Page 1

F I N E

L I V I N G

I N

T H E

G R E A T E R

Back to School Issue

P A S A D E N A

A R E A

SEPTEMBER 2010

SINGING THE SCHOOL BUDGET CUT BLUES?

TRY OUT ONE OF THESE LOCAL MUSIC GROUPS

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH THE

PRIVATE SCHOOL TUITION CRUNCH

CREATIVE SCHOOL LUNCHES

FOR BUSY PARENTS AND HEALTHY KIDS


ARROYO VOLUME 6 ~ NUMBER 9

M O N T H LY

8 BACK TO SCHOOL ISSUE 8 CREATIVE SCHOOL LUNCHES With childhood obesity on the rise, parents can fight back by packing these simple, healthy meals. –By Noela Hueso

11 STRIKE UP THE BAND Pasadena-area students facing school budget cuts for music can opt for a symphony of alternatives around town. –By Scarlet Cheng

14 KIDS VS. PETS As school buses start their engines, one empty nester considers the question, which are better, pets or kids? –By Nancy Spiller

17 YOUR BIG BACKYARD All the world’s a classroom, so take your kids outdoors for a master class in Southern California’s abundant flora and fauna. –By Ilsa Setziol

24 A TUITION MATH TUTORIAL Even in this grim economy, parents of private school students can master the formula for paying relentlessly rising tuition bills. –By Brenda Rees

DEPARTMENTS 7 FESTIVITIES Creative Arts Group’s golden anniversary and A Noise Within’s groundbreaking

39 THE LIST Cal Phil at the Mill, Pasadena POPS goes Hollywood, vaudeville at the Alex and more

42 OBJECTS OF DESIRE Finesse playtime with these brain (and body) teasers. 51 KITCHEN CONFESSIONS A love letter to bread, a power struggle between the heart and the hips ABOUT THE COVER: Illustration ©iStockphoto.com/minimil

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 5


EDITOR’S NOTE

YOU CAN CONSIDER THIS OUR BACK-TO-SCHOOL issue, but here at Arroyo Monthly, we’re declaring September Parents’ Month. Our hats, if we had them, would be off to Pasadena-area parents steering their kids toward adulthood around the hazardous shoals of family life in 2010 — school budget cuts, rising private tuition costs, ballooning childhood obesity and more. So we’d like to offer a hand to families braving the new millennium. As Scarlet Cheng explains, Pasadena-area kids grappling with school budget cuts for music have a symphony of after-school and weekend options for a finely tuned education. There’s no reason to limit your children’s schooling to the ABC’s when the Pasadena Conservatory of Music is happy to introduce them to G clef and other pleasures of the musically literate. And many music organizations offer financial aid for families in need. That’s true of area private schools as well. Brenda Rees, whose own children’s school raffled off a year of free tuition, spoke to local principals and headmasters to find out what parents can do if the grim economy threatens their plans. Of course, one of our favorite clichés – the best things in life are free – is still hanging in there. Mother Nature has plenty to offer SoCal families willing to put on their walking or biking shoes, and environmental reporter Ilsa Setziol has a myriad of suggestions for terrific excursions that come child-approved by her son, Mateo. Hitting the great outdoors has the added bonus of fending off that other dreaded trend, childhood obesity. Noela Hueso offers additional tips for parents who want to pack a healthy lunch that keeps kids interested — and away from fatty and sugary snack foods. And lest we forget, not all parents need stress about looming college tuition bills and other charms of family life. Some can kiss their four-legged brood on the head as they plan their Christmas in Italy. Nancy Spiller, who has parented both kinds of offspring — two-legged and four- — considers their respective pros and cons in her delightful illustrated musings, “Kids vs. Pets.” — Irene Lacher

ARROYO MONTHLY Altadena, Arcadia, Eagle Rock, Glendale, La Cañada Flintridge, La Crescenta, Montrose, Sierra Madre, Pasadena, San Marino and South Pasadena

EDITOR IN CHIEF Irene Lacher PRODUCTION MANAGER Yvonne Guerrero ART DIRECTOR Joel Vendette JUNIOR DESIGNER Eisen Nepomuceno WEB DESIGNER Carla Marroquin COPY EDITOR John Seeley CONTRIBUTORS Leslie Bilderback, Michael Burr, Michael Cervin, Scarlet Cheng, André Coleman, Mandalit del Barco, Patt Diroll, Gary Dretzka, Jenn Garbee, Lynne Heffley, Noela Hueso, Katie Klapper, Ilsa Setziol, Kirk Silsbee, John Sollenberger, Nancy Spiller, Bradley Tuck PHOTOGRAPHERS Johnny Buzzerio, Teri Lyn Fisher, Gabriel Goldberg, C.M. Hardt, Melissa Valladares ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Dina Stegon ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Fred Bankston, Carolyn Johansen, Leslie Lamm, Alison Standish, Cynthia Vazquez ADVERTISING DESIGNER Carla Marroquin VP OF FINANCE Michael Nagami HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Andrea Baker

CONTACT US ADVERTISING dinas@pasadenaweekly.com EDITORIAL arroyoeditor@pasadenaweekly.com PHONE (626) 584-1500 FAX (626) 795-0149 MAILING ADDRESS 50 S. De Lacey Ave., Ste. 200, Pasadena, CA 91105

BUSINESS MANAGER Angela Wang ACCOUNTING Alysia Chavez, Monica MacCree

ArroyoMonthly.com

OFFICE ASSISTANT Claudia Solano PUBLISHER Jon Guynn

6 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

©2010 Southland Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.


FESTIVITIES

1. Jacki Raymond, Kathy Snow, Mary Wallace and Vicki Mathieu 2. Louise and Dick Major and Jan Eriksson 3. Lynn Van Dam Cooper and Christy Johnson 4. Maddie Gordon and Danielle Wilson MAIN: Dottie Burnett and Jacquie Pergola

Foothill Creative Arts Group (CAG) celebrated its golden anniversary on July 31 with a garden cocktail party and silent auc1

tion at the Arcadia home of Janice and Robert Eriksson. More

2

than 100 supporters of Sierra Madre’s nonprofit arts-and-crafts center attended, raising some $22,000 for programs. Emceed by CAG instructor D. Lester Williams, the event was hosted by CAG President Vicki Mathieu, co-founders Mary Wallace and Kathy Snow and Executive Director Jacki Raymond. Revelers also included former Arcadia Mayor Mary Young and American Museum of Ceramic Art Director Christy Johnson.

PHOTOS: Lia Pearson Photography (CAG); Jamie Phan (A Noise Within)

3

4

1

2

A Noise Within, the Glendale-based classical repertory theater company, broke

3

1. Steve Haderlein, Samantha Starr and Arlen Smith

ground July 20 on the new 300-seat theater

2. Terri Murray, Lourdes Baird and Dr. Robert Israel

in Pasadena that will become its perma-

3. David Worrell and Jeff Allen

nent home. Construction on the 33,000-

LEFT: Mayor Bill Bogaard, A Noise Within Co-Founders/Co-Artistic Directors Julia Rodriguez-Elliott and Geoff Elliott and board President Terry Kay

square-foot venue, estimated at $13.3 million, is scheduled to be completed by fall 2011, in time for the company’s 20th season opening.

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 7


BACK TO SCHOOL

Creative School Lunches WITH CHILDHOOD OBESITY ON THE RISE, PARENTS CAN FIGHT BACK BY PACKING THESE SIMPLE, HEALTHY MEALS. BY NOELA HUESO

WHEN RETIRED MILITARY OFFICERS COME OUT WITH A REPORT CALLING SCHOOL LUNCHES A THREAT TO NATIONAL SECURITY, YOU KNOW THERE’S A PROBLEM. ACCORDING TO A RECENT NBC NEWS BROADCAST, THEY WARNED THAT AMERICAN KIDS ARE GAINING TOO MUCH WEIGHT AND HEADING TOWARD BEING UNFIT FOR MILITARY SERVICE. POINTING TO SCHOOL MEALS THAT ARE TYPICALLY HEAVY ON FAT AND CARBS AND LIGHT ON FARE THAT’S LEAN, GREEN AND HEALTHY, IT’S NOT TOO HARD TO SEE THEIR REASONING — ESPECIALLY SINCE UP TO 40 PERCENT OF KIDS’ FOOD INTAKE COMES FROM THE MEALS AND SNACKS THEY EAT AT SCHOOL. That report is just part of the growing media buzz identifying cafeteria food as a prime culprit in childhood obesity, which has more than tripled over the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Whether it’s Jamie Oliver, the chef who redesigned menus at a West Virginia elementary school on the ABC summer series Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution, or the legislators trying to reform the nation’s school lunch program with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the topic is a hot one. At the local level, parents of Pasadena Unified School District students should be encouraged: PUSD last year banished soda machines and installed salad bars in many campus cafeterias. Of course, the best way to take control of your children’s eating habits is to send them to school with food from home. But what to make? If you’re like many parents, you’ve spent many a day haggling over the contents of the lunch box. Kids of all ages can be finicky, not just the 2-year-old whose evolving taste buds and emerging assertion of independence can make for a potent power struggle between parent and child. Maybe finicky taste buds aren’t the problem — you’re just fresh out of ideas for making something other than a turkey sandwich (not that there’s anything wrong with that!). Never fear. With a little creative thinking and a dose of inspiration, you’ll soon be making the most out of your kids’ meals with minimal stress and maximum health benefits. Fresh is best. Stay away from prepackaged, processed foods. Yes, they’re time-savers, but they can also be calorie-laden, preservative-filled danger zones. If fresh isn’t always an option, Trader Joe’s, Fresh & Easy and Whole Foods offer an array of minimally processed frozen and packaged foods that are ideal for midday meals. Keep it simple. You forgot to make lunches last night and now you’re scrambling to get out the door. Even though the morning rush can be pure madness, healthy meals that are simple can be thrown together in a matter of minutes. Take a cue from the Japanese bento box concept — in which lunch components are prepared and tucked in their own containers or stored side-by-side with dividers — and fill each section with finger foods that go well together, such as: • Grilled chicken slices, snap peas, peanut sauce, rice crackers and grapes • Cinnamon pita chips, applesauce, almonds and mission figs • Cherry tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, carrots and ranch dressing —CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

8 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 9


BACK TO SCHOOL

Creative School Lunches WITH CHILDHOOD OBESITY ON THE RISE, PARENTS CAN FIGHT BACK BY PACKING THESE SIMPLE, HEALTHY MEALS. BY NOELA HUESO

WHEN RETIRED MILITARY OFFICERS COME OUT WITH A REPORT CALLING SCHOOL LUNCHES A THREAT TO NATIONAL SECURITY, YOU KNOW THERE’S A PROBLEM. ACCORDING TO A RECENT NBC NEWS BROADCAST, THEY WARNED THAT AMERICAN KIDS ARE GAINING TOO MUCH WEIGHT AND HEADING TOWARD BEING UNFIT FOR MILITARY SERVICE. POINTING TO SCHOOL MEALS THAT ARE TYPICALLY HEAVY ON FAT AND CARBS AND LIGHT ON FARE THAT’S LEAN, GREEN AND HEALTHY, IT’S NOT TOO HARD TO SEE THEIR REASONING — ESPECIALLY SINCE UP TO 40 PERCENT OF KIDS’ FOOD INTAKE COMES FROM THE MEALS AND SNACKS THEY EAT AT SCHOOL. That report is just part of the growing media buzz identifying cafeteria food as a prime culprit in childhood obesity, which has more than tripled over the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Whether it’s Jamie Oliver, the chef who redesigned menus at a West Virginia elementary school on the ABC summer series Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution, or the legislators trying to reform the nation’s school lunch program with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the topic is a hot one. At the local level, parents of Pasadena Unified School District students should be encouraged: PUSD last year banished soda machines and installed salad bars in many campus cafeterias. Of course, the best way to take control of your children’s eating habits is to send them to school with food from home. But what to make? If you’re like many parents, you’ve spent many a day haggling over the contents of the lunch box. Kids of all ages can be finicky, not just the 2-year-old whose evolving taste buds and emerging assertion of independence can make for a potent power struggle between parent and child. Maybe finicky taste buds aren’t the problem — you’re just fresh out of ideas for making something other than a turkey sandwich (not that there’s anything wrong with that!). Never fear. With a little creative thinking and a dose of inspiration, you’ll soon be making the most out of your kids’ meals with minimal stress and maximum health benefits. Fresh is best. Stay away from prepackaged, processed foods. Yes, they’re time-savers, but they can also be calorie-laden, preservative-filled danger zones. If fresh isn’t always an option, Trader Joe’s, Fresh & Easy and Whole Foods offer an array of minimally processed frozen and packaged foods that are ideal for midday meals. Keep it simple. You forgot to make lunches last night and now you’re scrambling to get out the door. Even though the morning rush can be pure madness, healthy meals that are simple can be thrown together in a matter of minutes. Take a cue from the Japanese bento box concept — in which lunch components are prepared and tucked in their own containers or stored side-by-side with dividers — and fill each section with finger foods that go well together, such as: • Grilled chicken slices, snap peas, peanut sauce, rice crackers and grapes • Cinnamon pita chips, applesauce, almonds and mission figs • Cherry tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, carrots and ranch dressing —CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

8 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 9


BACK TO SCHOOL

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

• Hard-boiled eggs, cheddar cheese sticks, pretzels and trail mix • Swiss cheese squares, sliced roast beef, spicy golden mustard, Spanish green olives and wheat crackers • Fruit salad, banana mini-muffins and rice pudding • Watermelon and cantaloupe slices and strawberries • Dried fruit: apricots, peaches, mangoes, strawberries, bananas, etc. • Vegetable chips and salsa Get the kids involved. One week, it’s peanut butter and jelly or nothing and the next week it’s on your kids’ No Fly list. Avert pickiness by getting them involved in the lunch-making process. Kids are more likely to eat what’s in their lunch box if they have a hand in choosing and preparing their meals. Simple dishes include: • Chicken salad • Egg salad • Heroes (a.k.a. submarines, grinders and hoagies) • A wheat bagel with sliced turkey, lettuce and cream cheese • Wraps of any kind: vegetable, turkey, chicken, etc. Speaking of peanut butter… Hailed as one America’s favorite foods, peanut butter is found in approximately 75 percent of American homes. The traditional PB&J sandwich is the most beloved, and if you’re going to go that route, be sure to use 100 percent spreadable fruit, such as the offerings from Sorrell Ridge, Smucker’s and Polaner, instead of sugary preserves. And that goes on whole grain bread, of course. Other satisfying lunchtime combinations include: • Sliced banana and peanut butter on a wheat tortilla • Sliced apples and celery with peanut butter in a cup • Peanut butter and honey on cinnamon raisin bread Go international. My personal favorites are lunches with foreign flair. While younger children need to be introduced to new foods a number of times before they become accustomed to them, older kids should be able to appreciate tastes from around the world. Some of these require a little advance preparation if you’re serving homemade, but they’re worth it. Consider: • Spanikopita (spinach pie), a traditional Greek dish combining spinach, butter, eggs, parsley, onions and feta cheese, can be made in a big tray or in individual triangles. Trader Joe’s sells a package of eight for $3.99; or try the Food Network’s recipe: foodnetwork.com/recipes/spanakopita-spinachtriangles-or-pie-recipe/index.html. • Middle Eastern falafels, dolmas, hummus and pita bread can be found at ethnic markets in Pasadena’s Armenian district, such as Vartan’s Family 10 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

Grocery (1515 E. Washington Blvd.) and Good Foods Market (1864 E. Washington Blvd.). Falafels, made of ground chickpeas and/or fava beans, parsley and spices, are traditionally served in a pita pocket with pickles, lettuce and tahini sauce. They travel more easily when the ingredients are served wrap-style in a flour lavash or tortilla. Buy the mix in a box and prepare at home in less than 30 minutes. Dolmas are marinated grape leaves stuffed with rice and sometimes beef — finger food at its best. • The Italian stromboli is a rolled baked sandwich with a yeast dough pocket that can contain any number of ingredients, such as provolone and parmesan cheeses, salami, pepperoni, turkey or ham, onions, basil and garlic (try the recipe at fabulousfoods.com/usa/article/137/27931). One stromboli is large enough to serve at least two, so slice it up and serve or freeze the leftovers. Check out the Roma Italian Deli & Grocery at 918 N. Lake Ave. for all your stromboli needs. • Ingredients for sushi and California rolls can be found at the Korean HK Market in Glendale (831 N. Pacific Ave.), which has a vast array of Asian foods to choose from. Get your short-grain rice, fish and seaweed there to make your own or check out the many varieties offered at Trader Joe’s, Fresh & Easy, Costco and Whole Foods. • Burritos are always sure things. You can make them as traditional (pinto beans, cheese, shredded chicken or beef) or as fancy as you like. I like mine with everything: lettuce, rice, salsa, corn, beans (black or pinto), guacamole, etc. The only problem is, the more ingredients you put in, the messier it can get — which is why a taco salad makes a good lunchtime alternative. Check out the fresh produce and meat at Super King Market (2260 N. Lincoln Ave., Altadena), where prices are super cheap. Appeal to their inner vegetarian. Not every meal has to have meat in it to have protein — or be tasty. Meals prepared with eggs, tofu, beans and grains, such as quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) and Israeli couscous (pearl couscous), are quick and easy. Revive leftovers. Last night’s dinner can be today’s lunchtime treat. Be inventive. Leftover grilled chicken can be the lead ingredient in a zesty Thai chicken wrap or Chinese chicken salad. Mix leftover rotini or fusilli with your choice of chopped vegetables, such as broccoli, corn, carrots and onions, and drizzle with Italian dressing for a fresh pasta salad. Water, water, everywhere. You’ve heard it before — water is the best beverage. It’s true. Forgo the disposable plastic bottles and pack it in a colorful reusable aluminum bottle. The environment will thank you. AM


BACK TO SCHOOL

PASADENA-AREA STUDENTS FACING SCHOOL BUDGET CUTS FOR MUSIC CAN OPT FOR A SYMPHONY OF ALTERNATIVES AROUND TOWN.

PHOTO: Tim Berreth

BY SCARLET CHENG

UNBOWED: String players in the Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra

IT’S A FAMILIAR REFRAIN: WHEN THE ECONOMY TAKES A DIVE AND SCHOOL BUDGETS SHRINK, THE PROGRAMS THAT FEEL THE PINCH ALWAYS INCLUDE MUSIC AND ARTS. AND THE COMING SCHOOL YEAR BRINGS PARTICULARLY PAINFUL CUTS: THE PASADENA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT SLASHED $25.1 MILLION FROM THE 2010–11 BUDGET, WHICH INVOLVED PINK-SLIPPING 250 TEACHERS — ULTIMATELY REDUCING THE NUMBER OF MUSIC EDUCATORS BY 13 PERCENT THIS YEAR ALONE. “MUSIC SEEMS VERY EXPENDABLE,” SAYS CYNTHIA ABBOTT, A CHORAL TEACHER AT WASHINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL AND THE PASADENA MASTER CHORALE’S DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION. “SO IT’S ALWAYS ON THE CHOPPING BLOCK.” For the survivors, times are still tough, particularly at the elementary level, says Karen Klages, PUSD’s music specialist. This fall, only fifth-graders will have music education, rather than some of the kids in third through sixth grades as —CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 11


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before. Even so, teachers will be stretched. “Some teachers will cover six or seven schools,” says Klages, who has been teaching music in public schools since 1987. “When I started out, I just covered three schools.” That was before several years of belt-tightening: Choral programs that used to be available in every school are now limited to four high schools and two middle schools. Jo Stoup, a former music teacher at John Muir High School, says the school’s marching band — 110 students strong in her day — had been reduced to 30 when she checked a couple of years ago; and the orchestra, formerly 60 students, was down to 11. Even in those relatively flusher days, running a music program was a struggle, says Stoup, currently music director of the Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra (PYMO) and a full-time faculty member at Pasadena City College (PCC). She had no budget for transportation, costumes or sheet music. “I had to sell candy bars out of my office; we sold wrapping paper,” she says. “So besides all your duties as a teacher, you’re doing all this other stuff. I was putting in 60 to 70 hours a week.” But fear not: Parents and students who consider music essential to a wellrounded education can cue up the “Hallelujah Chorus” — there are a number of alternatives in the Pasadena area. Most charge fees, although many offer scholarships to those in financial need. Here are some examples: Stoup’s Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra is composed of students from 10th grade through junior college age who rehearse once a week, and it’s conveniently housed on the PCC campus. The young musicians must audition; some 80 to 100 participants from the area make the cut each year. Performance venues have included PCC, the Wilshire Ebell in Los Angeles and a theater in Hawaii. The 50-year-old nonprofit requires students to participate in three concerts and a weekend retreat during the school year. Musicians must also belong to a performance group at their school. (So, Stroup notes, it’s a telling fact that this year, there are only two students from PUSD). Tuition and fees start at $900. Visit PYMO.org for more information. Another option is the Pasadena Youth Symphony Orchestra (PYSO), under

PHOTOS: Rick Myer (Pasadena Conservatory); courtesy of the PMC; courtesy of the PYSO

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

the umbrella of the Pasadena Symphony Orchestra, which has been helping to train classical musicians since 1972. Students in grades six through nine can sign up for the school year for a basic cost of $420, which covers weekly meetings that include group rehearsals and instruction for their particular section (wind, brass, string, etc.). Field trips involve additional fees. The group currently has about 150 students, says Clay Campbell, the PSO’s director of education and community engagement. “In February, we were asked to play at the American String Teachers Association’s National Orchestra Festival in Santa Clara,” says Campbell. “It’s a very big honor.” Next year they’re headed to Colorado Springs to play with the Air Force Academy Band, which is staffed by professional musicians. Visit pasadenasymphony-pops.org/education-and-community/pasadena-youthsymphony-orchestra/. The Pasadena Conservatory of Music (PCM), an independent nonprofit community music school founded in 1983, has a good reputation for training young musicians at its 100 N. Hill Ave. location. PCM has a faculty of 50 and enrollment of more than 1,300 students, ranging from infants to senior citizens. Its Young Musicians program, which serves children up to age 12, offers weekly classes designed for students of a particular age or grade. According to the website, the program “encourages and nurtures each child’s musicality with oneyear, age-specific classes that are fun, creative and developmentally appropriate.” Enrollment is for the entire school year. Annual tuition costs $648 ($576 for students also receiving private instruction at PCM). There’s a yearly family registration fee of $40, and an annual materials fee of $33 to $70. Visit pasadenaconservatory.org. The Pasadena Master Chorale (PMC) was formed a couple of years ago by its artistic director, Jeffrey Bernstein, who served as director of choral music at Occidental College from 1997 to 2008. The adult group of some 80 auditioned voices performs several times a year and recruits young singers when the program calls for it. “For the Christmas concert, we wanted to feature the Blair [High School] choir,” says Cynthia Abbott. “I know the program has a lot of nice musicians, and I thought it would be great to expose them to something classical.” So the group brought in 30 students from Blair and eight from other high schools. Students, who were each paired with an adult mentor, rehearsed every other week at no charge. Visit pasadenamasterchorale.org. AM

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before. Even so, teachers will be stretched. “Some teachers will cover six or seven schools,” says Klages, who has been teaching music in public schools since 1987. “When I started out, I just covered three schools.” That was before several years of belt-tightening: Choral programs that used to be available in every school are now limited to four high schools and two middle schools. Jo Stoup, a former music teacher at John Muir High School, says the school’s marching band — 110 students strong in her day — had been reduced to 30 when she checked a couple of years ago; and the orchestra, formerly 60 students, was down to 11. Even in those relatively flusher days, running a music program was a struggle, says Stoup, currently music director of the Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra (PYMO) and a full-time faculty member at Pasadena City College (PCC). She had no budget for transportation, costumes or sheet music. “I had to sell candy bars out of my office; we sold wrapping paper,” she says. “So besides all your duties as a teacher, you’re doing all this other stuff. I was putting in 60 to 70 hours a week.” But fear not: Parents and students who consider music essential to a wellrounded education can cue up the “Hallelujah Chorus” — there are a number of alternatives in the Pasadena area. Most charge fees, although many offer scholarships to those in financial need. Here are some examples: Stoup’s Pasadena Young Musicians Orchestra is composed of students from 10th grade through junior college age who rehearse once a week, and it’s conveniently housed on the PCC campus. The young musicians must audition; some 80 to 100 participants from the area make the cut each year. Performance venues have included PCC, the Wilshire Ebell in Los Angeles and a theater in Hawaii. The 50-year-old nonprofit requires students to participate in three concerts and a weekend retreat during the school year. Musicians must also belong to a performance group at their school. (So, Stroup notes, it’s a telling fact that this year, there are only two students from PUSD). Tuition and fees start at $900. Visit PYMO.org for more information. Another option is the Pasadena Youth Symphony Orchestra (PYSO), under

PHOTOS: Rick Myer (Pasadena Conservatory); courtesy of the PMC; courtesy of the PYSO

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

the umbrella of the Pasadena Symphony Orchestra, which has been helping to train classical musicians since 1972. Students in grades six through nine can sign up for the school year for a basic cost of $420, which covers weekly meetings that include group rehearsals and instruction for their particular section (wind, brass, string, etc.). Field trips involve additional fees. The group currently has about 150 students, says Clay Campbell, the PSO’s director of education and community engagement. “In February, we were asked to play at the American String Teachers Association’s National Orchestra Festival in Santa Clara,” says Campbell. “It’s a very big honor.” Next year they’re headed to Colorado Springs to play with the Air Force Academy Band, which is staffed by professional musicians. Visit pasadenasymphony-pops.org/education-and-community/pasadena-youthsymphony-orchestra/. The Pasadena Conservatory of Music (PCM), an independent nonprofit community music school founded in 1983, has a good reputation for training young musicians at its 100 N. Hill Ave. location. PCM has a faculty of 50 and enrollment of more than 1,300 students, ranging from infants to senior citizens. Its Young Musicians program, which serves children up to age 12, offers weekly classes designed for students of a particular age or grade. According to the website, the program “encourages and nurtures each child’s musicality with oneyear, age-specific classes that are fun, creative and developmentally appropriate.” Enrollment is for the entire school year. Annual tuition costs $648 ($576 for students also receiving private instruction at PCM). There’s a yearly family registration fee of $40, and an annual materials fee of $33 to $70. Visit pasadenaconservatory.org. The Pasadena Master Chorale (PMC) was formed a couple of years ago by its artistic director, Jeffrey Bernstein, who served as director of choral music at Occidental College from 1997 to 2008. The adult group of some 80 auditioned voices performs several times a year and recruits young singers when the program calls for it. “For the Christmas concert, we wanted to feature the Blair [High School] choir,” says Cynthia Abbott. “I know the program has a lot of nice musicians, and I thought it would be great to expose them to something classical.” So the group brought in 30 students from Blair and eight from other high schools. Students, who were each paired with an adult mentor, rehearsed every other week at no charge. Visit pasadenamasterchorale.org. AM

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BACK TO SCHOOL

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Pets: Potty training takes weeks of newspapers. Kids: Potty training takes years of diapers.

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BACK TO SCHOOL

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14 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

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MATEO ON THE MOVE (1,2,3) Explorations at home (4,5)

BACK TO SCHOOL

Hiking in Joshua Tree National Park

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YOUR BIG BACKYARD

ALL THE WORLD’S A CLASSROOM, SO PUT ON YOUR HIKING OR BIKING SHOES AND TAKE THE FAMILY TO THESE PARKS AND GARDENS FOR A MASTER CLASS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA’S ABUNDANT FLORA AND FAUNA. STORY AND PHOTOS BY ILSA SETZIOL

IT’S LATE ON A HOT SUMMER NIGHT. I WANT MY 3-YEAR-OLD TO LIE DOWN AND SLEEP. HE WON’T — HE’S BUSY NESTING. PERCHED ATOP HIS SCRUNCHED-UP BLUE BLANKIE, HE INFORMS ME “I CAN’T LIE DOWN, MY EGGS WILL GET COLD.” I SUGGEST HE KEEP THEM WARM BY LYING ON TOP OF THEM. “THEY’LL BREAK!” HE WAILS. I’m guessing he was a sea turtle that night, because a recent trip to a turtle rescue center had made a big impression on him. But he could just as easily have been a flamingo or an alligator. Could there be anything cuter than Mateo pretending he’s an animal? Well, yes — when he strikes up a conversation with one: “Here, ladybug, you can land on me.” Or “Nice to meet you, bunny.” For a decade, I’ve written about the environment and pondered contemporary America’s disconnect from nature. So I’m eager for my son to get outside and explore. Since he was barely old enough to hold up his head, my husband and I have toted Mateo along trails in the San Gabriel Mountains, around public gardens and out to the Pacific. So here’s an introduction to some of my favorite spots and activities:

TAKE A HIKE When Mateo was an infant, we bought a Kelty Kids carrier, a backpack-like contraption. Gently jostling on Dad’s back and sheltered under the carrier’s canopy, he looked like a little Indian prince atop an elephant (apologies to Dad). The rough spot came when he hit 2½ — too heavy to carry for long, too toddling to walk far. Still, in the right setting and with a little encouragement, a little kid will haul tuchus. Look for places with nature centers, water and relatively flat trails. And take your time. Be content to spend a half-hour moving pebbles from one side of a path to the other. Monrovia Canyon Park This lovely city park features a stream hemmed with alders, those elegant trees that seem to regard you silently (with the eye-like markings on their trunks). The waterfall trail is popular with families. If you have older kids, choose the trailhead near the entrance. You’ll get a 3.4-mile hike roundtrip and perhaps see some deer or native grey squirrels. For an easier 1.5-mile hike, start at the nature center farther up the road. Visit cityofmonrovia.org/community-life/parks/342-monrovia-canyon-park. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 17


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Ernest E. Debs Regional Park If you haven’t already scoped it out, head to the darling nature center at Debs Park, near the 110 Freeway between South Pasadena and downtown L.A. A small area surrounding this Audubon Center has been beautifully landscaped with native plants, and there are many wonderful niches for kids to explore. “The water is a huge draw for all ages,” says center Director Jeff Chapman. “Kids also enjoy watching dragonflies and other animals that come to get water. They like seeing how water moves through our mini-arroyo.” For a great spot to picnic, enter the park on Monterey Road, north of Huntington Drive. Spread your blanket on the large tree-studded lawn, or trek up the (stroller-accessible) closed road for panoramic views. Visit laparks.org/dos/parks/facility/ ernestEDebsPk.htm. Eaton Canyon Natural Area This county park is familiar to many denizens of Arroyoland. Come early or on weekdays and walk quietly; you’ll be sure to see something new. Look for cottontail bunnies and lizards darting among 2 the shrubs behind the nature center. And bring binoculars because birds abound here. My son and a friend recently spent a couple of hours completely enraptured by one stretch of the stream. They created little dams, scooped up polliwogs and poked the streambed with sticks. Mateo also loves the live snakes and frogs housed in the 7,600-square-foot nature center. A docent leads free family nature walks here on Saturdays at 9 a.m. Visit ecnca.org/. Stough Canyon The Verdugo Mountains, surrounded by La Cañada Flintridge, Tujunga, Glendale and Burbank, are a great place to experience wildflowers. In the spring, you might spot tall spikes of pink clarkias, scarlet delphiniums and California sunflowers. Most of the trails in the Verdugos are steep, though, so I recommend Stough Canyon, in Burbank, for older children. Visit trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=XMR013-040.

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Legg Lake Park Biking is another fun way to experience the outdoors. The paved trails surrounding Legg Lake at Whittier Narrows Recreation Area (Montebello/Pico Rivera) accommodate parents carting tots or kids riding on their own. The lake is bustling with waterfowl of all kinds. Kingfishers also buzz around this supersize pond. There are ample picnic benches, ice cream vendors and pedal boats for rent. Visit labikepaths.com/LeggLake.html.

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18 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

1

Angeles National Forest One of our most exciting trips during my son’s second year was a bike ride along the West Fork of the San Gabriel River, off Highway 39. He watched a man catch trout — and even got to touch one. He waded, climbed rocks and saw a frog.


TRAVELS WITH MATEO (1) To Joshua Tree National Park; (2) Huntington Beach; (3) LA County Arboretum; (4) Arboretum; (5) At home; (6) Franklin Canyon

For a first fishing experience, a sure bet is Mt. Baldy Trout Pools, a stocked fishing area on Mt. Baldy Road, 10 miles north of Claremont. For information about the San Gabriel River’s West Fork, visit nearfield.com/~dan/sports/bike/mountain/sgwf/index.htm. For the trout pools, go to mtbaldytroutpools.com. CAMP OUT Camping with kids can be exhausting — but rewarding. On a trip to Joshua Tree National Park this year, Mateo and his little friend devolved into cave-kids, whacking people with sticks and dumping fistfuls of gravel on each other. But it’s hard to top an evening of roasted marshmallows and stargazing. Despite the desert melée, one of my main camping recommendations is to go with another family. On the trail, kids will spur each other on; at the campsite, parents can share KP duty. GO ON SAFARI IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD Every day can be an adventure in your own backyard. Mine is teeming with native plants — which attract insects, birds and lizards — and edible plants. Among my son’s favorite backyard activities: planting 4 seeds, picking strawberries, hauling soil in dump trucks, filling the birdfeeder, magnifying things, handling worms from the composting bins and catching bugs. We’ve also raised painted lady butterflies from caterpillars we bought from insectlore.com. Perhaps our most exciting backyard exploration was inspired by Brent “The Bug Guy” Karner from the Natural History Museum. He showed us how to catch bugs by swooping a butterfly net over the tops of bushes. He not only reassured us that the vast majority of bugs in our yard wouldn’t hurt us, he also told us it’s okay to play with them. “My feeling is the experience is very important,” Karner says. “Bugs are a lot tougher than we think. If we’re being generally gentle, the bug will probably survive and then you’ve learned a bit about it as well.” Since then, Mateo has slept with jars of katydids and worms under his bed. And he has composed lyrics such as “Roly-poly you’re my friend/I will make you a dinner den.” A couple of months ago, we discovered a mourning dove nesting in our backyard. Mateo got a peek at her eggs and the baby. “Here, mother dove,” he said sweetly, “here’s some seed for you. Here’s some water.” 5 As for the human mom in our household (namely, me), she’s tired of being tackled and 6 punched, whined and yelled at. We’ve talked a lot about respectful behavior. And yet, when Mateo encounters animals, he’s exceedingly gentle, stroking them softly with two fingers, cooing to them lovingly. If I pretend to be a bird, could I get some mother dove love? AM For more on Ilsa Setziol’s excursions, visit her blog on the natural environment of Southern California: RamblingLA.com. ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 19


ART, ANTIQUES &JEWELRY Arnold’s Fine Jewelry Arnold’s Fine Jewelry is celebrating 120 years of serving Pasadena area families. From stunning engagement rings, engraved sterling baby gifts, watches for grads to spectacular evening baubles, Arnold’s is a destination for those seeking the very finest. Bruce Arnold’s personal joy is to suggest designs that respectfully restyle your cherished heirlooms. Thirdgeneration jeweler Arnold invites you to bring jewelry for repair or cleaning. Professionalism, trust and friendliness are why Arnold’s will be the choice for generations to come. 350 S. Lake Ave., suite 110, Pasadena. Call (626) 795-8647 or visit arnoldsfinejewelry.com Fancy That! It would be easy to mistake the delightful Fancy That! for a pet store. This first edition of Hanna’s Kittens are hand made from French milled faux fur and couldn’t be softer or cuter. Additional huggable pets in the menagerie include plush canines and a zoo sized selection —CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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ART, ANTIQUES & JEWELRY —CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

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BACK TO SCHOOL

A TUITION MATH TUTORIAL: ONE PLUS ONE PLUS ONE PLUS… PARENTS OF PRIVATE SCHOOL STUDENTS FIND HELP FOR THE HEADACHE OF RELENTLESSLY RISING BILLS IN A GRIM ECONOMY. BY BRENDA REES

24 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO


PHOTOS: Courtesy Pasadena Waldorf School; Marantha High School; High Point Academy

(Clockwise from top right): Pasadena Waldorf School, Maranatha High School, High Point Academy

LAST YEAR AT MY DAUGHTER’S SCHOOL, ST. PHILIP THE APOSTLE IN PASADENA, PARENTS WERE BUZZING ABOUT THE BIG-TICKET RAFFLE PRIZE AT THE ANNUAL DINNER DANCE AND AUCTION. WAS IT THE KIND OF TEMPTATION OFFERED IN YEARS PAST, LIKE A NEW CAR? AMPLE VACAY TIME IN SOME EXOTIC CONDO? ONE OF THOSE FANCY PEDIGREE POOCHES? Nope. It was a year’s free tuition — four of the most wonderful words parents of private school students can hear these days. Chet Crane, head of school at Maranatha High School in Pasadena, says that during the last school year, he witnessed “a big spike in requests for tuition assistance — about a 5 to 10 percent increase.” Last year, Maranatha awarded about $1.2 million in financial aid. “It’s a real challenge to meet everyone’s needs, because there is only so much money to go around.” Indeed, never before has sending your child to a private school been more of a privilege. In today’s miserable economy, committing to a private school education can be akin to tying a heavy weight around your neck for the next 13 years and throwing yourself into the rushing river of the Great Financial Unknown. Even in flusher times, many parents moved to more desirable school districts for their kids, but these days, some have been forced to take on a second (and perhaps third) job or hit up the grandparents to support junior’s academic aspirations. It’s daunting for parents to realize that, despite all these sacrifices, they will see tuition increase practically every year. At private schools across the board, these increases are mainly to cover rising teachers’ salaries and health care costs. Most schools try to limit these tuition hikes to the modest 3 to 5 percent range, but when you’re talking about an annual tab that can range from $5,000 to $16,000 a year, those small increases can quickly add up... and sap bank accounts. So what happens if dad gets downsized or mom is laid off? What can parents do if they want to continue down the independent school route? “Don’t wait until it’s too late,” advises Dr. Richard Gray, president of LaSalle High School. “Talk to the school and let them know what’s going on; we want to work with you.” Gray says that private schools, mindful of the pressures on parents, are extending more financial aid than ever before; last year, his school awarded $1.1 million from an emergency fund specifically designed to deal with these kinds of economic hardships. “We hadn’t had to tap into that fund in years, until about two years ago,” he says. It’s a pressing problem across the country. According to the National Association of Independent Schools, in the 2001-02 school year, only 15.6 percent of students received financial aid; during the 2009-10 school year, the percentage of students on aid jumped to 21.6. But is all this assistance available only to parents of kids who are already enrolled? At some schools — like High Point Academy in Pasadena — yes, but others also offer help for incoming families. And lest you think that ability to pay is a criterion for admission, most private schools keep their financial aid committees completely separate from admissions committees; schools say they look at personalities and academic achievements — not the size of the parents’ purse — when screening candidates. At High Point Academy, Headmaster John Higgins has seen tuition assistance ebb and flow over the years. “We have had families on financial aid for perhaps a few months [because] a parent lost a job and then a few months later, they’re back

at work,” he says. “But then we have other families who have been drawing aid in fifth, sixth, seventh and even eighth grades.” Such arrangements are kept private, so participating families needn’t worry about any social stigma. But that didn’t make it much easier for Cynthia A., who says she had to swallow her pride to ask for aid. With two kids in a Pasadena private school, Cynthia and her husband, once prosperous in their own businesses, found themselves hitting hard times during the past school year. They changed careers and made other financial adjustments, but money was still tight. “It was a teacher who knew what was going on with us who suggested we look into financial aid,” explains Cynthia. “I never even considered it [and] it was almost too embarrassing to admit we needed help. The school walked us through the process and it all worked out. I was surprised at how generous they were to us. They really came through.” Despite doling more out in tuition assistance, private schools say the general socioeconomic makeup of their student bodies has remained fairly constant, perhaps indicating how vulnerable people can be even higher up the economic ladder. In addition to tapping emergency funds, some schools are asking their alumni to kick in more toward the health of their alma maters. Gray says a new LaSalle campaign, Keeping Our Promise, invites alumni to sponsor a specific student who needs financial help. For the program’s first school year, alumni have pledged more than $100,000. And extended family members — particularly grandparents — are pitching in to help with tuition as well, says Diane LaSalle, admissions coordinator at Pasadena Waldorf School. “Grandparents are usually overjoyed to be asked,” she says. “They feel like they are contributing in a very significant way to their grandchildren; I’ve seen this make families even closer.” Despite the dismal economy, private schools are doing their best to maintain the status quo and holding their own overall. It’s a juggling act to pay the bills, work with struggling parents and maximize fundraising efforts to keep the wheels of education greased and humming. So perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that an uncertain future is always in the back of many educators’ minds. “You know what concerns me most?” says Principal Jennifer Ramirez of St. Philip the Apostle. “What if things get worse? We’re able to keep up now with the way things are going, but what happens if more families lose jobs, the economy gets stuck or keeps sinking? We can’t do much more than we are doing now. What then? Do we lay off teachers? Deplete programs? “Those are things I don’t even want to think about — and I hope I don’t have to.” AM ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 25


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ARROYO

HOME&DESIGN NAVIGATING THE NAUTICAL NARRATIVE: HOW TO BUILD OR REBUILD A PRIVATE POOL PARADISE

GARDENVIEW LANDSCAPE

BY JOANNA DEHN BERESFORD

ACCORDING TO HISTORIANS, SWIMMING POOLS HAVE TEMPTED BATHERS AND ATHLETES FOR MILLENNIA. PROBABLY THE “GREAT BATH,” OF THE ANCIENT URBAN SETTLEMENT AT MOHENJO-DARO, IN PRESENT-DAY PAKISTAN, IS THE OLDEST KNOWN SWIMMING FACILITY. THE POOL, BUILT SOMETIME AROUND 2,600 B.C., WAS LINED WITH BRICK, AND SEALED WITH A TAR-BASED MATERIAL. ANCIENT GREEKS AND ROMANS ALSO BUILT BOTH PUBLIC AND PRIVATE POOLS FOR TRAINING, AND PLEASURE. SOMETIMES THEY STOCKED FISH IN THEIR POOLS, HENCE THE LATIN TERM FOR POOL, PISCINA. And the story continues. Pools became popular among the British during the 19th century. After the Olympics Games were rehabilitated in 1896, including swimming competition, the sport climbed in popularity and, by the end of World War I, enthusiasm for the activity soared. Swimming pools appeared above and below ground, at resorts, on ships, in backyards and suburban recreation areas. The evolution of the modern pool has taken generations, improving with advances in technology, design, environmental and safety concerns. In 1954 Charlie Dennis’ father opened Swan Pools and today, more than 50 years later, Charlie is still designing, building and renovating pools and spas throughout Los Angeles County. They’ve built and renovated more than 5,000 pools in the San Gabriel Valley, and though the business has developed considerably over the years, many fundamentals remain the same. When asked what he learned from his father, Charlie says, “What didn’t I learn from him?”

Working Within the Space: Garocco Incorporated, the Pool Construction Company, is another family business, having served the San Gabriel region for more than 70 years, and now operated by the third generation. The Garocco family initiated the use of rock pools and built one of the first infinity-edge pools in California, at a homesite in Pasadena. Today the company continues to provide full design-and-build services, meaning that they concentrate not just on digging a hole and filling it with water, but incorporating the pool and water feature designs into the existing space, considering landscape, architecture and the needs and tastes of the homeowner. “As a full-service organization, we actually create outdoor rooms,” explains Don Engle, director of sales for Garocco Pools. “We create areas that families can gather around, and we actually add living space to the square footage of the home. We have an amazing team of experts who have worked together for 20 years, and they incorporate lighting, landscaping — anything that’s involved in building an outdoor environment.” Jeff Lokker, founder and principal of Huntington Pools and Spas, graduated from the California Polytechnic University and holds California C-53 and C-63 swimming pool contractor’s licenses. Huntington Pools is a member of the Genesis 3 Design Group since 2006. An international forum, Genesis 3 advocates for continuing education and higher standards in water-shape design and construction. Like many of his colleagues, Jeff specializes in designing pools and spas that reflect and enhance the design concepts of home and landscape. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 29

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 In 2008 Huntington Pools was selected to create a pool for the Pasadena Showcase House of Design. The house itself was a 1920s California Mission-style home. “In re-imagining the pool,” recalls Jeff, “we took into consideration the terra-cotta roof tiles, stucco walls, and arched doorways and created a simple but dramatic pool and spa that fit right in.” By contrast, Huntington’s recent residential projects include a private home in San Marino that features custom-tumbled brickwork, saline system, and an elevated, cascading spa. Drought-tolerant plantings and stone earthworks completed the landscape for a uniquely organic environment. In Hollywood Hills they built a stark and striking poolscape to resonate with a contemporary home.

When planning to build a new pool or renovate an existing one, you should consider the style and mood of your home and its surroundings. Look for a designer and builder who understands not only the technical aspects of pool design, but the aesthetic importance of continuity and beauty. Making the Old New Again: Creative and Eco-friendly Pool Renovation Most pool construction and design firms specialize in both new and reconstructed pool/spa projects. In either scenario, the designer will, typically, first examine the jobsite. If working on a remodel, the designer will determine which facets of the existing pool, water features, materials and mechanics should be changed or rejuvenated, —CONTINUED ON PAGE 31

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 and he/she will also confer with the client to determine what the individual or family homeowner wants to accomplish with a redesign. “We almost always resurface a pool during renovation,” says Charlie Dennis. “And a remodel usually includes an update of existing plumbing and an upgraded filter system, which results in the best maintenance, better water quality and higher overall efficiency.” At Garocco Pools renovation comprises about half of the company’s business. The process represents a collaboration between the design/build team and the client on the function and purpose of the pool — entertainment, decor, swimming and recreation — by guiding clients to the most workable and sustainable solutions.

“We try to create timeless environments,” says Garocco’s Don Engle. “We strive to remodel pools and surroundings that will still be beautiful in 50 years. We work with the architecture of the home, and take great pains with the initial designs.” The cosmetic elements of redesign have proliferated over the last few decades, using embedded rocks, waterfalls and foliage, natural streams, elevations and diverse surfacing materials. Equally innovative are the environmentally thoughtful advances in design and technology involving water flow and usage, and surrounding landscape. “Pools use less than half the water that a traditional grass lawn uses,” Mark Meahl, of Gardenview Landscape, Nurseries and Pools,

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31 says. “The use of a separation tank saves water, spins water in a tank and puts water through filters instead of spilling all the backwash into our sewers. The variable-speed pump also economizes on the use of resources — water and energy.” Smart pool systems utilize remote control devices for both pool and spa that read heat, lights and wave action. Contemporary Iphone apps even incorporate communication systems with home pool and spa systems, and in some cases the use of green technologies can bring rebates from power companies via progressive federal regulations. Swann Pools also offers a range of green alternatives. Remote control systems, sea salt and water purifying systems all provide for more efficient, eco-friendly pools.

Balance and Budget: Tom Scoble, president and head designer of Mother Magnolia, has been featured on HGTV’s Landscaper’s Challenge, winning three out of his four competitions on the program. His approach to life and design is driven by a search for balance — exploring the spiritual, the aesthetic, the practical and responsible depths of the possibilities. His goal when working on a pool and landscape design for residents of the San Gabriel Valley is to create a “dream outdoor refuge.” As a comprehensive landscape and pool designand-build company, Mother Magnolia offers a compact and economic service to clients. “Usually landscapers don’t do pools and pool builders don’t do landscapes,” explains Tom. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

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ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 33


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Stunning 2001 built home. Sunrise and sunset views from most rooms. Grand foyer with circular stairway, separate music room, office, 6 bedrooms, 5 1/2 baths, family room that opens to kitchen, gardens and patio. Ktichen with granite counters, stainless steel appliances. Guest studio with separate entrance. Gated community with pool, playground and park. 5,128 square feet, 7,558 lot. Lease/Lease Option at $5,500/mo

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DESIGN AND BUILD WITH YOU IN MIND

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33 “So what happens when the pool builder leaves you with a scarred and torn up yard? Then you have to deal with yet another contractor to restore your landscape. In the end it can be a huge investment of your personal time and resources, and lots of headaches dealing with all the issues. With Mother Magnolia there is no need to locate and hire individual contractors. We handle everything in house, from concept to completion. You just watch the transformation happen before your eyes.” Don Engle of Garocco Pools agrees that the design/build combination provides tremendous benefits. “The designer/builder knows exactly what he wants. He can design within a budget and he doesn’t have to take his designs to anyone else. That keeps costs down.” Don estimates that costs for building a new pool on a residential property can start around $35,000, and escalate depending on size, materials, and design concept. A remodel may start around $15,000 and varies similarly to a new construction. According to Charlie Dennis of Swan Pools, design and construction budget varies with the size of the project. “Resurfacing starts around $6,000 and the sky’s the limit, depending on what the client wants to do. An average remodel, with re-plumbing and tile, can run anywhere from $20,000 to $60,000, depending on size, materials and equipment costs.”

Pool Safety: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that the primary risk for drowning deaths and accidents at home is related to a lack of proper barriers and supervision. “Most young children who drowned in pools were last seen in the home, had been out of sight less than five minutes, and were in the care of one or both parents at the time,” according to the CDC website on pool safety. As of January 1, 2007, California Health and Safety Codes required that any building permit for construction or renovation of a pool or spa in a single family home must be equipped with at least one of seven drowning-prevention features. Your pool design/build team should be familiar and compliant with these requirements. “Mechanical, automatic covers offer an ontrack, roll-over cover for the pool and they’re probably the safest cover you can buy, but there are trade-offs,” says Mark Meahl, of Gardenview Landscape, Nurseries and Pools. “They can really only be used on a regular pool and won’t protect a raised spa. They don’t add to the aesthetics of the pool either, and the covers get dirty, require maintenance — though they also help to keep the pools warmer.” Mark suggests that net covers may be more attractive than conventional covers. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

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—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35 Netting protects the view of reflections and rain dancing on the water, and the net cover — made of durable, cargo/fiberglass material — aids in the skimming of the pool, thus reducing costs. Other safety features include: removable childproof fencing, wrought iron fences, large rolling gates, and a major advance in pool safety — alarm devices. These devices can be activated by unexpected water immersion, by the crossing of laser beam monitors, and individual movement and activity devices that can actually be attached a child’s wrists or ankles. “The important thing about pool safety,” advises Charlie Dennis, “is that you work with the needs of the family, the ages of the children.

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ARROYO

HOME DESIGN DIRECTORY OF SERVICES

ARCHITECTS

INTERIOR DESIGN JAMES COANE & ASSOCIATES

DAY OF DESIGN WITH TERRI JULIO

Since 1994, James V. Coane, has specialized in: custom residences, estates, historic renovations and expansions, residential and apartment interiors, multi-family residential, corporate interiors, retail and small commercial building design. American Institute of Architects award winners, and named Best Architect by Pasadena Weekly, their projects have been in Architectural Digest and other magazines and used as locations for filming and fashion shoots. Well-versed in historical and modern architecture and design and known for attention to detail on all projects. Visit jvca.com or call (626) 584-6922.

Imagine the opportunity to consult with a professional designer for an entire day. Now you can for a fixed flat fee. Let Terri’s expertise be the first thing you call upon when considering any project. It is a worthwhile investment and a good dose of prevention considering valuable dollars and time can be lost when improvements go awry. Call (626) 447-5370 or visit terrijulio.com

CYNTHIA BENNETT Cynthia Bennett & Associates has been a celebrated design and build firm for almost 30 years. They specialize in innovative kitchen and bath design, general construction, historical renovation, project management and interior design. With all areas of residential design and construction being taken care of by Cynthia Bennett and Associates, Inc., each detail will be thought of and coordinated. Call for a consultation at (626) 799-9701.

HARTMANBALDWIN DESIGN/BUILD HartmanBaldwin Design/Build is a fully integrated Architecture, Construction and Interior Design Company specializing in upscale remodels, additions, historic restorations and new custom homes for highly discerning individuals that are passionate about their home and lifestyle. We pride ourselves in being chosen by clients who look for a full service firm that will provide them with outstanding design services, cutting-edge materials and products, quality construction that is sustainable and energy-efficient, as well as a relationship that goes beyond the duration of a project. Call 626.486.0510 to schedule your complimentary design consultation. HartmanBaldwin.com.

ELLEN BAUM DESIGN Interior Designer, Ellen Baum, helps clients create spaces that are truly theirs. She brings 36 years experience into each project. Her ability to transform unworkable spaces into functional, practical and beautiful living and working environments is amazing. She really listens to her clients’ ideas and requirements and incorporates those along with their favorite pieces into a new, fresh design plan. She has been published in numerous publications and appeared in two HGTV “Designer’s Challenge” episodes.

MARBLE ARCHITECTURE Since 2001, Tom Marble has worked with clients to complete a variety of projects, including the renovation of a Queen Anne Victorian, the revitalization of a neighborhood retail center and the recasting of a bland ’60s office building as Hollywood Regency. His goal is to negotiate the territory between people and place, creating an environment that reflects the uniqueness of both. His own home was featured in a recent issue of the Los Angeles Times Magazine. Visit tommarble.com

INTERIOR SPACES

BUILDERS & REMODELERS CHELSEA CONSTRUCTION Many homeowners now choose to upgrade current living space, rather than rebuilding the entire structure. Whether it’s a kitchen/bath or complete remodel, we pride ourselves on classic design, maintaining the individual style of the house. Customers work closely with owner Mark Snashall, assuring their desired features and look are achieved, while he helps direct choices toward quality results, reflective of his finish carpentry training, commitment to quality, fine European craftsmanship and attention to detail. (818) 949-4595.

GREEN/SOLAR PHAT ENERGY We are more than a solar company; we are a new energy company. If you are like most of our customers, you are facing increasing challenges with the current energy infrastructure. That’s why we are interested in 4 principal issues: power generation at the place of use (“distributed power”), energy efficiency, transportation fueling (electric vehicles), and energy storage. Our team is motivated to make a difference in your life! 866-797-PHAT (7428) | ADVERTISEMENT |

CAROUSEL FLOORS This family-owned, 38-year-old company provides a superb selection along with remarkable service. For hardwood, select from all the top names, including Appalachian Hardwood Floors, pre-finished or finished by expert craftsman. For linoleum, Marmoleum is a natural, eco-friendly, stylish flooring with multiple patterns. Carousel is a Mohawk Color Center, carrying Fabrica, Karastan, Masland and Schumacher to name a few. Free consultations; designers welcome. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat.; or by appointment. 676 E. Green St., Pasadena. Call (626) 795-8085.

FLOORGATE, INC. Floorgate offers premium hardwood flooring designed to keep up with your family’s lifestyle. We offer the largest selection of colors and styles in wood flooring, hardwoods, laminate, carpet and tile, with virtually care-free finishes and our assurance of quality. Hardwood floors are incredibly beautiful, highly durable and extremely affordable. And they're always natural and safe for the environment. We install over 50,000 square feet of flooring every week! 3350 N. San Fernando Road, Los Angeles; call (323) 478-2000.

MARBLE AND STONELIFE Our skilled staff is ready to evaluate and address all of your stone and concrete related needs — floor leveling, scratch and stain removal, crack repair, grout restoration, polishing, sealing, and color enhancing. We offer concrete polishing, acid stain and polishing, acid stain and sealing, and have extensive expe—CONTINUED ON PAGE 38 ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 37


ARROYO

HOME DESIGN DIRECTORY OF SERVICES

MOTHER MAGNOLIA

—CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

rience with all types of natural and man-made stone: marble, granite, terrazzo, travertine, limestone, onyx, sandstone, concrete, Mexican tiles, agglomerate, slate, terra cotta, flagstone, brownstone, brick, ceramic and more. Call (877) 773-5820.

A private residential landscape design and construction firm operating here since 1999, Mother Magnolia’s passion is creating an outdoor space for you to enjoy. Your outdoor space should be your refuge, a place with power to rejuvenate. Our reliable and dedicated in-house designers, experienced masons, irrigation specialists, and landscape technicians will make your landscape vision a reality. Or, if you have a design prepared, we will provide construction bids. Fully bonded and insured, 3-time winner of HGTV’s “Landscaper’s Challenge,” and a member of the California Landscape Contractors’ Association, Angie's List, and the Better Business Bureau. Call (626) 296-2617, or visit mothermagnolia.com.

MAUDE WOODS Stepping into Maude Woods: Artful Living, shoppers may feel they’ve entered someone’s beautiful home. Owner Carrie Davich mixes new upscale furnishings with vintage and renovated second-hand treasures. Within this “home” shoppers can find a unique hostess gift for $25, a $5,000 table and a variety of beautiful items in between. 55 E. Holly St., Pasadena. Call (626) 577-3400 or visit maudewoods.com

SWAN POOLS MODERN LIGHTING Modern Lighting has been serving Southern California's lighting needs since 1946. With all types of fixtures in every price range, you’ll find what you want. If not, we do custom design. We have stocks of light bulbs to compliment your fixture and we continually watch the marketplace for the best buys. Our staff has decades of lighting experience.. Feel free to contact us if our service is what you are looking for: call (626) 286-3262.

Swan Pools has been building quality pools for over 50 years. We are experts at new construction, remodeling existing pools, spa additions and difficult site construction. All jobs are designed, contracted and supervised by the owner and family. We are fully licensed and general liability insured with the highest Better Business Bureau rating and can provide referrals upon request. Call us if you have any questions or would like to set an appointment for a free in home consultation. (626) 966-8631.

THE SOFA COMPANY

TEAK WAREHOUSE

Since 1998, The Sofa Company has been making the process of purchasing a sofa fun, fast, and simple. Along with the motto “you design it, we build it” comes the promise to make the process of buying a sofa enjoyable. With a new showroom at 100 W. Green St., The Sofa Company now delivers the largest selection of custom styles, sizes, fabrics, legs, sofa beds and more to Old Town Pasadena. Call (888) 778-7632 x412.

Today’s hottest outdoor trend is the outdoor living room ... a favorite for hotels & resorts for years and now available for residential settings. Why go to an expensive resort for the weekend when you can turn your back yard into one? Invest in something that will bring comfort and style for the long run! Teak Warehouse boasts over 16 varied collections of deep seating, offering teak and wicker at the best prices in California. 133 E. Maple Ave., Monrovia. Call (626) 305-8325 or visit teakwarehouse.com

MORTGAGE LENDERS REAL ESTATE

WELLS FARGO The Patsy Grant Team at Wells Fargo Home Financing meets your needs. Because your home is one of your biggest investments, it's important to ensure that your mortgage fits you. This is our specialty — helping you find mortgage solutions that meet your current situation while complementing your long-term financial goals. We will help you determine what mortgage options work for you, guide you through the loan process and answer your questions. Patsy: (626) 577-3721; Jim: (626) 577-3703

OUTDOOR LIVING

LIN VLACICH-SOTHEBY’S Lin Vlacich of Sotheby’s, a 25-year veteran in the real estate profession, is known for her reputation and success as a leader in the San Gabriel Valley brokerage community, as well as for high professional ethics, superior negotiating skills, innovative marketing plans and extensive knowledge of real estate sales. Committed to excellence in representing buyers and sellers throughout Pasadena, San Marino, South Pasadena and the surrounding communities. Call (626) 688-6464 or (626) 3963975 or email vlacichs@aol.com ■

Specializing in landscaping, nurseries and pools, Garden View Inc. can take you from a design idea to a finished, detail-oriented garden. Garden View & their clientele are recipients of 60 awards from the California Landscape Contractors Association. The intent of the company is to provide high-quality interrelated outdoor services. The synergy between having their own designer/project managers, in-house crews, their own large nursery, and being a licensed pool builder provides for efficiency, competitive pricing, quality and schedule control. Call (626) 303-4043.

38 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

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GARDEN VIEW LANDSCAPE


A HIGHLY SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS

THE

LIST COMPILED BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

PHOTOS: © John Cage Trust (An Artwork by John Cage); courtesy of the Pacific Asia Museum (Belle Yang); courtesy of the Huntington Library (Succulent); Marta Elena Vassilakis (Camerata Pacifica); courtesy of Steve Roden

CAGE AND KUROSAWA AT THE NORTON SIMON

Sept. 10 — The Japanese Traditional Performing Arts Organization presents “Music and Dance of Edo,” a 7 p.m. concert in a Japanese theater setting, featuring performers Wakana Hanayagi, Jyorokusho Kineya, Kikusa Katada and Yasoyo Kineya. Free with museum admission. Sept. 24 — The exhibition “Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel: An Artwork by John Cage” (pictured above) opens. The late composer created the installation in 1969 as a tribute to Marcel Duchamp, a personal friend and source of artistic inspiration. The exhibition is on display through March 28, 2011. Sept. 24 and 25 — Akira Kurosawa’s 1990 film Dreams consists of eight episodes inspired by the filmmaker’s actual dreams and nightmares. The movie screens at 6 p.m. Friday and 4 p.m. Saturday. Free with museum admission. The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Call (626) 449-6840 or visit nortonsimon.org.

PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM Sept. 4 — Storyteller Sunny Stevenson presents back-toschool stories from Asia, exploring kids’ educational experiences in other countries, at 10:30 a.m. in the Silk Road travelers’ tent. Admission for children under 12 is free. Sept. 9 — The film Raga Unveiled: India’s Voice receives its West Coast premiere, showcasing legendary musicians, Vedic scholars, musicologists, spectacular cinematography and rare archival footage as it explores the ancient tradition that underlies the Indian melodic form known as raga. The event, from 6 to 10 p.m., includes live musical performances, Indian food and an appearance by the film’s director, Gita Desai. Tickets cost $50, reservations required. Call ext. 28 for reservations. Sept. 12 — “Authors on Asia” presents artist and writer Belle Yang discussing and signing Forget Sorry: An Ancestral Tale (pictured) at 2 p.m. Free with admission; call ext. 20 for reservations. Pacific Asia Museum is located at 46 N. Los Robles Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 449-2742 or visit pacificasiamuseum.org.

HILLSIDE HAPPENINGS A variety of events marks the end of summer at Descanso Gardens: Saturdays through September — Descanso Display Horticulturalist Mike Brown leads the informal Saturday Morning Garden Chat from 9:30 to 10 a.m. Free with admission. Sept. 6 — Celebrate Labor Day at Descanso, also known as “Boddy’s Big Backyard,” with an event inspired by its original owner, E. Manchester Boddy, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Activities include a walk through the California Garden with Natives Garden Horticulturalist Rachel Young at 10 a.m.; a reading of the story “Teddy Bear Picnic” at 12:30 p.m.; and music by Mobile Homeboys from 1 to 3 p.m. Guests can bring picnics or purchase barbecue from Patina Catering from 11:30 to 3 p.m. Free with Gardens admission. Sept. 11 — Jay R. Ewing teaches a watercolor class from 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays starting today and continuing for six weeks through Oct. 16. The cost is $120 ($90 for members). Descanso Gardens is located at 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada Flintridge. Call (818) 949-4200 or visit descansogardens.org.

BOTANY, BACH AND BOTTLES OF THE OUTBACK AT THE HUNTINGTON Sept. 4 — Explorer, collector and succulent plant authority John Lavranos is the keynote speaker at the Succulent Plant Symposium from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $75, including lunch. An optional dinner is available at an additional cost. Call (626) 405-3504 for registration and details. Sept. 11, 18 and 25 — Botanical illustrator Lisa Pompelli leads a class in botanical illustrations in the Herb Garden from

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The cost is $295 ($275 for members). Call (626) 405-2128 to register. Sept. 14 — The Camerata Pacifica chamber (pictured) ensemble opens its 21st season with works by Joseph Schwantner and Osvaldo Golijob and classics by Bach and Dvorak at 8 p.m. The evening also includes the world premiere of Red Pepper, a new work by Bright Sheng performed by percussionist Ji Hye Jung. Tickets cost $42. Sept. 21 — As part of the Chinese Garden Lecture Series, University of Oregon historian Ina Asim discusses scholars’ gardens in Suzhou, Yangzhou, Sichuan and Lingnan at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free; no reservations are required. Sept. 22 — Brad Owen of Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts presents a lecture on and tasting of wines from Australia and New Zealand, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The cost is $85 ($75 for members). Call (626) 405-2128 to register. Sept. 24 and 25 — The conference “Science and Its Histories” explores approaches to the study of science as part of the larger story of world history, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The cost is $25. Call (626) 405-3432 or email skrasnoo@huntington.org to register. Sept. 29 — A Distinguished Fellow Lecture, “Britain, America and the Written Constitution,” features Linda Colley, professor of history at Princeton University and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free; no reservations are required. The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens are located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Call (626) 405-2100 or visit huntington.org. For Camerata Pacifica, call (805) 884-8410 or visit cameratapacifica.org

CAL PHIL VISITS THE MILL Sept. 11 — The “Cal Phil at the Mill” summer concert series closes with an 8 p.m. performance by ensemble groups from the California Philharmonic Orchestra. The concert takes place at the Old Mill in San Marino. Admission costs $10; advance reservations are required. The Old Mill is located at 1120 Old Mill Rd., San Marino. Call (626) 449-5458 or visit calphil.org.

STEVE RODEN EXHIBITION OPENS AT THE ARMORY Sept. 11 — Los Angeles native Steve Roden’s works include abstract paintings, sculpture, installations and sound art. An opening reception for “Steve Roden: In Between, a 20 Year Survey” runs from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Armory Center for the Arts. The exhibition continues through Nov. 14. The Armory Center for the Arts is located at 145 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Call (626) 792-5101 or visit armoryarts.org. —CONTINUED ON PAGE 40 ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 39


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THE

A HIGHLY SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS

LIST COMPILED BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

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Sept. 11 — Kids can be part of the action in June Chandler’s Children’s Fairy Tale Theatre performance of Steve and Kathy Hotchner’s The Tale of the Frog Prince (pictured) at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Young guests can rush to the aid of the prince, who is turned into a frog by an evil witch. Tickets cost $18 for adults, $12 for children under age 12. The Sierra Madre Playhouse is located at 87 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre. Call (626) 355-4318 or visit sierramadreplayhouse.org.

AVAILABLE SPACES AT PROJECT_210 Sept. 12 — Project_210 Gallery presents a solo exhibition by San Francisco artist Bianca Kolonusz-Partee. “Available Spaces” opens with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. and continues through Oct. 2. Kolonusz-Partee observes, draws and photographs major ports on the East and West coasts, creating collages directly on the gallery walls using recycled packing materials, some of which have passed through the ports. Project_210 Gallery is located at 2888 E. Walnut St., Pasadena. Call (323) 225-2229 or visit project210.org.

VAUDEVILLE LIVES

PASADENA POPS SALUTES HOLLYWOOD

At present rate of infection AIDS will orphan 20 million African children by 2010 !!

Sept. 25 — Pasadena POPS closes its summer concert series on the Rose Bowl–adjacent lawn with “Hooray for Hollywood,” a salute to movie music old and new, starting at 7:30 p.m. Vocalist Jodi Benson, the title voice of The Little Mermaid, sings hits from Titanic, The Wizard of Oz, Nine and other films. The orchestra, conducted by Rachael Worby, also performs movie music by Henry Mancini, Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams, with a special tribute to Star Wars. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. for picnicking; guests may bring their own meals or purchase dinner onsite. Kidspace Children’s Museum will provide pre-concert family entertainment. Tickets cost $25 to $90, $10 for kids under 14. The Rose Bowl is located at 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Call (626) 793-7172, ext. 16, for tickets or visit pasadenasymphony-pops.org.

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA LAUNCHES SEASON

The Shepherds Home Children’s Sanctuary in Nairobi Kenya provides education, food, housing and love to children whose parents have died in the HIV/AIDS crisis. www.theshepherdshome.org

40 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

Please send your tax deductible donations to: Discover The World, Inc., Shepherd's Home, 3255 E. Orange Grove Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91107

Sept. 25 — LACO opens its 14-concert 2010-2011 season at the Alex Theatre at 8 p.m. with “Infinite Enchantment” –– works by Mendelssohn, Prokofiev, Pierre Jalbert, Haydn and more. Jeffrey Kahane conducts, and the featured soloist is violinist Leila Josefowicz (pictured). Each of seven Saturday performances at the Alex is repeated Sunday at UCLA’s Royce Hall. Tickets cost $20 to $100; full-season and Flex Series tickets are also available. The Alex Theatre is located at 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call (213) 622-7001, ext. 215, or visit laco.org. AM

PHOTOS: John Gibson (“The Tale of the Frog Prince”); Brian Ellis (vaudeville); J. Henry Fair (Leila Josefowicz)

Sept. 19 — An afternoon of vaudeville, presented by the Alex Film Society starting at 2 p.m., includes a variety of live acts headlined by Ian Whitcomb and his Bungalow Boys. A screening of Depression-era short films follows, including Laurel & Hardy’s Hog Wild, a Little Rascals episode and a cartoon. Admission costs $20, $15 for seniors and students and $12.50 for members. The Alex Theatre is located at 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 243-2539 or visit alexfilmsociety.org.


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SEASON OPENS AT A NOISE WITHIN

PHOTO: Craig Schwartz (A Noise Within)

Sept. 25 — The classical repertory theater company A Noise Within opens the final season at its original Glendale venue before moving to its new Pasadena home next year. The opening production is Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, the tale of the Duke of Venice, who realizes that through his neglect, society has become a den of iniquity. He transfers authority to the morally upright Angelo, who in turn morphs from saint to beast because of an irresistible sexual attraction to novice nun Isabel. The play begins at 8 p.m. and continues through Dec. 5. Tickets cost $42 to $46. A Noise Within is located at 234 S. Brand Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 240-0910 or visit anoisewithin.org.

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 41


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8 UP, UP AND AWAY

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No one will be afraid of the dark when a refined pink Siamese cat

ranty policy for replacement parts. Believe us, it’s money well spent. $29.99, two

or a friendly blue dachshund is standing guard, emitting a soft

for $50 (one-year warranty $3.99).

incandescent light to scare away monsters, nightmares and crying

Available at Brookstone at the Paseo,

spells. My Pet Night Lamps are glowing molded plastic statues

340 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena.

that are both arty and functional. They’re perfect for 3 a.m. diaper

Call (626) 568-1410 or visit brookstone.com.

changes in the baby’s room or for the older

7 6 5 kid who would welcome a colorful night-

BY BRENDA REES

time companion –– but won’t publicly

8

admit it. $60.

Available at Giggle, 517 S. Lake Ave.,

Pasadena. Call (626) 744-0233

AFTER THE LONG, LAZY DAYS OF SUMMER, SEPTEMBER

or visit giggle.com.

SCHEDULES CAN BE OH-SO-DIFFICULT. GROGGY MORNINGS, 2

BURNT COFFEE AND GROUCHY CARPOOLERS. IT’S TIME TO

7

GET BACK INTO THE SWING OF THINGS AND REMIND THE 4

KIDS –– AND YOURSELF –– THAT LEARNING DOESN’T MEAN

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES

Is it a traveling suitcase? School backpack? Overnight bag to

THE END OF PLAYTIME. YOU JUST HAVE TO PUT THE WII IN

grandma’s? Whatever your kid decides, this practical and fun Dante Beatrix wheelie bag is big enough to hold as many

6

STORAGE AND DO YOUR HOMEWORK FIRST.

treasures –– and, yes, schoolbooks –– as your kid can pack

away. Choose between images of hungry Dieter the Monkey or

growling Percival the Dinosaur. Made of heavy-duty nylon over a sturdy metal frame. Greenies, take note: These wheelies are free of PVC, lead and phthalate. $103.50.

Available at Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd.,

1

Pasadena. Call (626) 449-5320.

ON THE ROAD The classic wooden car is cleverly reinvented for a new generation with the high-quality Automoblox series of cars, hot rods and assorted vehicles. Part building blocks, part puzzle, Automoblox cars

3

have interchangeable elements, shooting play potential up to a gazillion points. Tear apart

ON A ROLL

the car, fiddle around with the pieces and

Imagine the Big Wheels of the ’70s getting an extreme

then reassemble. Voila! –– a brand new

makeover and you’re beginning to get the picture of

means of transportation that glides across

this awesome super-stealth vehicle. Equal parts scoot-

the floor, just waiting for its next incarna-

er, bike and luge, the EzyRoller Ultimate Riding

tion. Individual cars range from $10 to $45.

Machine doesn’t require messy chains or batteries,

1

just good old-fashioned kid power to make it

Available at Swain’s ToyFun,

skedaddle and streak across the playground.

537 N. Glendale Ave., Glendale.

Riders say they feel as if they are gliding like

Call (818) 243-3129.

snakes as they silently speed up, twist and turn on

CHEW ON THIS

WHAT A DOLL!

Chemistry lesson + culinary desire = wicked fun taste treat. ’Fess up, who really

Move over American Girl –– there's a new doll in town. Precious Pollabies are col-

HOME, SWEET HOME

knows how gum is made? Well, the mystery will be solved after the kids get their

lectible soft dolls based on the characters of the children’s storybook Grandpa’s

As the McMansion of the tot set, Calico Critters’ Cloverleaf Manor is an impressive struc-

hands on the Ultimate Gum Kit, which contains everything they need to make

Treasure Box: the Adventures of Bobo & Tashi by Pauline Tsui. Youngsters can recreate

ture that boasts three stories with nine rooms, a balcony and a rooftop patio, not to mention a

mountains of homemade gum. Your inventive little chefs can mix up to 15 different

or make up journeys for the globetrotting twin sisters, Bobo and Tashi. Each Precious

light-up chandelier that can be placed in any room. This top-of-the-line playhouse comes

flavors and name their experiments accordingly. Monster Mastication? Blasting

Pollabie comes with her own embroidered carrying pouch and an artist-signed certifi-

without furniture or figurines, so you'll have to supply your own posse, interior decorator and

Blueberry Bubbles? Chewbacca Chew? You get the idea... $31.99.

cate of authenticity. Dolls, $45; books, $18.95.

landscaper. It’s big –– 3 feet across and nearly 2 feet high –– but it conveniently folds up for

Available at San Marino Toy and Book Shoppe, 2424 Huntington Dr., San Marino.

Available at the Huntington Bookstore & More, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino.

easy storage. Still, with all the imaginative play possibilities, who’d ever want to close it? $220.

Call (626) 309-0222.

Call (626) 405-2142.

Available at Dollmaker’s Kattywompus, 412 S. Myrtle Ave., Monrovia. Call (626) 357-1091.

2

42 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

a micro-dime. Dang, you'll wish it came in an

3

adult size. $110.

4

5

Available at The Dinosaur Farm, 1510 Mission St., South Pasadena. Call (626) 441-2767.

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 43


OBJECTS OF DESIRE

8 UP, UP AND AWAY

The Silver Bullet remote-control mini-helicopter is just the ticket for kids who yearn to be in the pilot’s seat –– but still might need a booster seat. Easy to maneuver and quickly rechargeable, these indoor ’copters can fly up to 100 feet

BANISH THE BACK-TO-SCHOOL BLUES AND FINESSE PLAYTIME WITH THESE BRAIN (AND BODY) TEASERS.

away from the remote and feature built-in LED strobes for night flights and land-

SHINE A LIGHT

ings. For all the inevitable bang-ups and crash landings, you'll want to add the war-

No one will be afraid of the dark when a refined pink Siamese cat

ranty policy for replacement parts. Believe us, it’s money well spent. $29.99, two

or a friendly blue dachshund is standing guard, emitting a soft

for $50 (one-year warranty $3.99).

incandescent light to scare away monsters, nightmares and crying

Available at Brookstone at the Paseo,

spells. My Pet Night Lamps are glowing molded plastic statues

340 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena.

that are both arty and functional. They’re perfect for 3 a.m. diaper

Call (626) 568-1410 or visit brookstone.com.

changes in the baby’s room or for the older

7 6 5 kid who would welcome a colorful night-

BY BRENDA REES

time companion –– but won’t publicly

8

admit it. $60.

Available at Giggle, 517 S. Lake Ave.,

Pasadena. Call (626) 744-0233

AFTER THE LONG, LAZY DAYS OF SUMMER, SEPTEMBER

or visit giggle.com.

SCHEDULES CAN BE OH-SO-DIFFICULT. GROGGY MORNINGS, 2

BURNT COFFEE AND GROUCHY CARPOOLERS. IT’S TIME TO

7

GET BACK INTO THE SWING OF THINGS AND REMIND THE 4

KIDS –– AND YOURSELF –– THAT LEARNING DOESN’T MEAN

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES

Is it a traveling suitcase? School backpack? Overnight bag to

THE END OF PLAYTIME. YOU JUST HAVE TO PUT THE WII IN

grandma’s? Whatever your kid decides, this practical and fun Dante Beatrix wheelie bag is big enough to hold as many

6

STORAGE AND DO YOUR HOMEWORK FIRST.

treasures –– and, yes, schoolbooks –– as your kid can pack

away. Choose between images of hungry Dieter the Monkey or

growling Percival the Dinosaur. Made of heavy-duty nylon over a sturdy metal frame. Greenies, take note: These wheelies are free of PVC, lead and phthalate. $103.50.

Available at Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd.,

1

Pasadena. Call (626) 449-5320.

ON THE ROAD The classic wooden car is cleverly reinvented for a new generation with the high-quality Automoblox series of cars, hot rods and assorted vehicles. Part building blocks, part puzzle, Automoblox cars

3

have interchangeable elements, shooting play potential up to a gazillion points. Tear apart

ON A ROLL

the car, fiddle around with the pieces and

Imagine the Big Wheels of the ’70s getting an extreme

then reassemble. Voila! –– a brand new

makeover and you’re beginning to get the picture of

means of transportation that glides across

this awesome super-stealth vehicle. Equal parts scoot-

the floor, just waiting for its next incarna-

er, bike and luge, the EzyRoller Ultimate Riding

tion. Individual cars range from $10 to $45.

Machine doesn’t require messy chains or batteries,

1

just good old-fashioned kid power to make it

Available at Swain’s ToyFun,

skedaddle and streak across the playground.

537 N. Glendale Ave., Glendale.

Riders say they feel as if they are gliding like

Call (818) 243-3129.

snakes as they silently speed up, twist and turn on

CHEW ON THIS

WHAT A DOLL!

Chemistry lesson + culinary desire = wicked fun taste treat. ’Fess up, who really

Move over American Girl –– there's a new doll in town. Precious Pollabies are col-

HOME, SWEET HOME

knows how gum is made? Well, the mystery will be solved after the kids get their

lectible soft dolls based on the characters of the children’s storybook Grandpa’s

As the McMansion of the tot set, Calico Critters’ Cloverleaf Manor is an impressive struc-

hands on the Ultimate Gum Kit, which contains everything they need to make

Treasure Box: the Adventures of Bobo & Tashi by Pauline Tsui. Youngsters can recreate

ture that boasts three stories with nine rooms, a balcony and a rooftop patio, not to mention a

mountains of homemade gum. Your inventive little chefs can mix up to 15 different

or make up journeys for the globetrotting twin sisters, Bobo and Tashi. Each Precious

light-up chandelier that can be placed in any room. This top-of-the-line playhouse comes

flavors and name their experiments accordingly. Monster Mastication? Blasting

Pollabie comes with her own embroidered carrying pouch and an artist-signed certifi-

without furniture or figurines, so you'll have to supply your own posse, interior decorator and

Blueberry Bubbles? Chewbacca Chew? You get the idea... $31.99.

cate of authenticity. Dolls, $45; books, $18.95.

landscaper. It’s big –– 3 feet across and nearly 2 feet high –– but it conveniently folds up for

Available at San Marino Toy and Book Shoppe, 2424 Huntington Dr., San Marino.

Available at the Huntington Bookstore & More, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino.

easy storage. Still, with all the imaginative play possibilities, who’d ever want to close it? $220.

Call (626) 309-0222.

Call (626) 405-2142.

Available at Dollmaker’s Kattywompus, 412 S. Myrtle Ave., Monrovia. Call (626) 357-1091.

2

42 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

a micro-dime. Dang, you'll wish it came in an

3

adult size. $110.

4

5

Available at The Dinosaur Farm, 1510 Mission St., South Pasadena. Call (626) 441-2767.

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 43


EDUCATION& ENRICHMENT Delphi Academy Delphi Academy is a K-12 school on a beautiful 10-acre campus surrounded by equestrian trails that offers an exciting summer program of fun and enrichment. Activities include adventurous camping & day trips to the beach, aquarium, Imax, Greyhound Rescue, Castaic Lake, a wild animal show, hiking, sports, cultural theme weeks, movie making, urban outdoor survival week, music cafe and more. A wide range of challenging courses include study skills, science, math, literature, and SAT & college prep. Call (818) 583-1070.

PASADENA

900 Valley View Ave. #4, Pasadena, Ca 91107 (626) 510-MATH (626) 510-6284

SOUTH PASADENA

1109 Fair Oaks Ave. South Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 53-A- PLUS (626) 532-7587

Drucker School of Management The Drucker School of Management in Claremont offers a world-class graduate management education through our MBA, Executive MBA, Financial Engineering, and Arts Management degree programs. Our programs infuse Peter Drucker’s principle of management as a liberal art along with our core strengths in strategy and leadership. We offer individualized, flexible course scheduling, an innovative curriculum focusing on values-based management, and the opportunity to learn from world-renowned faculty. To learn more, visit us at drucker.cgu.edu. High Point Academy Summer is particularly exciting because of the wide range of classes this year. We will be offering a number of enrichment classes including mock trial, woodworking, water games, computer games, movie making, and cinematography. Sports include golf, bowling, bas-

C A L L Y O U R L O C A L C E N T E R T O D AY !

English

Ladies Groups

Western

Private & Group Lessons

Boarding Training

by appointment only

Children’s Camps

FUN FOR ALL!

ALTADENA STABLES 3064 Ridgeview Dr. Altadena (626) 797-2012 www.altadenastables.blogspot.com 44 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

| ADVERTISEMENT |


ketball and volleyball. Arts and crafts will include painting, jewelry making, and mini-soldier painting. We have expanded the options for incoming kindergarteners this summer as well. Call (626) 798-8989 or visit highpointacademy.org. Justine Sherman & Associates, Inc. Justine Sherman & Associates is a nonpublic agency serving the speech-language, orofacial myology, and educational needs of young toddlers through adults. We strive to provide our clients with exceptional therapy and support so that they may achieve their greatest potential. Call (626) 355-1729 or visit justineshermanslp.com. La Cañada Preparatory Focuses on each student’s needs through an individualized curriculum. Low teacher-tostudent ratios have led to outstanding results with students learning at an accelerated pace. Classroom work is accompanied by enrichment programs that include art, music, Spanish, computer science, physical education and the performing arts. Each campus features a state-of-the-art computer lab along with a fully equipped art room. 4490 Cornishon Ave. in La Cañada. Please visit thelearningcastle.com Maranatha High School Maranatha, a college preparatory Christian high school, offers an educational experience where individual talents are celebrated and nurtured. The school’s athletic program boasts —CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

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ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 45


EDUCATION& ENRICHMENT —CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

44 competitive teams in 18 sports and offers state-of-the-art facilities. Performing arts students showcase their talents on stage at the renowned Ambassador Auditorium. Students are challenged with 29 AP and Honors courses, and every student can find a niche in one of the 19 student clubs. Discover the Maranatha Difference at Open House on November 13. Maranatha-hs.org. 169 S. Saint John Ave. in Pasadena. Call (626) 817-4000. Mathnasium Mathnasium is a highly specialized learning center where kids go year-round to improve their math skills. Students attend as often as they like - for as long as they like. The goal is to enhance your child’s math skills, understanding of math concepts and overall school performance. At the same time, Mathnasium builds your child’s confidence and forges a positive attitude toward the subject, yielding overwhelming results. Independent studies by EyeCues Education Systems found that Mathnasium students’ performance increased more than two letter grades in as little as three to six months. Enroll today to find out. Call (626) 510-6284 or visit mathnasium.com Pasadena Waldorf School Pasadena Waldorf School learn to approach the world both creatively and analytically. Integrating the visual, textural, and performing arts, Waldorf education activates the senses and stimulates deeper learning, igniting a life-long love of learning. Over 88 years of experience confirm that a Waldorf education fosters self-directed, life-long learners who are socially and environmentally responsible. Pasadena Waldorf School is a not-for-profit independent school offering integrated, developmental and experiential education for children Preschool through Grade 8 on a historic wooded campus. 209 E. Mariposa St., Altadena. Call (626) 794-9564. PASADENAWALDORF.ORG Upstage Upstage is a part-time theatre arts school in South Pasadena that runs an afterschool program during the school year and a summer camp in July and August. Today, more than ever, theatre skills are vital for a young person’s development. At Upstage students learn how to speak more clearly, move more easily, act more naturally and become self-aware. Call (626) 310-0447, visit upstageschools.com or email adrian@upstageschools.com. ■

High Point Academy KINDERGARTEN THROUGH EIGHTH GRADE Over 45 years of providing quality education in the Pasadena area. Accredited by CAIS and WASC

Here is the information for this new admissions season. Kindergarten Meetings:

October 19, 2010 at 7:00 pm November 20, 2010 at 10:00 am

Grades 1 through 8 Meetings: November 20, 2010 at 9:00 am

Call today 626·798·8989 1720 KINNELOA CANYON ROAD • PASADENA

highpointacademy.org 46 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

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ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 47


48 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO


TASTE

T H E

F L A V O R S

O F

A R R O Y O

Dynasties and Delicacies TRADITION, IMAGINATION, EXTENSIVE SPREADS FLOURISH AT LUNASIA BY DAN O’HERON By request, a host, velvet mallet in hand, will hammer a gong to announce your entrance to the capacious dining room, with its crisp contrast of golden decoration against whiteinfluenced linen and ceramic ornamentation. The gong’s sound, even after ceasing to throb in the air, should reverberate in the imagination and enhance the atmosphere being conjured — that of dining in an emperor’s house. On the way, with a peek in on a private room, you may, perhaps, glimpse a full-bodied roasted pig with a garland of flowers circling its head, the centerpiece of a feast attended by eager courtiers looking for more favors from the sovereign. These might come in setplate delicacies not found in the run-of-the-mill Chinese restaurant, such as braised shark fin’s soup, milk-stewed swallow’s nest, or baked live crab in a satiny wrap of lotus lily leaf. While the scene of a laureled pig might give some LUNASIA guests grandiose ideas, most will begin their own royal CHINESE CUISINE feasts — or dine completely and sumptiously on Lunasia’s 500 W. Main St., Alhambra classic dim sum. This ceremony includes a splendid array (626) 308-3222 of small, medium, large and special steamed , baked, deep-fried, sauteed and poached knickknack noshes of lunasiachinesecuisine.com everything from dumplings to duck tongues, and desserts from red jujube cake (made from Chinese dates with prune-like flesh to exquisitely rich, custardy “durian” cake — most items priced from $2.38 to $6.88 per plate or platter. Here, servers don’t push carts of dim sum around the round and wait for guests to “clap” before serving. Instead, as in a palace, after guests fill out an order form, waiters swiftly bring items directly from kitchen to table. In classic Chinese cookery, cutting the distance between kitchen and consumption is an important factor in preserving desired tastes. ■

FORTUNE CHINESE CUISINE

ZUSHI RESTAURANT

QUADRUPEL

60 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena (626) 577-1888

133 W. California Blvd., Pasadena (626) 578-9191 ZushiRestaurant.com

35 N. Arroyo Pkwy., Pasadena (626) 405-0830

CUISINE

CUISINE

For those of you who enjoy tasty Chinese food, Fortune Chinese Cuisine is the place for you! Using the freshest ingredients with specially brewed soy sauce to reduce the level of sodium by 40!

CUISINE Zushi does Western Sushi, the increasingly popular fusion sushi of North America. Fueled by invention of the California roll, a wide variety of popular rolls has involved since.

DINERS’ FAVORITES

DINERS’ FAVORITES

1. Baked Salmon roll ($10.95) 2. Pepper sheared tuna sashimi ($12.95) 3. Spicy Tuna Salad ($9.95)

1. Roasted bone-marrow salad with pancetta vinaigette ($11) 2. Honey-braised pork shank with parsnip potato puree ($19) 3. Croissant bread pudding with flambeed bananas ($7)

VIBE

VIBE

“Zushi is a subtle harmony of great food, good service and contemporary décor. Once experienced, this charming snuggery is yours forever.”

A quiet, romantic spot during the early hours of the week, but a fun and festive restaurant in this Old European setting surrounded by wall to wall mahogany wood.

PRICE

PRICE

$$$$$

$$$$$

DINERS’ FAVORITES

1. Mandarin Three Flavors ($13.95) 2. Honey Glazed Walnut Shrimp ($13.95) 3. Hot Spicy Orange Flavored Chicken ($8.95)

Chef Levoe puts a new spin on French bistro food. Serving over 60 eclectic wines and a late night menu featuring our "Nordli" Burger, there is definitely something for everyone.

VIBE In the heart of Old Town Pasadena , this family favorite offers comfortable seating for dine in, or take out if you wish! Easy parking. Check out our catering services!

PRICE $$$$$

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ (UP TO $10) | $$ ($11–15) | $$$ ($16-25) | $$$$ ($25+) | ADVERTISEMENT |

ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 49


TASTE

T H E

F L A V O R S

O F

A R R O Y O

Redwhite + bluezz: The Winning Trifecta MUSIC, KITCHEN, CELLAR, SERVICE FILLS A RHYTHMIC TERRAIN BY DAN O’HERON While the cocktail glass in many a restaurant/nightclub overflows with pleasure until it is drained of enticement, the redwhite + bluezz’ wine/grill and jazz club continues to pour refinements into a champagne bucket with no bottom. This "speakeasy" without a racket, this jazz club with longer live entertainments than a "cabaret," has proved that fresh selections of cool music, fine food and glorious drink combine for a gastronomical and social treat more pleasurable than the sum of its parts. Setting the stage, the staff makes no unnecessary moves while anticipating every need, and says the right words in a sincere manner to every guest. And the three sommeliers who can make authoritative suggestions from the diverse wine list on what to drink with what – which now includes 39 cheeses from around the world. And, whether a steak is well-done, medium or bloomy pink, it’s consistently cooked right by Executive Chef Gabriel Contreras from the finest 35-day dry aged USDA Prime beef extant. redwhite + bluezz 70 S. Raymond Ave., Old Pasadena He turns out favorites like fried mac & cheese and (626) 792-4441 Certified Black Angus short ribs too. Yet, to be ahead of the curve in the newly remodeled Point redwhitebluezz.com 08 Room, he’s added small plates like cold water oysters and "corn dogs" made of lobster. And, while hometown heroes like Ace, Ali and Annie continue to pour more cognac than cosmos to regular parties of one, Point 08 has added scientifically blended mixes like liquid nitrogen to freeze margaritas -- and olive foam atop martinis -- formulated by Tom Howard, the mixologist who opened the new Ritz-Carlton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. It will feature a different jazz style from the main dining room, yet equally classic. ■

UGO’S CAFE

NEW MOON RESTAURANT & BAR

THE COUNTER BURGER

74 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre (626) 836-5700 Ugoscafe.com

2138 Verdugo Blvd., Montrose (818) 249-4393 newmoonrestaurants.com

140 Shoppers Lane, Pasadena | (626) 440-1008 12117 Ventura Blvd., Studio City | (818) 980-0004 Thecounterburger.com

CUISINE

CUISINE

CUISINE

Gourmet Italian cuisine with a charm for dessert, plus fine wines, Ugo’s dishes come fresh from farm to fork. All entrées also include a side salad and Ugo’s own artisan bread.

New Moon’s contemporary take on classic Chinese cuisine is a happy balance of traditional asian flavors and fresh ingredients that have been re-imagined for contemporary tastes. Impressive wine list and a full bar.

The extensive list of fresh mouth-watering ingredients allows you to build your own gourmet burger. Our 312,120+ different combinations make every burger as unique as each customer. Rarely is the same burger made twice in one day.

DINERS’ FAVORITES DINERS’ FAVORITES

1. Roma Artichoke ($7.99) 2. Lasagna Bolognese ($15.99) 3. Lobster Ravioli ($19.99)

1. Chloe Shrimp ($14.95) 2. Filet of Sole in a Blackbean Sauce ($13.50) 3. New Moon’s Dragon Beef ($12.95)

VIBE With 12 tables, an intimate bar crannied in a room marked with family-and-friend memorabilia, and a romantic classical guitarist on weekends, owners Chez & Sherri create the experience of a cozy café in Italy.

1. Counter Burger ($10.50) 2. Old School ($8.50) 3. Unique Veggie ($8.50)

VIBE Casual, yet sophisticated atmosphere and attentive service has gained Zagat-rated New Moon a dedicated following. The newly opened bar has already proved a popular spot with special happy hour drink prices and menu.

PRICE $$$$$

DINERS’ FAVORITES

PRICE

VIBE Not the classic burger joint. A fresh era of industrial decor, laid back vibe, today’s music, and burger options only limited by your imagination. Happy Hour 3:30–6:30 M–F featuring 1/2 off starters excluding mini-burgers & $1 off beer/ wine.

$$$$$

PRICE $$$$$ 50 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ (UP TO $10) | $$ ($11–15) | $$$ ($16-25) | $$$$ ($25+) | ADVERTISEMENT |


KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

A Love Letter to Bread

LIKE ANY LOVE STORY, THIS ONE INVOLVES A POWER STRUGGLE — BETWEEN THE HEART AND THE HIPS. BY LESLIE BILDERBACK | PHOTOS BY TERI LYN FISHER

My Be-loav-ed Bread,

way to fill us up so that they can put less food on our plates, therefore saving billions of dollars a year? Preposterous!

I love you. I love the feel of your dough in my hands as I caress you across my countertop, gently coaxing out your elasticity with each tender stroke. I love the smell of my kitchen and the yeast-heavy steam that fogs up my glasses when I open the oven to check on you. I love the sounds you make — the delicate crinkling as you cool on the counter, the salacious ripping of your crust as it ruptures to reveal your inner treasure, the slow, deliberate crunch in my jaw as I savor your essence. And oh, the taste of you. My dearest, when we are apart, I hunger for you.

I do think, however, that the bread basket was concocted as a KGB plot to weigh down the capitalists — literally. In fact, if I am not mistaken, I think the first free bread basket was served at the Russian Tea Room in 1947. (Aha!) Of course, those commie carb-pushers never thought they’d lose the arms race, devalue the ruble and ultimately alienate the Soviet people. Nice try, comrade. Yes, we are a country stuffed to the gizzard with bread like a turkey at Thanksgiving, but that does not mean we are ready to go totally totalitarian. Sometimes bread has the upper hand; other times I do. Currently I am winning this affair d’honneur, but I feel certain there will come a day when I say, “To hell with it,” throw in the towel and spend my final hours gorging on croissants, Indian fry bread, sourdough boules and (gasp!) hot naan, like Robert Morley in the final scene of the

Affectionately yours (and waiting eagerly in anticipation of our next encounter), Leslie

best movie ever, Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? (Oh, sorry! I should have said “spoiler alert,” although I don’t think it counts if the movie was made in 1978. Perhaps I should issue myself a get-a-life-and-watch-a-movie-from-this-decade alert.) I am not the first to express loaf love. The ancient Egyptians were fans too.

Yes, despite Deuteronomy’s warning, I could absolutely live on bread alone. Well,

Bakeries unearthed at Giza date to 2600 B.C., and many grains and loaves have been

technically I would need water too, and probably some orange juice to prevent

found in a number of Egyptian tombs, along with drawings of busy bakeries and carv-

scurvy. But otherwise, I could totally live on bread, because I adore it.

ings of people kneading. (Either they’re kneading bread or running an ancient mas-

Also, I hate it. A contradiction? Perhaps. But I know that my precious bread is actually my

sage parlor, although I doubt that is the kind of imagery they took to the hereafter.) The process of making bread with naturally occurring yeast is a long one, but I

enemy. We are engaged in a mano-a-mano duel to the death. You see, simple car-

guess when you’re up for building pyramids, you are a patient people. It’s not as if

bohydrates do not initially satisfy my appetite and thus create a further craving,

they had a choice. Hatshepsutiri the Baker Girl could hardly take a quick cruise

which in turn leads to overeating. It is not until I am resting supinely on the floor,

down the Nile for a packet of Fleishmann’s RapidRise. In those days, one had to

pants unzipped (Hold your horses! This is not meant to be titillating), in an attempt

attract and capture wild yeast (an operation that did not involve hiding in the bushes

to alleviate the explosive gaseous thunderhead in my gut, that I think, “I probably

with a net). Yeast is a microscopic living organism found all around us. Like me, it is

shouldn’t have eaten that entire bread basket.” (Note to self: Find a new family

attracted to carbohydrates, and it prefers an environment that is warm and moist.

motto to replace “More Bread, Please.”)

When all the conditions are right, the yeast feeds, then produces carbon dioxide

Speaking of the bread basket, I blame this singular practice for the downfall of society. It is surely some sort of trick. Why else would restaurants give it away for free? Is it some kind of reward for making it to the table in one piece? No! Is it a

(CO2) and alcohol in a little process we call fermentation. Production of alcohol is less noticeable in baking than in brewing, but the longer the fermentation, the more —CONTINUED ON PAGE 52 ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 51


KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

SOURDOUGH STARTER Use this starter for any bread recipe, including the Sourdough Rye Bread below, or add it in place of half the liquid in recipes for biscuits or pancakes to add a hint of sour.

INGREDIENTS 3 cups water 1/8 teaspoon granulated yeast

1½ cups all-purpose flour 1½ cups whole wheat flour

METHOD DAY 1: Combine 1 cup water, yeast, ½ cup all-purpose flour and ½ cup whole wheat flour in a ceramic or glass bowl. Stir to combine, cover loosely with damp cheesecloth or towel and set aside at room temperature. Stir this mixture once a day for the next 3 days. After a few days, a dark liquid will accumulate on the surface. This is normal. DAY 5: Add to the starter 1 cup water, ½ cup all-purpose flour and ½ cup whole wheat flour. Stir well, cover again and set aside at room temperature for another 5 days, stirring once a day, as before. DAY 10: Again add 1 cup water, ½ cup all-purpose flour and ½ cup whole wheat flour. Mix thoroughly. Let stand at room temperature for 6 hours, or until the starter foams and doubles in volume. The starter is now ready to use. Makes about 6 cups. To keep your starter alive, replace the quantity that has been used with an equal amount of water and flour. Stir it every day, and feed it every 5 days by removing some starter and replacing it with an equal amount of water and flour. (For every cup used, replace with ½ cup water, ¼ cup all-purpose flour and ¼ cup whole wheat flour.) If you do not wish to feed it but want to keep it, you can refrigerate it indefinitely; before using, take it out and feed it for 10 days by removing some starter and replacing it with an equal amount of water and flour. This recipe has several variations, including substituting specialty grains or cornmeal for whole wheat flour or adding fruit. Red grapes are the most common, but berries, stone fruits and even potatoes work well for added flavor and yeast attraction. To the recipe above, add 1 cup of mashed fruit on Day 1.

*Caution: The starter should be a tan color with a gray liquid that separates and rises to the surface. If it turns pink or yellow, it has picked up a mold and should be thrown out.

SOURDOUGH RYE BREAD —CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51

a sour-tasting alcohol accumulates. This is the basic principle behind sourdough. (To correct a common misconception: Miner ’49ers, known for their sourdough and gold-prospecting, were not bakers — they were drunks. The starters were guarded

The starch content of rye flour makes it an exceptional food for sourdough starter. But more important, the sweet succulent flavor of caraway is the perfect complement to that sour flavor. Yeast is for cheaters, but if you’re worried about the potency of your starter, it’s a fail-safe ingredient.

diligently so they could drink the alcohol off the top. Now, that’s the kind of ingenu-

INGREDIENTS

ity that makes California great!)

1 cup sourdough starter 1 cup water Optional: 1¾ teaspoons active dry yeast (1 package); add if your starter is weak, or you are in a hurry.

The ancients probably first noticed natural yeast bubbling weirdly on the surface of some mushy fruit. They gathered it up and added it to a vat of fruit juice, which eventually produced wine, or what the ancients called “happy juice.” They

1 cup light rye flour 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 cup whole wheat flour 2 to 3 cups bread flour 2 tablespoons cornmeal

tried it in a tea of watery grains and created Pabst Blue Ribbon. Finally, Larry the Luxorian added some of the bubbly mass to a bowl of porridge. It was awful, so he threw it in the fire. But later that night, when the fire died out, he found a loaf of bread among the coals. Even with the knowledge of starters, brewing and bread making, it took the invention of the microscope for man to realize that yeast was the cause of fermentation, and it wasn’t until the 1860s that the commercial production of yeast began. Sure, grain has something to do with the lusciousness of bread too, but I am afraid to launch into my Ode to Endosperm, lest I lose the two readers I have left. Suffice to say the entire process of making bread is as magical as Houdini at Disneyland on Christmas Eve. AM Leslie Bilderback is a certified master baker, chef, cookbook author and lead pastry instructor at École de Cuisine Pasadena. Bilderback teaches her techniques online at culinarymasterclass.com. 52 ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ ARROYO

METHOD 1. To make a sponge (a bowl of warm, fermented batter), combine starter, ½ cup of water and yeast, if you’re using it. Stir to dissolve, and let stand 5 minutes. Add rye flour and beat for 1 minute. Cover and let stand at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours. 2. Add to the sponge the remaining water, whole wheat flour, salt and enough bread flour to make a soft dough. Turn out onto a floured work surface and knead 8 to 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Add flour only as needed to reduce stickiness. Return to bowl, dust with flour, cover with plastic and allow to rise at room temperature until doubled in volume, about 1 to 2 hours. 3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and sprinkle with cornmeal. Turn risen dough out onto a floured surface and divide into 2 equal portions. Roll into tight balls and place on prepared pan, seam side down. Dust generously with flour, cover again with plastic and let rise until doubled, another 30 to 60 minutes. Preheat oven to 475˚. 4. Using a serrated knife, slice a pinwheel or star pattern into the top of the dough, about ½-inch deep. Place a pan of cold water on the floor of the oven to create steam. Bake until golden brown and hollow-sounding, about 30 to 40 minutes. Cool completely on a rack before serving.


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Tired of waiting to see your doctor? HEALTH & BEAUTY —CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53

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ARROYO ~ SEPTEMBER 2010 ~ 56

Arroyo Monthly September 2010  

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