahn and Hahn, LLP, also still in existence, is another of both Pasadena’s and California’s oldest law firms. The specialized intellectual property law office of Christie, Parker and Hale, LLP, is an example of how the impact of Caltech and local technology companies led to the rise of supporting specialized businesses.

In 1886, the Pasadena Bank Corporation paid Isaac Banta, the owner of the Los Angeles Hotel, $25,000 for the three acres of land under and around the hotel, on the northwest corner of Colorado Street and Fair Oaks Avenue–the most prime piece of real estate in nascent Pasadena. On this site, the three-story First National Bank was built. This photograph shows the new bank’s interior, with bankers at the ready to begin recouping the cost of the land the new bank was sitting on.

In 1903, the Pasadena Evening News opined that “suburban life has been affected more by the telephone than by any other modern invention. With the wire always within reach, jaded businessmen feel that they are justified in taking much-needed rest in the country.” This photograph of Pasadena’s first telephone exchange was taken in the late 19th century.

This patent drawing was submitted by Pasadena intellectual property law firm Christie, Parker and Hale on behalf of its San Gabriel client the Wham-O toy company. After the hula hoop was released, it became an international phenomenon, selling more than 100 million hoops in the first year alone.

James T. Phillips Jr. posed for this photograph in his law office in the Francisca Building at 24 West Dayton St. Phillips, Pasadena’s first African American attorney, was an active member of the NAACP. He owned his office’s building and rented out space to a variety of African American–owned businesses.

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 45


DÉJÀ VU

PHOTOGRAPH BY HILLER

{

From

Telephones to Hula Hoops A history of Pasadena’s financial and professional community By Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History

P

Reprinted with permission from “Pasadena: A Business History,” by Patrick Conyers, Cedar Phillips and the Pasadena Museum of History. Available from the publisher online at www.arcadiapublishing.com or by calling (888) 313-2665.

44 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

New Home Telephone Company manager “Hap” Norris (center) is pictured here in 1931 being congratulated on the installation of Pasadena’s 40,000th telephone. By 1943, there were more than 50,000 phones in service for the city’s 88,500 residents.

PHOTO COURTESY CHRISTIE, PARKER AND HALE

asadena’s business and professional community has long consisted of a large number of bankers, attorneys, investment brokers, insurance agents and other men and women willing to help the area’s residents protect their money and resources. These businesses helped provide the resources for Pasadena’s businesses to flourish and, as such, played an integral role in the growth and development of the city throughout the years. With all the money flowing through a quickly developing Pasadena, it was only a matter of time before a broad range of banks and investment firms opened their doors. Pasadena has a long and rich banking history, and today the city’s many banks remain an integral part of the city’s business life. Palermo, Barbaro, Chinen and Pitzer, LLP, was a Pasadena law firm that opened up in town (although then under a different name), quickly followed by many other attorneys who set up offices in their homes and in Pasadena’s many new business buildings. Hahn and Hahn, LLP, also still in existence, is another of both Pasadena’s and California’s oldest law firms. The specialized intellectual property law office of Christie, Parker and Hale, LLP, is an example of how the impact of Caltech and local technology companies led to the rise of supporting specialized businesses.

In 1886, the Pasadena Bank Corporation paid Isaac Banta, the owner of the Los Angeles Hotel, $25,000 for the three acres of land under and around the hotel, on the northwest corner of Colorado Street and Fair Oaks Avenue–the most prime piece of real estate in nascent Pasadena. On this site, the three-story First National Bank was built. This photograph shows the new bank’s interior, with bankers at the ready to begin recouping the cost of the land the new bank was sitting on.

In 1903, the Pasadena Evening News opined that “suburban life has been affected more by the telephone than by any other modern invention. With the wire always within reach, jaded businessmen feel that they are justified in taking much-needed rest in the country.” This photograph of Pasadena’s first telephone exchange was taken in the late 19th century.

This patent drawing was submitted by Pasadena intellectual property law firm Christie, Parker and Hale on behalf of its San Gabriel client the Wham-O toy company. After the hula hoop was released, it became an international phenomenon, selling more than 100 million hoops in the first year alone.

James T. Phillips Jr. posed for this photograph in his law office in the Francisca Building at 24 West Dayton St. Phillips, Pasadena’s first African American attorney, was an active member of the NAACP. He owned his office’s building and rented out space to a variety of African American–owned businesses.

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 45


{

Don’tt justt makee itt Memorable…….. Makee itt unforgettable

DESIGN

People who live in glass houses

...live here

Photos provided by Kristen Urbanas Spencer

A home's modernist past co-exists comfortably with its environmentally sustainable future. BY ARLENE SCHINDLER

I

N 1958, ELVIS PRESLEY WAS A ROCK GOD, Dwight D. Eisenhower was President and Alfred A. Jausen was an architect building a house for himself on a lot with a stunning view of the Flintridge Hills. Hampstead House, his mid-century modern marvel, still boasts the original waterfall structure he designed for the entrance: a sleek copper sculpture that shepherds water into a small pond embellished with stepping stones and foliage. Kristen Urbanas Spencer of Setting the Stage Interior Design updated the entry door for her sporting-goods executive client by creating one from cast glass, her signature. Inside the house–part of the 21st annual Home & Kitchen Tour held by the Pasadena Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers on Oct. 7—the configuration of glass, foliage and pond is repeated along a wall, literally bringing the outside inside. Then it hits you: the entire far wall of the 2,700-square-foot house is floor-to-ceiling glass, revealing the world beyond: a pool, trees and an expansive view that includes the downtown Los Angeles skyline, the San Gabriel

46 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

Mountains, Jet Propulsion Lab and, on a clear day, Catalina Island. The four-bedroom house is 38 percent glass, a common feature of midcentury houses rarely found in contemporary homes because glass houses are not energy efficient. Indeed, the original windows have been coated with a film that tempers heat loss and gain. Spencer says her design challenge lay in bringing a mid-century masterpiece into the 21st century by incorporating environmentally sustainable design while preserving the home's historical integrity—its original design vocabulary and sensibility. Spencer specializes in green design, providing therapeutic environments that enhance indoor air quality and feature drought-tolerant, allergen-free landscaping. She became fascinated with green design as a dialysis nurse at a respiratory hospital, where she discovered that flaws in her patients' surroundings were harming their ability to breathe. “I wanted to combine my nursing skills and excitement for design to help people regain and maintain their health,” she says. Spencer's palette was inspired by the original backsplash above the kitchen stove: a gray,

tan and sepia design of abstract birds. When she began the project, the kitchen had wood cabinets with a Formica veneer typical of postwar style. But a half century of daily use had damaged the cabinets beyond repair, so they were taken down to the studs. Spencer discovered the original birch-wood columns supporting the cabinets above the kitchen island. New cabinets matching the original birch were built above the island and the stove. In keeping with her green philosophy, Spencer chose a GE Monogram Star energyefficient electric oven and refrigerator, as well as a unit that provides hot water on demand to reduce water wasted during heating. The Miele front-loading washer/dryer, utilizes less water, detergent and electricity than top-loading machines. Both the countertops and floors were covered with terrazzo to create a streamlined, space-age kitchen. Other green elements include redesigned rain gutters and drainage to divert water away from the building and prevent water damage, as well as white reflective roof paint to deflect heat on hot summer days. Spencer also transformed the wood-burning fireplaces into gas fireplaces covered with crushed glass, which

warm the house without the sparks and embers of a conventional fire. Glass adds charm to the guest bedroom as well, with two floor-to-ceiling windows that offer a clear view of downtown Los Angeles. Other original touches that were retained include the step-down tub and sliding shoji screen door—innovative for its time—in the bathroom off the master suite. The closet is 19 1/2 feet long, big enough to house the wardrobe of the most avid clotheshorse. Iconic modern elements in the living areas include a free-form Isamu Noguchi floor lamp and a George Nelson ceiling lamp in the living room as well as an Eames desk and chair in the office. A whimsical 1950s ashtray collection is scattered throughout the home. For all of its embrace of nostalgia, Hampstead House includes an update even the most die-hard modernist would appreciate: a built-in entertainment center with Bose speakers, making it the perfect scene to have a party, play some Elvis Presley tunes and watch the sunset. AM The Pasadena Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) presents the 21st annual Home & Kitchen Tour on Oct. 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The self-guided tour features six uniquely remodeled dwellings in Pasadena, San Marino and La Cañada designed by ASID members, a retail boutique, and an opportunity to meet the designers. San Marino stops include a 1937 French Revival by Jennifer Bevan-Montoya and a 1925 English Tudor estate featuring the work of Eileen Atwood. In Pasadena, guests can visit a renovated 1953 California Ranch-style home by Lori Sitz-Teacher and a 2001 Country English mansion by Ann Fletcher. La Cañada dwellings include a 1940-vintage English cottage by Sherry Stein and Albert Janz. Tickets cost $30 in advance, $35 at the door. For more information, call (626) 795-6898 or visit www.asidpasadena.org/calendar/home_and_kitchen_tour.htm. ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 47


{

Don’tt justt makee itt Memorable…….. Makee itt unforgettable

DESIGN

People who live in glass houses

...live here

Photos provided by Kristen Urbanas Spencer

A home's modernist past co-exists comfortably with its environmentally sustainable future. BY ARLENE SCHINDLER

I

N 1958, ELVIS PRESLEY WAS A ROCK GOD, Dwight D. Eisenhower was President and Alfred A. Jausen was an architect building a house for himself on a lot with a stunning view of the Flintridge Hills. Hampstead House, his mid-century modern marvel, still boasts the original waterfall structure he designed for the entrance: a sleek copper sculpture that shepherds water into a small pond embellished with stepping stones and foliage. Kristen Urbanas Spencer of Setting the Stage Interior Design updated the entry door for her sporting-goods executive client by creating one from cast glass, her signature. Inside the house–part of the 21st annual Home & Kitchen Tour held by the Pasadena Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers on Oct. 7—the configuration of glass, foliage and pond is repeated along a wall, literally bringing the outside inside. Then it hits you: the entire far wall of the 2,700-square-foot house is floor-to-ceiling glass, revealing the world beyond: a pool, trees and an expansive view that includes the downtown Los Angeles skyline, the San Gabriel

46 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

Mountains, Jet Propulsion Lab and, on a clear day, Catalina Island. The four-bedroom house is 38 percent glass, a common feature of midcentury houses rarely found in contemporary homes because glass houses are not energy efficient. Indeed, the original windows have been coated with a film that tempers heat loss and gain. Spencer says her design challenge lay in bringing a mid-century masterpiece into the 21st century by incorporating environmentally sustainable design while preserving the home's historical integrity—its original design vocabulary and sensibility. Spencer specializes in green design, providing therapeutic environments that enhance indoor air quality and feature drought-tolerant, allergen-free landscaping. She became fascinated with green design as a dialysis nurse at a respiratory hospital, where she discovered that flaws in her patients' surroundings were harming their ability to breathe. “I wanted to combine my nursing skills and excitement for design to help people regain and maintain their health,” she says. Spencer's palette was inspired by the original backsplash above the kitchen stove: a gray,

tan and sepia design of abstract birds. When she began the project, the kitchen had wood cabinets with a Formica veneer typical of postwar style. But a half century of daily use had damaged the cabinets beyond repair, so they were taken down to the studs. Spencer discovered the original birch-wood columns supporting the cabinets above the kitchen island. New cabinets matching the original birch were built above the island and the stove. In keeping with her green philosophy, Spencer chose a GE Monogram Star energyefficient electric oven and refrigerator, as well as a unit that provides hot water on demand to reduce water wasted during heating. The Miele front-loading washer/dryer, utilizes less water, detergent and electricity than top-loading machines. Both the countertops and floors were covered with terrazzo to create a streamlined, space-age kitchen. Other green elements include redesigned rain gutters and drainage to divert water away from the building and prevent water damage, as well as white reflective roof paint to deflect heat on hot summer days. Spencer also transformed the wood-burning fireplaces into gas fireplaces covered with crushed glass, which

warm the house without the sparks and embers of a conventional fire. Glass adds charm to the guest bedroom as well, with two floor-to-ceiling windows that offer a clear view of downtown Los Angeles. Other original touches that were retained include the step-down tub and sliding shoji screen door—innovative for its time—in the bathroom off the master suite. The closet is 19 1/2 feet long, big enough to house the wardrobe of the most avid clotheshorse. Iconic modern elements in the living areas include a free-form Isamu Noguchi floor lamp and a George Nelson ceiling lamp in the living room as well as an Eames desk and chair in the office. A whimsical 1950s ashtray collection is scattered throughout the home. For all of its embrace of nostalgia, Hampstead House includes an update even the most die-hard modernist would appreciate: a built-in entertainment center with Bose speakers, making it the perfect scene to have a party, play some Elvis Presley tunes and watch the sunset. AM The Pasadena Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) presents the 21st annual Home & Kitchen Tour on Oct. 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The self-guided tour features six uniquely remodeled dwellings in Pasadena, San Marino and La Cañada designed by ASID members, a retail boutique, and an opportunity to meet the designers. San Marino stops include a 1937 French Revival by Jennifer Bevan-Montoya and a 1925 English Tudor estate featuring the work of Eileen Atwood. In Pasadena, guests can visit a renovated 1953 California Ranch-style home by Lori Sitz-Teacher and a 2001 Country English mansion by Ann Fletcher. La Cañada dwellings include a 1940-vintage English cottage by Sherry Stein and Albert Janz. Tickets cost $30 in advance, $35 at the door. For more information, call (626) 795-6898 or visit www.asidpasadena.org/calendar/home_and_kitchen_tour.htm. ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 47


{

OBJECTS OF DESIRE

Palm-Size

Pleasures Little luxuries for people who have the whole world in their hands BY JOE BEAUVAIS

May the game go with you Star Wars fans should get ready to jump to warp speed. They can stage Empire vs. Republic battles any way — and anywhere — they want with a special “Ceramic White” PSP featuring a silkscreened image of Darth Vader on the back of the unit. Star Wars Battlefront Rogue Squadron, a PSP exclusive title, is included with this new release. All the regular PSP bells and whistles are still included--Internet, RSS channels, music, movies and pictures--all at a reduced unit thickness, weight and price. The force is strong with this one, indeed. $199. The Game Stop, 1253 N. Lake Ave., (626)794-2106, www.gamestop.com

48 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

The Golden Rules Tiffany & Co. might not be the first name that springs to mind in a hunt for purveyors of sporting goods. But the celebrated jeweler does carry a stylish item for the sportsman of the house: a gilded USGA rule book for well-heeled golfers. This $50 bible makes a great gift, and it fits nicely in the hip pocket, balancing out the recipient’s wicked slice. Pair it with Paloma Picasso’s handy sterling-silver tee tool–golf tee, turf repairer and stymie marker. $250. Tiffany & Co., 68 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 793-7424, www.tiffany.com.

— Continued on page 51


Retro Atmosphere, Great Steaks & HOT Nightly Entertainment Right Here in Eagle Rock!

5 minutes from Old Town Pasadena

1833 Colorado Blvd. Eagle Rock

Italian Steakhouse Serving the finest Italian-American Cuisine since 1954, Colombo’s offers steaks, seafood, pasta dishes, soft lighting, a full bar & fabulous jazz 7 nights a week. Calling all cool cats! Check out our website for complete music schedule; • Open-Mic / Jazz-Jam Monday nights 8:30 to midnight! • Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday nights, 7 to 10pm • Friday & Saturday, 5:30 to midnight *Friday – Piano / Vocals til 9:30, then Latin Jazz *Saturday – Piano / Vocals til 9:30, then Eclectic Jazz • Sunday afternoon, 5:30 to 9:30pm • Late-Nite Happy Hour Friday & Saturday Starting at 10pm! Serving Lunch & Dinner • Monday & Friday 11am to 11:30pm • Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 11am to 10pm •Saturday 2 to 11:30pm, Sunday 2 to 10 pm

For Reservations call (323) 254-9138 www.ColombosRestaurant.net ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 49


50 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO


{

OBJECTS OF DESIRE

—Continued from page 48

Mail Call Up in Smoke Quality cigars require the best tools for snipping and lighting. Pamper your favorite cigar lover with the S.T. Dupont Opus X cutter ($550) and S.T. Dupont Opus X lighter ($1,425). Cigars by Chivas, 58 S. De Lacey St., Pasadena, (626) 395-7475, www.cigarsbychivas.com.

The Vitra Coupe letter opener marries surrealist design with organic form. The curved stainless-steel opener was designed by Jean Prouvé and served as an inspiration for Charles and Ray Eames’ iconic La Chaise chair. $130. Fitzsu Society, 65 W. Green St., Pasadena, (626) 564-1908, www.fitzsu.com.

High Marks Even in this age of bits and bytes, the right pen can help you make your mark. Sign your important documents with a gold-and-black Meisterstuck Solitaire Doue. $995. Boutique Du Temps, 25 N. Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena, (626) 568-8878.

A Bag in the Hand In four short years, handbag designer Susan Farber has attracted a following that includes Sharon Stone, Debra Messing and Jennifer Love Hewitt. Her lush leather pieces are carried by 200 boutiques around the country. These stylish clutches come in pewter, silver, gold, red and black. $235. Flutter, 54 W. Green St., Pasadena. (626) 449-3224.

ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 51


Voted d Pasadena’s

Bestt Naill Salon

Pasadena Weekly Readers Poll 2007

Tinzee Nail Salon We provide our clients the ultimate protection in salon sanitizing

• Spas and chairs are cleaned after each use with anti-bacterial soap. • Spas and spa chairs are run with clean water & disinfectant after each use. • Fresh towels for each client • Pumice stones, files and buffers are one time use only and new for each client. • All implements are sanitized using 3 steps, anti-bacterial soap, EPA registered hospital disinfectant that kills bacteria, viruses and fungus and sterilizing oven.

Over 300 Nail Colors Gel Nail & Waxing Available 436 6 S.. Fairr Oakss Ave.,, S.. Pasadena (inn OSH H & Kinko’ss Plaza)

) 403-3311 626 Openn 10am m — 8pm m Daily

(

www.tinzeenailsalon.com

We have a large selection of juvenile products from all over the world. We offer services such as nursery and children’s room design, baby shower registry, gift baskets & gift wrapping.

Furniture • Bedding Décor • Travel Clothes • Care Toys• Gifts

10% OFF YOUR NEXT FURNITURE PURCHASE WITH THIS AD UNTIL OCTOBER 31, 2007

MONDAY – SATURDAY 10AM – 6PM 52 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

(626) 588-2810 956 HUNTINGTON DRIVE SAN MARINO


{ List THE

A highly selective preview of upcoming events

BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

NEW WORDS, NEW VISIONS OF PASADENA YOUTH Oct. 7 — Celebrate the words and images of northwest Pasadena youth at the opening celebration of the exhibit “New Words, New Visions,” from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Jackie Robinson Community Center. The event features food, music, photography and writing, including a 3 p.m. panel discussion on the work led by author/journalist Jervey Tervalon. Participants include Ibarionex Perello, former associate editor of Outdoor Photographer, Digital Photo Pro and PC Photo magazines; Jonathan Gold, Pulitzer Prize–winning LA Weekly food critic; Everard Williams, Art Center photographer and teacher; and student interns Rachael and Rebekah Aladdin and Coleman Dede. The exhibit is the culmination of a five-week writing and photography class taught by Tervalon and Perello and sponsored by the nonprofit California Living Histories, a Pasadena organization that develops young people’s skills of self-expression. The exhibit is on display throughout October at the community center at 1020 N. Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena. In November, it moves to the Pasadena Central Library, 285 E. Walnut St. Call (626) 744-7300 or visit www.newwordsnewvisions.net.

Images produced by the participants of the New Words - New Visions workshop

Chavez, Tony Blair and Fidel Castro. Free from the diplomatic constraints of his former office, he also talks about the rise of Mexico’s drug cartels. Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium is located at 332 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena. Call (888) 222-5832 or visit www.caltech.edu.

MUSICA ANGELICA KICKS OFF SEASON

BENEFITING RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE Oct. 6 — Ronald McDonald House across the street from Huntington Memorial Hospital provides a low-cost home away from home for the families of seriously ill children. The third annual “Shine” gala benefits the facility at 6 p.m. at Art Center College of Design’s South Campus Wind Tunnel. The event recreates Monte Carlo on the French Riviera, with French country cuisine, wine tasting, a display of vintage European roadsters and live entertainment. Silent- and live-auction offerings include a private suite for 20 at Staples Center for a 2007-08 Lakers game and a seven-night Alaskan cruise. Tickets cost $150. Art Center College of Design South Campus Wind Tunnel is located at 950 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 585-1588, ext. 101.

FOX SPEAKS Oct. 16 — Former Mexican President Vicente Fox discusses and signs “Revolution of Hope,” his bare-knuckle autobiography, at 8 p.m. at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium. In the book, he discusses how the combination of family, faith and revolution took him from humble beginnings to the top office in the land. He offers an inside look at his close but often rocky relationships with such world leaders as George W. Bush, Felipe Calderon, Hugo

Oct. 20 — The Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra begins its 2007-08 season with “Concerto!” at 8 p.m. at Pasadena Presbyterian Church. Conductor Martin Haselböck conducts a program including Bach’s Brandenburg concertos Nos. 3 and 5 and Telemann’s Concerto for Flute d’Amour, Oboe d’Amore and Viola d’Amore, Concerto for Flute, Violin and Cello in A from “Tafelmusik” and Concerto for Oboe. Featured soloists are Musica Angelica Concertmaster/Resident Artistic Director Elizabeth Blumenstock on violin and viola d’amore, principal oboist Gonzalo Ruiz and principal flutist Stephen Schultz. Tickets for orchestral concerts cost $25 to $49 for adults, $31 to $43 for seniors and $12 for students. The concert will be repeated at 4 p.m. Oct. 21 at UCLA’s Schoenberg Hall. Pasadena Presbyterian Church is at 585 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Call (310) 458-4504 or visit www.musicaangelica.org.

WINE, JAZZ WALK HAND-IN-HAND IN SIERRA MADRE Oct. 27 — Sierra Madre’s Second Annual Wine & Jazz Walk on Sierra Madre Boulevard runs from 4 to 7 p.m. to benefit the City of Hope’s cancer research programs. Nearly 40 businesses will offer snacks and potables from San Antonio Winery, against a backdrop of live performances by some of California’s top jazz artists, including Mark Towns Latin Jazz, Roger Cairns Combo, the Chris Murphy Trio, Doug MacDonald Trio, the Mike McDaniel Quartet and Jane Fuller Trio. Tickets cost $30 in advance, $35 at the door. Sierra Madre Blvd. between Baldwin and Auburn Avenues. Call (626) 233-9993.

—continued on page 54 ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 53


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THE LIST —continued from page 53

Photos Credit Rick Meyer

PASADENA ARTWEEKEND CELEBRATES THE CITY’S CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS Oct. 12, 13 and 14 — One of the world’s most art-friendly cities hosts three days and nights of cultural enrichment during Pasadena ArtWeekend. The festival brings together 40 eclectic events showcasing live music, contemporary art, cultural exhibitions and hands-on activities around the city. All activities are free and open to the public. ArtWeekend kicks off with ArtNight on Friday from 6 to 10 p.m. with cultural institutions opening their doors to offer a smorgasbord of art and music. A free shuttle connects participating venues including Armory Center for the Arts, Armory Northwest, Williamson Gallery of Art Center College of Design, Light Bringer Project at the Castle Green, One Colorado, Pasadena City College, Pasadena Conservatory of Music, Pasadena Museum of California Art, Pasadena Museum of History, Pasadena Jazz Institute, Pasadena Central Library, Pasadena Playhouse, Pasadena Symphony at the Civic Auditorium and more. Saturday brings ArtWalk from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event, set mainly on El Molino Avenue between Green Street and Colorado Boulevard, transforms the Playhouse District into a visual arts village where visitors can purchase artwork by juried artists, including acclaimed Chicana artists Patssi Valdez and Margaret Garcia. The Pacific Asia Museum and the Pasadena Museum of California Art also offer free admission, a variety of hands-on activities, a poetry slam, author readings, culinary art, live music and more. In addition, the 9th annual Latino History Jamaica (community fair) runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., beginning with a parade from Los Robles Avenue north of

RACING TO RESCUE ANIMALS Oct. 28 — The Rose Bowl’s Area H is the scene of the second annual “Race for the Rescues,” a 5K run/walk to raise funds for several nonprofit animal rescue organizations. Actress Jane Lynch (“The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” “Best in Show”) emcees the event, hosted by and benefitting the Rescue Train. The event also benefits Best Friends Animal Society, Kitten Rescue, Animal Alliance, A Dog’s Life Rescue, Four-Legged Friends Foundation, the Lange Foundation and Molly’s Mutts & Meows. Other activities include the “Walk of Paws,” an art auction of works created by celebrities; a one-mile non-competitive kid’s race; a Halloween pet adoption and fashion show, with adoptable pets from the Pasadena Humane Society/SPCA and Los Angeles Animal Services showing off their scary best; a silent auction of tickets to TV show tapings, specialty pet products and services, spa packages, photography, celebrity memorabilia, gift baskets, gift certificates, jewelry and more; a kids’ costume contest; a drawing class by a former Disney animator; a pet psychic; a dogtraining demonstration and more. Registration opens at 7 a.m.; the run/walk goes

Washington Boulevard ending at La Pintoresca Park on the corner of Fair Oaks Avenue and Washington Boulevard. Sunday features the Pasadena Art & Design Open Market from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., showcasing the work of students, faculty and alumni of Art Center College of Design and Pasadena City College. Objects by emerging artists, illustrators, ceramicists and a new generation of environmental and industrial designers in various media will be on display at the market in the One Colorado courtyard and alleys. Oct. 13 — Also part of Pasadena’s ArtWeekend is opening night of the Pasadena Symphony’s 80th anniversary season. The concert features a triad of powerful works by master composers, including “Homage to Lorca,” Silvestre Revueltas’ ode to the murdered Spanish poet, which features themes inspired by Mexican village music. Also on the program is Philip Glass’ “Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra,” featuring timpanists Jonathan Haas, who commissioned the work, and John Evans. The work of Hector Berlioz takes the stage in his romantic masterpiece. “Romeo and Juliet.” Tickets range from $20 to $75. A pre-concert lecture starts at 7 p.m. The concert begins at 8 at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 584-8833 or visit www.pasadenasymphony.org. Oct. 14 — Finally, ArtPerformance presents an eclectic slate of music from new and nationally recognized performers from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday on multiple stages throughout Old Pasadena. The bill features free performances by such artists as Meiko,Dengue Fever, Culver City Dub Collective, Ceci Bastida, Jessica Fichot, Sara Lov of Devics, Tijuanos and the LA Music Academy. And that’s not all. For more information, call (800) 307-7977 or visit www.pasadenaartweekend.com.

from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Other events continue until 12:30 p.m. The event costs $25 for guests ages 12 and up; $13 for kids. The Rose Bowl is located at 1001 Rose Bowl Drive, Pasadena. To register, visit www.racefortherescues.org or www.rescuetrain.org or call (323) 899-5640.

COLORED SQUARES IN THE SKY Through Nov. 11 — One Colorado’s courtyard is the site of an ambitious art installation by Daniel Buren. The French artist’s “A Colored Square in the Sky” features a flying field of more than 4,500 brightly colored triangular orange-and-yellow flags suspended high above the courtyard. The work is part of Armory Public View, dedicated to commissioning large-scale installations by internationally recognized artists in the walkways of One Colorado. This is Buren’s first grand outdoor presentation in California in 37 years. It is co-sponsored by the Armory Center for the Arts, One Colorado, Alliance Française de Pasadena and the Consulate General of France, Los Angeles. One Colorado is located at 24 E. Union St., Pasadena. Call (626) 564-1066 or visit www.onecolorado.net. AM ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 55


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FITNESS

The Runner’s High is to

the Swift

There are many roads to bliss for Pasadena-area runners BY NOELA HUESO

P

ASADENA IS AN IDEAL CITY FOR runners. Miles of verdant, tree-lined streets and historic landmarks make navigating the Rose City on foot a varied visual delight. In this diverse landscape, workouts can be wideranging, too, from the flatlands and sloping hills of the Rose Bowl to the rugged running trails of the nearby Foothill Mountains. But perhaps the city’s greatest assets for those who are fleet of foot are the numerous running clubs in town. Designed to help runners improve their skills by providing top-notch coaching and regular workouts — whether participants are prepping for a 5K or their first ultramarathon — the groups also offer the friendship and camaraderie that develops among people with common interests.

RUNNING CLUBS There are four major running clubs in the Pasadena area — and one devoted to the sport of triathlon — making it easy for those interested in getting in shape to do so. And the running community is always willing to welcome new friends into the fold. Los Feliz Flyers Members of the Los Feliz Flyers participate in five runs a week, alternating among a road run at the Rose Bowl, the trails in

Griffith Park and a track run at Caltech. All levels are welcome and potential members are encouraged to run with the club before joining. Members receive a racing singlet when they sign up, as well as a monthly newsletter. The annual cost is $35; there is an additional $100 fee, which can be paid in two installments, for the Caltech track workouts. For more information, visit www.losfelizflyers.com. Pasadena Pacers The Pasadena Pacers, founded by chiropractor Steve Smith in 1997, offers a 12- week pre-conditioning program for running novices that will ready them for a 5K race. The group also offers half-marathon, marathon and walking-for-fitness training programs, all free of charge. Meet at the picnic tables just south of the Rose Bowl Aquatic Center parking lot, 7 a.m. Saturdays, rain or shine. For more information, call Steve L. Smith, (626) 792-1221, or visit www.pasadenapacers.org. Pasadena Triathlon Club Wanna try a tri? Check out the Pasadena Triathlon Club, which trains together — swimming, biking and running — at various locations in the San Gabriel Valley, including Wednesday night bricks (a bike ride followed by a run) at the Rose Bowl. According to the Pasadena Tri Web site, to club mem-

bers, “fitness isn’t about logging time at the gym: It’s about getting out there and living life to the fullest.” Meet the team in front of the Rose Bowl Aquatic Center on a Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. The fee is $55 to join, $50 to renew. For more information, visit www.pasadenatriclub.com. A Snail’s Pace Running Club Membership to A Snail’s Pace Running Club entitles you to a 10 percent discount at any of its four running-goods stores in Southern California. The club meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the La Cañada High School track every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7 a.m. at the Rose Bowl (meet at the corner of West Washington and Rosemont avenues). Monthly meetings are held on the last Sunday of each month after the run. Individual memberships cost $30 a year; family memberships, $50. For more information, call A Snail’s Pace Running Shop, (626) 568-9886, or visit www.snailspace.org/pasadena/index.html. Team Run With Us Sponsored by Run With Us Running and Apparel on Lake Avenue in Pasadena and by Asics USA, Team Run With Us is a racing team created for post-collegiate, subelite runners. They train together three days a week and compete in various cross-country, road and track races throughout the year. For more information, contact Coach —Continued on page 59 Evae Silva, ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 57


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—continued from page 57 (818) 472-6558, coach@teamrunwithus.com, or visit www.teamrunwithus.com.

RUNNING COURSES If running on your own is more your style, check out these locations the next time you’re looking for a change of pace: The Arroyo Trail Many runners swear by the Arroyo Trail, which begins in the Lower Arroyo, south of the Rose Bowl, and extends to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the north, where trails that lead to the mountains can be found. Start off on Arroyo Boulevard just north of California Avenue where a dirt road leads to a parking lot and the trail. Distance: 6+ miles . Lacy Park San Marino’s beautiful 30-acre park features two loops around its perimeter: a 3/4-miler and a one-miler. Runners appreciate the tranquility of the park, which was originally Wilson Lake before it was filled in 1925. Between Virginia and St. Albans roads, north of Monterey Road, Mon. through Fri., 6:30 a.m. to dusk; Sat. and Sun., 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Rose Bowl 1. Start off from parking lot K and head clockwise around the stadium and golf course. The road has a slight incline, but everything that goes up must come down, as it does on the return trip on the east side of the loop. Other than that, it’s a flat, fast course. Distance: 3.1 miles.

2. About 50 percent of the Rose Bowl’s perimeter can be run on a dirt trail that parallels the road. Mix it up by running the inclines that lead to Arroyo Boulevard on the east and Linda Vista Road on the west. Distance: 2 to 3 miles. Brookside Park, 360 N. Arroyo Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 744-7275.

Pasadena; 8:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.racefortherescues.org. Nov. 10 — San Gabriel Turkey Trot (5K) Vincent Lugo Park, corner of West Wells and South Ramona streets, San Gabriel; 7 a.m. For more information, visit sangabrielcity.com.

The streets of San Marino Elegant and serene, the streets of San Marino are wide, well paved and quiet. For a hilly eight-mile run, start at Orlando Road and San Marino Avenue. Go east on Orlando to Oxford Road, left on Oxford, right on Virginia Avenue, right on Shenandoah Road and right on Oak Grove Avenue. Oak Grove loops around back to Shenandoah. Follow the same route back. Distance: approximately 8 miles.

Nov. 22 — Run for the Hungry (5K, 1-mile kids’ run) Memorial Park, 1201 Foothill Blvd., La Cañada; 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.runforthehungry.com.

RUNNING RACES

Dec. 8 — Rose Bowl Half Marathon Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena; 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.pacificsportsllc.com.

Most runners are motivated to hit the pavement every day by the prospect of a looming race. There’s certainly no lack of races in California — you can find them throughout the state — but you don’t need to leave the San Gabriel Valley to get your fix, as this list of upcoming events attests:

Dec. 1 — 2007 South Pasadena Tiger (5K, 10K) South Pasadena High School, 1401 Diamond Ave, South Pasadena; 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.tiger-run.com.

Dec. 15 — Girls on the Run Pony Tail Run (5K) Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena; 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.gotpasadena.com.

Oct. 21 — Three-Mile Trail Run Challenge Bonelli Park, 120 Via Verde Park Rd., San Dimas; 8 a.m. For more information, visit www.renegateraceseries.com.

Feb. 17, 2008 — Kids on the Run (5K, 10K, kids’ fun run) Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena; 9 a.m. For more information, visit www.kidsontherun.net.

Oct. 28 — 2nd Annual Race for the Rescues (5K, 1-mile fun run) Rose Bowl Stadium, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr.,

March 8, 2008 — Pasadena Triathlon (sprint distance) Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena; 8 a.m. For more information, visit genericevents.com/pasadenatri. AM ARROYO ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ 59


MERRIMENT

Syrah!

Que Syrah,

Singing the praises of…Syrah, of course BY BOB ECKER

I

f you’ve ever traveled to the Northern Rhône in southeastern France, you have likely seen the flinty earth, the virtually barren soil and tiny, hardy vineyards. And you probably consumed Syrah wines almost exclusively. (Southern Rhône wines are primarily blends of Syrah, Mourvèdre, and Grenache.) If you’ve tasted a Hermitage or Côte-Rôtie, you’ve definitely enjoyed the mysterious yet hardy flavors of Syrah. The Syrah grapes are…different. These wines offer spice, a little heat, lots of berry and earth. But based on a number of factors, Syrah wines vary quite a bit in complexity, structure and nose, not to mention, of course, taste. Some Aussie Shirazes will knock you out, while others—from say, the Sonoma’s Russian River or the Northern Rhône—will first ask for a little dance before they seduce you. And before we move further: Shiraz is Syrah, and Syrah is Shiraz. Make no mistake; it is the same grape and the same wine. Possibly named for the Persian (Iranian) city of Shiraz, where legend has it this grape originated, today Shiraz is one of the largest wine exports from Australia, and to a lesser extent, South Africa. Any decent Syrah (or Shiraz) will present white pepper, bold gaminess and typical berry notes like raspberry, boysenberry and black-

60 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

berry. You will also notice the unique earth that birthed the vines. This could mean the Northern Rhone, inland Santa Barbara County, northern Sonoma County or the Barossa Valley in Australia. Then the winemakers take over and truly make these grapes sing. As of late, I’ve been particularly enamored of the warm, bold Syrahs coming out of Washington state. For instance, L‘École No. 41 makes a delightful Seven Hills Vineyard Estate Syrah. Serving this bottle will certainly get you noticed. The wine is marvelously voluptuous, combining superb earthy power and complexity, rich terroir and winemaking excellence. Alexandria Nicole Block 17 Syrah from the Horse Heaven Hills area is a fascinating wine, co-fermented, in true Rhône style, with seven percent Roussanne and four percent Viogner. This Syrah is an olfactory delight and inspirational to the tongue. Californian vintners produce many Syrahs of note, in a number of price ranges. A new wine called PharaohMoans represents a coventure between John Schwartz of Amuse Bouche Winery in Napa and Bryan Ogden, the chef at Bradley Ogden restaurant (the renowned chef Bradley Ogden is Bryan’s father) in Las Vegas. This powerful, heady wine comes from prime vineyards in the Paso

Robles region and will certainly turn some heads. Another fine Paso Syrah is Tobin James Blue Moon Syrah. Winemakers plying their craft in Santa Ynez and the surrounding microclimates of Santa Barbara County are making a number of excellent Syrahs. The Barbieri lends itself more to the Rhône style, with far less fruit than your average Aussie or Cal Syrah, while adding floral, graceful notes. On the other hand, seek out La Sirena Syrah. Famed Napa winemaker Heidi Barrett produces this bold yet elegant wine. A few other Santa Barbara region Syrahs of note include: Qupe’s Bien Nacido Hillside Estate, Red Car's Trolley Series Syrahs, and Piedrasassi’s ’04 Syrah. As for Shiraz, well, ever since Yellow Tail hit the market nothing has been the same. Many of the cheap Shirazes are pretty decent, but they tend to obscure the truly great Aussie products. However, look for a great Torbreck Run Rig, Two Hands Angel’s Share and the big fat, juicy Barossa Valley Estate "E&E Black Pepper." These big Australian wines can be amazing, despite their obvious power. Syrahs are decidedly different and worth considering any time, any place. With food or without, you will find yourself pleasantly surprised. AM


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{

TA S T E T E S T

A Pioneering Palate Marty’s brings Kobe burgers and valets to a humble stretch of York BY IRENE LACHER

R

UDY MARTINEZ, PROPRIETOR of the new upscale restaurant/bar Marty’s, is a friendly guy, so friendly that he and his staff have named one of their signature drinks after a neighbor down the block. The Vintage Tattoo, aka three shots of Corzo Silver Premium Tequila, is named for, well, the Vintage Tattoo. “A guy came by the bar, and he wanted a tattoo so bad, but he was afraid to go in,” Martinez says. “He had three shots of tequila, and he came back and showed us the tattoo. That’s why we named it that.” The story says a lot about Marty’s, one of the happier footprints left behind by the real estate bubble in Highland Park. Since late spring, this rough-edged stretch of York Boulevard has become home to a crop of new bars and eateries: In addition to Marty’s, there’s the pub-style York on the site of the Wild Hare and the new incarnation of Johnny’s Bar, which shows films like “Godfather III” on the wall above the pool table. Perhaps the sleekest is Marty’s, named after Martinez’ 7-year-old son, whose tastebuds you can thank for the Kobe burger on the menu. The place comes a year and a half after the opening of Mia Sushi in Eagle Rock, named for Martinez’ yellowtailloving 4-year-old. “Marty had so much crap from his sister having a restaurant with her name on Eagle Rock Boulevard that I had to do something for him,”

62 ~ OCTOBER 2007 ~ ARROYO

says Martinez, a former partner in Cha Cha Cha and the erstwhile Cava in Los Angeles. Fortunately, Mia was generous with her interior designer, Mary O’Grady, who helped realize Martinez’ vision of a modern, masculine lounge with burnished copper walls; tobacco-colored leather banquettes; dim, recessed lighting; and Asian accents that include a Buddha carving and wood-framed mirrors from Indonesia. Interestingly, there’s no conventional dining-room seating despite a full menu that could be described, perhaps oxymoronically, as high-end bar food. Instead, there are two tall, long group tables with leather-topped barstools, designed to promote friendliness among customers. Behind the restaurant is a modern-looking concrete patio with striped walls formed by redwood planks. Marty’s offers valet parking, but York Boulevard isn’t exactly Colorado just yet, so my companion and I were easily able to park across the street. We settled into a banquette and started with a Highland Breeze, a fresh and zingy purée of watermelon, lime juice and Stoli. The second order of business was to sample the specialité de maison created by Chef Robert Zaldana, a veteran of the Getty Center’s kitchen–Marty’s Kobe burger, a thick patty topped with melted jack cheese and a powerful smear of garlic aioli. The burger nicely met expectations, but the broiled chicken sandwich surpassed them, served with a surprising kick from

chunky apple butter and pesto aioli that was sweet but not cloying. Also not to be missed is Zaldana’s version of that ubiquitous menu item, macaroni and cheese— actually cheeses, five to be exact, including fresh goat cheese. There’s a hint of nutmeg that recalls wintry nights and makes this dish an über-entry into the annals of comfort food. Since you’ll be at the gym at dawn the next day anyway, you might as well round

Marty’s 5137 York Blvd. Highland Park 323-256-2400 Mon.-Sat. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. Closed Sun. out the meal with a hit of shoestring fries doused with herbs and my favorite food group–garlic–or the sweet potato version. They may not be for die-hard aficionados of crispiness, but they’re a nicely seasoned variation on a bar-food staple. And for the insatiable among us, there’s the ginormous, 14ounce T-bone steak, a tender hunk of aged beef that comes simply prepared with a smudge of fresh garlic, a Roma tomato and a hearty peppercorn sauce. That should give anyone the strength to go for that tattoo down the street. AM


ARROYO ~ FEBRUARY 2007 ~ 63


Arroyo Monthly October 2007  

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