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ELEISH VAN BREEMS

Brown is the New Grey

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Display through May 2018

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COMMUNITY CONNECT Designers Network

NIKE SCORES New NYC HQ


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March 22–25, 2018 Piers 92 & 94 NYC

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Features Volume 15 Issue 1

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10 Everything Old is New Again By Cathy Whitlock Connecticut designers Eleish Van Breems Reinvent the Classics.

18 Nike's New York Presence By Cathy Whitlock The Inimitable Brand’s Manhattan Headquarters.

56 24 Community by Design By Liz Logan Designers band together to share tips and tricks.

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Departments Volume 15 Issue 1

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6 STYLERADAR By Bébé Howorth Chintz makes a comeback, but not always how you’d expect!

8 TROVE By Katie Doyle April showers bring May flowers—these items will ensure you enjoy both.

30 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock Books on Manhattan gardens, entertaining, the American country house and a revisit to a classic design tome are among a few new offerings.

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32 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle From molecular gastronomy to reconstructed Middle Eastern cuisine, Old World charm to New Age community, Manhattan has a lot going on this spring.

34 GALLERY 42

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

52 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

62 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

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72 NEWSHOWROOMS Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 BACKSTORY By Bébé Howorth The wide selection at PROFILES avoids cookie-cutter thinking.

80 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

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ARRAY MAGAZINE, INC. 79 Madison Avenue 15th Floor New York, NY 10016 +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. © 2018 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

EDITORIAL Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Annette Rose-Shapiro Managing Editor/Copy Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

CONTRIBUTORS Bébé Howorth Cathy Whitlock Katie Doyle Ted Lambert

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Chief Marketing Officer Bébé Howorth Design Services/ Marketing Manager Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager

ON THE COVER Rhonda Eleish and Edie van Breems photographed by Neil A. Landino Jr.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Readers, It’s happening again—the planet’s axis shifts, the season changes and everything begins to blossom anew. This cycle also signals fresh ideas, renewed energy and new collaborations. Spring also trumpets the arrival of colors. Color is a huge factor in design, and different hues periodically become “hot” or wane in popularity. For many years, lighter shades became the standard bearers, with many different shades of grey (50?) ruling over the other neutrals. But now, darker richer browns are staging a comeback. ARRAY’s Cathy Whitlock spoke with Rhonda Eleish and Edie van Breems, two design partners who definitely aren’t afraid of the dark (Everything Old is New Again, p. 10). Energy is key to the redesign of Nike’s Midtown Manhattan NYHQ, a collaboration between their own internal Workplace Design + Connectivity division, Studiod Architecture and WeShouldDoItAll. The teamwork is obviously firing on all cylinders, and the new NYHQ, as it is known, is bursting with power and playful strength, like a world-class athlete (Nike’s New York Presence, p. 18). And as days get longer and warmer, we venture out from our hi-rise burrows and reestablish connections with the outside world. The design world is relatively small, yet we are often so immersed in projects, we barely have a moment to lift our heads and take it all in. But we’re also social creatures who benefit from interaction and dialogue. Several groups, some new and some of which were established decades ago, foster this type of open exchange, sharing experiences and resources to build a stronger design community (Community By Design, p. 24). May the pages of this issue of ARRAY inspire you to create new connections, forge new collaborations, and even take a new spin on the color wheel.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar Chintz makes a comeback, but not always how you’d expect!

By Bébé Howorth

No need for fresh flowers in the powder room Ashley Woodson Bailey with “Dutch Love” and “Into the Garden” wallpapers, $8.40 per square foot bradley-usa.com, Suite 802 These whimsical wallcoverings will give the tiny nook a feminine touch 24-7. Unlike traditional chintz, printed on cotton or linen, Ashley Woodson Bailey creates her own floral arrangements, photographs them, and transforms them into wallpaper. With anemones, peonies, and ranunculus bouquets, her “Into the Garden” print is a softer version of Bailey’s most popular design, “Dutch Love” which has largescale arrangements bursting over a black background.

It’s always tea time The Shell Garden Floral Collection Teacups, $85 each richardcohencollection.com, Suite 801 With these cups there’s always time for tea. They’re not fabric, but the Halycon Days teacups take a page from chintz with rims that were inspired by the gardens of the Castle of Mey, Queen Elizabeth’s home in Caithness, Scotland.

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Chintz for guys NK Collection Linen Thistle Pillow, $485 1stdibs.com/info/nydc, 10th floor A more masculine version of chintz, this thistle pillow is an easy in for anyone fighting florals. The Claremont thistle fabric with brown linen piping takes the floral chintz motif to a delightful new level.

In the boudoir Brett Design’s “Watercolor Bouquet” and “Blueberries” wallpapers, $138/yard on paper; $148/yard on Type II or mylar bradley-usa.com, Suite 802 Serene and subdued, these watercolor wallpapers are bound for the boudoir. Brett Design’s contemporary take on the repeating floral pattern turns watercolor bouquets into homage. The designer, Brett Beldock, is one of the New York Design Center’s Access to

Color outside the lines—literally Pair of Barrel Chairs with Botanical Print Upholstery, $5,000 for pair 1stdibs.com/info/nydc, 10th floor These Midcentury Barrel Chairs were reimagined by designer Sasha Bikoff and upholstered in a botanical fabric fit for a chintz rulebreaker—floral buds in black and white with pops of apple green and orange everywhere else.

Design designers. Old meets new Brunschwig & Fils “Les Pivoines”, To the Trade only brunschwig.com, Suite 401 The “Les Pivoines” cotton prints from the Les Ensembliers collection, designed by Richard Ouellette, are the historic brand’s more modern spin on chintz with black, blue, and green backgrounds.

Treasures chest 1950s Swedish Botanical Chest, $12,500 1stdibs.com/info/nydc, 10th floor The treasures are on the outside of this chest. A more modern approach to chintz, where paper botanical prints by C.A.M. Lindman adorn the façade of a Midcentury vintage chest.

Blueprints to beauty Theodore Alexander, $225/yard theodorealexander.com, Suite 515 A more contemporary version of chintz with a blue and cream color combination.

Suitable for royalty Brunschwig & Fils “Coligny Glazed Chintz”, To the Trade only brunschwig.com, Suite 401 This long-established pattern would suit the “Prince of Chintz” himself, interior designer Mario Buatta. The most traditional chintz of the bunch, this “Coligny” glazed fabric features pink florals on a cream background. FEB

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Trove 01

By Katie Doyle

April showers bring May flowers—these items will ensure you enjoy both.

DOGGONE DRY We all know a dog who won’t step a paw out onto a wet sidewalk. On those days, the Push Pushi Rainbow Line Dog Raincoat will keep your pup dry and cozy (and keep the smell of wet dog out of your apartment). The raincoat’s water-repellent nylon shell is lined with soft fleece, and an adjustable chest and belly straps ensures a comfortable fit while a button hole opening allows for a seamless connection for either a leash or harness. The umbrella-style hood is detachable, and a magnet holds it down when it’s just drizzling. The raincoat is available in a multitude of sizes, from teacup all the way to XL. Push Pushi Rainbow Line Dog Raincoat, $75 at baxterboo.com.

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CLEANING KICK Keep your rain boots clean from the most stubborn mud with this hand-crafted boot brush, which comes with an accompanying hook that makes the brush easy to hang by your doorway or in the mudroom. (The brush can be hung indoors or outdoors, so long as it is sheltered from the rain.) Each brush and hook is made in the U.S.A. and crafted from sturdy iron by traditional American blacksmiths, with natural cocoa fiber bristles. With its rustic, curved handle and hand-crafted rod, the brush is as much an interior accessory as it is a functional tool. Iron Boot Brush, $98 at shopterrain.com.

03 RAIN, RAIN GO AWAY—OR STAY The Cleverhood is in essence a high-performance rain poncho. Waterproof, durable, and made in the U.S.A., it’s a rain cape that will protect you from the elements whether you’re walking the dog, riding a bike, or just on a quick jaunt to grab your morning latte. With its thoughtful design, the Cleverhood is the antithesis of a disposable drug store poncho. What sets the Cleverhood apart is its top-notch manufacturing and elevated attention to detail: it is seam-sealed with a lightweight, talc-finished membrane, and features reflective 3PM piping, elastic thumb loops, and a hood that is fitted to optimize peripheral vision. The Cleverhood is available in a variety of styles, from corduroy to gingham to camouflage, and more. Cleverhood Rain Cape, $249 at cleverhood.com.

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04 ON THE DOT One way to ruin your morning? Run to the train (jump over puddles, trudge through spring slush) only to miss your train by a millisecond. Well, the NYC Train Sign is here to change that, once and for all. Hand-crafted in Bushwick, the sign uses Raspberry Pi, a micro-computer, an LED matrix, and a 3D printed base to display real-time public data. You can customize your sign to display the station or train line of your choice, so the train sign can move with you. The train sign currently serves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, L, M, N, Q, R, W lines, and you can also display personalized text or weather information. Inwood Train Sign, $499 at nyc.trainsign.com.


JUMP FOR GOLD This is not your everyday, schoolyard jump rope. Rather, this is an LED-embedded smart rope that tracks your jump count and displays it in front of you as you jump, much like a hologram—perfect for a quick indoor workout on rainy days, or to take to the park on sunnier ones. The jump rope also syncs with a mobile app (available for iOS, Android and Apple Watch) which tracks calories burned, workout times and more. It’s easy to charge with a standard microUSB cable, and efficient: just two hours of charge gets you 36 hours of workout time. The jump rope is available with silver, chrome or gold handles. Smart Jump Rope, from $119 at fishpond.com.

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SUIT UP While we’d love to suggest this suit for your commute on the rainiest of the days, it is in fact a fully-functioning, neoprene wetsuit that debuted on the Thom Browne runway. Designed for scuba diving, this technical wetsuit is printed with a jacket, tie, top collar, lapels and trousers to emulate the classic menswear that the designer is known for. The centered back zipper is fitted with a tab in the designer’s signature red, white and blue grosgrain. Trompe L’oeil Technical Wetsuit in Neoprene, $4,900 at thombrowne.com.

WILL BIKE FOR WINE This bicycle-mounted leather wine carrier is superb for a jaunt to the park or beach. Designed by Pedal Happy Design out of California, the carrier is available in light brown, mahogany or black, and includes a built-in opener. The carrier is secured by a removable strap, so you can detach it from your bike and continue to enjoy your bottle of vino in its gorgeous, vegetable-tanned leather case. You can even personalize your carrier with a custom graphic. If you’re more of a cicerone than a sommelier, Pedal Happy Design also makes a version for beer growlers. Leather Wine Carrier, from $65 at pedalhappydesign.com.

08 LEATHER HEAD This motorcycle helmet combines fashion and function in a chic design, handcrafted by Andrea Cardone Italia, out of Pozzuoli, Italy. While the Cardone family is known for a legacy of Neapolitan craftsmanship, this is not a novelty accessory. The helmet adheres to the highest European safety standards, so you can cruise the streets in both style and confidence. The supple Italian leather is available in black or brown and features an intricate laser-cut motif. The interior is lined with fabric for comfort. Cutout Leather Helmet, $299 at ahalife.com.

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By Cathy Whitlock All photographs by Neil A. Landino Jr except where noted.

Everything

OLD is

NEW

Again

C O N N E C T I C U T D E S I G N E R S E L E I S H VA N B R E E M S REINVENT THE CLASSICS

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esign extremists anxiously anticipate each new decade, expecting something outré or the never-yet-seen, but no matter the decennial, count on it being the well-designed classic—retooled or refined for a new generation—that is the standout in every decade.

Dark wood panels provide an impressive backdrop and balance with the light furnishings and geometric patterns in the Library at the 2014 Holiday House NYC.

In the eighties and nineties, the classics meant design elements that comprised English Country Style and was popular in what can best be described as the Bonfire of the Vanities period (named after the author Tom Wolfe’s best-selling book). Loved by Anglophiles, it was a time where rooms were filled to the brim with chintz-on-chintz patterns, dog paintings hung from satin moiré ribbons and no self-respecting room was complete without a mahogany chest or two.

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Photographs by Simon Upton

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Top: Swedish design experts Rhonda Eleish and Edie van Breems of Eliesh van Breems Ltd. Opposite page: Flanked by carved Rococo armchairs, a circa 1770 Gustavian blue and white gingham settee is front and center in van Breem’s sitting room.

Soon the millennium ushered in a more tailored and pared down aesthetic, as minimalism and sleek crème-toned rooms were de riguer. Contemporary lightfilled monochromatic looks coupled with Midcentury furnishings and statement art have been in vogue for the past couple of decades.

Specializing in Swedish and Scandinavian design, they have found the style’s clean and elegant lines when mixed with a touch of “brown” furniture or antiques marry both classic and modernism in

“What do I do with the inlaid zebra wood card table I inherited or the Biedermeier chest that cost a fortune decades ago?”

a very successful way. Friends since childhood, they have a penchant for combining painted Scandinavian pieces from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with antiques as van Breems says, “When you put an eighteenthcentury Gustavian console table next to a Danish piece from the mid-twentieth century, they have a dialog with each other. They work together because the forms are pure: there is no extraneous detailing.”

Rhonda Eleish and Edie van Breems of Eleish Van Breems are two interior designers who have successfully navigated these waters.

Eleish and van Breems first discovered antiques on a buying trip in Stockholm (both have a Scandinavian background and Eleish‘s

A change is in the air as everything old is new again. Clients are posing the age-old question,

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Photographs by Simon Upton

Top: Hand restored wide planked chestnut flooring provides a balance with the Gustavian furnishings in van Breem’s 18th century farmhouse. Opposite page: Eleish along with Richard Cerrone and Lisa Hymen designed the room for Lillian August.

great-aunt Ittan Gullers who was a well known antique and textile dealer). Filling a 40-foot container in three days, they opened a shop in a charming historical house in Woodbury, Connecticut in 1997 (they have since moved to Westport) and created lifestyle displays specializing in 18th Century Swedish that were right out of an Ingmar Bergman film. Quickly Eleish van Breems became the go-to destination for all things Swedish and Gustavian. Their projects have included everything from a French chateau in Connecticut and a ’40s Georgian-style estate outside Minneapolis to a modern Swedish style house on the beach. “The Scandinavians do a better job than anyone

mixing periods of high and low together. It’s all about natural materials, woods, metal, glass and everything is very layered,” says van Breems. “People think it is all about white-on-white and one note, but it’s really about mixing neutral and layering such as the addition of an 18th-century bucket or a Midcentury modern chair for example. Its all about soul and craftsmanship.” As the pair wrote in their third book Reflections on Interiors (Gibbs Smith, 2013), “Swedish Style mixes the old and the new. Swedish homes are highly personal and antique heirlooms are mixed side by side next to the most current designs creating sophisticated design dynamics.” Much like contemporary, the style often consists of

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furnishings with graceful lines, tone-on-tone palettes with light floors and walls as a backdrop and like traditional, has deep roots in history and woods that help define a sense of place. “Brown furniture injects soul into a space. I am excited that brown is coming back into vogue as it has soul and depth. Anything with a patina brings life, warmth and comfort,” details Eleish. She also brings up another reason for the resurgence in darker furniture noting, “People work in contemporary office spaces with hard edges and LED lighting and they want to come home to warmth.” And not to mention millennials are catching on to the looks of the past. “There is a whole generation that hasn’t done floral or pretty. This is of interest to our clients in their 20s and 30s.”

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Whether you are adding a mahogany console or a walnut end table, success lies in the balance of the room. “The best brown piece to add to a Scandinavian interior is the anchor,” details van Breems. “It adds the grounding element and soul to an interior.” This can translate into a brown table with painted dining chairs and a console or dark nightside tables contrasted with a light armoire and bed. “Browns are actually an incredibly versatile neutral that we find go with almost any accent color—some of our favorite combinations with brown are blue, pink, orange and green added as pottery, textiles, art and especially antiques,” explains Eleish. “In a way, brown really is the new grey. Because the trend in decor these last fifteen years has very modern and hard edges, there is a return to warmth, exotic layered textures, fabrics, lots of color and wood furniture.”


Will we see a resurgence of dark wood antiques and reproduction furniture? At the end of the day, it’s all about what works and pleases you and your client. As Eleish aptly notes, “The trick is in a harmony/balance between brown and painted. The objective is to have the injection of brown in a space be natural and not contrived. Random placement looks random. A well-designed space will naturally call for patina and depth to add that final layer of completion and definition.”

Top left: “The emphasis on form and function and the client's Scandinavian heritage continues into the dining room where a rare carved Rococo Mirror reflects the Hans Wegner dining table and chairs and light cast from the Soul pendant by Eva Eisler,” details van Breems. Top right: An atmospheric landscape by artist Jim Seitz pairs beautifully with a Saarinen Womb Chair. Bottom right: Incorporating the client’s existing Gustavian antiques and art collection added a “livable, modern and fresh spin” to their Greenwich pied-a-terre.

200 Lex has numerous showrooms featuring antique and traditional furniture—and they’re making a comeback. Baker Furniture Suite 300 The Baker Stately Home Collection was founded by Sir Humphry Wakefield, an authority on English antiques, who continues to act as consultant as he travels the globe searching for storied pieces to reproduce. Wakefield has even loaned pieces from his personal collection for reproduction, such as his father’s desk when he was minister in Winston Churchill’s government and Regency chairs from his English castle, Chillingham. bakerfurniture.com/design-story/designers-andcollections/stately-homes

Wood & Hogan Suite 812 Founded in 1927, Wood & Hogan has been managed by the same family for three generations. In addition to its collections of traditional English reproductions and fine antiques, the showroom is complete with exceptional prints, lamps, china and decorative accessories. woodandhogan.com

Colombo Mobili Suite 1618 Using methods passed through the Colombo family for six generations, the Italian-based Colombo Mobili company continues to produce beautiful classic furniture which draws from European designs. The buffing technique used during production is the same technique used four centuries ago. colombomobili.com

Hickory Chair Suite 102 Although the American company Hickory Chair does not manufacture traditional furniture exclusively, it does collaborate with designers, specifically Alexa Hampton, whose collections are made of antique reproductions. Hampton’s late father, the legendary Mark Hampton, also collaborated with the company in the ’80s. hickorychair.com/Furniture/c500053-Alexa-Hampton

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By Cathy Whitlock

NIKE’S

NEW YORK The piece de resistance is the working indoor basketball court complete with spectator bleachers.


PRESENCE TH E INIM ITAB LE B RAN D’S M A N HATTA N HE A D Q U A RTE RS

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ne only need look at the revolution of athletic shoes to see that reinvention is in Nike’s DNA. So it’s fitting that the 53–yearold company completely reinvented its East Coast headquarters, as thinking out of the box is the order of the day.

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Top left: A Big Apple-style food truck for employees is one of the many New York City-centric touches. Bottom left: Synonymous with one of Nike’s biggest selling shoes, the likeness of Michael Jordan is portrayed with mosaic tiles. Bottom right: Custom graphic art inspired images on wall tiles form the walls of a meeting workspace. Top right: The designers’ goal was to create open freestyle offices and space within the confines of the 147,000-square-foot space.

Working with Nike’s Workplace Design + Connectivity (WD + C) in partnership with Studiod Architecture and WSDIA/ WeShouldDoItAll, the primary goal was to highlight the synergy between the iconic brand and New York City through the use of sports themes throughout the six floors at 855 Avenue of the Americas in Midtown. Notes Matthew Kneller, Director of Global Corporate Communications with Nike, “With this move, we wanted to further Nike’s already deep roots in New York City. At Nike’s NYHQ (the official name of the building), we are better equipped to connect with our most influential consumers in the most influential city. It serves as the pinnacle expression of the brand in a global city. We will continue to redefine creativity, collaboration and influence as we inspire and connect with our consumers.” Another goal was to create a “Nike built environment and brand experience that transcends the typical workplace.” This translated into “freestyle” offices that ensure “workability” for an open and collaborative work environment. “We assessed current ways of working and implemented ‘Freestyle’—a new way of working that empowers our employees to work where, how and with whom they work best. This created the opportunity for our integrated design team to create key moments throughout the build environment that enhanced the employee experience and optimized opportunities to work in a variety of setting that promoted collaboration and focus,” says Kneller. “We provided unassigned seating to amplify flexibility and mobility allowing people to remain connected through elevated services and purposely placed collector space for social gatherings.” To achieve this result, the 147,00 square-foot-space has no private offices. Some 180 employees stow their personal items in lockers and have the choice of working in booths, lounges and conference rooms or diagonal book-filled cubicles in the library. The space also boasts wellness rooms, a VIP lounge, fitness studio, two terraces and a food truck equipped.

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Top: A dark blackened steel staircase is used to resemble the tunnel of a sports arena. Middle: The iconic Nike “swoosh” appears throughout the building as shown here in the lobby. Bottom: Graffiti-like images depict the synergy between Nike, New York and sports. (Opposite page) Top: The open ceiling plan coupled with the use of raw and refined materials and blackened steel comprise the design aesthetic. Bottom: A bird’s eye view of the company’s logo can be seen on the headquarter’s rooftop.

Front and center is the eight-foot-wide blackened steel stairway that mimics the dark tunnel entrance into a sporting arena. At the top of the stairs is the ultimate showstopper—a 4,000-square-foot, full-length indoor basketball court and bleachers that seats up to 400. Regulation size, it will serve as a practice space for visiting Nike-endorsed athletes such as LeBron James, Kevin Durant and the latest athlete to have his own shoe, Indiana Pacer Paul George. Community-based activities will include high school teams and local basketball leagues as well as Nike employees who want to unwind and shoot a few hoops. For a company that put Air Jordan’s on the map, its branding at its finest. Whimsical touches include an orange Volkswagen minibus similar to the original one founders Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight used to distribute their first pairs of Nike shoes. Doing double duty, the VW is outfitted with a conference table for one-on-one meetings. Kneller notes the company wanted to “both pay homage to Nike’s roots in Oregon and honor the legacy of sport in New York City.” Michael Jordan mosaics adorn a wall while conference ceiling tiles are designed to reflect show soles, the VIP Jeter Lounge celebrates the championship years of the Yankees while New York City bridge designs make up the floor patterns. And a nod to the Oregon-based company’s origins (the global headquarters are still based in Beaverton) is depicted with a 30-foot-tall bark wall.

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“Throughout the space, we’ve highlighted iconic New York sport moments and locations and Nike athletes through the use of graphics, image, illustration color, typography and space,” details Kneller, “You’ll note digital art by Beaverton artist More and More; bold illustrations by NYC based artist Micah Belamarich and studio Dark Igloo; and custom tiles designed by Brooklyn-based studio WSDIA/ WeShouldDoIt All.” And the proverbial icing on the cake? The sixth-floor terrace boasts the 90-foot long likeness of the Nike iconic trademark logo “swoosh” planted into a garden.

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By Liz Logan

COM MUNITY BY DESIGN

Peter Sallick

Barry Goralnick

DESIGNERS BAND TOGETHER TO SHARE TIPS AND TRICKS

Kati Curtis 24


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arry Goralnick has been practicing interior design for more than three decades, but recently his firm, Barry Goralnick Architecture & Design, has gone through some changes. While his experience is mostly in residential projects, some potential commercial projects recently came his way, prompting him to seek advice on commercial proposals from a designer he knows through a private group, Designers Collaborative.

“My peers in the group give me invaluable advice, and that gives me more confidence,” he observes. More and more, designers and industry leaders are building community by forming their own small, selective groups or joining relatively young, exclusive design organizations, such as the Design Leadership Network. In these groups, designers share advice, resources and ideas.

The Design Leadership Network's annual Design Leadership Summit draws hundreds design-industry professionals from across the country.

“The design world has undergone major changes in recent years,” says Peter Sallick, CEO of Waterworks, co-founder of Dering Hall and founder of the Design Leadership Network. “There are generational shifts in our workforce and our client base increasingly expects immediate gratification. So, in order to demonstrate our value, it’s more important than ever for designers to show that they are connected, organized and engaging in professional development.” Sallick founded the Design Leadership Network in 2003 to bring high-level design professionals together to work through common issues and challenges, such as marketing, business structure, managing employees and leadership. In the early days, Sallick organized regional discussions where designers shared expertise with their peers. Years later, the group now hosts an annual national summit that attracts hundreds of participants. Its membership

A room designed by Barry Goralnick Architecture & Design. Barry Goralnick, the firm's president, is a member of the private group Designers Collaborative, from which he gains advice and ideas.

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numbers roughly one thousand design-industry professionals across the country. There is an application process for membership.

“Education is core to our mission,” Sallick says. “There are endless cocktail parties in our industry, but oftentimes small talk leaves me unfulfilled. I believe that sitting down with colleagues in a workshop setting, structured around a particular business issue, creates a much greater sense of connection.” Then there are designers who are just starting their careers, who perhaps have an even greater need for connection. Just last year, the New York Design Center partnered with the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) to form a young alumni group for the school’s recent graduates. The initiative walks hand-in-hand with the New York Design Center’s efforts to support community events, such as the Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse, an annual charitable initiative. Alix Lerman, the New York Design Center’s chief marketing officer and organizer of the NYSID alumni group says, “We believe in building a community. Part of that is reaching out to the new designer, who may feel alone, and arming that person with resources and expertise.” The group of about 20 alumni share the topics they’re interested in—such as how to use social media to market your business—and the NewYork Design Center, in turn, creates programming to address those topics, drawing from its vendors and experts in its network.

Top left/right, bottom left: The Design Leadership Network's annual Design Leadership Summit includes panels and presentations by industry experts. Bottom right: A room designed by Barry Goralnick Architecture & Design. Barry Goralnick, the firm's president, is a member of the private group Designers Collaborative, from which he gains advice and ideas.

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As these early-career designers build up their portfolios, later they may seek out a group such as Designers Collaborative, of which Goralnick is a member. The informal, invitation-only group of roughly a dozen designers has been meeting every other month for more than 20 years. (They’ve become great friends in the process.) Meetings start with an open call for members to share a new resource or discovery, such as a fabric or other material. Then there’s a discussion structured around a particular topic—contracts, employee benefits, ordering software and the like—and there might even be a guest speaker. Goralnick says he’ll email the group when he’s looking for a specific resource—say, an upholsterer in Aspen—and it’s also been a great source of support. “In 2008, we were all in a sinking boat, with the economy faltering. So, we talked about how to drum up business during tough times.”

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Top Left: Kati Curtis Design created the interiors of this bold, youthful penthouse in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood for two 20-something sisters. Principal Kati Curtis has participated in many different design groups, which have informed her practice. Opposite page: The wideopen, colorful second-floor playroom of renovated Artsand-Crafts-style house in New Jersey. The interior design is by Kati Curtis Design.

Bottom left: A townhouse in New York City's meatpacking district, with vintage-inspired interior design by Kati Curtis. Bottom right: A Central Park West apartment with interior design by Kati Curtis.

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Kati Curtis, principal of Kati Curtis Design, has been involved in many different groups during her 25-year career. She’s been to events hosted by the Design Leadership Network and Leaders in Design, a group with a similar mission. She’s now part of Design Share, a small, private group, that’s similar to Designers Collaborative, and she’s been a member of the invitation-only group The Boardroom, which is part of Gail Doby’s coaching service for interior designers. She says that as her business grows, she becomes more eager to connect with other designers.

“As a small business owner, there’s a new challenge every day. If your firm is growing, every six months you have to turn on a dime to change your business structure,” she observes.

“I donʼt want to be doing that on an island alone. Iʼd much rather be doing it with the help and input of peers whom I trust and admire.”

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Books Axel Vervoordt: Stories and Reflections

Creating Beauty: Interiors

Classical Principles for Modern Design: Lessons from Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman's The Decoration of Houses

India Hicks: A Slice of England: The Story of Four Houses

Axel Vervoordt and Michael James Gardner Flammarion April 2018, 312 pages $30

Kathryn Scott Rizzoli March 2018, 240 pages $55

Thomas Jayne Monacelli Press January 2018, 240 pages $50

India Hicks Rizzoli March 2018, 224 pages $50

At the age of 67, international Belgian interior and product designer Axel Vervoordt has at long last written a memoir on a life well lived. Known for his unique and effortless minimalist interiors, he has garnered a worldwide following, and his personal home and reconstruction of a village in Antwerp is the stuff of design legend. Notable projects include actor Robert De Niro’s Manhattan penthouse and the interiors of Ira Drukier’s Greenwich Hotel. A fixture on the global art and antique scene, Vervoordt is widely considered one of the most esteemed dealers and curators in the world. Readers are privy to recollections and stories of the people who influenced his life and shaped his work from patrons, friends and clients to artists and mentors. Personal musings on visits from Rudolf Nureyev to his castle, his first Magritte purchase and tales of his legendary Venice exhibitions dot the pages of his fourth book.

Interior designer and awardwinning artist Kathryn Scott’s first monograph Creating Beauty: Interiors features a wide array of her handcrafted interiors from a sophisticated Central Park and Parisian-inspired neoclassical townhouse to a contemporary Hudson Valley retreat. Her five-story Italianate Brooklyn Heights brownstone is one of the special highlights, showcasing her use of customized details in serene and harmonious spaces. Reflecting her disciplined eye and attention to artisanal detail, the book explores the tried and true principles of proportion, effective use of unexpected materials and architectural detailing along with the various themes of her interiors that have appeared on the pages of House Beautiful, Architectural Digest and Southern Accents. She also conducts popular tours for Institute of Classical Architecture.

Turn-of-the-century interior designers Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman’s iconic design tome The Decoration of Houses was known as the “Bible of American Design” in 1897. A primer of classical symmetry and proportion, the book eschewed heavy Victorian-style furnishings that were a welcome departure from the Gilded Age of excess. The book also signaled the emergence of design as a profession. Noted design historian and designer Thomas Jayne tackles the age-old classical principles, adapting the doctrine of today’s modern living. As he aptly notes, “The Decoration of Houses is the level-headed, indispensable book on the subject. It is not an overstatement to say that it is the most important decorating book ever written.” Elaborating on the design principles through his own work at Jayne Design Studio, he showcases the restoration of eighteenth-century interiors in Crichel House in Dorset, England and Hudson Valley country house retreats to city living in Manhattan. Wharton and Codman would be proud.

Author, model, designer, television personality and entrepreneur India Hicks could easily be considered this decade’s Martha Stewart. Daughter of the legendary ’60s design icon David Hicks, life growing up in England and life as an adult in the Bahamas shaped her design aesthetic and the creation of a lifestyle brand that includes books and home accessories. With a royal lineage and pedigree (Charles, Prince of Wales is her godfather and she served as a bridesmaid in his wedding to Princess Diana), it’s only fitting her fifth book explores her recently designed country home in Oxfordshire and the history of three of her parent’s homes, Broadwell, The Grove and Bitwell along with David Hick’s celebrated gardens. The second portion of the book dissects the interpretation of her new home, America Farm, and how she has incorporated English traditions, adapting the designs into modern life and making it her own. Anecdotal tales on country life, local pubs and markets also fill the pages. Couture designer Carolina Herrera pens the book’s foreword.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Books on Manhattan gardens, entertaining, the American country house and a revisit to a classic design tome are among a few new offerings. Harrie T. Lindeberg and the American Country House

Charlotte Moss Entertains: Celebrations and Everyday Occasions

Ray Booth: Evocative Interiors

City Green: Public Gardens of New York

Peter Pennoyer Monacelli Press January 2018, 256 pages $60

Charlotte Moss Rizzoli April 2018, 228 pages $50

Ray Booth and Judith Nasatir Rizzoli April 2018, 240 pages $55

Jane Garmey Monacelli Press March 2018, 240 pages $50

Manhattan architect, AD 100 member and author Peter Pennoyer turns his attention to the work and career of one of the 20th century’s most influential but largely unknown architects, Harrie T. Lindeberg. His work has been compared to Frank Lloyd Wright, as his sloping roofs and floor plans that integrate the landscape influence the country house we know today. Prominent in the early 1900s, Lindeberg’s work for famous American families such as the DuPonts and Doubledays in affluent enclaves from Newport to Grosse Point put him on the map. Inspired by the English Arts and Crafts movement along with touches from the Beaux Arts and Georgian, Tudor and Newman styles, his work reflects his ancestral roots in Sweden. Pennoyer and historian Anne Walker survey the architect’s most meaningful projects, many reaching their second century. Displayed in over 200 photographs, floor plans and sketches, the book is a true exploration of how we view country houses today. A foreword by architect Robert AM Stern also brings to light the work of this unappreciated yet influential architect.

Interior designer, philanthropist and tastemaker extraordinaire Charlotte Moss’s new book tackles the subject of hospitality, a topic that is literally a second language for the Virginia native. Incorporating elegance into everyday life is a predominant theme throughout her books on designs, gardening and style as well as the interiors she has designed all over the country for decades. Charlotte Moss Entertains centers on the topic of events where none is too small to acknowledge, honor and celebrate. From everyday treats such as breakfast in bed or afternoon tea to dinner parties and holiday luncheons, china, monogrammed napkins and silver almost always make an appearance. Moss pays homage to influential tastemakers of the past—Pauline de Rothschild and her tabletops, Marjorie Merriweather Post for her organization, Lesley Blanch’s exotic additions to the tablescape and Elsie de Wolfe’s party-perfect recipes. A stickler to detail, the designer also covers the organization of butler pantries, linen closets and flower arranging.

Fans of designer Bobby McAlpine will no doubt recognize the work of partner, architect and designer Ray Booth whose book Ray Booth: Evocative Interiors debuts this spring. Influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School, the Nashville and Manhattan-based designer’s work showcases his love of midcentury modernism coupled with a keen eye towards history and setting. Projects include never-before-seen interiors in Palm Beach, Texas, New York and the Hamptons along with his own home in Nashville. The designer, whose furniture line is in development, also explores his use of traditional materials (wide expanses of glass, masonry and wood) in fresh modern styles and his “innovative use of furniture as architecture to define rooms, draperies instead of walls” along with his trademark mix of eclectic and contemporary pieces.

When you think of gardens in New York, perhaps the New York Botanical Garden, the High Line, and Central Park spring to mind. With space at a premium, the city is rich in outdoor venues that enrich the lives of its inhabitants and provide a welcome contrast to skyscrapers and cement. City garden landscapes do exist— museum gardens, community and conservancy sponsored gardens, neighborhood parks and even the occasional building atrium along with parks you might recognize such as the Chinese Scholar’s Garden, Brooklyn Bridge Park and Roosevelt Park. Noted garden writer Jane Garmey takes readers into the manicured landscapes and gardens of the Cloisters, the 9/11 Memorial Garden, Carl Schurz Park and the Noguchi Museum just to name a few. Surveying the vitality and variety of these beautiful spaces that grace the city’s urban landscape, the book is a must read for garden aficionados and lovers of all things Manhattan.

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Eats’N’Sleeps Made Nice 8 W. 28th St. 212.887.1677 madenicenyc.com

Ferris 44 W. 29th St. 212.213.4420 ferrisnyc.com

The Aviary 80 Columbus Circle 212.805.8800 aviarynyc.com

Nur 34 E. 20th St. 212.505.3420 nurnyc.com

In our opinion, fine dining should not be limited to nights and weekends. Thanks to Made Nice, NoMad’s debut high-end “fast casual” eatery, it doesn’t have to be. This counter-service restaurant is a satisfying choice for either graband-go or even a quick sit-down meal, making seasonal gourmet grub as accessible as ever. Our favorites include the Tuna Nicoise with seared tuna, haricots verts, soft boiled egg, tomatoes, olives, potatoes and lemon caper relish on romaine; the Curry Cauliflower with cauliflower stew, tofu, couscous, coconut, lemongrass, scallion, almond and grapes; and the signature Chicken Frites, a stuffed, roasted half-chicken with rosemary fries, though that’s available only on weekends after 5 PM and all day Saturday. Made Nice keeps it interesting with a diverse drink menu, too—including local wines and beer, coffee and tea, beet punch and cider.

Located inside the hot new MADE hotel, Ferris’s 40-seat dining room features an open kitchen and coveted seating at the chef’s counter. With seasonal cuisine by Greg Proechel, this restaurant is a must-try for spring. Ferris takes liberty with its “New American” designation, exemplifying global influences in dishes such as the Iberico pork collar with mushrooms, peppers and black bean sauce, or the Okinawa sweet potato with pumpkin mustard and buttermilk. While you’ll also find classics like bread and butter or fresh cheese, the restaurant’s novel menu is certain to pique your taste buds, and ingredients like ‘nduja (spreadable salami from Italy), Pedro Ximinéx (a white Spanish wine used in the octopus dish), timur (aka Turkish) yogurt will surely keep your table’s conversation interesting. Ferris also boasts a robust wine menu and an inspired cocktail list.

Located in the Mandarin Oriental, The Aviary’s all-day menu is a feat of molecular gastronomy, evident in both its luxurious small plates menu and it’s bold, sci-fi-esque cocktails. At the Aviary, bartenders are trained as chefs and their creations look something like laboratory experiments. Here, drinks are truly to by experienced with all five senses: the Wake and Bake, inspired by breakfast in Manhattan and featuring single-barrel rye whiskey and Vermouth infused with coffee, orange and the aroma of everything bagels, or the Boom Goes The Dynamite cocktail, with two types of rums, vanilla beaninfused rooibos tea, violet sugar, vanilla liquor and dry ice to diffuse the flavors, are just the start. While cocktails take the main stage here, the signature bites are no less interesting. Be sure to try the Black Truffle Explosion plate, featuring ravioli filled with exploding truffle in liquefied form, or the Thai Pork Belly with young coconut and banana curry.

At Nur, Chef Meir Adoni’s inventive recipes draw from multiple facets of the Middle East. From the old to novel, to street food turned fine dining. Adoni’s modern touch elevates every dish, as seen in unique menu items like the foie gras parfait, where challah toast is garnished with citrus and rose water gelée and fennel blossom, or the chickpea fried octopus, with chickpea cream, black and white tahini, preserved lemon and tamarind paste, with a side of chickpea and caramelized onion samoas. You’ll also find favorites— here’s looking at you, Jerusalem sesame bagel—as well as more daring dishes, like the Palestinian Tartare with raw tahini and sheep’s yogurt, for example. Nur also doubles down on its dessert dishes, which get their fair share of creative thought with ingredients like cardamom chocolate, almond sable, smoked yogurt ice cream, chocolate foam, and of course, halvah.

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By Katie Doyle

From molecular gastronomy to reconstructed Middle Eastern cuisine, Old World charm to New Age community, Manhattan has a lot going on this spring.

The Allen Hotel 88 Allen Street 212.965.8898 theallenhotel.com

The Marmara Park Avenue 114 E. 32nd St. 212.603.9000 park.marmaranyc.com

Mondrian Park Avenue 444 Park Ave. South 212.804.8880 morganhotelgroup.com/Mondrian/ Mondrian-park-avenue

Cachet Boutique NYC 510 W. 42nd St. 212.947.2999 cachetboutiquenyc.com

The Allen is a new hotel elegantly distinguished by its Old World charm. Its 41 rooms and suites are outfitted with Brazilian cherry wood floors, gilded trims that pop against buttery cream walls, hand-carved furniture and sleek marble bathrooms. The Allen’s furniture hails from the Far East, and it is this aesthetic from which the hotel draws much of its design inspiration, evident not just in the guest rooms but in the lobby’s mosaic murals and exotic collection of orchids. While The Allen’s Old World characteristics will likely be the first thing to draw your eye, the hotel is not without New World amenities: free, high-speed Wi-Fi throughout the property, 42” HDTVs in guest rooms, and a 1,000-square-foot conference room. If you visit, do try to book the Penthouse King Suite: its spacious living room provides plenty of lounge space and its fully furnished terrace will treat you to sweeping views of the Lower East Side.

The One of NoMad’s newest hotels, the Marmara Park occupies a 21-story building dating back to 1927 that once housed design and architecture studios. The vast ceilings of the hotel’s 128 suites—40 with private terraces— and guestrooms provide a flood of natural light and extraordinary city views, with extra-large beds, wetbars, fully-equipped kitchens with stainless steel appliances, and hardwood floors. Each room has a 55-inch LED smart TV, an iPad Air with the New York Times and Wall Street Journal, and connected 24/7 to the hotel’s guest services. The wellness center boasts a Turkish hamman, lap pool and experience shower.

Mondrian Park Avenue is a buzzy oasis in the heart of the trendy NoMad neighborhood. The hotel prioritizes design, from the eccentric lobby outfitted in mobile and complete with a log bench, to its 189 guest rooms featuring metallic tones and multiple pops of color. Art, too, is a major player at the Mondrian: a New York Cityinspired canvas by Ara Starck graces the lobby, along with a variety of modern paintings in the guest rooms. While the Mondrian takes style seriously, they also prioritize hospitality (expect topnotch service) and comfort, from the pillow-top mattresses and down comforters to large walk-in rain showers. Amenities extend beyond the guest rooms: the hotel boasts the award-winning restaurant Cleo on-site, as well as Fifteen Stories, a rooftop lounge with an outdoor terrace, and Never Never, an exclusive underground nightclub.

Hell’s Kitchen gets a dose of glam with the Cachet Boutique NYC, a newly renovated hotel at W. 42nd St. and between 10th and 11th Avenues. The loft-like space makes a unique backdrop for updated rooms outfitted with custom furnishings by Jay Godfrey. Dynamic lighting sets the mood as luxury abounds across the board, from the stone and glass bathrooms to the rain showers, the plush robes to the pillow-top Keetsa bed. The curated mini-bar is stocked with only the best local items—from Bushido sake to La Colombe coffee, Widow Jane whiskey to Tate’s cookies. If you’ve worked up your appetite, Eden, the on-site restaurant, is a wonderful choice for breakfast, lunch or dinner: the farm-to-table eatery features all-natural, non-GMO cuisine and boasts the motto, “Eat no evil.”

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GALLERY A PI C T UR E -PE R F ECT SHOWROOM EXHIB ITION

Dutch Blooms I Giclee available at Leftbank Art, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Mooon! Lamp available at Fermob USA, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com FEB

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Gallery

Meda Occasional Chair available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Elizabeth Chairs available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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Infinity Pendant/ Cluster Mix available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Gabriel Dean Penny Table available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Midcentury vintage barrel chairs, reimagined by Sasha Bikoff in a lively and chic botanical print available at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com

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Winterthur Daybed available at Hickory Chair– Pearson–Henredon, 212.725.3776, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

FS Collection Large Exterior Hanging Pendant available at CL Sterling & Son, clsterling.com.

Ava Chair available at Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

DJ Dining Table available at LORIN MARSH, 212.759.8700, lorinmarsh.com

Indian Flower Hand-knotted Rug available at Odegard Carpets, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Fernando Exposed Wood Chair available at Verellen, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

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Glass Wall Gems available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Nexpo fixture by George Kovacs available at Metropolitan Lighting, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlighting.com Mazandaran Flatweave available at NASIRI fine handmade carpets, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

St. Honore Chest available at Baker, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Travertine Boxes available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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freshpicks THE MOST CURRENT PRODUCTS IN 200 LEX SHOWROOMS.

Classic Curves

With its curvy nature and structural beauty, the new Marcela Chair from Verellen, shown here in Bozeman leather, has become a modern classic. Available in fabric or leather, Marcela comes standard with a tight seat and back, double-needle stitch detail, upholstered or wood turned exposed legs, knife-edge kidney pillow, and standard outside welt. Verellen, Suite 804, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz White Knight

Mr Brown loves light whites all year long, but most especially for spring. Texture is the essential ingredient. Note the zigzag profiled door fronts on the Corsica Cabinet, finished in white smooth gesso. It’s charmingly irregular to the touch, and a statement piece for the new season. Paired with the Eliza daybed, in snow white velvet. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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freshpicks

Teak Talk

The Surprising Teak Dining Chair embodies Fermob’s propensity for working with different materials and its ambition to bring magic into people’s gardens. The chair is the product of a collaboration with Vlaemynck—experts in teak. The result is a bold alliance between sturdy metal and velvetysmooth wood that exudes warmth. Fermob USA, Suite 414, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com 44


Brava, Sophia Hellman-Chang’s Sophia Cocktail Table at The Bright Group can easily be customized in size, one of 10 metal finishes, and various stone, glass or wood tops. Handmade in Brooklyn, New York, this design is also available as a stunning side table, or a dramatic entry foyer round. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Modern Marriage

NASIRI’s Vintage Pelas Flatweave Rug combines traditional colors with today’s favored flat style. This rug pairs perfectly with modern décor creating a nice balance between old and new. The Midcentury Modern Collection has been skillfully sourced by NASIRI and embodies the 20th century minimalist sophistication that has enjoyed a global revival. NASIRI fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

Brand New Day

Darryl Carter’s new concepts for Baker bring a refined clarity and freshness to traditional crafts and fine artisan traditions. Carter’s stunning Canopy Day Bed shown here with light Chinoiserie and a white powdercoat has a complexity of forms that demonstrates his appreciation of design in its purest sense. Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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freshpicks

Buttoned Down and Relaxed With its exquisite tailoring, buttoned seat cushions, loose pillow backs and elegant wood trim, the Anna Sectional from Pearson is both inviting and comfortable. Silk throw pillows in shades of teal, chartreuse and emerald greens on the sectional and the Olivia Square Ottoman pair beautifully with the Pat Chair in teal leather. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

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Off the Cuff Two-tone finishes and texture embrace in Alecia’s Collection by Alecia Wesner for George Kovacs at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Based on Alecia’s dual metal cuff bracelet creations, Alecia’s Tiers is literally jewelry for the home. Brushed Nickel and Bronze Patina finishes combine to give depth and sparkling illumination to this unique pendant. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

Serene Highness The Rivulet Hand-knotted Rug from Odegard Carpets is made from Indian silk. A trickling stream of raw silk in pale greys and blues gives this rug a feeling of serenity. Custom sizes and colors are available. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Showstopper Stunning in its simplicity of lines and its artful hardware, the Briallen Gray Demi-Lune from Currey & Company is a bit of haute couture for a space. It features an elegant winter-grey stained wood and an impressively sized cast aluminum flower pull in antique silver that steals the show. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

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freshpicks

Lucky Seven

The Dante VII is the newest piece in this popular collection by Downtown. With seven lamps and a sleek Midcentury feel, it is now large enough to make a statement in your high-end dining room and kitchen projects. Shown in steel grey and brass. Also available in black and brass. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

New Slant on Round The Roulette Round Table at Dennis Miller Associates features a pinwheel-style base layout with slanted legs suggesting a rotating movement. Profiled legs and table edges add a softened, tactile quality to the design. Available in a variety of shapes and sizes, as well as fixed and extension versions. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Catch a Cab In Cab Calloway IV from Leftbank Art, color contrast and graphics are what make this image of a flamingo so striking. The white grid is enhanced with “diamond dust� that reflects light. As shown on canvas with white float frame. Available in several sizes with multiple frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

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Fresh and Swede Elias Barup was the first furniture designer for Gärsnäs AB in Sweden. This rare Mohair Settee by Barup dates from the beginning of his tenure there in the 1930s. Like much Scandinavian Modern design, it is clearly inspired by earlier English furniture models, but feel fresher and more playful. 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com Playing the Angles The octagonal form of the Facet Gold Leaf Console from Global Views emulates natural crystal formations. It has a hand-waxed painted finish with hand-applied gold leaf on the interior. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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freshpicks

Leaves of Brass

Designer Aviva Stanoff created the Seeded Eucalyptus Wall Objects for Studio A Home from pure brass with antique nickel-plated finishes. These realistic metal interpretations of silver dollar eucalyptus, seedy eucalyptus, palm and huckleberry branches all have cleverly hidden mounting devices. Studio A Home, Suite 612, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com 50


Tumble 4 Ya

The Carousel Pendant from CL Sterling & Son is composed of nuggets of recycled glass crystal that have been tumbled to remove sharp edges and then hand tied to a nickel-plated brass frame using jeweler’s wire. A variety of diffuser options are offered. The fixture is suspended by black silk rope-covered stems. CL Sterling, Suite 408, clsterling.com

Plot Twist

With a sculptural, layered frame and angular sensibility, LORIN MARSH new Swirl Mirror is a playful but complex arrangement of tone-on-tone brushed bronze, mirrorpolished brass, and clear mirror. The swirling arrangement of corner pieces around the glass was inspired by the twisting motion of air or water in a vortex. LORIN MARSH, Suite 809, 212.759.8700, lorinmarsh.com

Forma and Function

The Forma Series at WOVEN utilizes simple forms and unexpected color combinations, resulting in elegant rugs that are both unusual and transitional. Lines, circles and rectangles are composed in multiple textures to accentuate the natural strengths of the highest quality aloe, silk and mohair. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F E ATUR E D HI GHLIGHT S OF CR AFT AND D ES IG N .

1. Detail Oriented (opposite) The Naomi Occasional Chair from Verellen, comes standard with a loose, boxed seat cushion, diamond-tufted inside back, tufted seat cushion, double needle stitch detail, and fabric covered ball buttons. 2. White Gold Currey & Company’s Martine Chandelier has graceful leaves with a gesso white finish and gold leaf interiors that seem to wave in the wind as they undulate away from the center.

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StyleSpotlight

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3. Luxe Life (opposite) Henredon’s sophisticated Park Avenue Collection, including the Morgan Chair, was inspired by luxurious, stylish homes built in the 1920s on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. 4. Soft and Tuft The Arches Rug from Global Views is made from hand-tufted high- and low-pile ivory white wool. 5. Today’s Flat World The Pelas Collection of Persian flatweaves from NASIRI highlights Midcentury modern recreations that bridge the past and present by maintaining traditional techniques and rich colors while applying minimal design. 6. Dancing on the Edge As is plainly evident in her Edge Cocktail Table for Baker Furniture, Kara Mann’s signature design style strikes a balance between daring and inviting—with unexpected details.

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StyleSpotlight

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7. Silver Scrolls During the Manchu Qing Dynasty, scrolls were used by the privileged class and at the royal court. These beautifully handcrafted, enlarged Sliver-Plated Scrolls were created by Roger Tomas for Studio A Home. 8. Work Smart The Cortes Desk from Julian Chichester is elegantly simple, but offers ample surface space for serious work. Four drawers with brass pulls are framed with beveled detail, the only ornamentation in otherwise streamlined statement.

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9. Pour Me Another Dennis Miller Associates’ gliding Open Bar Cart is made from cast concrete with pieces of polished, crushed clear glass. It features grey mirrors on the top and bottom shelves. 10. In the Loop In the Niki Rug by WOVEN, thin silk lines suggest a subtle, hand-drawn look. Rectangular motifs on the top, bottom and sides are looped, creating a soft shadowy shape along the border. 11. Construction & Building Metropolitan Dining Table by James Duncan is indicative of his clean, restrained style. The oak tabletop and base, shown in Aspen white, can be ordered in many finishes.

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StyleSpotlight

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12. Play the Garden Sha Jahan’s Garden from Odegard Carpets is named for the builder of the Taj Mahal. 100% vegetal-dyed wool gives the rug unique tonal variation within colors, bringing spring indoors. 13. Flower Power Wearing her floral hat in celebration of spring, First Visitor from Leftbank Art is poised for the season. A giclée reproduction of an original collage and painting with textured gel finish. 14. Highlight Real Echoing styling from the 1920s, Douglas Jennings’ Francis Credenza at The Bright Group combines bleached walnut tones and sunburst highlights. The lines of the walnut case juxtaposed with antique brass frame, creates the perfect contrast.

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15. Dripping with Style Like a bright spring rain, the Honey Drip Pendant from George Kovacs at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. glistens with superb LED illumination and a rich Sunset Gold finish.

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16. Minimal to the Max With red lacquer door fronts and satin-finished golden bronze details set in a deep chocolate stained walnut case, LORIN MARSH’s Cosmopolitan Credenza is like a Rothko painting, a study in composition and color. 17. Multitasking in French The Cocotte Collection from Fermob includes the Low Table, with a steel rod frame and removable aluminum tabletop that doubles as a tray, and the steel Low Stool, which is equally versatile.

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18. Leafy Greens This 1950s-style Swedish Botanical Credenza at 1stdibs Gallery was created by Sasha Bikoff, in the manner of iconic designs by Josef Frank. 19. Outdoor Types Updated traditional styles along with clean and balanced modern forms are the basis for the CL Sterling collection of exterior fixtures, including this Large Round Exterior Sconce, handcrafted in brass with various finishes available.

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De. FIN.ingPieces I T E MS THAT SUM U P WHAT A SHOWROOM IS AL L AB OUT.

Dennis Miller Associates The sleek racetrack silhouette of the Powell & Bonnell Derby Ottoman is certain to be a clear winner in any setting. The individually box-quilted, button-tufted seat, set into a cantilevered plated steel frame, offers maximum comfort and high style. Available in a variety of Powell and Bonnell metal finishes, textiles, leathers or COM/COL. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon The Amelia Sideboard is part of Hickory Chair’s Winterthur Estate Collection, based on fine antiques from the Winterthur Museum. Their craftsmen preserved the classic style and proportion while updating the form for today’s home. Each piece is made to order by hand, in countless finishes with optional hardware and nearly endless personalization. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com

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DefiningPieces

Global Views The Pleated Media cabinet is vintage-inspired. Made of textured pine in a black onyx finish, with bold cast-aluminum door pulls, it features an equipment-cooling slat back, adjustable interior shelves and a metal-clad base. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Milord Antiques has had the opportunity to own a few pieces of furniture by Carlo Bugatti. This rare Bugatti Desk and Chair has multiple intricate inlays as well as precise wood turning and unusual shapes all designed in the “Orientalist” style. The pieces still retain their original silk tassel work and vellum upholstery. 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com

WOVEN Woven in aloe with silk motifs, the Otto Rug uses both the line and circle to create a sleek and powerful design that works in traditional, modern, contemporary and transitional settings. This rug is named in honor of the Austrian artist, Otto Muehl. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

BAKER Thomas Pheasant’s calm, luxurious interiors emphasize elements of quality and comfort. A master of the neutral palette, Pheasant’s collection for Baker Furniture includes the Perspective Mirror, which, with its oil-rubbed brass and bright bronze frame, brings a contemporary dimension to classic design principles. Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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DefiningPieces

Studio A Home A precisely hewn diamond pattern is carved into the front and side panels of the Diamond Media Cabinet. An antique grey finish on the multi-dimensional mango wood surfaces richly enhances the grain of the wood. Uniquely shaped brushed matte nickel steel legs repeat the diamond pattern of the cabinet. Studio A Home, Suite 612, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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Verellen The Gregoire Sofa, shown here as a sectional, is made with a sustainably harvested hardwood frame and eight-way hand-tied seat construction. Its pure and simple form lends itself to a truly comfortable home. Gregoire comes standard with loose, boxed style spring down seat, knife-edge toss pillows, double needle stitch detail, and a floating wood base. Verellen, Suite 804, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

Julian Chichester Inspired equally by Saarinen and Brancusi, the Dakota Table is a Julian Chichester classic for today. The iconic base is offered in a shimmering polished nickel, subtle antiqued nickel, dark bronze and dante brass, as shown here. Dakota is designed to support a variety of standard or custom sized tops. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Fermob USA Fermob asked designer Frédéric Sofia to reinterpret the legendary chairs and armchairs of the Jardin du Luxembourg in France. The result, the Luxembourg Chair, creates greater comfort with distinctive lines and forms, combining the lightness and resistance of aluminum, the comfort of curved seat slats and the practicality of a stackable frame. Fermob USA, Suite 414, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co Hand-blown ribbed glass shades adorn a metal frame in the Aalto Linear Suspension by Hammerton Studio. The Aalto Collection is available in a variety of configurations as well as several finishes and glass colors. The waterfall style is perfect for a two-story entry, the round or linear style for kitchen or dining areas. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com NASIRI fine handmade carpets The Mazandaran Collection, including this Persian Pelas Flatweave features a minimalist design that parallels the painting, architecture, and music of the West—looking forward while applying ancient techniques that honor the traditions of the past. NASIRI uses only hand-spun wool and natural, organic dyes. NASIRI fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

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CL Sterling The BG Sconce from CL Sterling’s Rock Crystal collection is composed of nuggets of recycled glass crystal and hand tied to a nickel-plated brass frame using jeweler’s wire. CL Sterling, Suite 408, clsterling.com

Leftbank Art Hand painting on gallery-wrapped canvas make up this piece, called Indigo Sky. Each example has hand-applied texture, upon which layers of paint in blues, greys and neutrals, with silver embellishment are added. Shown with a double frame of black and silver. Custom sizes and multiple frame options available. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com PROFILES The Malibu Chair, the ultimate in California chic for indoor and outdoor use, is an icon by an icon. Originally created in 1950 by famed interior designer William Haines, it stands the test of time and is representative of Profiles’s collection of Midcentury modern design and collection of transitional upholstery and case goods. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

The Bright Group Let the arms of Milo Lounge Chair envelop your frame in a comfortable experience that looks fresh and feels fantastic. Designed to exude a casual, laid-back vibe, Milo pairs a thick, plush cushion with sleek, lines. Perched on a faceted wood base that provides the entire series a distinctive profile. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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DefiningPieces

Currey & Company The Chimera Chandelier is a confection of light for the eyes to feast upon. This fantasia is composed of pieces of coral, shells and freshwater pearls, fastened artfully to a wrought iron frame that has been treated to a contemporary gold leaf finish. Perfect for any oceanfront abode. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

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LORIN MARSH LORIN MARSH’s iconic white DJ Dining Table was originally conceived as a statement in black. Its inset, reverse-painted black glass top looked so much like a vinyl record, that the name DJ instantly sprang into founder Sherry Mandell’s mind. But the design really came to life when the dark tones were replaced with vivid whites. LORIN MARSH, Suite 809, 212.759.8700, lorinmarsh.com

Odegard Carpets An Odegard classic design inspired by the traditional Tibetan apron updated with a modern aesthetic, the Pangden Multi II Rug is hand-knotted in Nepal from Himalayan wool. Custom colors and sizes are available. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

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NEW Showrooms F R E S H FACE S A ND NEW D ESIGNS.

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW LOCATION

OPENING SOON

CL Sterling & Son, Suite 408 clsterling.com

LORIN MARSH, Suite 809 phone 212.759.8700, lorinmarsh.com

ERIK BRUCE, Suite 417A phone 917.628.1091, erikbruce.com

The timeless and elegant simplicity of the CL Sterling & Son line of lighting fixtures have built only part of the company’s reputation. Luxurious quality and impeccable finishes, committed service and timely delivery are equally important. Fixtures are made by hand in Portugal and then delivered to their main office in Niantic, Connecticut.

LORIN MARSH was founded in 1975 as a decorative showroom to the trade. By innovating the concept of bringing furniture, lighting and accessories— antique, vintage, modern, and custom—all under one roof, an eclectic, a fashionable furniture boutique was born. For the past 42 years, their furniture and accessories have set the standard for glamour, quality, and diversity.

With an architecturally informed approach, ERIK BRUCE designs bespoke curtain creations. Each piece is unique and handmade in Brooklyn, New York.

Formations Suite 902

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Dennis & Leen Suite 902

Dennis & Leen encompasses a wide range of refined seventeenth- and eighteenth-century furnishings that refence, but do not replicate in the literal sense the time-honored traditions of those periods. When Dennis & Leen opened more than 50-years ago with an exuberant collection of antiques, chandeliers and reproductions, Richard Hallberg, Barbara Wiseley and Dan Cuevas kept the honored tradition going alongside their Formations business. Although the two collections, Dennis & Leen and Formations have different points of view, they maintain a synergy that allows them to mix well with each other. Each piece has been carefully designed by Richard, Barbara and Dan. The design team has developed a signature style that mixes antiques, contemporary furnishings, accessories and art. Both showrooms include one-of-a-kind antique objects and accessories as well as numerous signature pieces manufactured in the Los Angeles workshop, bustling with over 120 Artisans, woodworkers, finishers and gilders.


SHOWROOMPORTRAITS

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex 10th Floor

Baker Suite 300

Bakes & Kropp Suite 430

The Bright Group Suite 902

1stdibs and the New York Design Center have joined forces to create 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, a 33,000-squarefoot shopping destination that features more than 54 1stdibs dealers specializing in 20th-century design and antiques. Located on the 10th floor, this one-of-a-kind space offers an elegant environment and a knowledgeable sales staff, and is open to both the design trade and consumers weekdays from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (7 p.m. on Thursdays). 1stdibs Gallery, 10th Floor, phone 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com 

Founded in 1902, Baker remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Through their exquisite cabinetry, Robert Bakes and Paul Kropp are building a legacy of fine design and craftsmanship in some of the country’s most beautiful homes. Bakes & Kropp’s commitment to exceeding the expectations of homeowners, designers, architects, and builders is evident in their extensive portfolio of luxury kitchens, vanities, libraries, closets, bars, and media rooms. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.512.4853, fax 631.725.1710, bakesandkropp.com

The Bright Group is an amalgam of independently owned and operated manufacturers, artisans and designers. Their combination of high quality, handcrafted pieces, a complimentary design esthetic and versatility of manufacture is unique in today’s market. While their offerings provide a wide breadth of standard products, they are known for custom capabilities that help them meet the unique needs of clients. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Suite 509

Currey & Company Suite 506

Dennis Miller Associates Suite 1210

ERIK BRUCE Suite 417A

Fabienne and Franco Cosulich have traveled throughout Italy, France and England, gathering one-of-a-kind pieces from prestigious Italian villas and European estates. Now they’ve brought their reputation and discerning eye to 200 Lex, attracting respected designers and collectors worldwide with their 20th-century Italian statement pieces, exclusive Venetian Murano glass creations, and contemporary, customizable Made in Italy line. Cosulich Interiors & Antiques, Suite 509, phone 646.293.6680, cosulichinteriors.com

Inspired by the beauty of nature and the legacy of the past, Currey & Company strives to create furnishings of timeless style and exceptional quality. Handcrafted from natural materials and enhanced with historical details, their work reflects a commitment to meaningful design. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/ NYDC

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th–century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections in the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

With an architecturally informed approach, ERIK BRUCE designs bespoke curtain creations. Each piece is unique and handmade in Brooklyn, New York. ERIK BRUCE, Suite 417A, phone 917.628.1091, erikbruce.com

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Global Views Suite 613

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon Suite 102

In House Kitchen Bath home Suite 1511

Julian Chichester/ Mr. Brown London Suite 604

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible and always edgy Mr. Brown London in his New York showroom, with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com, mrbrownlondon.com

Leftbank Art Suite 609

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Suite 512

Munder Skiles Suite 436

NASIRI fine handmade carpets Suite 714  

Leftbank Art creates original artwork and manufactures in their facility in Southern California. Their goal is to bring to market images that look as though commissioned or one-of-a-kind, but at a price point for the design and retail trade. Leftbank Art’s website shows their complete line and allows trade customers to select finish, size and frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, phone 646.293.6694, fax 646.293.6695, leftbankart.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Its New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, metropolitanlightingny.com

Munder Skiles offers 153 wood and metal designs for garden furniture, in styles ranging from historical to ultramodern. For 25+ years the company has been recognized for its standards of comfort, craft and proportion. John Danzer’s ergonomic, modernist Taconic Chair™ received the 1994 Roscoe Award for “Best American Chair”—the first garden seat ever to have been so honored.  Munder Skiles, Suite 436, phone 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

NASIRI began as dealers of antique carpets and have translated this knowledge of ancient weaving techniques into the creation of unique handmade pieces, including Persian Ziegler Sultanabad, Tabriz, and Bakshaish rugs. They now offer complete custom recreations of all varieties of carpets, and designers receive bespoke service with endless options for size, color, weave, texture, and design. NASIRI is also the leading source of vintage flatweaves. NASIRI fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, phone 212.532.6777, fax 212.532.6776, nasiricarpets.com  

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Odegard Carpets Suite 1209

PROFILES Suite 1211

SA Baxter Architectural Hardware Suite 1205

Saladino Furniture Suite 1600

Since 1987, Odegard Carpets has been an innovative leader in the production of sophisticated high-end, hand-knotted carpets. Recently partnered with Kooches Handmade Carpets, Odegard has greatly expanded its distinctive carpet offerings and production capabilities. Odegard Carpets requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising the standard of living for thousands of artisan weavers in developing countries. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, odegardcarpets.com

Serving the high-end design community for over 37 years, PROFILES’ workrooms in the USA create midcentury modern and transitional pieces with a commitment to the highest quality and innovation. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com 

SA Baxter designs and manufactures bespoke architectural hardware and lighting for residential and commercial projects. Cast in brass, bronze and white bronze, their products offer one of the most comprehensive finish palettes in the industry. SA Baxter’s hardware is handmade in their foundry located in the Hudson Valley. The ancient process of lost wax casting and modern, green technology allows for limitless design capabilities. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, phone 212.203.4382, fax 888.713.6042, sabaxter.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has more than 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

Verellen Suite 804

WOVEN Suite 805

Verellen conceives, designs, and creates objects of desire for the home. The story began in Tom and Sabine Verellen’s hometown of Antwerp, Belgium, where the old and the new— modern and traditional—are in natural harmony. Fast forward to High Point, NC, where the Verellens recruited a team to bring life to their unique ideas, building an extensive collection of 5000+ SKUs. From casegoods to lighting to upholstery, Verellen has it all. Verellen, Suite 804, phone 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

WOVEN is a leading full service contemporary rug gallery, specializing in a carefully curated inventory of antique and vintage rugs sourced and hand-selected from around the world. Introduced in 2016, the Studio Woven Collection, a series of in-house designed contemporary hand-woven rugs for the 21st century, is made up of six series of rugs, inspired by the modern nomad and antique and vintage masterpieces. WOVEN, Suite 805, phone 646.964.4838, woven.is

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Events at 200Lex A LO OK AT A F E W RECENT CELEB R ATIONS.

What’s New, What’s Next The New York Design Center presented the record-breaking ninth annual What’s New, What’s Next on September 14, 2017. The historic 16-floor design building was filled with over 7,500 guests who attended what has become the design industry’s most anticipated event. This year’s event included 92 participating showrooms, 52 designer conversations, presentations, and panels and 22 Meet & Greets with the industry’s top names, editors, and manufacturers—all celebrating what’s “new” and “next” in design. The New York Design Center partnered with 23 media publications and editors from esteemed titles: Architectural Digest, Aspire Design and Home,

Business of Home, Dering Hall, domino, Elle Decor, Flower Magazine, Galerie, Hospitality Design, House & Garden, House Beautiful, Interior Design, interiors, The Lifestyle Edit, Luxe Interiors + Design, New York Cottages & Gardens, New York Magazine Design Hunting, New York Spaces, T: Magazine, PaperCity, Traditional Home, Veranda, and Viyet. What’s New, What’s Next is an energizing event, that offers attendees the opportunity to network with the best in design, learn about the latest trends, and view hundreds of new products all under one roof!

Tracey Winn Pruzan, Lee Cavanaugh, Ellie Cullman, and Alyssa Urban; Ric Watts, New York Design Center president & CEO Jim Druckman, Traditional Home’s Tori Mellott, Theodore Alexander president Neill Robinson, Leslie Keno, Michael Berman, and Jamie Drake; James Aman, Liz O’Brien, Dennis Miller, New York Magazine’s Wendy Goodman, and John Meeks; Shawn Henderson and Brad Ford; Margaret Russell, editor-in-chief of Galerie magazine; new introductions from Kasthall; Suzanne Kasler, Alexandra Champalimaud, Circa Lighting president Gale Singer, Aerin Lauder, and VERANDA editor-in-chief Clinton Smith; Thomas O’Brien, Carol Leskanic, AD editor-inchief Amy Astley, Warner Walcott, and Dan Fink; Baker president Russell Towner, Susannah Charbin, Josh Greene, Naomi Mdudu, Keith Pollock, and Laura Bindloss; Max Humphrey, House Beautiful editor-in-chief Sophie Donelson, Anthony Baratta, and Barbara Westbrook; Elle Decor’s Robert Rufino, Analisse Taft-Gersten, Neil Thomas, Christine Gachot, and Robert Stilin; Hospitality Design editor-in-chief Stacy Shoemaker, Workshop/APD principal and co-founder Matt Berman, and Desiron president & creative director Frank Carfaro; Eric Hughes, Nicole Fuller, Drew McGukin, Anna Burke, and Caroline Burke with Anthony Barzilay Freund, editor-in-chief of 1stdibs’ Introspective magazine; Martha Stewart. Photographs by ©MatthewCarasella.com and Andrea Fischman for editor at Large. 76


30E31 Launch Event On Wednesday, November 1, 2017, the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex and Douglas Elliman celebrated the launch of 30 E 31 NoMad, a visionary new boutique skyscraper designed by Morris Adjmi. The evening of cocktails and conversation featured a discussion on The Intersection of Art, Design, and Real Estate, moderated by Richard Kirshenbaum with panelists architect Morris Adjmi, developer Erik Ekstein, interior designer Nicole Fuller, and celebrated gallerist Liz O’Brien. Following the discussion, attendees shopped the 1stdibs Gallery and were invited to model residence tours.

Nicole Fuller, Robert Verdi, and McKenzie Liautaud; Richard Kirshenbaum moderating panelists Morris Adjmi, Liz O’Brien, and Nicolle Fuller; Erik Ekstein and Richard Kirshenbaum; guests exploring 1stdibs Gallery booths. Photographs by Snowflake.

The Gallery After Dark presents The Art of Entertaining On Thursday, December 7, 2017, the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex hosted “The Art of Entertaining,” a master class in holiday entertaining. Guests learned how to fix “Merry Manhattans” from a mixologist, create the perfect centerpiece, calligraph place cards with stationery by Dempsey & Carroll, and brushed up on holiday etiquette. The host committee Jennifer Hunter & Georgie Tipper of JG Design, Lydia Melamed Johnson, Hillary Mazanec, and Alberto Villalobos were on hand to make the festivities merry and bright. The center of the gallery space was adorned with a holiday tablescape designed by Cullman & Kravis. The evening was part of the ongoing monthly series “The Gallery After Dark” which features extended shopping hours and exclusive programming. Spend these special Thursdays learning about up-and-coming artists, newly released books, specialty cocktails, delicious food, and of course, shopping.

Holiday tablescape designed by Cullman & Kravis featuring products generously provided by 200 Lex showrooms; arranging the perfect centerpiece; guests mingled in the 1stdibs Gallery space; calligraphy lessons with stationery by Dempsey & Carroll; holiday table setting. Photos by Anna Buoma. FEB

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BACKSTORY FINDING YOUR NICHE T HE WI D E SEL ECT I ON AT P R O F I LE S AVO I D S C O O K I E -C U TTE R THIN KIN G.

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s the needs of the design community have changed, so has the Profiles showroom. The showroom in the New York Design Center has served the Tri-State area since 1980 with a significant collection of furniture, art, lighting, and accessories produced by an unrivaled selection of artisans. One of few remaining multi-line showrooms within the New York Design Center, Profiles draws on the taste of its employees, including General Manager Russell Ratieri and longtime Senior Sales Associate, David Gittleman, while expanding on the purpose of meeting designer needs in the New York area. “Profiles represents a very personal aesthetic versus a more cookie cutter approach,” Ratieri says.

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“Everything is handmade – items that cannot be constructed unless they are done by an artisan – otherwise, they would become stock items.”

a Randolph & Hein Trinity table, blown-glass low tables by Gabriel Dean, and pendants and chandeliers by Kenneth Nilson. The showroom also carries lines such as Bicycle Fine Art, which represents a selection of artists from all over the United States, as well as high-end lines like Michael Berman, Robert Marinelli, and Gary Hutton Design.

On the floor you can find pieces which range in style from mid-century to updated classics, such as the iconic William Haines Brentwood chairs and Valentine sofas, and consoles by the interior designers-turned-furniture designers Brett Beldock and Madeline Stuart. There’s

In addition to access to exceptional and exclusive designs, Profiles also gives clients the ability to work with artisans to modify furniture. Nearly everything in the showroom can be customized, and the staff likes to ensure that a designer or client is thrilled with the end result. Gittleman, who has been with Profiles


By Bébé Howorth

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1. Brett Design Ruby Cabinet 2. Hudson chandelier 3. Piedmont Swivel Chair 4. Laura 5. Dante vii Chandelier 6. Trinity RH

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for 25 years, sees the process of working with a designer and an artisan as an exciting collaboration. “When you have someone of David’s tenure, he can look at a piece and see it needs to be modified to fit a designer’s need,” Ratieri says. “He’ll then work with the engineers and workrooms to have a piece customized to fulfill a designer’s purpose and fit.” Over the years, Jim Druckman, who wears two hats, as the owner of Profiles and as the President and CEO of the New York Design Center, saw the need for sophisticated, niche pieces which were not readily available to the design community in New York.

Originally, many of Profiles’ artisans were based overseas, like the English furniture designer William Yeoward and the French furniture company, Philippe Hurel. Over time, as more American companies began manufacturing out of the U.S. the idea of “Made in America” became appealing to designers and the need for high-end products could be met within the country. With that, the showroom began bringing upholstery made everywhere from California to New York, and featuring art from artists from places like North Carolina and Nebraska. Profiles expects to continue to work and adapt to serve the design community.

“The quality and design of merchandise at Profiles makes it easy for a designer to fill in the needs of their clients who are seeking a warm, inviting, but still design forward, environment,” Ratieri says.

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex 80

SH OWR OOM

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1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Access to DesignTM AERO Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Archetypal Imagery Corp. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atlas Carpet Mills Avery Boardman Baker Bakes & Kropp Bendheim Benjamin Moore Bograd Kids Boyce Products Ltd BRADLEY The Bright Group Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Circa Lighting CL Sterling & Son Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis & Leen Dennis Miller Associates DESIGNLUSH DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune Elle W Collection EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI ERIK BRUCE FAIR Fermob USA Formations GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Gordon International Grange Furniture and Viking Groupe Lacasse Guy Regal Decorative & Fine Art Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home IFDA Jasper Group Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller

10th Fl 424 1500 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 419 1416 608 1314 916 300 430 1602 814 433 1405 802 902 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 103 408 1405 505 809 509 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 902 1210 415 702 1516 806 715 100 420 816 1304 417A 601 414 902 1510 502 613 1401 201 1109 425 1304 1301 102 1511 417B 1514 1208

646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.966.4700 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.602.3455 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.779.4300 212.688.6611 212.779.8810 917.512.4853 212.547.2946

646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.966.4701 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

S H OW RO O M Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer Kelly Wearstler Kenneth Cobonpue KGBL KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture Kooches Carpets Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight

646.786.4818 212.779.0838 212.838.9046 212.689.2827 631.725.1710

212.726.0006 212.726.0061 212.683.3100 212.683.5005 646.766.1011 212.726.9030 212.726.9029 212.725.0340 212.684.7350 212.689.9511 212.779.0721 212.479.0107 212.479.0112 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.684.2123 212.961.6984 212.725.2500 212.725.5900 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 646.293.6680 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691

212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559

212.684.0070 212.532.5450 212.353.2600 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.472.0191 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 917.628.1091 212.352.9615 678.267.2029

212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220

212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.447.7717 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 212.684.0070

212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143

212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843

646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273

212.683.7011

212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 212.684.0776

Kravet Inc. Krug LaCOUR Lee Jofa Leftbank Art LEPERE Levine Calvano Furniture Group Lexington Home Brands Lobel Modern LORIN MARSH Louis J. Solomon Inc. Luna Textiles McGuire Furniture Merida Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Milano Smart Living LLC Mr. Brown London Munder Skiles Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. NASIRI The New Traditionalists Niermann Weeks Odegard Carpets PALECEK Pennoyer Newman LLC Phillips Collection Plexi-Craft Primason Symchik, Inc. Pringle Ward Prismatique PROFILES

SUITE 604 611 1101 816 410 1616 1313 806 1209 716 401 1415 1412 401 609 1207 1406 212 915 809 911 1410 101 423 512 711 604 436 1304 714 701 905 1209

610 416 603 914 1101 1514 1101 1211 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Seguso Murano 431 Skram 427 Skyline Contract Group 1106 SMART 1115 Studio A Home 612 Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 Timothy Brown 1608 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Verellen 804 Versteel 1106 Visual Comfort Studio 103 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 WOVEN 805 New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 646.293.6622 212.421.0220 212.679.0300 212.679.4341 212.532.5450 212.420.4866 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.545.0205 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 646.293.6694 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.242.9075 212.759.8700 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.293.6622 212.717.0149 212.683.7272 212.532.6777 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.545.0205 212.287.0063 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.924.3244 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006

FA X 917.591.2413 212.421.0230 212.679.5996 914.679.4935 212.420.7865 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.545.0305 212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350 646.293.6695 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.242.9078 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.532.6776 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.545.0305 212.287.0066 212.839.0501 336.882.7405

212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.686.1133 212.696.9757 336.222.6622 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 646.293.6628 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.255.4895 212.255.4861 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 646.293.6695 800.876.2120 212.725.2500 212.725.5900 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 646.964.4838 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


D A L L A S

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N E W

Y O R K

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S E A T T L E

INTERIOR DESIGN & FURNITURE COLLECTION

DIXON CONSOLE

REPRESENTED AT THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER BY

DENNIS MILLER A S S O C I A T E S W W W. D E N N I S M I L L E R . C O M W W W. C H R I S T I A N G R E V S TA D . C O M 81


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