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I N E LINI V I NSAN G GABRIEL I N T HVALLEY E G R E A T E R FINEF LIVING THE

P A S A D E N A

A R E A

APRIL 2009

Design Pasadena 2009

MEDITERRANEAN STYLE

PAUL WILLIAMS

in Arroyo-land

Shopping for the

SHOWCASE HOUSE THOM MAYNE’S STAR

Rises at Caltech


ARROYO VOLUME 5 ~ NUMBER 4

M O N T H LY

19 DESIGN PASADENA 2009 10 WHERE WILLIAMS WALKED Pasadena architect James V. Coane leaves an invisible footprint on his renovation of a 1928 estate designed by the architect behind the Beverly Hills Hotel. –By Katie Klapper

14 PAUL REVERE WILLIAMS: DESIGNER TO THE STARS — AND EVERYMAN The prominent architect surmounted racism to leave his eclectic stamp on La Cañada Flintridge and its environs between the World Wars. –By Michael Cervin

19 A MEDITERRANEAN MANSE GETS AN UPDATE Designer Jeff Valenson brings a 1931 Robert Ainsworth villa in San Marino into the 21st century. –By B.J. Lorenzo

46 ON THE BLOCK Pasadena’s homegrown auction house, John Moran Auctioneers, competes with behemoths in New York and London by offering a personal touch. –By Jana Monji

DEPARTMENTS 9 FESTIVITIES The Heritage Square Museum, Hillsides and Kidspace Children’s Museum

48 OBJECTS OF DESIRE 2009 Pasadena Showcase House participants reveal where they shopped for their top designs.

53 THE LIST The Society of Architectural Historians’ conference on Pasadena, Jean Anouilh at A Noise Within, a country fair in La Crescenta and more

55 THE ART OF SCIENCE Thom Mayne’s blueprint for Caltech’s Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics evokes the dynamism of the expanding universe.

58 KITCHEN CONFESSIONS Spice up your dinner table with Jamaican jerk cuisine, savored by some of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base’s finest. ABOUT THE COVER: Photo of renovated Paul Williams estate cabana by Irmina Kobylko

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 5


BECOME YOUR BEST!

EDITOR’S NOTE

In this country, only Alaska and Hawaii are farther away from the Mediterranean Sea than Southern California is, yet the balmy region’s architectural influence is so strong here that it still defines the local landscape. Pasadena’s origin as a resort town for wealthy Easterners pointed architects toward the area’s European counterparts, leading to such Mediterranean Revival jewels as Pasadena City Hall and Glendale’s former Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, both built in the 1920s. Of course, the Spanish Colonial influence was particularly marked in that country’s former colony as well, and it still mesmerizes some dedicated aficionados of Southern California style. One of the last century’s prime proponents of both architectural styles was Paul Revere Williams, the renowned African-American architect behind the Beverly Hills Hotel. As Michael Cervin reports in his moving profile of the late Los Angeles icon, Williams designed more than 25 homes between the World Wars in the La Cañada

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Flintridge area alone, thanks to an odd quirk of fate. Katie Klapper takes us on a tour of a 1928 Spanish Colonial estate designed by Williams and recently renovated by Pasadena architect James V. Coane with minute attention to his predecessor’s silhouette. And B.J. Lorenzo opens the doors to a Mediterranean Revival home in San Marino by Robert Ainsworth that has received a glam new interior from designer Jeff Valenson. Thinking of freshening the look of your own home with timeless style? Check out an upcoming sale by Altadena’s own boutique auction house, John Moran Antique &

THERMAGE…

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ARROYO MONTHLY EDITOR IN CHIEF Irene Lacher PRODUCTION MANAGER Yvonne Guerrero ART DIRECTOR Joel Vendette • JUNIOR DESIGNER Evelyn Duenas WEB DESIGNER Carla Marroquin COPY EDITOR John Seeley STAFF WRITER Carl Kozlowski CONTRIBUTORS Karen Apostolina, Jenine Baines, Leslie Bilderback, Michael Burr, Michael Cervin, André Coleman, Caroline Cushing, Mandalit del Barco, Patt Diroll, Gary Dretzka, Lynne Heffley, Katie Klapper, Bettijane Levine, Jana Monji, Arlene Schindler, Ilsa Setziol, Kirk Silsbee, John Sollenberger PHOTOGRAPHERS Johnny Buzzerio, C.M. Hardt, Melissa Valladares ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Dina Stegon ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Fred Bankston, Dana Bonner, Elizabeth Guzman, Leslie Lamm, Rochelle Reiff, Alison Standish ADVERTISING DESIGNER Carla Marroquin VP OF FINANCE Michael Nagami • HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Andrea Baker BUSINESS MANAGER Angela Wang ACCOUNTING Alysia Chavez, Archie Iskaq OFFICE ASSISTANT Emma Rodriguez Luna PUBLISHER Jon Guynn

CONTACT US ADVERTISING dinas@pasadenaweekly.com • EDITORIAL editor@arroyomonthly.com PHONE (626) 584-1500 • FAX (626) 795-0149 MAILING ADDRESS 50 S. De Lacey Ave., Ste. 200, Pasadena, CA 91105 www.ArroyoMonthly.com ©2009 Southland Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.

6 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO


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FESTIVITIES

1. (From left) Sierra Madre residents Hank and Ana Maarse with Clara and Jacob Maarse 2. Pasadena residents Michael and Ellen Hatch 3. Board members Mary Dee Hacker and Steve Nishibayashi of Glendale 4. Dee Fisher and Mark Martinez of La Cañada Flintridge (At left) Fritz Coleman, Liz Arizmendi, Ellen Hatch and Dr. Drew Pinsky

Quashing concerns about the grim economy’s impact on its annual gala dinner, Pasadena’s foster-care charity, Hillsides, raised $380,000 at “Tangerine Dreams: A Jazzy Affair” on Feb. 28 at a private club in downtown Los Angeles. Emcee and KNBC Channel 4 weathercaster Fritz Coleman echoed organizers’ relief and gratitude when he addressed the crowd: “We are so honored you have gone against what we expected — a softening of attendance because of what is happening in the world today. You are our economic stimulus package.”

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The event, chaired by Ellen Hatch, was inspired by Dave Brubeck’s iconic piece, “Tangerine,” which she called her “introduction to jazz music.” Jacob Maarse Florists adorned the setting with arrangements of tangerine and orange roses, as well as kumquat trees dressed in twinkling lights and silver fabric. Jacob Maarse was among the live auction winners, leaving with Holland America cruise tickets and a Barbara Poer Designs necklace. Guests dined on avocado and mandarin orange salad, herb-crusted filet mignon and a trio of tangerine and lemon sorbet and pistachio ice cream in a tulipe cookie shell, while Mark LeVang and his band entertained the revelers.

Kidspace Children’s Museum’s own constituents gathered at the Nordstrom Santa Anita store on March 7 to raise funds for the popular Pasadena venue at a tile-painting event and sale. More than 500 children and their families came to paint ceramic floor tiles under the direction of

PHOTOS: Heritage Square Museum by Franklin Cariffe

Seattle artist Charlie Bigger. About 200 of the colorful tiles were sold at $45 each. The bugthemed event also offered insect-inspired snacks as well as a balloon artist and face painter.

History enthusiasts in period dress joined supporters of the Heritage Square Museum to celebrate the Los Angeles venue’s 40th anniversary on March 7. Noted Southern California architectural historian Robert Winter addressed the crowd from the recently reconstructed Longfellow-Hastings Octagon Veranda surrounding a house originally constructed in Pasadena in 1893 and moved to its current location in 1986. ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 9


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Where Williams Walked PASADENA ARCHITECT JAMES V. COANE LEAVES AN INVISIBLE FOOTPRINT ON HIS RENOVATION OF A 1928 SPANISH COLONIAL ESTATE DESIGNED BY LOS ANGELES’ RENOWNED ARCHITECT TO THE STARS. BY KATIE KLAPPER PHOTOS BY BROOKE ABERCROMBIE AND IRMINA KOBYLKO

Motorcourt and entry

MUCH TO HIS WIFE’S CHAGRIN, ARCHITECT JAMES V. COANE BASKS IN SATISFACTION WHEN SOMEONE SEES HIS WORK AND ASKS, “BUT WHAT DID YOU DO HERE?” The question arises frequently, as much of the Pasadena-based architect’s practice consists of renovations and additions to residences by “golden age” architectural masters, including Wallace Neff, Sylvanus Marston and Paul Williams. A visit to a Williams Spanish Colonial estate nestled in the oakladen Pasadena foothills inspires the query once again. Located all around the four-acre property — which includes a 7,500-square-foot main house, numerous outbuildings, gardens, water features and recreational areas — Coane’s additions are virtually indistinguishable from the 1928 original designed by Los Angeles’ famed architect to the stars. Coane (jvca.com) didn’t set out to be a specialist in historic renovation and, indeed, he continues to work in all styles, including cutting-edge contemporary. But the arc of his practice — built exclusively on relationships — has led him deep into Pasadena’s traditional neighborhoods, where some 70 percent of his work has been concentrated since he established his own office in 1994. His path was set during his student days at Cal Poly Pomona, when he rented a Tudor apartment in a Pasadena courtyard complex. Coane loved exploring nearby neighborhoods with all their stylistic variety and the history classes that helped him put them in perspective. He still relishes the research phase of each project, happily delving into libraries, bookstores and old photographs for inspiration. But Coane is no doctrinaire reconstructionist. As he notes, “These places don’t have to be museums.” He recognizes what attracts his clients to Paul Williams — his mastery of siting, gracious spatial rhythms, a variety of intimate spaces and inventive, tasteful details. “People don’t change,” he says. “The desirable things remain the same. Everyone wants easy access to the outdoors, a place to sit in the shade, to watch their kids swim and play, maybe have a cocktail nearby.” At this property, Coane has accommodated not one, but two different clients. For the previous owner, he renovated the master suite, updated a few baths and added a naturalistic stream to the grounds. The current renovation, begun in 2004, has been more extensive, including interior design for the entire house, more work on the master suite and upstairs library, a complete reworking of the guest house and adjacent grounds and the addition of numerous recreational facilities, including a wine cave and outdoor living room. Throughout, Paul Williams’ original design provided the template for additions and updates. Referencing Williams’ precedents, Coane evokes an earlier era through the liberal use of beamed ceilings, groin vaults, arcades, Italian tile and walnut paneling. Taking his cue from the owner’s direction that the renovation be “not noticeable,” Coane nevertheless has added all the comforts a contemporary family would want. Hidden in the coffered ceilings of the living room are stereo speakers, and wide-screen televisions are deftly disguised within “medieval” chests made to the architect’s specifications. Always referring to the main residence, Coane has replicated many of its features around the property, tracing the shape of a corbel here and duplicating a chimney there or a three-panel, embossed wood door. Floral detailing in Williams’ cast-iron stairwell inspired “historic” light fixtures and lanterns —CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

10 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 11


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Where Williams Walked PASADENA ARCHITECT JAMES V. COANE LEAVES AN INVISIBLE FOOTPRINT ON HIS RENOVATION OF A 1928 SPANISH COLONIAL ESTATE DESIGNED BY LOS ANGELES’ RENOWNED ARCHITECT TO THE STARS. BY KATIE KLAPPER PHOTOS BY BROOKE ABERCROMBIE AND IRMINA KOBYLKO

Motorcourt and entry

MUCH TO HIS WIFE’S CHAGRIN, ARCHITECT JAMES V. COANE BASKS IN SATISFACTION WHEN SOMEONE SEES HIS WORK AND ASKS, “BUT WHAT DID YOU DO HERE?” The question arises frequently, as much of the Pasadena-based architect’s practice consists of renovations and additions to residences by “golden age” architectural masters, including Wallace Neff, Sylvanus Marston and Paul Williams. A visit to a Williams Spanish Colonial estate nestled in the oakladen Pasadena foothills inspires the query once again. Located all around the four-acre property — which includes a 7,500-square-foot main house, numerous outbuildings, gardens, water features and recreational areas — Coane’s additions are virtually indistinguishable from the 1928 original designed by Los Angeles’ famed architect to the stars. Coane (jvca.com) didn’t set out to be a specialist in historic renovation and, indeed, he continues to work in all styles, including cutting-edge contemporary. But the arc of his practice — built exclusively on relationships — has led him deep into Pasadena’s traditional neighborhoods, where some 70 percent of his work has been concentrated since he established his own office in 1994. His path was set during his student days at Cal Poly Pomona, when he rented a Tudor apartment in a Pasadena courtyard complex. Coane loved exploring nearby neighborhoods with all their stylistic variety and the history classes that helped him put them in perspective. He still relishes the research phase of each project, happily delving into libraries, bookstores and old photographs for inspiration. But Coane is no doctrinaire reconstructionist. As he notes, “These places don’t have to be museums.” He recognizes what attracts his clients to Paul Williams — his mastery of siting, gracious spatial rhythms, a variety of intimate spaces and inventive, tasteful details. “People don’t change,” he says. “The desirable things remain the same. Everyone wants easy access to the outdoors, a place to sit in the shade, to watch their kids swim and play, maybe have a cocktail nearby.” At this property, Coane has accommodated not one, but two different clients. For the previous owner, he renovated the master suite, updated a few baths and added a naturalistic stream to the grounds. The current renovation, begun in 2004, has been more extensive, including interior design for the entire house, more work on the master suite and upstairs library, a complete reworking of the guest house and adjacent grounds and the addition of numerous recreational facilities, including a wine cave and outdoor living room. Throughout, Paul Williams’ original design provided the template for additions and updates. Referencing Williams’ precedents, Coane evokes an earlier era through the liberal use of beamed ceilings, groin vaults, arcades, Italian tile and walnut paneling. Taking his cue from the owner’s direction that the renovation be “not noticeable,” Coane nevertheless has added all the comforts a contemporary family would want. Hidden in the coffered ceilings of the living room are stereo speakers, and wide-screen televisions are deftly disguised within “medieval” chests made to the architect’s specifications. Always referring to the main residence, Coane has replicated many of its features around the property, tracing the shape of a corbel here and duplicating a chimney there or a three-panel, embossed wood door. Floral detailing in Williams’ cast-iron stairwell inspired “historic” light fixtures and lanterns —CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

10 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 11


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

This page: Stair hall (Opposite, clockwise from left) Wine-tasting room juxtaposes tile and rock for textural contrast; 35-foot groin-vaulted hall overlooks courtyard through arched doors; Period preserved in living room, though today’s speakers hide in coffered ceiling; Tomorrow’s plumbing coexists with ’20s lighting, carved sink in master bath.

12 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO


—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

throughout, a collaboration between Coane and a local metalsmith. Coane is especially proud of the elaborate ornamental cast-iron fire screens he modeled after Williams’ style and the cast concrete mantlepieces that crown several new fireplaces. Upstairs, Coane provides for modern-day needs with traditional-looking fixtures. New library paneling mimics coffered ceilings and dining room panels installed by Williams. A new walk-in closet conceals hanging storage behind cabinet-style doors, with drawers built into a peninsula that resembles the freestanding furniture of decades past. Coane restored a 1920s aura to bathrooms that had been modernized in the 1950s, using custom Gothic medicine chests, sink cabinets that recall baptismal fonts and a Deco palette for tilework and flooring. Retaining proportions appropriate to an earlier era, Coane has provided the most desirable, up-to-the-minute bath features, including double showers, bidet and fireplace. Perhaps the greatest challenge in the main residence was the owner’s request that Coane furnish the entire house in a month’s time. With the goal of creating soothing interiors that integrated the homeowner’s limited furnishings and art with Williams’ grand spaces, Coane’s firm moved at a furious pace to acquire turned-wood antiques, Old Master–style paintings and tapestries, decorative objects, rugs and even a Louis XVth–style grand piano.

Yet the home exudes a sense of refirement that suggests the décor came together gradually over many years. One of Coane’s most striking additions to the property is his transformation of the 4,500-square-foot garage and guest quarters into a stunning “little brother” to the main house. Outfitted with seven bedrooms, a downstairs sitting room and vaulted upstairs living room, this structure derives its key design elements from the main residence. Continuing Williams’ liberal use of water features, a breathtaking, tumbled-stone terraced fountain falls away from the motor court, connecting this side building with the original landscape and terraced lawns beyond. Williams’ aesthetic also informs outdoor spaces designed to accommodate a contemporary lifestyle. Using rocks found on the property, an outdoor fireplace was expanded into a built-in barbecue and party area. The existing pool and tennis court are connected with tile-roofed cabañas, supported by Doric columns derived from arcades and a pergola elsewhere on the property. Below this serene outdoor living room, Coane located subterranean changing rooms, a sitting area and a wine cave with fountain, retaining a rustic stone wall and incorporating graceful iron grillwork in Williams’ style. Some architects might find it daunting to rework the achievements of so prominent a master as Paul Williams, but Coane is surprisingly relaxed about it. “Having done so many of these homes,” he says, “by now I feel like I’m collaborating with an old friend.” AM ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 13


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Elaborate ornamental ironwork — as in the floral grille on a terrace window (top), and on a lower entryway (bottom) — was a key accent in Williams’ 1928 design of the Pierce residence in West Pasadena’s San Rafael area.

HOLLYWOOD’S STAR-MAKING FACTORY MADE CELEBRITIES NOT ONLY OF MERE MORTALS, BUT ALSO

Paul Revere Williams:

SOME OF THE FABULOUS HOMES WHERE MOVIES WERE MADE. LIKE PASADENA’S STUNNING 1929

DESIGNER TO THE STARS — AND EVERYMAN

ATKINS HOUSE ON THE BANKS OF THE ARROYO SECO, WHICH WAS FEATURED IN THE 1937 HIT COMEDY

(Clockwise from top left) The octagonal breakfast room, with Moorish-style ceiling and lantern, offers a tree-top view; French doors opening onto the patio help illuminate the coffered-ceilinged living room; lush greenery softens the clean dramatic lines of the lap pool.

“TOPPER,” STARRING CARY GRANT. YEARS LATER, NEWS MEDIA SPECULATED THAT THE TUDOR REVIVAL MANSE HAD FALLEN UNDER THE SWAY OF “BATMAN” FILMS AND PAUL MCCARTNEY BEFORE IT BURNED DOWN IN 2005. WHAT’S CERTAIN IS IT DID ATTRACT HIGH-POWERED PROPRIETORS AND ATTENTION, WHICH SHOULDN’T COME AS A SURPRISE WHEN YOU CONSIDER THAT IT WAS DESIGNED BY PAUL REVERE WILLIAMS, ONE OF LOS ANGELES’ MOST PROMINENT ARCHITECTS. WILLIAMS’ CAREER SPANNED 50 YEARS AND 3,000 BUILDINGS, INCLUDING SUCH ICONIC STRUCTURES AS THE BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL, THE FUTURISTIC RESTAURANT AT LAX AND SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ON WILSHIRE BOULEVARD.

THE PROMINENT L.A. ARCHITECT SURMOUNTED RACISM TO LEAVE HIS ECLECTIC STAMP ON LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE AND ITS ENVIRONS BETWEEN THE WORLD WARS.

House photos by Ron Stinnett

BY MICHAEL CERVIN

The same year “Topper” beamed images of the Atkins House around the country, the African-American architect wrote in American Magazine that many prospective clients refused to hire him after meeting him in person. “In the moment they met me and discovered they were dealing with a Negro, I could see them ‘freeze,’” he wrote. “Their interest in discussing plans waned instantly and their one remaining concern was to discover a convenient exit without hurting my feelings.” If Williams harbored any anger, he never showed it in public. But he wrote of “successive stages of bewilderment” over the way he was treated and how he wrestled with “inarticulate protest, resentment and, finally, reconciliation to the status of my race.” In her book, “Paul R. Williams, Architect: A Legacy of Style” (Rizzoli; 1993), Williams’ granddaughter Karen Hudson wrote, “My grandfather certainly had to deal with the color issue, because back then, you couldn’t lean over a white woman if you were a black man.” That didn’t stop the talented designer from impressing some of the most prominent clients of the day. “White Americans, in spite of every prejudice, are essentially fair-minded people who cannot refuse to respect —CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

14 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 15


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Elaborate ornamental ironwork — as in the floral grille on a terrace window (top), and on a lower entryway (bottom) — was a key accent in Williams’ 1928 design of the Pierce residence in West Pasadena’s San Rafael area.

HOLLYWOOD’S STAR-MAKING FACTORY MADE CELEBRITIES NOT ONLY OF MERE MORTALS, BUT ALSO

Paul Revere Williams:

SOME OF THE FABULOUS HOMES WHERE MOVIES WERE MADE. LIKE PASADENA’S STUNNING 1929

DESIGNER TO THE STARS — AND EVERYMAN

ATKINS HOUSE ON THE BANKS OF THE ARROYO SECO, WHICH WAS FEATURED IN THE 1937 HIT COMEDY

(Clockwise from top left) The octagonal breakfast room, with Moorish-style ceiling and lantern, offers a tree-top view; French doors opening onto the patio help illuminate the coffered-ceilinged living room; lush greenery softens the clean dramatic lines of the lap pool.

“TOPPER,” STARRING CARY GRANT. YEARS LATER, NEWS MEDIA SPECULATED THAT THE TUDOR REVIVAL MANSE HAD FALLEN UNDER THE SWAY OF “BATMAN” FILMS AND PAUL MCCARTNEY BEFORE IT BURNED DOWN IN 2005. WHAT’S CERTAIN IS IT DID ATTRACT HIGH-POWERED PROPRIETORS AND ATTENTION, WHICH SHOULDN’T COME AS A SURPRISE WHEN YOU CONSIDER THAT IT WAS DESIGNED BY PAUL REVERE WILLIAMS, ONE OF LOS ANGELES’ MOST PROMINENT ARCHITECTS. WILLIAMS’ CAREER SPANNED 50 YEARS AND 3,000 BUILDINGS, INCLUDING SUCH ICONIC STRUCTURES AS THE BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL, THE FUTURISTIC RESTAURANT AT LAX AND SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ON WILSHIRE BOULEVARD.

THE PROMINENT L.A. ARCHITECT SURMOUNTED RACISM TO LEAVE HIS ECLECTIC STAMP ON LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE AND ITS ENVIRONS BETWEEN THE WORLD WARS.

House photos by Ron Stinnett

BY MICHAEL CERVIN

The same year “Topper” beamed images of the Atkins House around the country, the African-American architect wrote in American Magazine that many prospective clients refused to hire him after meeting him in person. “In the moment they met me and discovered they were dealing with a Negro, I could see them ‘freeze,’” he wrote. “Their interest in discussing plans waned instantly and their one remaining concern was to discover a convenient exit without hurting my feelings.” If Williams harbored any anger, he never showed it in public. But he wrote of “successive stages of bewilderment” over the way he was treated and how he wrestled with “inarticulate protest, resentment and, finally, reconciliation to the status of my race.” In her book, “Paul R. Williams, Architect: A Legacy of Style” (Rizzoli; 1993), Williams’ granddaughter Karen Hudson wrote, “My grandfather certainly had to deal with the color issue, because back then, you couldn’t lean over a white woman if you were a black man.” That didn’t stop the talented designer from impressing some of the most prominent clients of the day. “White Americans, in spite of every prejudice, are essentially fair-minded people who cannot refuse to respect —CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

14 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 15


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Celebrating 6 years

&

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

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courage and honest effort,” he wrote in his diary. “They will, therefore, give me an opportunity to prove my worth.” For five decades, Williams designed with consistency and confidence, both for the elite and everyman. He was a favorite of wealthy businessmen, corporations and celebrities whose names could have easily filled out an awards ceremony program — Grant, Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Danny Thomas and Barbara Stanwyck, among them. His portfolio also included public housing projects, hospitals, banks, car dealerships and schools. Orphaned at age four, Williams sold newspapers as a youngster outside a downtown Los Angeles bank where his stepfather worked as a janitor. One of the bank’s customers was state Sen. Frank Flint. Years later, Flint hired Williams to design several homes for his new subdivision, Flintridge, which consisted of 1,700 acres bordering La Cañada. The San Gabriel Valley became one of Williams’ most profitable regions; he designed more than 25 homes in Flintridge alone, as well as residences in Glendale, Sierra Madre, Pasadena and Tujunga. Observed Richard Phillips, a former La Cañada Flintridge resident who has both lived and worked in buildings designed by Williams, “You go from one room to another and it’s so natural. You feel he suited it for the human condition. There’s nothing intimidating; there’s no unnecessary ornamentation.” Though many of Williams’ designs, such as the 32,000-square-foot Cord Residence in Beverly Hills, were conceived on a grand scale, Williams was restrained in his use of ornamentation so that each building felt modest and unpretentious. “The majority of his designs were not particularly innovative or trend-setting; they were appealing and solidly grounded in established architectural principles,” said Mella Rothwell Harmon, the Nevada Historical Society curator who researched his work for National Register of Historic Places nominations. “His designs reflected imagination and an understanding of the ways in which people relate to buildings.” Williams built a 1928 Missionstyle residence in Glendale the same year he designed an 8,000-square-foot Mediterranean residence showcase for the wealthy Dr. V. Mott Pierce in the San Rafael area of Pasadena. Currently on the market for $3.8 million, it is the most expensive Williams property in the San Gabriel Valley, according to Realtor Tink Cheney of Coldwell Banker. Less than two miles down the road but a world away, a 1926 Tudor Revival sits modestly among Craftsman and Spanish Revival homes on La Loma Road. The price tag: $2.1 million. As these homes demonstrate, Williams was able to move among The home’s modest street-level public face radically different design forms with(top) belies the luxe intimacy within, as in this lower-level courtyard. out a stumble. A Williams home can’t

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be identified by architectural style alone. This doesn’t imply a lack of creativity, but rather a deep mastery of various styles and an ease in implementing them. Even with its vast scale and expansive rooms, the Pierce Residence feels subdued and intimate. Crown molding with diamond-pattern detailing and carved fireplaces are visible throughout the house, and the living room has a beautiful coffered wood ceiling. Built into a hillside and surrounded by foliage, the La Loma property was a modest 2,600 square feet when it was completed in 1926 and has since undergone interior renovations. There is purpose and flow to the main entrance, from which a gently curving staircase offers access to the upstairs bedrooms. In 2006, a prominent Pasadena couple moved a 1936 Holmby Hills home once owned by Revlon mogul Ron Perelman 20 miles east to a site near the Colorado Street Bridge. The $2 million move was spearheaded by Ann-Marie Villicana, a Realtor, lawyer and former member of the Pasadena City Council, and her husband, Robin Salzer, owner of Robin’s Wood Fire BBQ & Grill. The $2 million project involved dividing the 10,000-square-foot home into 26 sections and trucking three pieces a night after midnight.”We’ll have a chance to do something good for Pasadena and it’ll be in a prime spot where people can see it,” Salzer told the Pasadena Weekly at the time. “People are thankful that another house of Williams’ will be saved.” At the height of his career, Williams had satellite offices in Bogotá, Colombia, and Washington, D.C. In 1923, he became the first African-American to join the American Institute of Architects Southern California Chapter; in 1957, he was the first African-American elected to the AIA College of Fellows. Williams served on the Los Angeles Planning Commission, on the Big Brothers of Greater Los Angeles board of directors and as a life member of the NAACP, among other leadership roles. “It’s difficult to separate his professional accomplishments as an architect from his personal achievements as a black man in a white profession,” Harmon says. “The importance of his commissions is wrapped up in the story of his perseverance in pursuit of a career that would have otherwise not been open to him. The romantic air of his designs was achieved not only through the manipulation of design elements, but they came from his soul and life experience.” Williams was showered with recognition from all sides when he retired in 1973. When he died seven years later, there were no financial scandals or allegations of sexual misconduct — which plagued the memory of many of his prominent peers — to taint his legacy. Williams had always valued purpose and responsibility. Says Harmon: “I think Paul Williams’ remarkable and valuable contribution was embodying the importance of architecture in the lives of common people.” AM

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DESIGN PASADENA 2009

Celebrating 6 years

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

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courage and honest effort,” he wrote in his diary. “They will, therefore, give me an opportunity to prove my worth.” For five decades, Williams designed with consistency and confidence, both for the elite and everyman. He was a favorite of wealthy businessmen, corporations and celebrities whose names could have easily filled out an awards ceremony program — Grant, Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Danny Thomas and Barbara Stanwyck, among them. His portfolio also included public housing projects, hospitals, banks, car dealerships and schools. Orphaned at age four, Williams sold newspapers as a youngster outside a downtown Los Angeles bank where his stepfather worked as a janitor. One of the bank’s customers was state Sen. Frank Flint. Years later, Flint hired Williams to design several homes for his new subdivision, Flintridge, which consisted of 1,700 acres bordering La Cañada. The San Gabriel Valley became one of Williams’ most profitable regions; he designed more than 25 homes in Flintridge alone, as well as residences in Glendale, Sierra Madre, Pasadena and Tujunga. Observed Richard Phillips, a former La Cañada Flintridge resident who has both lived and worked in buildings designed by Williams, “You go from one room to another and it’s so natural. You feel he suited it for the human condition. There’s nothing intimidating; there’s no unnecessary ornamentation.” Though many of Williams’ designs, such as the 32,000-square-foot Cord Residence in Beverly Hills, were conceived on a grand scale, Williams was restrained in his use of ornamentation so that each building felt modest and unpretentious. “The majority of his designs were not particularly innovative or trend-setting; they were appealing and solidly grounded in established architectural principles,” said Mella Rothwell Harmon, the Nevada Historical Society curator who researched his work for National Register of Historic Places nominations. “His designs reflected imagination and an understanding of the ways in which people relate to buildings.” Williams built a 1928 Missionstyle residence in Glendale the same year he designed an 8,000-square-foot Mediterranean residence showcase for the wealthy Dr. V. Mott Pierce in the San Rafael area of Pasadena. Currently on the market for $3.8 million, it is the most expensive Williams property in the San Gabriel Valley, according to Realtor Tink Cheney of Coldwell Banker. Less than two miles down the road but a world away, a 1926 Tudor Revival sits modestly among Craftsman and Spanish Revival homes on La Loma Road. The price tag: $2.1 million. As these homes demonstrate, Williams was able to move among The home’s modest street-level public face radically different design forms with(top) belies the luxe intimacy within, as in this lower-level courtyard. out a stumble. A Williams home can’t

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be identified by architectural style alone. This doesn’t imply a lack of creativity, but rather a deep mastery of various styles and an ease in implementing them. Even with its vast scale and expansive rooms, the Pierce Residence feels subdued and intimate. Crown molding with diamond-pattern detailing and carved fireplaces are visible throughout the house, and the living room has a beautiful coffered wood ceiling. Built into a hillside and surrounded by foliage, the La Loma property was a modest 2,600 square feet when it was completed in 1926 and has since undergone interior renovations. There is purpose and flow to the main entrance, from which a gently curving staircase offers access to the upstairs bedrooms. In 2006, a prominent Pasadena couple moved a 1936 Holmby Hills home once owned by Revlon mogul Ron Perelman 20 miles east to a site near the Colorado Street Bridge. The $2 million move was spearheaded by Ann-Marie Villicana, a Realtor, lawyer and former member of the Pasadena City Council, and her husband, Robin Salzer, owner of Robin’s Wood Fire BBQ & Grill. The $2 million project involved dividing the 10,000-square-foot home into 26 sections and trucking three pieces a night after midnight.”We’ll have a chance to do something good for Pasadena and it’ll be in a prime spot where people can see it,” Salzer told the Pasadena Weekly at the time. “People are thankful that another house of Williams’ will be saved.” At the height of his career, Williams had satellite offices in Bogotá, Colombia, and Washington, D.C. In 1923, he became the first African-American to join the American Institute of Architects Southern California Chapter; in 1957, he was the first African-American elected to the AIA College of Fellows. Williams served on the Los Angeles Planning Commission, on the Big Brothers of Greater Los Angeles board of directors and as a life member of the NAACP, among other leadership roles. “It’s difficult to separate his professional accomplishments as an architect from his personal achievements as a black man in a white profession,” Harmon says. “The importance of his commissions is wrapped up in the story of his perseverance in pursuit of a career that would have otherwise not been open to him. The romantic air of his designs was achieved not only through the manipulation of design elements, but they came from his soul and life experience.” Williams was showered with recognition from all sides when he retired in 1973. When he died seven years later, there were no financial scandals or allegations of sexual misconduct — which plagued the memory of many of his prominent peers — to taint his legacy. Williams had always valued purpose and responsibility. Says Harmon: “I think Paul Williams’ remarkable and valuable contribution was embodying the importance of architecture in the lives of common people.” AM

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ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 17


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DESIGN PASADENA 2009

A MEDITERRANEAN MANSE GETS AN UPDATE DESIGNER JEFF VALENSON BRINGS A 1931 ROBERT AINSWORTH VILLA IN SAN MARINO INTO THE 21ST CENTURY WITH CONTEMPORARY TOUCHES THAT PRESERVE THE HOME’S ELEGANT LEGACY. BY B.J. LORENZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES BUTCHART

WHEN DESIGNER JEFF VALENSON GOT THE CALL TO CONTEMPORIZE AN 80-YEAR-OLD HOUSE IN SAN MARINO FOR A FAMILY WITH FOUR CHILDREN, HE KNEW HE’D WANT TO PRESERVE AS MUCH AS RENEW. “THE PLACE IS SO SOLID AND HAS SUCH GREAT BONES,” HE SAYS, THAT IT NEEDED ONLY AN UPDATE — THE EQUIVALENT OF A NEW WARDROBE Contemporary kitchen with cutting-edge appliances is the exception in a preservation-minded update.

RATHER THAN A COMPLETE OVERHAUL. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 21 ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 19


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DESIGN PASADENA 2009

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

Architect Robert Ainsworth designed the rambling Mediterranean Revival home in 1931, decades after the Greene brothers and others had already left their mark on the area, designing massive abodes on multi-acre estates. The neighborhood was lush with the rolling hills and majestic oaks that inspired its name, Oak Knoll. Henry Huntington’s lavish luxury hotel (now the Langham, Huntington Hotel & Spa) was running at full tilt just a few blocks away. And East Coast tycoons still traveled in private railway cars, their families in tow, to winter in the sun-swept paradise that was Pasadena. Some were so taken with the climate and topography that they decided to build their own private family resorts — grand estates that blended European influences with the relaxed and leafy luxe of western life. The house Ainsworth originally designed for the Clarence Pipers and their five children is one of them. The home, sited on a steeply sloped acre-and-a-half on Fairfield Circle, is inspired by a Tuscan villa. Built on six terraced levels, each handsomely landscaped, it reveals few of its charms from the front. A broad drive curves from the street toward the weathered brick façade of what appears to be a simple, elegant two-story structure. In fact, the 15,000-square-foot house is architecturally complex. It is built into three of the six terraced levels, with most rooms facing the extraordinary grounds at back. From the entry hall, which opens onto all the main floor’s public rooms, one can either travel up to the bedrooms or down to a lower floor, which contains another fully realized living area, complete with its own kitchen, living

and dining rooms. Most rooms on the main and lower floors are graced with French doors and patios leading to outdoor living spaces. Bedrooms and baths on the top floor offer eye-stopping tree-top views over the property — what Valenson calls “a certain sense of being transported to another time and place.” The house, with one of the first residential elevators in Pasadena, has five family bedrooms and seven baths, as well as servants’ quarters and all sorts of auxiliary rooms that could easily house another family or two. A large laundry room, gift wrap room, sewing room, wine cellar and tasting room, even a clublike pub that Valenson upholstered in white tufted leather, are tucked into the two lower levels, along with two full kitchens and assorted living and dining areas. Despite its imposing dimensions, architect Ainsworth managed to imbue the space with a kind of artistic intimacy — no rooms are too vast or formal for a simple sit-down with family or friends. Valenson has maintained that mood. That said, the designer had his work cut out for him. The main entry hall — which runs the full width of the house and opens onto the home’s main rooms — had been lined with mirrors by a previous owner, who had also installed a plethora of crystal chandeliers. A bit too Versailles-like and not true to the architect’s original intent, he says. Off with the mirrors and chandeliers, he directed. Underneath were beautifully burnished walls of carved wood, which Valenson restored, and to which he added sconces for gentler illumination. The home’s most formal space, at the north end, is the 670-square-foot living room with a 20-foot-high trussed-beam cathedral ceiling. Valenson updated —CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

(Left) Main entrance, on second of four levels, and cathedral panes in faux-stone window surround (Right) The master bedroom’s sitting area overlooks the terrace. (Below) The client’s big-game-hunter father would have felt at home among the faux tusks and club chairs in the library.

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 21


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

(Top) Illuminated cabinets highlight the collection of crystal behind the white tufted-leather bar — in the “most popular room in the house.” (Below, left to right) Velvet and faux leather furnishings warm up the high-ceilinged upstairs living room; the former “theater,” now a modern media room, features a carved stone ceiling and fireplace.

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

it with custom-designed seating: classic sofas in muted gold and ivory velvet, slipper chairs in subtly striped bronze silk, oversized pastel velvet ottomans. For an extra bit of zing, he added contemporary wingback chairs in ivory faux ostrich with Lucite feet. A giant armoire, along with wood chests and tables from various periods, many already owned by the family, punctuate the space. The kitchen, pantry and breakfast rooms at the opposite end of the floor comprised the only area that needed a major remodel, says Valenson (jeffvalensondesign.com). For this space, still in its original 1930s configuration of smaller separate rooms, he envisioned a significant update — one large, open, light-filled room with state-of-the-art equipment. Once all the interior walls had been removed, Valenson installed multiple stoves, cooktop surfaces and ovens, along with warming drawers, built-in refrigeration and a massive center island. In place of traditional cabinets, he designed floor-to-ceiling closets which function as “wardrobes” for all the accoutrements any chef might need. For informal meals in the kitchen, the family gathers around an antique wood farm table they found while vacationing in Tuscany. The Los Angelesbased designer added Philippe Starck’s crystal-clear polycarbonate “ghost chairs,” introduced in 2002 and already considered classics. A walk-through pantry connects the kitchen with the dining room, and custom cabinet handles there, as in the kitchen, are a sensory surprise. They’re made of soft, braided silver leather. A family room and library on the main floor and all rooms on the level below remain intimate in scale. Most enticing is Valenson’s black-and-white 22 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

design for the dimly lit bar — a retro cave that recalls a bygone era. One enters through a massive, quilted white leather door, and the white leather motif continues on the banquette that curves around one wall, accessorized with small black lacquer tables. The base of the black lacquer bar is quilted in the same white leather. “This could be the most popular room in the house when the family entertains,” Valenson says. “I’ve seen people lined up here waiting to get in.” A wine cellar and tasting room are off to one side of the bar. While there are multiple outdoor spaces outside the middle and lower levels of the house that can be used for entertaining, there are three additional levels below them with a distinctive character and function. One is a vast landscaped terrace — furnished for lounging and dining in front of an oversized fireplace — that could easily accommodate a few hundred guests. The pool level, a few steps below, is meant for serious swimming or pool parties where robes, towels and refreshments can be distributed from the large cabana nearby. And the bottom-most terrace, which opens onto a street, is called “the trampoline terrace” for obvious reasons. “The children love to trampoline and play all sorts of games down there,” Valenson says. The Ainsworth home reminds the designer of his first major assignment, at age 25, on the team that refurbished the interior of Carnegie Hall in New York. “It may sound strange, but I see major similarities between that job and this,” he says. “Both structures have a unique and irreplaceable character, history and charm. And in both cases, the goal was to preserve those assets while adding a more modern aura of comfort and style.” AM


ABOUT SNYDER DIAMOND A Pasadena favorite since 1975, Snyder Diamond has recently relocated, opening a stunning 17,000-squarefoot showroom in the historic former Thomasville building, across from the new Whole Foods Market. The new showroom features the Living Kitchen, California’s first store-within-a-store concept created exclusively by Sub-Zero and Wolf. Here you’ll experience the most complete selection of products, ideas, inspiration and information. Sub-Zero refrigerators, freezers and wine storage units offer the ultimate in performance, reliability and design with hand-built products from a third-generation family-owned company. Built to the same exacting standards, Wolf cooking instruments help give fullest expression to your love of good food and the pleasure of preparing it. Wolf fuels your passion for cooking. Connect with these two kitchen soul mates and explore the full potential for what you want your new kitchen to be.

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Many homeowners now choose to upgrade current living space, rather than rebuilding the entire structure. Whether it’s a kitchen/ bath or complete remodel, we pride ourselves on classic design, maintaining the individual style of the house. Customers work closely with owner Mark Snashall, assuring their desired features and look are achieved, while he helps direct choices toward quality results, reflective of his finish carpentry training, commitment to quality, fine European craftsmanship and attention to detail. (818) 949-4595.

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Thinking of Solar? Need to fix your roof? HVAC not doing its job? Contemplating a remodel but worried about design and budget? HartmanBaldwin Design/Build, certified by Energy Star and the Building Performance Institute, can evaluate your home from attic to basement and provide you with money-saving solutions, ranging from quick energy-efficiency fixes to GREEN remodeling or retrofitting projects. There are tremendous rebates, tax credits and incentives for homeowners to help offset the costs of these improvements. Give your home a nice little “face-lift” while improving your home’s comfort, health and energy efficiency without breaking the bank. Call (626) 486-0510 today!

MacMar, Inc. finds that our clients’ trends are adding space to an existing singlestory dwelling while protecting their yard for recreational use. A common solution has been adding a second story with a master suite to free up space on the first floor. We also assist them by keeping the improvements in the same historic style as the existing home, whether it is Ranch, Mission, Craftsman, even a Frank Wright house addition. (818) 566-8302 or www.macmarinc.com.

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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BUILDERS & REMODELERS

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These days homeowners want their home to be their sanctuary, so special attention is paid to the complete house design and how it relates to overall living space and color schemes throughout. Everything from the tiles, cabinetry and flooring must all come together to create a feeling of this is where I want to be! Working together for over 15 years, Teresa Airo Designs and Village Builders specialize in full historical restoration, kitchens, baths, living spaces, exterior facelifts and Green Awareness. See more at www.airodesigns.com. (626) 585-8502; (626) 359-1998

Current trends see homeowners doing extensive research before taking on the restoration of all or part of their homes. To restore a home to its exact period requires a great deal of expertise. From the living room’s crown molding of a Historical Craftsman to the masterful restoration of a kitchen wing of a Revival Home, Romani Restoration brings extensive knowledge of European methods of personalized restoration for all types of historical homes. (626) 284-4447

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34 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURE

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Cabanas are totally romantic and relaxing. They have most of the amenities of family rooms and kitchens, such as fireplaces, bars, televisions, sound systems, curtains, ceiling fans, refrigerators, heaters, and lots of comfortable furniture. Typically overlooking a pool or view, they are exterior living rooms, perfect for California. Whether a small individual project or part of a larger private estate, we have always designed cabanas, but have lately received more requests. I love them. For more information, please call James Coane & Associates at (626) 5846922 or visit www.jamescoane.com.

Welcome to the 21st century: In order to maximize the returns on home improvement investment please consider the following trends that are now the norm. Master Suite: a walk-in closet with a minimum of 20 ft. of pole and shelf space, two sinks with a separate tub and shower. Kitchen: Window above sinks, open to family or great room with peninsula or island separation from family room. Walk-in pantry is a mega plus. Living: Unfortunately, most living rooms are obsolete and unused. The best bet is to incorporate it into another use if possible. Laundry: Place this function close to the bedrooms if possible. Family Rooms: Should be contiguous with kitchen and backyard. (626) 403-0844

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Our goal is to welcome everything that we are given: program, budget, site specifics, concerns and constraints. In thinking outside the box, we won’t stop design at the four walls and roof – we create total environments, both interior and exterior, which are places in which to work and live. Ultimately, the solutions must be a functional, specific and inspiring fit for the needs initially expressed. Current trends see homeowners working in tandem with nature, creating natural breezeways throughout the home, and utilizing a design approach that best expresses a

Southern California’s experiments with outdoor living and entertaining concepts are continually generating new combinations of outdoor environments for relaxing, entertaining, playing and exercising. A trend that I have been seeing in my practice is the development of thoughtfully designed multi-sport courts architecturally integrated with home and surroundings. This sometimes includes a natural setting with lush plantings and multiple terraces for entertaining and relaxing before and after the sports event. Alex Varga, Architect. (626) 683-8484 or www.alexandervarga.com.

unique architecture complementing the terrain and climate of their home and lifestyle. (818) 279-8236

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—CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

INTERIOR DESIGN

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“I want lots of color” is the number one request from our clients, followed by the desire for larger, open family and entertainment areas. As professional designers, our goal is to express the clients’ personality and taste with comfort and utility, and create a beautiful home for their living pleasure. We effectively accomplish this by planning the use of their spaces from the early stages, before the shovel hits the ground, ensuring the best results and saving money too! Contact us today at (818) 548-8880.

The Facelift is a trend resulting from the concern over the economy. Improving your real estate is a safe investment, but spending less is important. Rather than gutting an entire room and replacing everything, a facelift is comprised of making a few improvements for half the budget. The kitchen pictured has a new granite countertop, tile backsplash, sinks, faucet, and lighting over the island. Floors were refinished and cabinets painted. Call Cynthia Bennett and Associates, Inc. for your kitchen or bathroom facelift. (626) 799-9701 or www.cynthiabennett.com.

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What’s old is new! That is the trend today. A 100-year-old trend, which is popular and green at the same time, is cork floors. As you can see at the Old Pasadena Library, Cork floors are all natural (straight from the bark of the cork oak tree!), biodegradable and long lasting. Another “natural” trend is real linoleum (“Marmoleum”). Invented over 115 years ago and made from wood fibers, linseed oil and jute, this product is naturally non-allergenic and bacteria-resistant. Carousel Floors has the largest selection of green flooring products. Would you expect anything less from a company that has been located on Green Street for the past 38 years? 676 E. Green St., at the corner of El Molino Ave. (626) 795-8085.

Keeping up not only with the current trends in color, Catalina Paints offer products that are designed for today’s sophisticated homeowner, such as zero V.O.C. paints, socalled “clean air” paints that have virtually no odor and nothing to harm the environment. Catalina Paints is the premier source of quality paints and offers the largest array of colors. Over 45 years in business, they now have two stores in the San Gabriel Valley. (626) 471-3599; (626) 793-4100.

We also Specialize in Agingin-Place products

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

DreamMaker is a full service remodeling company

From concept to completion, We do it all! Give Us A Call To Get Started Today!

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626.445.3100

PAINTS

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ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 37


—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Whole House Design, Kitchens, Bathrooms, Green Design & Outdoor Living Specialty

Call for Free Initial Consultation with this ad.

INTERIOR SPACES

INTERIOR SPACES

DREAMMAKER BATH & KITCHEN

KITCHEN TUNE-UP

At DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen, building green and using recyclable products is a priority. For example, in our showroom you can view our countertop display made of fresh glass from old liquor bottles, windows, stemware, dinnerware, traffic lights and many other unusual sources! With Vetrazzo glass surfaces, you are able to express both your style and your respect for the earth without compromise. These surfaces are stain-resistant and can be made in many different unique shapes, styles and colors. Dreammaker Kitchen & Bath is the exclusive dealer for Vetrazzo surfaces, located at 25 Flower St. in Arcadia. (626) 445-3100. www.dreammaker-SGV.com

With the obvious slowdown in the economy, more homeowners are – staying home! As a result of the trend to spend more time at home, they are deciding to make improvements to their homes. The new word is “Staycation” – consumers are choosing to spend their vacation time at home. Another trend we are seeing is that in the SoCal housing market, homeowners are staying in their homes longer – another good reason they are choosing to enjoy it themselves now with a “sprucing up” instead of a full expensive remodel. Call Steve and Megan Morelock at Kitchen Tune-Up at (626) 533-4402.

Jan Ledgard, C.K.D., C.B.D.

Dreammaker Kitchen & Bath photo by Joel Puliatti for Vetrazzo

626.345.1750

38 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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Dreammaker Kitchen & Bath photo by Joel Puliatti for Vetrazzo

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OUTDOOR LIVING

OUTDOOR LIVING

BUNGALOW FENCES

CAL SHADES

When you specialize in working with older and even historic homes, current “trends” don’t necessarily apply. Homeowners want quality from builders/craftsmen who know something about architectural history and appropriate style. We specialize in restoring and enhancing older houses with thoughtfully designed and well-built redwood and cedar fences. We help our customers understand that fences don’t have to come in onesize- fits-all, and instead can be beautiful ornaments that significantly improve the curb appeal of their home. (626) 403-2947.

Dress up your outdoor entertaining area with outdoor curtain panels, attractive awnings or shades. With summer coming, many homeowners are looking for the newest trends to keep the heat out. Fabric awnings are effective as well as slide wire shades. The most effective way to stop the heat is with an external shading device. In addition to controlling light and temperature, the Slide on Wire Shade filters out harmful ultraviolet rays by up to 90%, which protects furniture and fabrics from fading. Call Cal Shades for more information on the Slide on Wire Shade at 1-800257-7886 or visit www.calshades.com.

PARIS MOSAIC & STONE

Onyx Mosaic Stone Glass Tiles Marble Porcelain Tiles Shower Doors by Mitrani Travertine Metal Tiles Specializing in Caesarstone Installation and all Granite Countertops

1264 S. Central Ave. Glendale • (818) 240-7555 —CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

Caroline Baker INTERIOR DESIGN 745 So. Marengo Avenue Pasadena CA 91106 626.796.6670 info@carolinebakerdesign.com carolinebakerdesign.com allied member, A S I D

Colorful, elegant yet livable interiors

Photography by: Cameron Carothers | ADVERTISEMENT |

2006 Pasadena Showcase House of Design ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 39


—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Hugee Liquidation n Sale Beautify Your Home This Spring!

OUTDOOR LIVING

OUTDOOR LIVING

GARDEN VIEW LANDSCAPE

GARROCCO POOLS

Trends in landscaping design we anticipate seeing are the result of water restrictions or higher priced water. People would be surprised at the array of plants that we love that are lush – yet can survive on minimal water. Everything doesn’t have to be cactus or succulents. The key is planting plants of the same water needs on the same valve. Technology now available allows you to reduce your water needs by up to 50 %. Call Garden View Landscape at (626) 303-4043.

The design trend for today’s modern pool is creating a unique environment with function and safety. Huge rock grottos, rockslides, and even diving boards are becoming obsolete. Low-profile fountain swimming pools, with minimum hardscape that incorporates an automatic pool cover, is the new trend for today’s modern family. Having peace of mind with a safe pool while still enjoying water features, surrounding outdoor environments and fireplaces, in a garden setting, is the new outdoor environment design trend. 695 E. Green St., Pasadena. (866) 427-6226 or www.garocco.com

BEST PRICES IN TOWN!!

248 W. Huntington Drive Monrovia, California 91016 626-357-5202 • 626-357-5203

40 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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OUTDOOR LIVING

OUTDOOR LIVING

LA CUSTOM GRILL

OUTDOOR COLLECTION

Outdoor kitchens are becoming very popular in Southern California. Bringing indoor conveniences to outdoor cooking is a great way to entertain with friends and family. The most popular style grill islands lately are granite countertops with stone siding. This popular combination offers an elegant, yet rough appearance to enhance any backyard’s décor. And, with so many different granite and stone siding choices, along with the varied styles of island accessories, our custom-built islands will bring your imagination to reality. Visit ww.lagrillislands.com or call (626) 6287405 for more information.

Today’s hottest outdoor trend is the outdoor living room ... a favorite for hotels & resorts for years and now available for residential settings. Why go to an expensive resort for the weekend when you can turn your back yard into one? Invest in something that will bring comfort and style for the long run! Teak Warehouse boasts over 16 varied collections of deep seating, offering teak and wicker, at the best prices in California. 133 E. Maple Ave., Monrovia. (626) 305-8325 or www.teakwarehouse.com

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

CREATING CUSTOM FENCES & GATES IN THE ARTS & CRAFTS TRADITION bungalowfences.com • 626.403.2947

Offered at $895,000 Classic Spanish-style home with lovely details highlighting period architecture. Living room with Batchelder-like fireplace . 3 bdrms, 1.5 baths. Cozy kitchen w.blt-ins, Central air & heat, 2 car detached garage. Lush gardens and patios wrap the home with privacy & serenity. Beautiful French windows & doors throughout create a light and bright hue to every room; warm oak floors and neutral carpet create a soft and inviting color scheme. Built in 1924

1558 Diamond Avenue • South Pasadena

Lin Vlacich vlacichs@aol.com Office: 626-396-3975 Cell: 626-688-6464 | ADVERTISEMENT |

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 41


—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

OUTDOOR LIVING

REAL ESTATE

YORKSHIRE KITCHENS, INC.

LIN VLACICH-SOTHEBY’S

The “Heart of the Home” has moved outdoors. Today’s trend of outdoor living and entertaining requires its own space. One that is well equipped and stocked to whip up a family meal or a party for friends. Take your outdoor living experience to the next level with an outdoor kitchen designed with cabinetry specifically built from materials for the outdoors, with options of beautiful Cypress or Teak doors. Jan can help turn your dreams into reality with great designs for every room in or “outside” your home. Call us at (626) 345-1750.

A current trend and successful formula for selling a home quickly is making sure that you have it professionally staged, along with clean, sharp, uncluttered photos of the home. Make sure your agent has a dedicated website to showcase your home’s pictures. Today’s home-buyer wants to buy a home that makes sense, so close attention will be paid to structural authenticity, especially if the home is historic. Lin has over 25 years of experience in the San Gabriel Valley real estate market. (626) 688-6464

BEFORE

Architectss & Engineers

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AFTER

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(626) 287-1146 42 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 43


ART, ANTIQUES & JEWELRY John Moran Auctioneers Expertly serving clients since 1969, John Moran Auctioneers is a full-service auction house offering quality objects and complete personalized dedication. Monthly estate and fine furniture auctions are where collectors, dealers, decorators and others gather to buy the finest antiques, silver, American Indian, oil and watercolor paintings, jewelry, unusual accessories and much more. They also hold an auction (three times per year) for exceptional California and American paintings. Consignment and the purchasing of estates. 735 W. Woodbury Road, Altadena. Call (626) 793-1833 or visit www.johnmoran.com. Fancy That! If a man’s home is his castle, in times of great uncertainty it should also be a safe and comfortable haven. Go to FANCY THAT! for a unique selection of home accents, holiday and special occasion decorations and really great gifts for friends and relatives. Paula and Jim feature products made in America with particular emphasis on California craftsmanship, and they take great pride in their personalize service and reasonable pricing. And starting April 1, Fancy That! will pay the 1% sales tax increase on all purchases through June 30, 2009! Now’s the time to visit FANCY THAT! ■

Fancy That! Gifts,, Home e Accents s & Seasonal l Decor

2575 Mission Street | San Marino | CA 91108

626.403.2577 44 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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SPACE PLANNING & DESIGN

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Give us a call for a current workshop schedule! 325 E. Live Oak Ave., Arcadia 626.447.7753 • www.beadcompany.com Tue – Thurs 12pm – 9pm, Fri 12pm – 6pm Sat 10-6pm, Sun 12-5pm

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ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 45


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

On the Block PASADENA'S HOMEGROWN AUCTION HOUSE, JOHN MORAN AUCTIONEERS, COMPETES WITH BEHEMOTHS IN NEW YORK AND LONDON BY OFFERING A PERSONAL TOUCH. BY JANA MONJI

Madeleine and John Moran preside over an auction. (Below, from left) Potential buyers study paintings about to go on the block; John Moran; Jeff Moran; antiques and paintings on view before a sale.

MANY MOONS AGO, JOHN MORAN HAD TO SATISFY HIS PASSION FOR AUCTIONS BY LISTENING TO TAPES OF THEM WHILE STUCK IN TRAFFIC. NOW HIS NAME IS ON A SMALL, PERSONABLE AUCTION HOUSE IN ALTADENA, AND FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES, JOHN MORAN ANTIQUE & FINE ART AUCTIONEERS HAS HELD REGULAR AUCTIONS AT THE PASADENA CONVENTION CENTER, LOGGING MORE THAN 400 TO DATE. BUT THE FAMILY FIRM DOES MORE THAN MERELY TURN HIGH-END POSSESSIONS INTO CASH. MORAN’S CLIENTS OFTEN BECOME AND REMAIN FRIENDS — AND HE HELPS THEM IN MANY WAYS, FROM DOWNSIZING THEIR ACCUMULATED BELONGINGS TO REFEREEING FAMILY DISPUTES OVER WHO GETS WHAT. “Sometimes, I feel like I’m working on a TV drama rerun,” the company president and principal auctioneer says with a broad smile, perched on a seat beside a wall lined with art books in his West Woodbury Road office. “There’s the greedy neighbor, the distant relative who says, ‘Aunt Mildred always promised to give me the Steinway grand piano.’ Sometimes the family gets along very well and everything is very equitable. But sometimes the family has not spoken to each other for 10 years, and we have to be mediators, without bias or favoritism to the family, neighbor or buyers. That’s our fiduciary duty to the family trust or estate.” At the moment, the spry, moustached Moran is nattily dressed in a gray pinstripe suit, textured white shirt and multicolored bow tie. “Every house is a challenge; every piece has a story,” he continues. He delights in discussing

46 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

memorable moments at his auction house, such as the $1.2 million sale of “Early Morning, Summertime” by impressionist Guy Rose (whose family lent its name to Rosemead) in 2001 — at the time, a world auction record for the sale of a painting by a California artist (a record broken in 2005 by the sale of another Rose painting, which went for $1.92 million). Another painting of note included in the firm’s February auction — one of three annual auctions of California and American paintings — was E. Charlton Fortune’s oil painting of a scene at the “foot of Tyler Street [Monterey, CA], near the waterfront in 1920,” as the artist described it in a letter. Titled “Town Gossip,” the work had been expected to bring in $600,000 to $800,000, although it was ultimately withdrawn by its seller, the Monterey History & Art Association. Moran says the grim economy hasn’t dented demand for such valuable works. “The top 20 percent of the market is still doing well,” he says. “Affluent buyers are still buying really good things.” It does, however, seem to have increased supply, as more and more people liquidate their valuables. “There’s a lot of quality material up for auction, more so than normal,” says Moran’s son and vice president, Jeff Moran. Over the years, father and son have gone to great lengths to search for treasures. Moran has been known to don a headlamp to navigate the dark tunnels of a recently deceased antique dealer’s home. That collector, an expert on Steuben glass, liked to scour Southern California’s secondhand stores hunting for great pieces. He’d store them at home in banana boxes he procured from his day job as a produce manager. By the time the collector died, he had amassed more than 20,000 objects. Moran visited the residence with two colleagues. “The relatives had a horrified look and said, ‘See what you can do,’” Moran recalls. “When I came out, I told them, ‘We can handle it.’ It was such a giant relief for them. We worked there for weeks and weeks.” Each item had to be soaked, cleaned, dried and then photographed in detail. It was five months before the last piece was disposed of. “Our work is very interesting because we see families in a situation that is very difficult for them. They may have had a relative who was out-of-control collecting. Say Aunt Mildred had 3,800 pieces of Elvis collectibles. The family comes in and goes, ‘Good grief.’ We organize it into realistic lots and sell it to [other collectors like] Aunt Mildred. It’s a win-win situation.” About 98 percent of their items are sold on a commission of 10 to 20 percent, the rate dropping as the lot’s value goes up.

Son Jeff, 40, makes appraisals and runs the day-to-day operations as vice president and auctioneer. Moran’s wife of 47 years, Madeleine, is vice president, public relations. Rounding out the 15-person staff are several former employees of noted London-based auction house Christie’s, and specialists are brought in on a temporary basis to meet specific needs. Moran says his small firm has prospered alongside Christie’s and other behemoths of the auction world by offering a personal touch. In addition to arranging auctions, the firm offers what it calls “concierge-level” services associated with the disposition of estates: packing and shipping bequeathed items to out-of-state heirs, appraising objects for charity and making referrals to second-

paintings (mostly from the 1800s through the 1950s), European and American antiques, fine furnishings and jewelry and Native American art and objects. The firm also sells books and monographs on California and other American art. Estates in greater Pasadena have been a rich source for these treasures, accounting for 80 percent of the firm’s wares. Valuables put on the block by local clients have included such singular memorabilia as a fishing rod custom made for Gary Cooper, which went for $700 — $200 above its high estimate — in last December’s sale. Plums from the past have been the stock-in-trade for Moran Auctioneers, but the present marketplace is having an impact too, namely the relatively

ary sales outlets for items not suitable for auction. The firm restores art, frames pictures and even provides house-cleaning and disposal services. “We offer a level of service that they simply can’t compete with,” Moran says. Moran grew up in Pasadena, after his family moved to the Crown City from New England when he was 10. As a young man, he was a sales and service manager at Robinson’s Department Store in Pasadena. He couldn’t afford the fine dining room set he wanted to furnish his home, so he worked his way up to the purchase by buying less expensive sets and selling them at a profit. The experience inspired him to move into selling high-end goods, and in 1969, with a start-up nut of only $2,000, he launched his antiques business. At the time, most auction schools specialized in training students to sell livestock, so he learned by observing at art auctions and listening to tapes of them. Over the years, the business has grown to embrace sales of California and American

recent entry of eBay, which has had “a profound effect on our business,” Jeff says. “They made the auction concept more approachable, and people can see the benefits. [PBS’ ‘Antiques] Roadshow’ for a lot of people dispelled the myth of price and value. Tastes don’t necessarily correlate with value.” In this era of eco-awareness, John and Jeff consider their auction business more relevant than ever. They call themselves “urban recyclers” involved in a fascinating form of contemporary urban archeology. Says John, “I’ve never had a boring day at work in my life because I’m constantly learning.” AM John Moran Auctioneers will hold an antique and fine furnishings estate auction at the Pasadena Convention Center on May 19. The preview opens at noon, and the sale begins at 6:30 p.m. The Pasadena Convention Center is located at 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 793-1833 or visit www.johnmoran.com

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 47


DESIGN PASADENA 2009

On the Block PASADENA'S HOMEGROWN AUCTION HOUSE, JOHN MORAN AUCTIONEERS, COMPETES WITH BEHEMOTHS IN NEW YORK AND LONDON BY OFFERING A PERSONAL TOUCH. BY JANA MONJI

Madeleine and John Moran preside over an auction. (Below, from left) Potential buyers study paintings about to go on the block; John Moran; Jeff Moran; antiques and paintings on view before a sale.

MANY MOONS AGO, JOHN MORAN HAD TO SATISFY HIS PASSION FOR AUCTIONS BY LISTENING TO TAPES OF THEM WHILE STUCK IN TRAFFIC. NOW HIS NAME IS ON A SMALL, PERSONABLE AUCTION HOUSE IN ALTADENA, AND FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES, JOHN MORAN ANTIQUE & FINE ART AUCTIONEERS HAS HELD REGULAR AUCTIONS AT THE PASADENA CONVENTION CENTER, LOGGING MORE THAN 400 TO DATE. BUT THE FAMILY FIRM DOES MORE THAN MERELY TURN HIGH-END POSSESSIONS INTO CASH. MORAN’S CLIENTS OFTEN BECOME AND REMAIN FRIENDS — AND HE HELPS THEM IN MANY WAYS, FROM DOWNSIZING THEIR ACCUMULATED BELONGINGS TO REFEREEING FAMILY DISPUTES OVER WHO GETS WHAT. “Sometimes, I feel like I’m working on a TV drama rerun,” the company president and principal auctioneer says with a broad smile, perched on a seat beside a wall lined with art books in his West Woodbury Road office. “There’s the greedy neighbor, the distant relative who says, ‘Aunt Mildred always promised to give me the Steinway grand piano.’ Sometimes the family gets along very well and everything is very equitable. But sometimes the family has not spoken to each other for 10 years, and we have to be mediators, without bias or favoritism to the family, neighbor or buyers. That’s our fiduciary duty to the family trust or estate.” At the moment, the spry, moustached Moran is nattily dressed in a gray pinstripe suit, textured white shirt and multicolored bow tie. “Every house is a challenge; every piece has a story,” he continues. He delights in discussing

46 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

memorable moments at his auction house, such as the $1.2 million sale of “Early Morning, Summertime” by impressionist Guy Rose (whose family lent its name to Rosemead) in 2001 — at the time, a world auction record for the sale of a painting by a California artist (a record broken in 2005 by the sale of another Rose painting, which went for $1.92 million). Another painting of note included in the firm’s February auction — one of three annual auctions of California and American paintings — was E. Charlton Fortune’s oil painting of a scene at the “foot of Tyler Street [Monterey, CA], near the waterfront in 1920,” as the artist described it in a letter. Titled “Town Gossip,” the work had been expected to bring in $600,000 to $800,000, although it was ultimately withdrawn by its seller, the Monterey History & Art Association. Moran says the grim economy hasn’t dented demand for such valuable works. “The top 20 percent of the market is still doing well,” he says. “Affluent buyers are still buying really good things.” It does, however, seem to have increased supply, as more and more people liquidate their valuables. “There’s a lot of quality material up for auction, more so than normal,” says Moran’s son and vice president, Jeff Moran. Over the years, father and son have gone to great lengths to search for treasures. Moran has been known to don a headlamp to navigate the dark tunnels of a recently deceased antique dealer’s home. That collector, an expert on Steuben glass, liked to scour Southern California’s secondhand stores hunting for great pieces. He’d store them at home in banana boxes he procured from his day job as a produce manager. By the time the collector died, he had amassed more than 20,000 objects. Moran visited the residence with two colleagues. “The relatives had a horrified look and said, ‘See what you can do,’” Moran recalls. “When I came out, I told them, ‘We can handle it.’ It was such a giant relief for them. We worked there for weeks and weeks.” Each item had to be soaked, cleaned, dried and then photographed in detail. It was five months before the last piece was disposed of. “Our work is very interesting because we see families in a situation that is very difficult for them. They may have had a relative who was out-of-control collecting. Say Aunt Mildred had 3,800 pieces of Elvis collectibles. The family comes in and goes, ‘Good grief.’ We organize it into realistic lots and sell it to [other collectors like] Aunt Mildred. It’s a win-win situation.” About 98 percent of their items are sold on a commission of 10 to 20 percent, the rate dropping as the lot’s value goes up.

Son Jeff, 40, makes appraisals and runs the day-to-day operations as vice president and auctioneer. Moran’s wife of 47 years, Madeleine, is vice president, public relations. Rounding out the 15-person staff are several former employees of noted London-based auction house Christie’s, and specialists are brought in on a temporary basis to meet specific needs. Moran says his small firm has prospered alongside Christie’s and other behemoths of the auction world by offering a personal touch. In addition to arranging auctions, the firm offers what it calls “concierge-level” services associated with the disposition of estates: packing and shipping bequeathed items to out-of-state heirs, appraising objects for charity and making referrals to second-

paintings (mostly from the 1800s through the 1950s), European and American antiques, fine furnishings and jewelry and Native American art and objects. The firm also sells books and monographs on California and other American art. Estates in greater Pasadena have been a rich source for these treasures, accounting for 80 percent of the firm’s wares. Valuables put on the block by local clients have included such singular memorabilia as a fishing rod custom made for Gary Cooper, which went for $700 — $200 above its high estimate — in last December’s sale. Plums from the past have been the stock-in-trade for Moran Auctioneers, but the present marketplace is having an impact too, namely the relatively

ary sales outlets for items not suitable for auction. The firm restores art, frames pictures and even provides house-cleaning and disposal services. “We offer a level of service that they simply can’t compete with,” Moran says. Moran grew up in Pasadena, after his family moved to the Crown City from New England when he was 10. As a young man, he was a sales and service manager at Robinson’s Department Store in Pasadena. He couldn’t afford the fine dining room set he wanted to furnish his home, so he worked his way up to the purchase by buying less expensive sets and selling them at a profit. The experience inspired him to move into selling high-end goods, and in 1969, with a start-up nut of only $2,000, he launched his antiques business. At the time, most auction schools specialized in training students to sell livestock, so he learned by observing at art auctions and listening to tapes of them. Over the years, the business has grown to embrace sales of California and American

recent entry of eBay, which has had “a profound effect on our business,” Jeff says. “They made the auction concept more approachable, and people can see the benefits. [PBS’ ‘Antiques] Roadshow’ for a lot of people dispelled the myth of price and value. Tastes don’t necessarily correlate with value.” In this era of eco-awareness, John and Jeff consider their auction business more relevant than ever. They call themselves “urban recyclers” involved in a fascinating form of contemporary urban archeology. Says John, “I’ve never had a boring day at work in my life because I’m constantly learning.” AM John Moran Auctioneers will hold an antique and fine furnishings estate auction at the Pasadena Convention Center on May 19. The preview opens at noon, and the sale begins at 6:30 p.m. The Pasadena Convention Center is located at 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 793-1833 or visit www.johnmoran.com

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 47


OBJECTS OF DESIRE

Shopping for the Showcase House BY CARL KOZLOWSKI Beautifying one of Pasadena’s most distinguished homes with lavish furnishings

restaurant and shops have raised more than $16 million for the Los Angeles

and the creative inspiration of the area’s top designers might seem a dubious

Philharmonic, Walt Disney Concert Hall and local symphonic, cultural and educa-

proposition in these harsh financial times. Yet thanks to the Pasadena Showcase

tional programs for youth.

House of Design’s worthy goal — raising funds for local arts organizations — as

The 2009 Pasadena Showcase House transformed the Italian Renaissance

well as its near-escapist charms, the country's oldest house and garden tour might

Revival Stimson House in San Marino. The 10,000-square-foot home, resting on more

just be more relevant than ever.

than two acres, was designed and built by George Lawrence Stimson for his parents,

The Pasadena Showcase House of the Arts, which organizes the annual

George Woodbury and Jennie Stimson. This year, 22 interior and nine exterior design-

event, rallied more than 70 full-time volunteers and 200 other supporters to pro-

ers received the call to dress the home’s rooms and grounds according to their visions.

duce the 45th tour, which goes on view from April 18 through May 17. Over the

Like what you see? You can recreate the looks with these tips from several partici-

years, tickets (which range from $30 to $40), benefits, donations and an on-site

pants, who reveal where they shopped for their top designs. AM

48 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO


Young Adult’s Bedroom

Breakfast Room Suzi Reader and Scot Barr of Burbank’s SuziScot Design — (818) 953-9534, www.suziscotdesign.com — were inspired by Lucullus, a politician of the late Roman Republic known for consuming lavish feasts, as the design team set about transform-

David Dalton of Los Angeles — (323) 525-3155, www.daviddaltoninc.com —

ing the breakfast room. Borrowing earth tones

gave a hip ambience to what he calls the “guest sweet” at the top of the grand

from dates and walnuts for their palette, the

staircase by incorporating new indoor/outdoor fabrics from fashion designer

pair arranged plates and sconces along

Trina Turk. “The true power comes from energizing a bedroom suite with high-

the ceiling border to play off the crown

intensity color and bold patterns,” Dalton said.

moldings throughout the house “and

To that end, Dalton used black hand-dyed raffia wall coverings by Phillip Jeffries — (973) 575-5414, phillipjeffries.com — and a new shade of iridescent white paint called Snowflake from Dunn-Edwards’ Modern Masters series. Bedding and furniture were custom made, including an elaborate upholstered opium bed. “Traditionally, the Chinese built these beds for small rooms where opium was smoked,” Dalton said. Polishing the look are lots of ethnic

create a frieze or ornamental band around the perimeter,” Barr said. The room showcases a chandelier created for the space, which helped “play the room as both a breakfast room and an intimate dining room,” Barr added. “We wanted to be very elegant and timeless, yet warm and inviting.” Environmentally responsible, too. SuziScot upholstered

accessories, including eight Syrian and Turkish

pieces in its own line of hemp and organic silk and cotton fabrics

trays from Berbere World Imports in Culver City.

and hung wallpaper by Innovations, which uses recycled materials. Says Reader: “We want to inspire people so that they can go

(Clockwise from top) Pierced-metal Moroccan chandelier, $3,500, Berbere World Imports, (310) 842-3842, berbereimports.com; Trina Turk Collection Pisces Print, price available on request, F. Schumacher & Co., (800) 523-1200, fschumacher.com; Peruvian peacock mirror, $2,200, Berbere World Imports, (310) 842-3842, berbereimports.com

green without sacrificing style.”

(Clockwise from left) Ebony-framed curved chair, $2,000, Susanne Hollis, (626) 441-0346, susannehollis.com; Art Deco rosewood table with man-onthe-moon center medallion, hand sanded and ebony-stained, $15,000, refurbished by Susanne Hollis, (626) 441-0346, susannehollis.com; Radiance by Barbara Barry for Wedgwood cup, set of 6 for $100, bloomingdales.com

Dining Room Pasadena’s Paul Devine of Interior Devine — (626) 795-5025, interiordevine.com — looked to “Alice in Wonderland” for his design of the dining room. “I used 18th-century Rubens engravings, which I got from a Paris flea market and placed in velvet frames,” Devine said. “The walls will also be velvet, which will result in putting velvet next to velvet to create a very tactile experience. The room was built on these engravings. I wanted it to be impressive and luxurious. How many rooms have an aggressive and luxurious velvet on their walls?”

(Clockwise from top left) Breakfast chair upholstery, Vicenzo line of hemp/silk-blend fabrics, price available on request, SuziScot Design, (818) 953-9534, suziscotdesign.com; Niderviller “Gran Siecle” plate by Debi Wise & Associates for Devine Corp., price available on request, (213) 765-8918; Crystal chandelier with beaded shade of semi-precious stones, $2,500, Chandi Design, (323) 662-9277, chandidesign.com ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 49


EDUCATION W & SUMMER CAMPS Camp Shi ini was established in 1947, and is a 5-week American Indian-themed day camp in Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco. Families may sign up for daily, Tues. & Thurs., or M/W/F schedules. Activities include horseback riding, fishing, archery, canoeing, swimming, hiking, Indian crafts, athletics and an incredible month-long treasure hunt. Campers are picked up from home in brand new 2009 camp vans. www.campshi-ini.com for more information. Clairbourn School Summer Spree 2009 at Clairbourn School! Clairbourn is now enrolling preschoolers through 8th graders for summer fun and learning! Preschool/Kindergarten activities are from 9 a.m. to noon and include crafts, music, science, story time, play time and water games. 1st through 8th graders can enjoy over 40 educational and recreational workshops between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Go online to www.clairbourn.org/summer. Register by May 22nd, 2009.

Summer School at High Point Academy One of the best K-8 values in the area! June 22 - July 17 ACADEMIC CLASSES INCLUDE Math • Language Arts Test Preps • Spanish Children’s Literature Science • Creative Writing

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50 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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Highpoint Academy Summer School at High Point Academy in Pasadena, June 22 – July 17, one of the best K- 8 values in the area! This summer we are offering academic classes, including Math, Language Arts, Test Preps, Children’s Literature, Science, Creative Writing and Spanish. Enrichment classes being offered include Sports (Golf, Volleyball, Bowling, and Basketball). Arts and Crafts (Painting, Ceramics, Painting and more)! Other classes include yoga, music, model rockets, photography and movie-making! Call for a brochure (626) 798-8989 or visit our website www.highpointacademy.org Huntington Learning Center The Huntington Learning Center is a nationally recognized leader in the field of improving a child’s basic study skills through remediation and enrichment programs. Students are given individual attention by certified teachers using personalized programs tailored to improve skills in a child’s trouble area. Huntington offers individual testing and tutoring in reading, math, study skills, writing and SAT/ACT preparation to students of all ages. Parents who would like additional information, or who are concerned about a specific aspect of their child’s academic performance, are encouraged to contact the Huntington Learning Center at 1832 E. Washington Blvd. in Pasadena or call (626) 798-5900. Institute For Girls’ Development Announcing: Mind, Body, Spirit Adventures. Elementary and middle school girls attending Mind, Body, Spirit Adventures enjoy indoor and outdoor activities, yoga, arts/crafts, journaling, friendship skills, skits & theater games and fun. Announcing: Steppin’ Up Adventures at the Institute for Girls’ Development. High School girls will appreciate this shop program that empowers teens to flex their selfrespect & strengths; deal with friendship challenges; and other tools for real teen life. www.InstituteForGirlsDevelopment.com. 95 N. Marengo Ave.,suite 205, Pasadena, (626) 585.8075, Ext. 120. Japanese American National Museum Come and explore at the Japanese American National Museum! Join us for Target Free Family Saturdays and celebrate shared Asian American traditions with fun, theme-filled activities for kids of all ages. Admission is FREE all day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Target Free Family Saturdays are a great way for families to learn, play, and grow together. Your visit to the National Museum will inspire you to discover your own cultural heritage. Located in historic downtown LA’s Little Tokyo, the National Museum is dedicated to promoting a better understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by preserving and sharing the Japanese American experience. Visit janm.org for more information, or call (213) 625-0414.

Target Free Family Saturday What's Cooking? Saturday, April 11, 2008 11-4 PM FREE ALL DAY! All Day Arts ‘n Crafts Make your own apron, origami candy bowl, sushi candle, placemat, or potholder plus join in the JANM chopstick challenge! 12–3 PM Kidding Around the Kitchen—Drop-in cooking family workshops featuring the popular “rainbow stir fry” dish 12:30 PM & 2:30 PM Fugetsu-Do Sweet Shop—mochi (sweet rice cakes) demonstration and tasting 1 PM & 3 PM Sushi Chef Institute—sushi making demonstration and tasting Upcoming Target Free Family Saturdays… Saturday, May 9 • Aloha Saturday, June 13 • Try This on For Size Saturday, July 11 • Books Galore Generously sponsored by Target, these special Saturdays are filled with fun activities giving families unique ways to learn, play, and grow together.

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the source of a difficulty is unknown, it can often be labeled as a “learning disability” or even a “behavioral problem.” Our phonetic reading program is designed to cover all the sounds and spellings to be found in the English language. A preschooler will learn to read and write in 20 hours. We offer home school help & private morning school. Hollywood, West LA, North Hollywood, Pasadena. Call (323) 467-6659 or visit www.learningconnectionla.com Pasadena Waldorf PWS Festival of Art takes place Saturday, April 25, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Artists and artisans offer amazing works for sale. Painters, sculptors, knitters, quilters, jewelry artists, ceramicists, weavers, glass artists, furniture artists and more – organic food, live music, children’s Recycled City creation area. Beautiful wooded setting on historic Scripps Estate in Altadena. Free Admission! 209 E. Mariposa Street, Altadena; (626) 7949564; www.PWSFestivalOfArt.com. Summer Art Academy The Summer Art Academy invites your child to take an exciting hand's-on culinary journey during one of our 10 one-week COOKING CAMPS this summer for ages 7 to 16! Using fresh ingredients and time-tested culinary techniques, our professionally trained chefs teach campers how to read a recipe, prepare and cook healthy delicious dishes, from blueberry muffins to cheese raviolis, quiche to double chocolate fudge. Cooking camps, running June 22 through August 28, are wonderful opportunities to experience the creativity of preparing your own meals! Call (866) 507-COOK Enroll online at www.summerartacademy.com Village Christian Schools The only K-12 National Blue Ribbon school in Southern California, Village Christian Schools upholds high academic scores within the warmth of Christian values. Our secluded campus is framed by mountains and features a Fine Arts Academy, art studios, computer labs, classroom Internet access and three athletic fields. From the elementary phonics-based curriculum to the middle school’s character focus to the high school’s AP classes, students experience a cornucopia of academic choices plus personal attention. Extracurricular programs include football, soccer, T-ball, zoology, chess, strings and equestrians. Also available: bus transportation, extended day care (6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.), on-site hot meal preparation, financial aid, camps and full-day activities during vacations. Call (818) 767-8382 for our free DVD! Westminster Academy Christian Day School The overall purpose of our Christian school is to provide a means by which a child can grow and become inspired to live the Christian life. We provide an atmosphere and work that not only builds academic skills but good character as well. New student testing will be conducted by appointment for grades K-8th on Saturday, May 16. Tours of the campus are available upon request. Call (626) 3987576 or email us at westminsteracademy1953@juno.com. ■

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626.798.5909 52 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

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THE

LIST COMPILED BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

A HIGHLY SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS

CALIFORNIA ART CLUB TURNS 100 WITH EXHIBITION, EVENTS

California Art Club photo courtesy of California Art Club, “The Birds” photo by costume designer Linda Cho, “The Rehearsal” photo by Craig Schwartz

April 25 through May 17 — The California Art Club celebrates its centennial year with the 98th annual Gold Medal Juried Exhibition and related events at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. The exhibition, which opens April 26 and runs through May 17, features nearly 300 paintings and sculpture by some of the nation’s leading representational fine artists, many of whom have helped spark interest in the club’s plein air heritage. An artists’ gala reception at the museum kicks off the exhibition from 6 to 9 p.m. April 25. Tickets cost $75 per person and include the catalog. Other events include a lecture at 3 p.m. May 3 by Jean Stern, executive director of the Irvine Museum, on the early Los Angeles art community and club founder William Wendt. An artist-led tour of the exhibition and membership open house will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. May 17. The Pasadena Museum of California Art is located at 490 E. Union St., Pasadena. Call (626) 568-3665. For information about the California Art Club, call (626) 583-9009 or visit www.californiaartclub.org.

“Coast Highway Gold” by Jeffrey Yeomans

HISTORIC PRESERVATION HIGHLIGHTED IN PASADENA

900 YEARS OF CHINESE ART

April 1 — As part of its annual meeting at the Pasadena Conference Center, the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) hosts a public colloquium on historic preservation in Pasadena. The day wraps up with a bus tour of the city’s important preservation projects. The event begins with registration and coffee at 9 a.m., followed by panel presentations from 9:20 to 11:45 a.m. Panelists include Sue Mossman, executive director of Pasadena Heritage; Julianna Delgado, associate professor at Cal State Poly Pomona and former president of the Bungalow Heaven Neighborhood Association; Jeff Cronin, principal planner for the City of Pasadena; and Teresa Grimes, senior architectural historian for Christopher Joseph & Associates. The cost is $75 for SAH members, $95 for non-members and $60 for students. Pre-registration at sah.org is required. The Pasadena Conference Center is located at 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (312) 5431365 or visit sah.org.

April 11 — The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens presents “Treasures through Six Generations: Chinese Painting and Calligraphy from the Weng Collection” through July 12 in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery. Culled from a private collection of Chinese art considered among the nation’s greatest, the exhibition features 41 masterworks spanning 900 years as well as personal objects collected by the Weng family in China, most during the 19th century. The collection, which has traveled to Boston and Beijing, was formed by Weng Tonghe, a prominent scholar-official. Surviving unscathed through more than 150 years of dynastic changes and warfare, it was passed down to his great-great grandson Wan-go H.C. Weng, a New Hampshire–based scholar, poet and filmmaker, who consulted with the Huntington on the design of its Suzhou-style Garden of Flowing Fragrance. The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Call (626) 405-2100 or visit huntington.org.

EXPLORING LINCOLN AT THE HUNTINGTON April 3 and 4 —The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens hosts a conference on Lincoln’s legacy to celebrate the bicentennial of the 16th president’s birth. “A Lincoln for Our Time” features a distinguished group of scholars, including Pulitzer Prize– winning historians James McPherson and Daniel W. Howe, exploring Lincoln’s times and his historical impact. Discussions include his reaction to the Mexican-American War, his relationship with Mary Todd Lincoln and his role as commander-in-chief. The conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The cost is $25. The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Call (626) 405-3432 to register. For information, visit huntington.org.

EASTER AT DESCANSO MEANS EGG HUNTS AND BRUNCHES April 11 and 12 — You know it’s Easter at Descanso Gardens when it plays host to a small army of excited children hunting for 6,000 multicolored eggs. On Saturday, hunts run from 9:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. The cost is $5 per child per hunt, which includes a gift basket. The Easter Bunny will hop by for photo ops. Patina offers an Easter brunch in the Rose Pavilion on Saturday and Sunday with seatings at 9 and 10 a.m. and noon and 1:30 p.m. Call Patina at (818) 790-3663 for reservations, which are required. Descanso Gardens is located at 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada Flintridge. Call (818) 9494200 or visit descansogardens.org.

“THE BIRDS” FLY AT LA OPERA April 11 —Los Angeles Opera Music Director James Conlon conducts a new production of “The Birds” (Die Vögel) by Walter Braunfels, with performances at 7:30 p.m. today and April 23 and at 2 p.m. April 18 and 26 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. “The Birds” is part of the opera’s “Recovered Voices” project, which revives the works of composers suppressed under Hitler’s Third Reich. This whimsical work, based on the Aristophanes comedy, chronicles two disillusioned men who find a utopia in the sky as they intercept burned sacrifices to the gods. Cast members include sopranos Désirée Rancatore and Stacey Tappan, tenor Brandon Jovanovich and baritones James Johnson and Martin Gantner. Darko Tresnjak directs. The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion is located at 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Call (213) 9728001 or visit laopera.com.

A NOISE WITHIN PERFORMS “THE REHEARSAL” April 18 — A Noise Within presents “The Rehearsal” through May 24. In the acclaimed work by Jean Anouilh, Count Tiger is disillusioned by a life of pleasure but seems to find salvation in the purity of a young court visitor. When jaded court members feel threatened by the disruption of the court’s fragile status quo, they set about annihilating the innocent newcomer. A Noise Within co-founder and coArtistic Director Julia Rodriguez-Elliott directs. The play starts at 8 p.m. A Noise Within is located at 234 S. Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 240-0910, ext. 1, for dates and tickets or visit anoisewithin.org. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 54 ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 53


THE

LIST

A HIGHLY SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS

AN EXCEPTIONALLY

GIFTED EXHIBITION

AT NORTON SIMON April 17 — “Exceptionally Gifted: Recent Donations to the Norton Simon Museum” goes on view at the Colorado Boulevard venue through Aug. 31. The selection of art donated since 2002 includes some 160 works in a variety of media from various time periods and countries. Indian and Southeast Asian paintings, manuscripts and sculpture are showcased, along with 20th-century California prints, paintings and sculpture and photographs from the 1960s and ’70s. The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org.

April 20 — The Musical Theatre Guild presents “Kiss of the Spider Woman” at the Alex Theatre. The Tony-winning musical, with a book by Terrence McNally and score by John Kander and Fred Ebb, tells the complex story of the jailed Molina, who seeks escape from prison life by imagining that his favorite B-movie actress, in her role as the sinister Spider Woman, visits him before she delivers a final, fatal kiss. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. The Alex Theatre is located at 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale. For information, visit musicaltheatreguild.com or call (818) 8486844. For tickets, call (818) 243-ALEX or visit alextheatre.org.

TWO PIANISTS, FOUR HANDS, ONE PIANO April 19 — The Russian-born husband-and-wife team of Yelena and Vladimir Polezhayev, known as the Long Island Piano Duo, headline this month’s Restoration Concert at the South Pasadena Library Community Room. The couple, who often play together on a single piano, perform classical selections by Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and others, as well as folk tunes from around the world and original jazz compositions. Light refreshments will be served. Tickets for the 4 p.m. concert cost $18 at the door and benefit the library. The South Pasadena Public Library is located at 1115 El Centro St., South Pasadena. Call (626) 799-6333.

SUNDAYS WITH COLEMAN AT CALTECH April 19 — Coleman Chamber Music’s “Sundays with Coleman” season is in full swing at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium. The Amelia Piano Trio, the grand prize winner at the Yellow Springs Competition, performs works by Shostakovich, Harbison and Chopin at 3:30 p.m. Trio members are violinist Anthea Kreston, cellist Jason Duckles and pianist Rieko Aizawa. Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium is located at 332 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 395-4652 or visit colemanchambermusic.org.

A GRAND HOME ON DISPLAY April 19 — The 2009 Pasadena Showcase House of Design is on view through May 17. The annual event, presented by the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts, celebrates its 60th year benefiting community arts programs. This year’s Showcase House is a 1917 Italian Renaissance Revival structure, designed and built by George Lawrence Stimson, with some 10,000 square feet of living space on more than two acres in San Marino. Twenty-five interior designers transformed rooms on three levels, honoring the home’s past while showcasing the latest in style and design. Nine exterior designers have enhanced the property’s gardens and terraces. The property is not handicap-accessible or child-safe, and children under 12 are not admitted. Tickets cost $35 in advance, $40 at the door for “prime time” (weekdays 9 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. and weekends 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.). Tickets for “weekday matinees” (Tuesday from 2 to 3:45 p.m. and Wednesday through Friday 2 to 7:45 p.m.) cost $30 in advance, $35 at the door. For advance tickets, visit pasadenashowcase.org or call (714) 442-3872. For information, call (626) 578-8500 or visit pasadenashowcase.org. 54 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

A COUNTRY FAIR IN LA CRESCENTA April 24 and 25 — The Crescenta Valley Chamber of Commerce hosts a two-day “Hometown Country Fair” in Crescenta Valley Park. The fair opens Friday with carnival rides and live entertainment. Saturday festivities include a car show, craft booths, games and more carnival rides and entertainment. Admission is free. The fair runs from 3 to 9 p.m. Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. Crescenta Valley Park is located at 3901 Dunsmore Ave., La Crescenta. Call (818) 248-4957 or vist lacrescenta.org.

WALDORF FESTIVAL OFFERS DIVERSE ART FEST April 25 — The Pasadena Waldorf School presents its second annual Festival of Art from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., featuring a wide array of paintings, sculpture, knitting, quilts, dolls, jewelry, ceramics, weaving, glass art, furniture and more. A silent auction of art chairs, created by local artists, is included, along with organic and local food, live music and a children’s area. The Pasadena Waldorf School is located at 209 E. Mariposa St., Altadena. Call (626) 794-9564 or visit pwsfestivalofart.com.

F. SCOTT FITZGERALD PARSED IN LECTURE SERIES

Elliot Engel

April 26 — The San Marino Celebrity Series continues with English scholar Elliot Engel’s discussion of “The Rise and Fall of F. Scott Fitzgerald” at 5 p.m. at Lake Avenue Church in Pasadena. Tickets cost $30. Proceeds benefit Huntington Hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit. Lake Avenue Church is located at 393 N. Lake Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 441-1465 or (626) 405-0497. AM

“Kiss of the Spider Woman” photo by David Edward Byrd, “Ladies Visiting an Ascetic at Night” painting courtesy of Norton Simon Museum

A WICKED KISS AT THE ALEX

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53


THE ART OF SCIENCE

A Cosmic Design PRITZKER PRIZE–WINNING ARCHITECT THOM MAYNE’S BLUEPRINT FOR CALTECH’S NEW CAHILL CENTER FOR ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS EVOKES THE DYNAMISM OF THE CONSTANTLY EXPANDING UNIVERSE. BY GARY DRETZKA

As Caltech’s new Cahill Center for Astronomy and

Pasadena to see family. “Our dialogue with administrators, faculty and students also told us that they wanted us to design a modern building in a city that has a

Astrophysics looks toward the future, it fulfills a promise

reputation for being conservative. While convergence was an important consideration inside, the exterior had to fit contextually within the campus…just as

that’s 60 years old — the board of trustees’ vow to build

Caltech fits within the context of Pasadena.” If the hundreds of rust-colored panels, in combination with its crushed and

a single facility dedicated to researching the cosmos,

fissured façade, make it seem as if the Cahill Center were designed to house “Star Trek” crew members on shore leave, rest assured that its occupants would

made during the Cold War space race. And as Caltech’s

be hard-pressed to forget their place in the cosmos. At the end of each of the building’s north-south corridors are floor-to-ceiling windows whose respective

president, Jean-Lou Chameau, said at the opening cere-

views “stitch” the south campus’ athletic fields to the traditional Spanish and Mediterranean buildings across California Boulevard prescribed by Bertram

mony in late January, the dream would still be languishing

Goodhue’s 1917 master plan. As a bonus, most of the offices on the center’s north and east sides also enjoy majestic views of the San Gabriel range.

“if not for the extraordinary generosity of Charles Cahill

Mayne argues that the irregular visual effect, inside and out, reflects the dynamism of the constantly expanding universe. The slanted hallways and stair-

and several other supporters.” Indeed, if it weren’t for the Charles Cahill and Aniko Cahill Foundation, which provided the lead gift for the $50 million facility at 1216 California Blvd., some of the world’s most profound thinkers might still be jostling for space in a half-dozen

astronomers to peer into the far corners of the universe. During the day, precious sunlight burrows into the deepest recesses of the facility. “We made sure that the ceilings of the labs in the basement extended a

buildings across the street. Instead, by summer, some 300 students and faculty

meter above ground level, ensuring that the windows in each of the rooms

members will be sharing the center’s 100,000 square feet of offices, laboratories,

provided some natural light,” Mayne added. “In this way, the labs reminded me

conference rooms and common areas — as well as the ideas that arise from

of a classical art studio.”

within. The opening marks Caltech’s bow to the International Year of Astronomy,

The rooms are spacious, free of architectural clutter and highly conducive to

a global campaign launched by the International Astronomical Union and

technological experimentation and development. “The idea was to give the build-

UNESCO to honor the 400th anniversary of the first use of an astronomical tele-

ing a collegial status, not one that’s hierarchical,” Mayne said. “They wanted a

scope by Galileo Galilei.

variety of offices and meeting spaces on the second and third floors, so we made

The visually striking three-story building was designed by Pritzker Prize–winning

sure there was a communal space — conference rooms, dining areas, multimedia

architect Thom Mayne — co-founder of the Santa Monica firm Morphosis — and

centers — at every intersection. Windows allowed passersby to catch glimpses of

built by the California-based general contractor Hathaway Dinwiddie. Having won

the activity going on inside the meeting rooms.”

the commission to create a facility that would stand as both an architectural landPhotos courtesy of Caltech

wells are also intended to reference the giant telescopes that have allowed

Andrew Lange, chair of Caltech’s Division of Physics, Mathematics and

mark and theater for advanced scientific pursuits, Mayne and the Morphosis team

Astronomy, envisioned a floor plan that would radically change the way

needed to do some research of their own. The magnitude of the work to be per-

researchers interacted with each other while at work or just moving from one

formed inside the Cahill Center demanded that form follow function, in part by

space to another. For years, brick walls, closed doors and dark hallways dis-

encouraging researchers to collaborate.

couraged the impromptu sharing of ideas. To facilitate a “fresh start” at the

“We knew that this was one of the most advanced research centers in the world,” recalled Mayne, a former South Pasadena resident who frequently visits

Cahill Center, the Morphosis staff would first be required to familiarize them—CONTINUED ON PAGE 57 ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 55


THE ART OF SCIENCE

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 55

selves with the university’s unique academic culture and how space is utilized by researchers. “The 26 astrophysics faculty members have been at Caltech for a long time and know each other pretty well, but their groups have been separated,” Lange said. “Because of this, communication was difficult and not a driving force for their research. The Cahill Center has been designed to break down the cloistered tradition, which makes it too easy for people to close their doors and not share what they’re doing. If everyone is sharing the break rooms, the interaction will help put their own research into a larger context. Ideas will be generated by people bumping into each other in the hallways.” Lange noted that the close proximity of his new office to the conference room across a narrow corridor allows him to keep in direct contact with his students, even when he isn’t physically there. To facilitate eavesdropping, he asked

IF THE HUNDREDS OF RUST-COLORED PANELS, IN COMBINATION WITH ITS CRUSHED AND FISSURED FAÇADE, MAKE IT SEEM AS IF THE CAHILL CENTER WERE DESIGNED TO HOUSE “STAR TREK” CREW MEMBERS ON SHORE LEAVE, REST ASSURED THAT ITS OCCUPANTS WOULD BE HARDPRESSED TO FORGET THEIR PLACE IN THE COSMOS. the designers to eliminate doors at the entrances to some meeting rooms. If Lange senses a need for his input, his desk is only a few short steps away. Also, an extensive wireless system allows researchers to keep abreast of what’s going on in various parts of the building. One aspect of the Cahill Center design that didn’t require a great deal of debate or reeducation involved the building’s environmental footprint. Caltech was green long before the color became identified with anything besides money and lawns. And Morphosis, Mayne emphasizes, “takes it for granted” that its creations will promote energy efficiency and sustainability. Even so, it’s worth noting that the Cahill Center is the first Caltech building to earn gold-level certification under the LEED Green Building Rating System. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, promotes “whole-building” sustainability by accrediting structures that meet the building council’s demanding standards. Although the center’s unusual profile has raised the eyebrows of students, neighbors and people cruising down California Boulevard, Mayne considers its design to be one of his most conservative. Moreover, to everyone’s surprise, his plans virtually sailed through the Design Commission, Pasadena’s tradition-minded architectural review board. “They even asked us to put back several interesting things that were lost during various revisions,” he said. By now, the pluses and minuses of the Cahill Center have been adjudicated by the professional pundits, and bloggers have lit up the switchboard with their wildly divergent opinions. The criticism Mayne valued most, however, came from one of his grandchildren, who observed, “It’s a building that moves in your brain” — just like the universe itself. AM 56 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 57


THE ART OF SCIENCE

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 55

selves with the university’s unique academic culture and how space is utilized by researchers. “The 26 astrophysics faculty members have been at Caltech for a long time and know each other pretty well, but their groups have been separated,” Lange said. “Because of this, communication was difficult and not a driving force for their research. The Cahill Center has been designed to break down the cloistered tradition, which makes it too easy for people to close their doors and not share what they’re doing. If everyone is sharing the break rooms, the interaction will help put their own research into a larger context. Ideas will be generated by people bumping into each other in the hallways.” Lange noted that the close proximity of his new office to the conference room across a narrow corridor allows him to keep in direct contact with his students, even when he isn’t physically there. To facilitate eavesdropping, he asked

IF THE HUNDREDS OF RUST-COLORED PANELS, IN COMBINATION WITH ITS CRUSHED AND FISSURED FAÇADE, MAKE IT SEEM AS IF THE CAHILL CENTER WERE DESIGNED TO HOUSE “STAR TREK” CREW MEMBERS ON SHORE LEAVE, REST ASSURED THAT ITS OCCUPANTS WOULD BE HARDPRESSED TO FORGET THEIR PLACE IN THE COSMOS. the designers to eliminate doors at the entrances to some meeting rooms. If Lange senses a need for his input, his desk is only a few short steps away. Also, an extensive wireless system allows researchers to keep abreast of what’s going on in various parts of the building. One aspect of the Cahill Center design that didn’t require a great deal of debate or reeducation involved the building’s environmental footprint. Caltech was green long before the color became identified with anything besides money and lawns. And Morphosis, Mayne emphasizes, “takes it for granted” that its creations will promote energy efficiency and sustainability. Even so, it’s worth noting that the Cahill Center is the first Caltech building to earn gold-level certification under the LEED Green Building Rating System. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, promotes “whole-building” sustainability by accrediting structures that meet the building council’s demanding standards. Although the center’s unusual profile has raised the eyebrows of students, neighbors and people cruising down California Boulevard, Mayne considers its design to be one of his most conservative. Moreover, to everyone’s surprise, his plans virtually sailed through the Design Commission, Pasadena’s tradition-minded architectural review board. “They even asked us to put back several interesting things that were lost during various revisions,” he said. By now, the pluses and minuses of the Cahill Center have been adjudicated by the professional pundits, and bloggers have lit up the switchboard with their wildly divergent opinions. The criticism Mayne valued most, however, came from one of his grandchildren, who observed, “It’s a building that moves in your brain” — just like the universe itself. AM 56 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ APRIL 2009 ~ 57


KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

Gitmo Out of Life SPICE UP YOUR DINNER TABLE WITH JAMAICAN JERK CUISINE, SAVORED BY SOME OF GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE’S FINEST. BY LESLIE BILDERBACK

Ahoy! I am back from another Navy excursion. This time, I was asked to provide some advanced bakery training to the cooks at the Bilderback with some of her boys at the base

U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Of course, current events being what they are, I jumped at the chance. Plus, I

wide) and a number of Jamaican eateries, including my personal favorite—the

love, love, love Cuban food. A subtle blend of Caribbean, Spanish and African

Jerk Shack. Here, at least, I could escape the “comforts of home” and try some-

cuisines, the great dishes of Cuba rank high on my Best Foods in the World list. I was

thing interesting.

eager to taste authentic ropa vieja, a savory shredded flank steak, boliche, delicious

Not being as familiar with Atlantic geography as I am with Pacific, I was a lit-

beef round stuffed with chorizo, humble rice and beans cooked with piquant herbal

tle surprised to learn that Jamaica is only about 90 miles from Cuba. I learned this

sofrito sauce and my favorite — tostones, fried, smushed and fried-again plantains.

from one of my Jamaican students, Mr. Williamson, who volunteered that nugget

Yes, please. Send me to Cuba!

when he learned I had become a regular at the Jerk Shack. He introduced me to

My purpose was to help improve bakery production, provide variety with

ackee and saltfish, pepperpot soup and curried goat and was delighted to learn

more recipe options and introduce a higher level of culinary sophistication. This

that I thought the jerk spice was mild. Apparently, Americans are not fond of the

final point was important, because in addition to providing three meals a day for

Scotch bonnet chili, a main component. He turned me onto the Jerk Shack’s

the servicemen and women, there is a constant flow of bigwigs, which means

secret stash of spiced-up sauce.

fancy meal preparation on a regular basis. You just can’t serve Attorney General Eric Holder Navy-brand canned butterscotch pudding. Upon my arrival, I received a warm Navy welcome and was given the grand

Of course, I didn’t spend all my time at the Jerk Shack. I was there to teach, and what an experience that was. Rarely have I had a more enthusiastic, inquisitive class of adults. All my students were eager to learn, and most aspire to culinary school and

tour. It didn’t take long to figure out that I wasn’t really in Cuba at all.

restaurant ownership. They already possessed impressive skills and could easily out-

Guantanamo Bay, like every other naval base, tries to look and act like a typical

bake any cupcake diva in L.A. They were grateful to take a break from the Navy

American small town. There are about 7,000 residents, including military families

recipe cards and learn some classic European baking and pastry techniques.

and civilian foreign nationals from the Philippines, Jamaica and Cuba, which claims a few (mostly families that were stuck here when the fence went up). Unlike the situation at other bases, one cannot pass through the gate at

The students were both sailors and foreign nationals. That is because, although culinary operations at Gitmo have Navy oversight, the day-to-day operations are managed by civilian contractors. When Gitmo closes its detention cen-

GTMO for a quick jaunt around the host country. As a result, the Department of

ter, the base will downsize, and two-thirds of the servicemen and women will be

Morale, Welfare and Recreation has taken great pains to make this little village

happily reassigned. (The flight off the island was my first experience of passen-

feel like home. In their free time, families can enjoy the golf course, arboretum,

gers cheering at takeoff.) The civilians, though, will be on their own. Hopefully, I

skate park, football field, water park, bowling alley, fitness center and movie the-

was able to give them a culinary leg up in their future quest for employment. AM

bingo jackpot, play Ultimate Frisbee or throw pots at the ceramics workshop. If it

Bilderback is a certified master chef and baker, a former executive chef of Pasadena’s

weren’t for the gazillion iguanas (and everyone dressed in uniform), you might

California School of Culinary Arts and the author of six books in Alpha Publishing’s

easily mistake it for Anytown, USA.

“The Complete Idiot’s Guide to…” series — “…Sensational Salads” (March 2009),

In addition to three galleys, residents can eat at any number of fine establish-

“...Snack Cakes” (June 2008), “...Good Food from the Good Book” (March 2008),

ments. But to my infinite disappointment, none of them were Cuban. There were

“...Spices and Herbs” (Dec. 2007), “...Comfort Food” (Sept. 2007) and “...Success as

McDonald’s, Starbucks, Subway, O’Kelly’s Irish Pub (which, I was told, arrives

a Chef” (Feb. 2007). A South Pasadena resident, Bilderback teaches her techniques

as a “pub kit,” which can be found assembled at several military bases world-

online at www.culinarymasterclass.com.

58 ~ APRIL 2009 ~ ARROYO

Food photos: Teri Lyn Fisher

ater. They can take lessons at the scuba center, rent a boat at the marina, win the


JERK PORK

Jerk is a seasoning blend that originated in Jamaica. Recipes vary but usually contain chilies, thyme and allspice. The mix can be used on any number of meats and vegetables. Chicken is the most common jerked meat in the U.S., but I often find it to be too dry. I much prefer jerked pork, which is deliciously savory, due in no small part to the animal's fat. Choose a fatty cut, as American pork is now bred to be much leaner than in the olden days. Care should be taken not to cook this dish too fast, or it will dry out. This recipe calls for the Scotch bonnet chili, which is one of the hottest out there. This is, of course, optional. You can leave it out entirely, or reduce the heat index by substituting a humble jalapeño. Ingredients 1/4

cup soy sauce cup sesame oil 1/2 cup rice vinegar 1/4 cup orange juice 1/4 cup lime juice 2 scallions, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon ground allspice 1/4

1 tablespoon dried thyme 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon dried sage 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 Scotch bonnet chili, minced 3 to 4 pounds country-style pork ribs

Food photos: Teri Lyn Fisher

Method 1. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients but meat and mix well. Add the pork and coat thoroughly. Be sure pork is fully submerged in marinade, and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight. 2. Preheat oven to 200°F. Place a rack in the bottom of a roasting pan, and fill the pan with 1/2 inch of water. Remove pork from marinade, place on rack and cover with foil. Bake 2 to 3 hours, until meat is tender. 3. Increase oven temperature to 500°F, remove foil and cook another 15 minutes to brown. This step can also be completed on a grill for a crispy, charcoal flavor. Serve with red beans and rice and simple steamed veggies or coleslaw.

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Arroyo Monthly April 2009  

Design Pasadena 2009

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