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Mini Barrel Chair BELOW AND AT RIGHT: Items in the Huntington Store

Jade Necklace

Kovecses Ikebana

Ceramic Seedpod Bowl

paintings everyone goes to see, Thomas Gainsborough’s Blue Boy and Thomas Lawrence’s Pinkie. There are also plenty of other reasons to go to the Huntington, of course — the extensive gardens of various kinds (the Desert Garden, Rose Garden, Japanese Garden and Chinese Garden, among them), plus the library and two other galleries: the Boone Gallery and the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art. The latter boasts such works as Mary Cassatt’s Breakfast in Bed and Edward Hopper’s The Long Leg, as well as noted contemporary work such as Andy Warhol’s Brillo Box. To design the new center, the Huntington tapped the San Francisco--based fi rm of Architecture Resources Group, the historic-building specialists who had so successfully executed the mansion’s renovation for its 2008 reopening. (They also maintain an office in Pasadena.) “The overarching objective we received from the board was that they wanted to preserve the quality of the estate,” says architect Stephen Farneth, ARG’s founder and principal in charge of the Huntington project. “We had a lot of conversations about what is an estate and how to preserve that.” A typical estate has a main

building surrounded by smaller ones that serve specific functions. “We wanted to keep the scale, not have anything else larger than the library and the house,” he continues. “We wanted them connected with loggias, garden courtyards, trellisses and some sort of outdoor structure.” The team also wanted a layout that was easy Morris Strawberry Thief Red Bag to see at a glance; visitors will funnel into one entry area to buy tickets and continue on to a courtyard immediately beyond where they can rest or meet people. “Something we thought a lot about is what the buildings would look like,” says Farneth. “We wanted them to be very simple, with classical proportions, and keep the materials simple as well, with a simple palette.” The buildings have creamy white exteriors, clay-tile roofs and copper gutters and downspouts. In keeping with the Huntington’s traditional-but-airy Wisteria Pedestal Lamp style, the interiors have wooden paneling and trims, mostly of light oak, and natural daylight and a view of the gardens from every room. Of course, there will also be new gardens leading the way to the old ones, among the 6½ acres (out of 207 acres total) designed by the San Francisco--based landscape architectural firm Office of Cheryl Barton. In all phases of the project, architecture and landscaping have gone hand in hand. “One of the most unique things about this project is that we designed the buildings and landscape in a completely integrated manner, and we’re building them in an integrated manner,” says Sowd. “We’re doing a lot of things to make the landscape successful.” The podocarpus trees in the visitors’ courtyard, for example, were planted taking into account the soil density and drainage required for their roots. Even before that, she says, as they began to contour the terrain, “We scraped off the good planting soil and stockpiled it.” |||| The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Hours are noon to 4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday through Friday, and 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekends. Admission costs $20 for adults on weekdays ($23 on weekends), $15 for seniors over 64 ($18), $12 for students ($13) and $8 for youth ages 5 to 11 every day. Children under 5 and members are admitted free. Call (626) 4052100 or visit huntington.org. 01.15 ARROYO | 37

Profile for Southland Publishing

Arroyo Monthly January 2015  

The beauty issue

Arroyo Monthly January 2015  

The beauty issue

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