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ELLIE CULLMAN French Twist

LINHERR HOLLINGSWORTH

Design Via Fashion FEB

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CORDELIA LAWTON & PATRICK MULL Display through May 2017

Interior Storytellers


Timelessly designed, each piece of SA Baxter hardware and lighting carries the SA Baxter mark. It is our master artisans’ signature, attesting to the quality of the piece and certifying that it has not only been produced using the finest materials, but that it meets the highest standards of design. It is a promise of our unending commitment to produce the worlds most distinctive hardware and lighting in our foundry and atelier.

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Features

Volume 14 Issue 1

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18 Design via Fashion By Cathy Whitlock Connecticut-based interior and product designer Linherr Hollingsworth has a deep love for textiles.

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24 French Twist By Cathy Whitlock Visit a forties-inspired pied-Ă -terre at the Plaza, designed by Ellie Cullman.

32 Interior Storytellers By Catherine McHugh Cordelia Lawton and Patrick Mull compose beautiful narratives out of meaningful dĂŠcor.

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Departments

Volume 14 Issue 1

8 STYLERADAR By Katie Doyle 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex's unique collection of antiques rivals the season’s trendiest accessories, but each item has the distinction of being more than 100 years old.

11 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Feeling blue in Brooklyn, looking stylish in Chelsea, shining light in Connecticut, and getting scrappy on the Upper East Side.

14 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock

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Design inspiration from decorators, doyennes, hotels, and the world of antiques are a few of the offerings this spring. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Katie Doyle Hindsight, as they say, is 20/20. We look to the past for unique trinkets and treasures, from the 1700s onward.

38 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle From NoMad to Chinatown, downtown Brooklyn to Williamsburg, hot new eateries and diverse, one-of-a-kind hotels are popping up across the boroughs.

40 GALLERY 48

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Ted Lambert The brand-new Beekman Hotel is 136 years old.

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ARRAY MAGAZINE, INC. 115 West 18th Street Second Floor New York, NY 10011 +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2017 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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EDITORIAL Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Katie Doyle Managing Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Dara Stewart Copy Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

CONTRIBUTORS Catherine McHugh Cathy Whitlock Katie Doyle Ted Lambert

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Chief Marketing Officer Leah S. Blank Director of Special Events/Marketing Claire Evans Public Relations Manager/Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing & Digital Manager ON THE COVER Ellie Cullman photographed by Nelson Hancock.

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Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Readers, We rarely, if ever, end up where we started or intended to go. And that, in the words of Martha Stewart, is “a good thing.” We’re all on a journey, and with hard work and some serendipity, the future will always be interesting. In this issue of ARRAY, the subjects of our feature articles have one thing in common: They find themselves far from where they began, but are all better for the trip. When Ellie Cullman met her first design client, she was trying to pitch him a screenplay. Instead, she became his decorator, and a career was born that’s lasted more than three decades. Yet the allure of film still stirs her, as evidenced in her recent pied-à-terre at the Plaza, inspired by French cinema of the ’30s and ’40s. Cullman’s penchant for antiques fits our theme perfectly, as repurposing pieces in an unexpected way gives them a surprising second chapter (French Twist, p. 24). Writing also was the starting point for Cordelia Lawton and Patrick Mull, a married couple who met at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. After they moved to New York, however, they found their true calling as curators and collectors of extraordinary objects (Interior Storytellers, p. 32). In 2014, Lawton and Mull opened their first showroom inside the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, where every piece has a rich tale to tell. Fashion designer Linherr Hollingsworth had a successful career with several big-name labels, but after renovating her own home following a maternity leave, she gravitated toward a new passion: interiors. Hollingsworth has a special appreciation for fabrics and textures, not surprising for the daughter of a textiles executive. Not coincidentally, her love of modern lines is coupled with an appreciation for placing antiques in a new context (Design via Fashion, p. 18). After meeting these individuals, each of whom came to a fork in the road and took the unexpected turn, it makes me wonder when the next life-changing moment might present itself. Wherever it leads, I’m eager to follow. I hope you are too.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

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Amethyst Geode

Decorative Lead Skull

French Display Table

White Porcelain Elephant

Dating to the 15th century (or earlier), this gorgeous, glimmering geode from Uruguay stands nearly three feet tall and sparkles with deep purple crystals and a polished agate border.

This “memento mori”—a Latin expression for the remembrance and respect of mortality—is a rare and darkly beautiful piece of decor. The skull is cast from lead and originates from Austria, circa 1750.

Hailing from 19th-century France, this robin’s-egg-blue display table features a rectangular display case, accessorized with a handcarved wreath of flora and traces of antique-gold paint. Barley twist legs add to the charm.

A Chinese export from East India Company’s reign in the 19th century, this immaculate porcelain elephant stands upon a glowing fire-gilded bronze base.

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By Katie Doyle

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex's unique collection of antiques rivals the season’s trendiest accessories, but each item has the distinction of being more than 100 years old.

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Republic of Texas Liberty Half-Dime Sterling Silver Money Clip

University Collection of 21 Mathematical Interpenetration Models

Cachepot Chaudron

Japanese Ceramic Plate

This commemorative silver money clip is hand-numbered as one out of 100, and was designed to celebrate Texas’s statehood. A notable piece of American history, the clip features an authentic 1836 silver-head dime.

In three sets of seven, these exceedingly rare didactical models from Germany represent the advancement of science and learning in the late 19th century.

Once used as a decorative holder for a flower pot, this iridescent chaudron, a collaboration between painter Lucien Lévy-Dhurmer and ceramist Clement Massier, is a radiant example of unique Art Nouveau luxury.

These plates, dating to the early 1900s, are a spectacular feat of whimsy, featuring two rabbits against a field of blue, backed by intertwining flora and a looming full moon.

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Feeling blue in Brooklyn, looking stylish in Chelsea, shining light in Connecticut, and getting scrappy on the Upper East Side BROAD-BASED BIENNIAL COME SIT BY HER Rochelle Udell is a fine artist and speaker based in Ossining, New York. After a successful career in the publishing, beauty, and fashion industries, she now creates artwork focusing on subjects that will provoke and inspire the viewer to reflect on the questions and narratives in their lives. Her exhibition, “Where Do You Sit in Life?” will open at NYDC 1st dibs gallery on Monday, April 3, and run through the end of April. Proceeds from sales will benefit the Decorator’s Club Education Fund. In it, Udell explores chairs, their role in raising humans off the floor and above animals, and why sitting is never just sitting. "Chairs are history, power, and identity. Chairs hold us, and they hold meaning and our imaginations. And chairs raise questions: Where do I sit in life? Am I sitting where I want to sit? How can I get to where I want to sit?" she says.

The Whitney Museum of American Art is presenting the 2017 Whitney Biennial, the 78th in its signature survey of contemporary art in the United States and the first in its new building in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. The formation of self and the individual’s place in a turbulent society are among the key themes reflected in the work of the artists selected for the 2017 Whitney Biennial. Co-curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks, the exhibition will showcase 63 participants, ranging from emerging to well-established individuals and collectives working in painting, sculpture, drawing, installation, film and video, photography, activism, performance, music, and video-game design. March 17–June 11. Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 212-570-3600, whitney.org Aliza Nisenbaum, La Talaverita, Sunday Morning NY Times, 2016. Oil on linen, 68 x 88 in. (172.7 x 223.5 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy T293 Gallery, Rome and Mary Mary, Glasgow.

BIENVENUE CHAREAU The Jewish Museum is hosting Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design, which aims to present a fresh look at the internationally recognized designer. Chareau balanced the opulence of traditional French decorative arts with interior designs that were elegant, functional, and in sync with the requirements of modern life. His innovative furniture, veneered in rare woods with occasional touches of exotic materials, had clean profiles and movable parts that appealed to the sensibilities of the progressive bourgeoisie. Organized into four sections, the exhibition showcases rare furniture, lighting fixtures, and interiors, as well as designs for the extraordinary Maison de Verre, the glass house completed in Paris in 1932. The exhibition is bringing together more than 180 rarely seen works from major public and private collections in Europe and the United States. It also addresses Chareau’s life and work in New York, including the house he designed for Robert Motherwell in 1947 in East Hampton, NY. Drawings, ephemeral material, and archival photographs will provide contextual background to Chareau’s activities in France and the United States. Through March 26. The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street, 212.423.3200, thejewishmuseum.org. La Religieuse floor lamp (SN31), 1923, designed by Pierre Chareau. Alabaster and hammered brass, 67 3⁄8 x 17 3⁄4 x 21 5⁄8 in. (171 x 45 x 55 cm). Centre Pompidou, Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre de Creation Industrielle. Paris. Purchase funded in part by Scaler Foundation in 1995. Photograph by Georges Meguerditchian, image provided by CNAC/MNAM Dist. RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, New York.

CELEBRATING STYLE The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology’s current exhibition, Black Fashion Designers, examines historic and ongoing issues of diversity within the fashion industry while honoring the creative talents of designers who are often overlooked and emphasizing the significant roles in culture and society played by black designers. Drawing exclusively from the museum’s permanent collection, the exhibition features approximately 75 fashion objects that illustrate the individual styles of more than 60 designers and places them within a wider fashion context. Objects date from the 1950s to the present, including midcentury evening gowns by Anne Lowe, controversial work by Patrick Kelly from the 1980s, and contemporary pieces from Maki Oh, Tracy Reese, and Charles Harbison. The exhibition also addresses the influence of black fashion models by highlighting milestone events such as “The Ebony Fashion Fair.” Duro Olowu, ensemble, Fall 2012, Through May 16. Museum at the Fashion Institute of England. Gift of Duro Olowu. Technology, Fashion & Textile History Gallery, Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, fitnyc.edu/museum. FEB MAR

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CultureCalendar GILDED STATEMENT

Top, left: Eungie skirt, 2008 collection. Designed by Christina Kim (American b. South Korea 1957), produced by dosa inc. (Los Angeles, California). Copyright: dosa inc. Above: Appliqué artisans stitching reverse appliqué motifs, Gujarat, India, 2007. Photograph by Yoko Takahashi for Ku:nel magazine. Bottom, left: Appliqué artisans laying out jamdani scraps on a base panel, Gujarat, India, 2007. Photograph by Yoko Takahashi for Ku:nel magazine.

The Museum of Art and Design’s provocative exhibit Lauren Kalman: But if the Crime Is Beautiful... takes up the subject of gold (specifically jewelry and adornment) as representative of power, wealth, and love. Created by performance artist and metalsmith Lauren Kalman, the title references Austrian architect Adolf Loos’s 1908 treatise, “Ornament and Crime,” in which he declared decoration regressive and fit only for degenerates and criminals (this included women and minorities). As guest curator and installation designer, Kalman commits a “crime” by covering the inside and outside of MAD’s jewelry cases with 2,000 golden brass kudzu leaves. Her work recontextualizes the jewelry gallery, MAD’s historic collection, and other artists’ practices in an act both beautiful and suffocating. The organic gilded foliage overtakes the pristine gallery space and weaves in and around gold jewelry from MAD’s collection, upending minimalism and austerity. Kalman further challenges Loos’s equation of decoration and femininity in her image and video work made for the exhibition. Using the purity of gold contrasted with the blunt physicality of her own body, Kalman claims the feminine as a position of power rather than shame. Through March 15. Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, 212.299.7777, madmuseum.org.

SCRAPPY TRIO Offering creative alternative approaches to confronting textile waste, Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is presenting the work of three designers who put sustainability at the heart of the design process: Luisa Cevese, founder of Riedizioni in Milan; Christina Kim, founder of dosa, inc., in Los Angeles; and Reiko Sudo, managing director at NUNO in Tokyo. Each designer’s practice involves innovative and sophisticated reuse of textile materials and resources, while engaging in preservation of local craft traditions. With more than 40 works on display, the exhibition explores key facets of sustainability, such as the efficient use of materials and resources, the preservation of local craft traditions, and the integration of new technologies in the recycling process. Through April 16. The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, 2 East 91st Street, 212.849.8400, cooperhewitt.org.

Myra Mimlitsch-Gray, Untitled (Ring II), 1993. Gold-plated brass and brass charms. Museum of Arts and Design, gift of Donna SchneierGoldberg, 2000. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.

BLUE MOODS

Amulet in the Form of a Ba as Human-Headed Bird. Reportedly from Saqqara, Egypt, Ptolemaic Period, 305–30 B.C.E. Gold, lapis lazuli, turquoise, and steatite. 1 1/4 x 2 11/16 x 3/8 inches. Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund (Photo: Brooklyn Museum).

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The works of art in Brooklyn Museum’s exhibit Infinite Blue feature the myriad depths in blue. From ancient cultures to those in the present and in between, blue—the color of the skies—has been associated with spirituality as well as power, status, and beauty. The spiritual and material aspects of blue combine to tell us stories about global history, cultural values, technological innovation, and international commerce. This cross-departmental survey includes paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, the decorative arts, illuminated manuscripts, printed books, and contemporary art from the museum’s Asian, African, Egyptian, American, Native American, and European art holdings. The exhibit will expand throughout the first floor as subsequent chapters unfold. Infinite Blue is part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of 10 exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Through November 5. Brooklyn Museum, Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion and Lobby and Great Hall, 1st Floor, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY, 718.638.5000, brooklynmuseum.org.


SEAFARING SOUL The Frick Collection is presenting Turner’s Modern and Ancient Ports: Passages Through Time. Joseph Mallord William Turner was 19th-century Britain’s greatest land and seascape artist, who depicted ports throughout his career, both in monumental oil paintings and in watercolors. An insatiable traveler and an artist with a deep fascination with light, topography, and local traditions, as well as with classical antiquity, Turner brought an innovative approach to the depiction of both modern and ancient ports. This major exhibition brings together 35 works from the 1810s through the late 1830s in oil, watercolor, and graphite that capture contemporary cities in England, France, and Germany, as well as imagined scenes set in the ancient world. It will unite for the first time the museum’s two paintings of Dieppe and Cologne with a closely related, yet unfinished, work from Tate Britain that depicts the modern harbor of Brest. Through May 14. The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street, 212.288.0700, frick.org. Devonport and Dockyard, Devonshire, for Picturesque Views in England and Wales, ca. 1825–29. Watercolor and gouache, with scratchwork, on cream wove paper 11 3/4 x 17 5/16 inch. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum; Gift of Charles Fairfax. Murray in honor of W. J. Stillman (1903–49). Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

Joséphine Douet, Navy and Gold 2015. Giclée print on Hahnemulle Photorag paper 320 gr. 28 x 18 ½ inches. Courtesy of the artist.

KINDRED SPIRITS The Hudson River Museum is hosting Wyeth Wonderland, in which French photographer Joséphine Douet envisions Andrew Wyeth’s world. The exhibition illustrates how the same Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, landscapes and people who inspired the famous realist painter inspire her photographs. Douet has selected 12 of the painter’s drawings and watercolors to pair with photographs in the series. Some of these comparisons are direct, as in a portrait of the same sitter, years later. With others, she was drawn to an aesthetic synergy she felt when looking at Wyeth’s and her images together. SHINING LIGHTS Her admiration for Wyeth dates back to her childhood in Normandy, and her photographs offer a vision of Wyeth’s art as well as a variation on it, given that both the everyday lived by these two artists and the secrets they reveal in their works are different. Through May 14, 2017. Hudson River Museum of Art, 511 Warburton Ave, Yonkers, NY, hrm.org.

Yale University Art is hosting Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light, which is the first exhibition on this groundbreaking artist and his spellbinding light compositions in more than 40 years. As early as 1919, well before the advent of consumer television and video technology, Wilfred began experimenting with light as his primary artistic medium, and his projections employ a technique akin to painting with the rays of a light bulb. The light is reflected and refracted off moving structures and projected onto screens of varying format and size—some resembling early television cabinets, others cinema-size screens. The brilliantly colored compositions, which unfold over time, have been compared to the aurora borealis. Wilfred designed and built an array of sophisticated mechanical sculptures to create vibrant, multicolored displays, realizing a new medium—which he collectively called “lumia”—that was among the first successful fusions of modern art and technology. The exhibition will contain 15 kinetic light sculptures, including three from the Gallery’s permanent collection as well as Wilfred’s most ambitious project, Lumia Suite, Opus 158, commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1963. Through July 23. Yale University Art Gallery, Yale University, 1111 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT, 203.432.0600, artgallery.yale.edu.

Thomas Wilfred, Lumia Suite, Op. 158, 1963–64. Projectors, reflector unit, electrical and lighting elements, and projection screen. Museum of Modern Art, New York, Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund, 582.1964. Photograph by Yale University Art Gallery. FEB MAR

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Books How They Decorated: Inspiration from Great Women of the Twentieth Century

The Art of Elegance: Classic Interiors

Hotel Chic at Home: Inspired Design Ideas from Glamorous Escapes

Past Present: Living with Heirlooms and Antiques

P. Gaye Tapp Rizzoli April 2017 224 pages, $55

Marshall Watson Rizzoli March 2017 256 pages, $55

Sara Bliss Monacelli Press November 2016 272 pages, $45

Susan Sully Monacelli Press April 2016 216 pages, $45

Much has been written about the great doyennes of the past, but few accounts are quite so entertaining and informative as designer P. Gaye Tapp’s new book How They Decorated: Inspiration from Great Women of the Twentieth Century. Sixteen celebrated women of style are profiled in four different categories—Legacy Style, In the Grand Manner, Fashionably Chic, and Unconventional Eye—with each story reading like a novel. The lives and designs of style setters such as Pauline de Rothschild, Mona von Bismarck, Babe Paley, Elsa Schiaparelli, Bunny Mellon, and Georgia O’Keefe—just to namedrop a few—are showcased in their fashionable and well-curated habitats. Tapp notes that their refined way of living had a lasting effect on generations to come in the areas of fashion, interiors, and art. And as interior designer Charlotte Moss—a great woman in her own right—pens in the book’s foreword, “Each of the subjects in How They Decorated moved to the beat of her own drum: Yet their lives have all stirred our own in some way.”

New York interior designer Marshall Watson makes his foray into the publishing world with his book The Art of Elegance. Named Traditional Home’s “Designer of the Year,” the Stanford-educated designer has a penchant for European inspired, richly detailed interiors. Watson details projects ranging from a cottage in Newport Beach and a Gramercy Park apartment to an Italianate villa in Los Cabos, and he delves into the history of the houses as well as the design principles behind each project. As each interior is as unique as its owner, the designer examines the topics of light, balance, proportion, and livability, all successful tenets of good design. Watson also has signature lines for Edward Ferrell + Lewis Mittman and rugs for Doris Leslie Blau.

Inspiration comes from a variety of sources and none better these days than the hotel room. Five-star hotels, in particular, are the new design stars, providing a serene and sophisticated womb for the weary traveler. Writer Sara Bliss offers a virtual hotel library for the inveterate armchair traveler and design aficionado, taking the reader around the world with a glimpse of spaces we may never see—bedrooms, baths, and even children’s rooms and hallways. Based on research for her traveland-design blog Hotel Chic (which reaches readers in more than 180 countries), 130 of the world’s unique hotels are profiled, including boutique hotels from India and Thailand to East Hampton and Hollywood. The author also provides practical design tips “for any style and budget” and interviews from top designers such as Mary McDonald, John Robshaw, and Michele Bonan, who reveal their favorite hotels and designs.

The past meets the present in Southern author Susan Sully’s latest design book Past Present: Living with Heirlooms and Antiques. An antiques aficionado and expert, she details, “Antiques add the touch of time and the human hand. Every dented baby cup, mended tablecloth, perfectly or imperfectly preserved piece of silver or porcelain tells a story that began long ago and hasn’t ended yet. There are no rules about living with them, except to take what’s old and keep it young by making it part of daily life.” Sully offers ways to incorporate antiques into contemporary interiors along with how to display collections, set a table with heirlooms in mind, and mix and match items from a variety of periods and styles, which is no easy feat. From a converted 1915 Alabama fire station to a Greek revival in New Orleans, the homes of collectors, designers, and antique dealers and how they live with treasured items are also showcased.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Design inspiration from decorators, doyennes, hotels, and the world of antiques are a few of the offerings this spring.

New York Living: Reinventing the Home

The Artisanal Home: Interiors and Furniture of Casamidy

The Decorated Home: Living with Style and Joy

Robert Adam: Country House Design, Decoration, and the Art of Elegance

Paul Gunther and Gay Giordano Rizzoli April 2o17 304 pages, $60

Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada Rizzoli Universe March 2017 224 pages, $20

Meg Braff Rizzoli March 2017 240 pages, $45

Jeremy Musson Rizzoli March 2017 272 pages, $65

New York Living poses the intriguing question “What does a home look like in 21st-century New York?” While residential living in the Big Apple translates to high-rise apartments, Brooklyn brownstones, Chelsea flats, and the occasional Fifth Avenue penthouse, city living is much more. Authors Paul Gunther, executive director of the Gracie Mansion Conservancy, and writer Gay Giordano explore the “limitless” potential of ways to reinvent home life in Manhattan as depicted in 26 different domiciles. Interior designer David Netto’s kid-family project on Park Avenue; milliner-to the-stars Rod Keenan’s four-story Harlem home; and historic transformations in Washington Heights, Park Slope, and Greenwich Village are just a few of the homes featured. There is something for every design taste in this unique book.

The Brussels-based husband-andwife design team of Anne-Marie and Jorge Alameda, also known as Casamidy, is internationally known for the pair’s love of handcrafted furnishings and bohemian interiors with a modern bent. A mix of artisanal, contemporary, and antique, the couple’s aesthetic reflects their French and Mexican backgrounds and is chronicled in their book The Artisanal Home: Interiors and Furniture of Casamidy. The design duo’s knack for combining family heirlooms with unique objects is showcased in their various interior projects in both urban and country settings such as Brussels, Paris, and their ranch in Mexico. History, craftsmanship, and tradition are hallmarks of a vibrant and cheerful Casamidy interior, and the book gives the reader a glimpse into both their creative process and the true meaning of indoor-outdoor living.

Perhaps Traditional Home magazine’s review of this book sums it up perfectly, “Think Slim Aarons meets Technicolor elegance.” Mississippi-raised, Locust Valley– based interior designer Meg Braff’s first book The Decorated Home: Living with Style and Joy is an inspiring and idea-filled book that showcases the talented designer’s signature styles—rooms that are beautiful to look at and comfortable to live in. Colorful and classic, her interiors are all about symmetry, successful use in mixing patterns and color, and the effective use of timeless vintage treasures. She details the basics of her design tenets in seven chapters, covering everything from the fundamentals of designing baths and breakfast rooms to the importance of finishing touches and the extras that pull a successful room together.

British architect, interior designer, and furniture designer Robert Adam was one of the foremost leaders of the neoclassical style. Incorporating influences from ancient Greece and Rome into his architecture and interiors that resulted in Adam Style, his work strongly influenced Palladian Neoclassicism in England. The book Robert Adam celebrates his unique visions for the classic English country house interior. Author and former architectural editor of Country Life Jeremy Musson takes the reader on a behind-the-scenes tour of some of Syon House, Harewood House, and Home House—all magnificent examples of the neoclassical country estate. The book is filled with Adam’s original sketches from Sir John Soane’s Museum along with an account of his life, achievements, and design process.

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Trove 01

By Katie Doyle

Hindsight, as they say, is 20/20. We look to the past for unique trinkets and treasures, from the 1700s onward.

A PORTRAIT OF DEBAUCHERY Behold Bacchus, god of wine, fertility, and the theatrical arts. If there’s ever a season to don a pendant with his likeness, spring is it. No doubt, the whimsy of this piece makes up most of its charm, but the artistry of this pendant deserves acknowledgment, too. Every vine of Bacchus’ crown, every swirl of his beard and angle of his cheekbone is a tiny piece of glass in this stunning “micromosaic.” This mode of jewelry-making was favored by young Italian artisans in the late 18th century, who used hundreds of tiny pieces of glass to produce novel but precious keepsakes like this one. The portrait is set in an 18k gold pendant mount. $4,600. Available at 1stdibs.

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Hailing from the United Kingdom, this gentleman’s signet ring makes a statement, one that’s subtle but noble. With its escutcheon-shaped face and its flared, sloping shoulders, the ring is characterized by its handsome geometry and fine engraving work. Though simple in profile, the stag’s-head embellishment is remarkably crafted; clearly the hands at work here, labeled “R&V” according to the hallmark, were masters at their craft. The ring dates to 1901 and bears the Chester city arms inside its 9k-gold band. $1,656.96. Available at 1stdibs.

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ITALIAN RED In the case of many pieces carved from red Sicilian coral, the workmanship of nature itself—with hues of salmon, tomato, and tangerine and subtle sheen— overshadows the hand of the jeweler. This bracelet, though, is an exception, with its intricate, miniature cherubs and flora carved flawlessly into a beautiful piece of coral. The bracelet is the kind that catches the eye from afar and wows the mind up close. We can thank artisans of 18th-century Southern Italy for this masterpiece. $39,000. Available at 1stdibs.

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RUSSIAN HISTORY Wear a piece of history on your hand with this rare men’s diamond ring. Crafted by Nikolai Nemirov-Kolodkin, who was the court jeweler for Moscow’s Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, sister of Empress Alexandra, the unique antique ring dates to the early 1900s. Its 1.05 carat diamond is embraced by two flowing female shapes, hewn in classic Art Nouveau style from substantive 14 karat gold. The ring comes in its original Nemirov-Kolodkin box, complete with the stamp of Grand Duchess Elizabeth. $16,000. Available at 1stdibs.


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IN THE DARK Sometimes antique jewelry tells a story, and sometimes it asks questions. In the case of these dramatic skull cuff links, crafted from shiny enamel with 14k-gold backing and dating back to 1915, we have many questions—and few answers. And yet, that mystique is all part of the appeal. Who wore these cuff links, a gentleman or an outlaw? Could they have been created, innocently, for a costume ball or a masquerade…or for something more sinister? One can only wonder. If anything’s for sure, it’s that these may just be your best conversation piece this spring. $2,600. Available at 1stdibs.

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OVER THE MOON This late-Victorian-era bracelet, featuring moonstone and amethyst, dates to the 1900s. Moonstone used in jewelry for more than 2,000 years, first appearing in Ancient Rome, and throughout history has been gifted as an amulet of protection for travelers and an illustration of romance between partners. In Europe, where this piece originates from, moonstone was believed to cure insomnia and reunite estranged lovers. The bracelet features a radiant oblong moonstone set between two brilliant, faceted amethysts. It is mounted on 14-karat gold. $3,500. Available at 1stdibs.

ON THE BACKS OF ANGELS Angel skin coral is considered ”noble coral,” as it is one of the most desirable types of coral in jewelry-making. With a delicate pale-pink hue and a soft sheen so luminous it almost looks pearlescent, the “angel skin” in this necklace pairs beautifully with the white diamond detailing and its 18-karat yellow gold mount. The necklace was created by historical Neapolitan jeweler Michele Piscione, and comes with the original box. It dates to 1905, the Belle Epoque era—or the “Beautiful Age,” in which Europe’s upper class thrived due to the effects of the industrial revolution. $35,000. Available at 1stdibs.

08 LOOKING FOR LOVE This piece is part of a limited genre of jewelry, in which both singles courting each other and married couples would exchange rings as a symbol of their passion. Only the eye, or the eye and hair, would ever show, creating an air of mystique that served to enhance the experience. The face of the rings contains an original miniature painting, depicting the eye of this aristocratic gentleman with a fine quality of detail. This ring dates to the George III period, originating in the United Kingdom during the late 18th century. $12,000. Available at 1stdibs.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Designvia Fashion A CONNECTICUT DESIGNER’S LOVE OF TEXTILES.

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Hollingsworth used layers of warmth and texture and organic materials for a master bedroom in the West Village.

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rom Armani and Trina Turk to Gaultier and Diane Von Furstenberg, the fashion industry has made its mark in the world of interior design. The creative and design processes are quite similar, making the move from runway to interior a natural progression for many a designer. Case in point is fashion-turned-interior designer Linherr Hollingsworth. “I think we are all born into the world with a predisposed talent. Typically we go where our passion is and are drawn toward what we love in life.”

Linherr Hollingsworth

For the Connecticut-based designer, her first passion was fashion. Growing up as a child on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, exposure at an early age came from her parents, a mother who was a model for Look magazine and a father who was an executive in the textiles industry. Hollingsworth’s first foray into the field was for the legendary chairman Mickey Drexler (known as the man “who dressed America”) at Ann Taylor. “New York City was on fire then, and the fashion industry was booming,” she notes.

“It was an era when retail was really retail, out-of-the box thinking and pushing the limits. Drexler’s mind-set was inspiring.… It was push, push, push, and if you can dream it, it can happen.” Opposite page: Top: Since the ceiling slab presented a unique challenge, recessed lighting gave way to a pair of unique torchère wall sconces. Retouche fabric from her eponymous collection was used on the sectional pillows. Bottom: The designer created a “tonal, sublime and calm” bedroom for the daughter of a client. A pair of mirrors and bedside tables from Holly Hunt flank architectural framework behind the bed.

Positions with Elie Tahari in menswear and activewear at Adrienne Vittadini soon followed and proved to be vital experiences for the next chapter in her life. A third child and a subsequent leave of absence coupled with the renovation of the family house in Darien, Connecticut, resulted in a new career in interior design. “I fell in love with architecture while working on our house. I worked with metals and molding and became quite passionate about it,” she explains about the career-changing experience. “It was on-the-job training, and design came about organically. I never looked back.” Fashion provided business experience and product knowledge, as Hollingsworth explains, “Menswear is all about merchandising, and Seventh Avenue is all about fashion, line, and drape.” Today she looks to clothing for inspiration, citing the runway shows in Paris and Milan and fashion photography as major influences for her interior designs. Hollingsworth’s small boutique practice in Norwalk is known for her custom interiors and clean, refined, and comfortable spaces. “My signature is handsome and organic infused with subtle and sophisticated. Everyone wants to feel wonderful in their spaces and people always tell me, ‘I love what you do, it’s a casual luxury.’ ” Her balance between strength and tension versus softness and refinement are characteristics reflected in her residential work, as is her penchant for mixing the old and the new.

“I love pure modern lines and see the use of a subliminal focus on antiques with a fresh new perspective. Great design is the ability to infuse a room and create a space with a really great collection that gives it soul and depth.”

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Fabric

Opposite page: Top: To the Point wallpaper and Cubist carpet in Mink is a complementary backdrop to Bijoux fabric in Indigo on the Karl Sofa. All fabrics, trims, and furnishings from the Linherr Hollingsworth collection. Bottom left: Zebrato wallpaper and Lou Lou Slipper chair in Modica in coal colorways from her line. Bottom: right: Hollingsworth’s love of metallic is reflected in the Mosaique trim in Sand.

This page: Fabrics and wallcoverings from the designer’s collection are available at Kravet.

Wall Covering

Hollingsworth’s interior work led to product design as well. Upon discovering a lack of product in the market, particularly with patterned grass cloths, she started a file of patterns for inspiration that eventually grew into a line of wall coverings for Kravet. “Creating patterns that are both masculine and feminine, the line goes back to organic, soft, subtle, and sexy. I looked to St. Tropez and Italy for my ‘Bohème’ line that is carefree, timeless, easy, and unbound by any convention.” The designer and her team of artisans receive requests for a lot of custom wall finishes, a collaborative process that she enjoys. “Our clients want a high level of design and something well-suited for them. My first call is to the people I know and work with—it’s all about the collaborative process and my love of metal in particular. It’s a focus on the right amount of tension and where to place it, where to hit the high notes, where to place the light, and when to pull it back.” Her line at Kravet includes fabrics (velvets, leathers, and soft linen prints), trims (tapes and small cords), and carpet. Her love of burnished metals is translated into metallic accents. An organic color palette, abstract patterns, and free-flowing forms are also hallmarks of the collection. In all her work, there is the ever-present play of masculine and feminine. While Hollingsworth’s practice is primarily residential and product design, branching out is clearly on her mind. “I would love to do some commercial work and perhaps a fashion showroom, restaurant, or yacht, as we are good with small spaces. I would love to do a Gulfstream in the future!”

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By Cathy Whitlock

Designer and founding partner of Cullman & Kravis Ellie Cullman.

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FRENCH TWIST INSPIRED BY FRENCH FILMS OF THE FORTIES, A HISTORIC HOTEL-TURNED-RESIDENCE GETS A MAKEOVER.

Blame a brilliant career on a rejected screenplay. Some 30 years ago, Elissa “Ellie” Cullman and her friend (and soon–to–be business partner, the late Hedi Kravis) concocted and wrote a screenplay about the trappings of divorce from a captain of industry. The pair approached a friend who produced the 1979 film Kramer vs. Kramer and were promptly told it was “the worst thing he had ever read.” While the screenwriting gig did not work out, he did offer a proposition: Why not decorate his Manhattan apartment? Important to note: He had already run through three interior designers. One orange-and-blue color scheme and happy client later, a career was born. “I never looked back,” notes Cullman who celebrates her 33rd year in business. The venerable Manhattan interior design firm of Cullman & Kravis has transformed apartments and townhouses all over the world with its elegant yet practical style for three decades. Known for her distinctive color palettes and a masterful mix of antiques and architectural elements with a keen eye toward detail, Cullman produces interiors nothing short of stunning. And in a world of traditional versus contemporary, her mission is to “redefine traditional design” with a fresh new approach to what she coins “modern traditional,” bringing interiors into the 21st century while recognizing the past. At the top of her game, she has been a regular on the AD 100 list since 2000, and won the Albert Hadley Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York School of Interior Design this past year. A design project at the legendary Plaza Hotel–turned-condominium is a prime example of her credo of modern living with charm and soul. “A client called and said they were in a brand-new condo and wanted me to give it a couture look,” Cullman explains. “They were coming from a home that was decorated with traditional English 18th-century and 19th-century mahogany furniture and was attracted to the light woods in the furniture they saw at the Four Seasons in New York.” The couple traveled a great deal and was in need of, as Cullman aptly terms it, “a grown-up pied-à-terre.”

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Top: French Art Deco–inspired interiors form the design plan for a Manhattan pied-à -terre. Bottom left: Metallic beads and silk threads add a special decorative detail to the pillows and curtain border.

Opposite page: Left: Forties meets present day as Cullman designed a Ruhlmann-inspired desk and chair to accommodate 21st-century living. Right: An early-20th-century Swedish commode is flanked by a pair of Jules Leleu sycamore chairs and anchored by a striking Nan Goldin photograph on the wall.

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Cullman, who had worked with the couple on previous homes in East Hampton and Santa Barbara, came up with the perfect solution. Inspired by French films of the ’30s and ’40s, she advised the client:

“Let’s do French Forties, as it was quite a departure. To me, the French Forties represents the height of sophistication. The lines of the furniture are clean and modern, but there is always refined and elegant detailing.”

Together with architect John B. Murray, she gave the apartment’s boxlike structure an immediate face-lift with the addition of architectural embellishments such as the entrance hall’s fantastic circular vaulted ceiling that received an aluminum-and-gold wash finish. The flooring continued the circular theme with concentric circles made of Crema Marfil stone inlaid with brass and onyx. While no interior is perfect, this one presented a challenge in the living area with a small unmovable window in the middle of the living-room wall. Murray and Cullman created a long art wall to accommodate the client’s oversize works as well as to hide the window in question. The multifunctioning living room also does double duty as a place to watch television and as a diningroom area. Three bedrooms were soon turned into a master, sitting room, and two separate studies.

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Opposite page (clockwise from top left): Celadon cashmere adorns the walls of the master bedroom. A series of six Jiang Yiming photographs are front and center on the wall that hides a Murphy bed. The designer transformed the brass and hammered copper bottom of a chandelier found at the Marché aux Puces in Paris into a dining room table top. A dining area boasts spectacular views of Central Park.

This page: Left: A ‘40s parchment and sycamore vanity and stool were discovered during the designer’s shopping trips in France. Right: A guest room doubles as a sitting room. Cullman’s love of materials is evident with her use of pony-skin ottomans, faux crocodile Venetian plaster on the walls and gilt bronze lamps.

Since the client was on the board of New York’s International Center of Photography (ICP), her photography collection (an impressive and ever-expanding body of work that included the likes of Diane Arbus, George Brassai, Nan Goldin, and Vik Muniz) was a major design consideration. As a result, a soothing and sophisticated color palette of caramel, beige, and pale-green shades form the perfect backdrop in the light and airy 2,000-square-foot apartment. A custom ivory shagreen bookcase was also constructed to accommodate the client’s photography books and prints. The glam ’40s–style French Art Deco look translated into an homage of Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann–inspired furnishings with a nod to pieces from noted designers of the period including Jean-Michel Frank and Jacques Adnet. “The clients were interested in finding ‘oneoffs’—pieces made by craftsmen and not commercially made,” Cullman says. “Light woods, especially sycamore, are the hallmarks of French Forties furniture and a logical choice for the vocabulary of the new apartment.” Function over form was also the order of the day, as furniture from the ’20s to ’40s doesn’t necessarily accommodate necessities of the 21st century (specifically television, computers, and storage), so period-inspired cabinets and desks were made. A mélange of materials and styles, each one more interesting than the next, formed the composition of the design scheme. Walls covered in faux-crocodile Venetian

plaster, cognac leather, or cashmere; and furnishings in hand-embroidered cashmere, imported horsehair, marquetry, bronze, and lacquer are just a few of the decorative details. A Swedish commode intermingles harmoniously with Jules Leleu crocodile-covered sycamore chairs while utility and space necessitate a Murphy bed for the apartment’s sitting room. The traditional guest room was turned into a home gym and optimizes, as with all of the spaces, incredible views of Central Park. Cullman’s love of antiques proved to be a natural fit for the project, as she clearly enjoys the thrill of the hunt. “It was a journey purchasing antiques. A lot of the items I found came from 10th and 11th Street dealers in Manhattan along with 1stdibs and Swedish Grace.” One of the more unusual finds was located at Paris’s Marché aux Puces St.-Ouen de Clignancourt: The brass and hammered-copper bottom of a chandelier found new life as the top of a dining table. And for the Brooklyn-born designer, the operative word is repurposing. “I love antiques and repurposing as a kind of nondisposable idea—antique pieces should connect to an aesthetic and history. It’s important for all of us to express individuality in our homes.” The subject is one near and dear to her heart and the topic of her second book published by Monacelli Press next fall. From Classic to Contemporary: Decorating with Cullman & Kravis will explore 14 different homes, showing how clients can “modernize their interiors without throwing out everything they love and still adhere to the principles of the past.”

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THE AGE OF BEAUTY the general manager of 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex (which has a cobranding agreement with online marketplace 1stdibs.com) on the 10th floor of the New York Design Center (200 Lex), Emily Collins is well versed in the nuances of vintage versus antique furniture. Many of the 56 dealers on the gallery’s floor also sell, in addition to modern items, vintage and antique pieces, which the government technically defines as items that are 100 years old or older. “We see people who are looking for everything from a George III dining table to 1970s designs, such as those by Paul Evans or Vladimir Kagan,” Collins says. “Some clients are more concerned about authenticity, but the people who are buying more vintage pieces seem to lately be gravitating toward items that have original labels—where the dealer has gone the extra step to document the catalog number that the piece originally appeared in.” So what are the hottest items? “The thing that people are buying the most of is hard to define these days because clients seem to be gravitating toward an eclectic look,” Collins says. “Everyone wants their interiors to reflect their personality, which is great for us because everything we offer on the floor is one of a kind. So when you’re choosing a vintage or antique piece, you can pretty much rest assured that it’s not also going to be at your best friend’s dinner party. That’s what people come to us for.”

Lost City Arts "The Hoop Chair" by Hans J. Wegner

George and Mira Nakashima English Oak, Walnut and Hickory Minguren Coffee Table

But it’s still the big names that bring people in. “Even if they’re not going for something with a particularly older look, they want those Vladimir Kagan sofas or those Fornasetti cabinets,” Collins says. “People are really drawn to items that are well known. It’s true with some pieces of 18th-century furniture; it’s true with some pieces of 20th-century furniture. If it’s a great design, it will stand the test of time. That’s the business we’re in.” As for catering to trends, well, yes and no. “Lawton Mull does a really great job of bringing in antique pieces that are slightly outside of the box,” Collins says. “They do focus on Scandinavia, which I think is still a big trend in the market. Another dealer we have, Evergreen, also sells Scandinavian 18th- and 19thcentury furniture, and they also do very well. Those clean lines can sit with any interior and the lighter wood and gives a more airy feel to the pieces. Lawton Mull also does a wonderful job in giving history to their pieces and putting them in context, so you see where they came from in the history of design as well as being able to picture where they could fit into your life.” “I think people are choosing things that reflect who they are, which is exciting and very interesting,” Collins concludes.

“Our homes always reflect that. They tell you to dress for the job you want, not the job you have. Interiors play a similar role in telling people who come into our homes who we are.”

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Full Circle Modern 1970s Orange and White Hourglass Pendant by Carlo Nason for Mazzega 1950s Vladimir Kagan "Contour" Lounge Chairs and Ottoman


Emily Collins of the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex explains how today’s clients choose the antiques—or not—that suit their style best.

Evergreen Antiques Pair of Swedish Grace Armchairs Pair of Svend Aage Holm Sorensen Hanging Lights

Karl Kemp Antiques Pair of Tall Table Lamps by Tony Paul for Westwood Thonet Magazine Stand

Weinberg Modern David Roth "Archetypes," Set of Nine Screen Prints Finn Juhl Sofa and Chair for Niels Vodder

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NTERIOR STORYTELLERS CORDELIA LAWTON AND PATRICK MULL COMBINE ANTIQUES WITH MODERN PIECES TO COMPOSE BEAUTIFUL NARRATIVES OUT OF MEANINGFUL DÉCOR.

number of esteemed novelists—Flannery O’Connor, John Irving, and Ann Patchett to name a few—have emerged from the renowned Iowa Writers' Workshop, but Cordelia Lawton and Patrick Mull may be its first pair of interior designers. When Lawton and Mull were enrolled in the program more than 20 years ago, they discovered each other—and their love of beautiful things.

After moving to New York City, the couple did try to make a living as writers. “We were teaching and editing, which was fun but not as satisfying as making our own work,” Lawton explains. “We still needed to set a stage, tell a story, make poetry, move an audience. We explored other avenues including my own long digression as a professional gardener, but kept coming back to art and design.”

Lawton, who was raised in New York, was always interested in style. “I watched a lot of old movies as a young girl and loved the Hollywood glamour of the 1930s and ’40s. Still do,” she says. “And I was caught up in New Wave and Goth music in the ’80s and played a lot with that style. Also, from the moment I was fully responsible for my own living space, I thought about atmosphere, about harmony in space, but in a very intuitive way.”

Spurred on by their environment, the couple consciously sought daily inspiration from the city streets. “When Cordelia and I first moved back to New York, we gave each other the challenge of coming home with a beautiful object found somewhere during our travels in the city every day,” Mull says. “It was a hard task, but it had the wonderful effect of focusing your mind on the world around you, and, of course, we became as obsessed with the story behind each object as we were with the object itself. But the rules of the game required that each object had to be able to justify its own existence without the story. Even today, this principle guides our collecting philosophy:

In contrast, Mull grew up mostly in a bucolic part of Virginia. “I was always interested in the way that art can transform the way we receive messages and moods from the world,” he says. “I think the largest early influences on my notions of design came from reading, and especially reading the American Transcendentalists at about the same time that I discovered Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine. I guess that’s a strange combination, but it has never stopped making sense to me.”

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“Stories are wonderful, but beauty is everything.”


By Catherine McHugh

Lawton Mull created this vignette in the company's Long Island City design studio with a portrait attributed to Joshua Reynolds, a pair of 1970s rare "Gambacorda" chairs by Giovanni Offredi, and a 19th-century intact ceremonial canoe from Kerala.

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Opposite page: Lawton Mull designed the living room of this model apartment on the Upper East Side (top). Favorite pieces include a mid-19thcentury lamp by Danish architect Michael Gottlieb Bindesbøll (lower left) and a pair of mid-18th-century Sicilian polychrome and gilt side chairs with original embossed leather seats (lower right).

This page: A George III settee from the estate of the De Guigné family of San Francisco (left) and a tribal statue of unknown age in a model rest comfortably together in an apartment designed by Lawton Mull (right). The "Strata" wallpaper is from Apparatus and Zak + Fox.

Lawton says that their wedding was perhaps the first interior event they truly designed, and, bolstered by encouragement from friends and family that their taste and love of beauty held broad appeal, they decided to open their own business. The couple incorporated Lawton Mull in 2010, opened their Long Island City studio space in 2011 and then their New York Design Center showroom (in the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex) in 2014.

made,” Mull explains. “They should always be of excellent quality, but we also like them to proudly show their age. A period French or English armchair with rubbed gilding can strike a very thrilling note in a room that is otherwise mostly pale, soft, and quietly luxurious. We recently acquired a 19thcentury Japanese screen with a mysterious interplay of figures standing amidst a deep midnight blue and a wonderfully soft gold. This kind of piece almost demands a modern room.”

During this time, Lawton and Mull have attained a certain expertise in blending antiques with modern pieces, which seems to have naturally evolved from their experience and talent. “Because we love to tell stories, we find that older objects give a room more depth and atmosphere,” Mull explains. “Our favorite rooms are ones that appear to have been composed very deliberately by a collector over the course of a lifetime as his or her tastes and interests have grown. In that kind of space, there’s always a sense of mystery. It’s not a mystery that needs to be solved, but its presence is felt.

Some of Lawton's current favorites include a George III sofa, a pair of 18th-century polychrome and gilt Sicilian chairs with their original leather seats and a Danish Neoclassical lamp by Michael Gottlieb Bindesbøll.“We like sinuous curves, ornate carving, and worn gilding, but in limited doses,” she says. “We also like non-European antiques, such as tribal sculpture and Japanese objects.

“In our own collecting, we tend toward the modern, but we also love to look deeper into the designer’s own sources of inspiration,” he continues. “That’s one of the reasons we love Scandinavian design of the early half of the 20th century. The great designers of that era gathered inspiration from many sources, like the Shakers of New England and 19th-century cabinetmakers in England, to create something entirely new and gorgeous.” “Yes, the best modern design evolves from what came before it, so there's often a great harmony between antique and modern,” Lawton adds. “But mostly, modernity without relief is rather cold. We find it essential to mix it up.” For example? “Sometimes we love working with period pieces of a more Baroque or Rococo design in a modern or contemporary context for which they weren’t originally

“The antiques can serve a number of purposes: lend romance, or a sense of age and permanence, an appealing fragility, the luxury of a thing that is very beautiful but shouldn't be used on a daily basis any more,” she continues. “Also, furniture that's pre-Industrial was made by hand, and one feels that hand now. It’s profoundly satisfying.” Lawton notes that as the business has grown, they have been able to invest in more valuable pieces. “But our approach hasn't changed,” she says. “We have always basically been trying to furnish our ideal home. That picture has evolved over the years, but in a pretty seamless way. Everything we buy has to speak to something we already own. We have to love it enough to keep it if it never sells, and that has always been our guiding principle.” The pair count themselves lucky to have fostered a like-minded clientele. “We work with a very high caliber of interior designers, clients, and collectors,” Lawton says. “They understand that genuine luxury is in the quality of a thing—whether it has lasted generations, or has recently been built to do so.”

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Lawton Mull styled and shot these three vignettes in its Long Island City studio by incorporating a mix of antique and modern furniture, objects of natural history, and art from Europe, Asia, and Africa.

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Always in search of beauty, Lawton Mull found this pair of 18th-century Neapolitan painted and parcel-gilt armchairs (left). At right, a vignette in the Lawton Mull studio features a rare center table by Nanna Ditzel, the "First Lady" of Danish design.

But surprises—such as the unpredictable curves of a primitive wooden bench—are also welcome. “They aren't afraid of patina, of the evidence of use, the imperfections and repairs engendered by normal wear,” Lawton says. “They are drawn to the rarity of something that is no longer produced.” Lawton Mull’s small but growing business requires both partners to wear many “one size fits all” hats, though Lawton tends to do a lot of the day-to-day administration, correspondence, and the social media component. “But I consider my most important task that of a kind of ‘dream factory,’ ” she says. “Patrick has a great gift for the hunt, for the necessary detective work, an incredible instinct for authenticity and an astonishing visual memory. My talent is in combining what he brings in the door and revives. I can't do it without his editorial good sense. I am incredibly grateful to have found a partner in this work.” By now their roles have become so intertwined that everything they do is a true collaboration. “One day I’ll be making drawings for a new design and Cordelia will be on the hunt for just the right mohair fabric,” Mull says. “Later in the day we might head to Brooklyn for a studio visit. The next day one of us might be at a museum research library while the other is taking a chair over to one of our restorers. But at least once a week we spend a day together, reviewing plans and sharing inspirations.” And that work continues to broaden in scope. “We are dealers, which means we rescue beautiful objects, restore them, and find new homes for them,” Lawton explains. “We are also decorators—we create conversations between the pieces in our inventory in the hopes of making people happy, and inspiring them to consider adopting older pieces into their homes. “When I was a middle school student, I used to linger in a flower shop across the street from the apartment building where I lived in Chelsea and bathe in the beauty and the fragrance of all those plants and fresh

flowers,” she continues. “The owner often gave me a single flower to take home. I felt so cared for, so known, in that space, and I hope the spaces we make inspire that feeling in our clients and visitors.” For the past few years, Lawton Mull has also been designing and fabricating a line of tables with a neoclassical profile and unusual natural materials, such as pheasant feathers under glass, or the leaves of a hornets' nest. “We want to work more with stone and skins [parchment, sheepskin, shagreen],” Lawton says. “We have also begun showcasing works by contemporary artists and designers, mostly women, whose work we admire and that we think makes sense in the context of our inventory: glass drawings by Anne Peabody, blown glassware by the Swedish Jennie Olofsson, ceramics by Yulia Tsukerman, welded iron sculptures and furniture by Rebecca Welz.” Recently, they have begun staging luxury homes and model apartments with their inventory. “We've had considerable success using the mix of modern and antique in such a way that buyers can imagine themselves living in that space,” Lawton says. No matter where their passions might lead them next, Lawton and Mull’s search for beauty remains an abiding touchstone . “We described ourselves once as ‘purveyors of beauty,’ ” Mull says. “That feels a little precious, but it’s accurate. An ideal client is one who loves the object because it offers pleasure in a way they hadn’t quite expected.

“There is an old truism that we’ve carried over from the writer’s life: A good story feels both inevitable and surprising at the same time,” Mull concludes. “We feel this is even more possible with the best art and design.”

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Eats’N’Sleeps Lalo 104 Bayard St (646) 998-3408

Augustine Temple Court Building and Annex 5 Beekman St (212) 375-0010

Italienne 19 W 24th St (212) 600-5139 italiennenyc.com

Rouge Tomate 126 W 18th St (646) 395-3978 rougetomatechelsea.com

Lalo exudes the electric energy of a border town, channeling a true cultural fusion, where Mexican meets Californian and melds with Mediterranean. The menu balances traditional flavors from Mexican street food with trendier, newschool styles of cuisine that utilize ingredients like nutritional yeast and dulse seaweed. Dishes are made to share, and diners with even the most divergent diets will find common ground in fun dishes like the chili strawberries topped with aleppo peppers, sumac, smoke salt, and plum sauce, or the kasha salad with raw crimini, and goat’s-milk gouda. There’s even a vegan Caesar and goddess cucumber salad with brown mole and mint. In contrast to the flamboyance of its menu, Lalo’s interiors are stark but beautiful, with narrow white tables that sit between a mustard wrap-around leather booth. With its creative menu and thoughtful interior, Lalo is a welcome addition to lower Manhattan.

Classic fine dining lives on at Augustine, with both a menu and interior to prove it. Traditionalists will appreciate staples like filet mignon, leg of lamb, and broiled lobster, but Augustine also appeases its more adventurous patrons with mains like the indulgent whiskey burger, the savory sea urchin spaghetti, and flavorful sides, such as the carrots glazed with citrus and tarragon oil. No matter what you order, you’ll want to wash it all down with a drink, and if you’re at Augustine, you should make that drink a cocktail. Much like the dinner menu, the cocktail list splits between classic and creative. You certainly can’t go wrong with a martini— particularly the French martini—but the restaurant’s specialty creations, such as the “Le Fumoir,” with Mescal del Amigo, chartreuse, and espelette syrup, are also worth a gander.

Italienne’s name—the French word for Italian—is a perfect caricature of the place, which combines flavors from Northern Italy and Southern France. With a menu that’s continuously reinspired by Chef Sippel and James King, who journey to Europe every year in search of new ideas, Italienne is a true “old world” restaurant where authentic food meets approachable hospitality. This is evident, too, in the restaurant’s warm neighborhood feel and wholesome menu, which is centered around its grill and wood smoker. Diners can choose from a seasonal prix fixe menu or a la carte from the Taverna menu, which offers tasty delights such as the Siciliani crostini with ricotta, caper, and olive; the Casoncelli Bergamaschi, a roastmeat-stuffed pasta with pancetta and sage; or the Fazio farm rabbit with thumbelina carrots and tropea onions. One must also taste from the wine list, which highlights red from Piemonte and Northern Italian whites, all sourced from lesserknown producers.

Dining at Rouge Tomate is a wonderfully colorful experience, from the green vines that hang freely from the ceiling and the sultry ruby lighting and design highlights to fresh ingredients like purple cauliflower and pumpkin romesco. Most impressive, though, is the restaurant’s focus on sustainable dining using modern, healthful ingredients. Start with the Snacks menu (the guinea hen with radish, prune, and crostini is a favorite) and move on to the Small Plates—the arctic char with beer, cabbage, mustard, and hazelnut is a must-try. From the large plates, the acorn squash with quinoa, daikon, baby bok choy, and smoked onion broth is a winner, as is the venison with butternut squash and huckleberry. Interestingly, the beverage list is even more expansive than the dinner menu, offering numerous organic, biodynamic, and natural wines along with a range of sake, cider, and beer. The service is equally impressive, with an abundance of warm and attentive hospitality that’s missing from many New York hot spots. Bon appetit!

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By Katie Doyle

From NoMad to Chinatown, downtown Brooklyn to Williamsburg, hot new eateries and diverse, one-of-a-kind hotels are popping up across the boroughs.

The William Vale 111 N. 12th St, Brooklyn (718) 631-8400 thewilliamvale.com

AKA Wall Street 84 William St (212) 252-9090 stayaka.com

Arlo NoMad 11 E 31st St (212) 806-7000 arlohotels.com

EVEN 46 Nevins St, Brooklyn (718) 552-3800

The William Vale is one of the latest spectacles in Williamsburg’s skyline. The 21-story high-rise overlooks Manhattan and offers an abundance of luxury unseen in the well-appointed neighborhood. The William Vale has even been called “resortlike,” thanks to amenities such as a 60-foot pool, an oversize ballroom, and a pristine 24-hour gym. Every room is appointed with sleek, modern decor and a spacious balcony, though given its prime location at North 12th Street next to McCarren Park, it’s unlikely guests will spend their stay indoors. Indeed, patrons are not without an abundance of vibrant bars and restaurants within a minute’s walk, but it’s worth noting that onsite establishments may leave the William Vale’s guests with second thoughts about wandering outside its door. Andrew Carmellini’s restaurant, Leuca, features delectable Southern Italian fare such as wood-fired pizza, and the hotel’s rooftop bar, Westlight, offers 360-degree views of the city.

The Financial District is abundant with charm—from the Charging Bull to its cobblestone streets, waterfront views, and winding streets—and finally, with the opening of AKA Wall Street, it gets its first luxury all-residential hotel. The hotel was designed for discerning travelers who want “more than a bed and a minibar,” according to Larry Korman, president of AKA. And so, in a gorgeous restored building on William Street and Maiden Lane, AKA Wall Street opens to offer 132 guest residencies, ranging from studios to penthouses. The establishment has been characterized as “having the style and hospitality of an intimate hotel with more offerings than a vacation rental,” and all properties feature living rooms and top-of-the-line kitchens complete with Fisher & Paykel appliances, stainless-steel celadon countertops, and custom cabinetry.

Located right off Fifth Avenue between E. 30th and 31st Streets Arlo NoMad has all the swag of the surrounding neighborhood, tempered with an abundance of charm. Arlo is one of those hotels that’s perfect for either business or pleasure. With a lobby that feels more like a living room offering plenty of space for work or play, Arlo is the perfect home base for urban exploration. Argo is a supreme example of purposeful design, with its compact rooms featuring 250 “micro-rooms” that feature gorgeous midcentury modern interiors and, in some cases, floor-to-ceiling glass walls. Complimentary Wi-Fi is an undeniable perk, as are the hotel’s onsite establishments, including the “Italian-ish” Massoni, from the lauded Chef Dale Talde; Barlo, featuring creative cocktails, and the Library that doubles as a co-working space, and the soon-to-open Heights, a rooftop bar offering a glass-bottom view of the city.

Located in downtown Brooklyn, this is EVEN’s second New York City location. EVEN matches the vibe of its hip, up-and-coming surrounds, offering guests a multifaceted experience that is totally different from a typical Manhattan stay, with Brooklyn hot spots like BAM (the Brooklyn Academy of Music), the year-round Fort Green farmer’s market, and a multitude of diverse bars and restaurants just a hop and a skip away. Most notably, though, EVEN stands out as one of the only wellness-focused hotels in the industry. This is evident in so many dimensions: from the Athletic Studio, with its living green walls and yoga and Spin classes and its “InRoom Training Zone,” which includes a foam roller, yoga mat, and block and core exercise ball to thoughtful amenities like eucalyptus fiber linens that offer a cooler sleep, all-natural bath products, and LED mood lighting. For travelers into fitness, EVEN comes as a highly anticipated hotel option.

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GALLERY A PI C T UR E -PE R F ECT SHOWROOM EXHIB ITION

Dover Street Settee available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com Bicycle Wall Art available at Phillips Collection, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com FEB MAR

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Pullman Carved Triptych Mirror Frame available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Table Lamp from George Kovacs Lighting available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

Luca Dining Chairs available at Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Graduation Chandelier available at Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Bonita Tables available at BRADLEY, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

Jewels 6 Drawer Dresser available at Rooms by Zoya B, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

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Fish and Swan Dhurrie available at Odegard Carpets, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Watson Loveseat Margo Steel available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Mr. Brown London Lombardi Cabinet available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Olivia Accent Table available at Reagan Hayes, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com

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Fortuny Floor Lamp available at LEPERE, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

Pair of matching Gorham Silverplated Ice Buckets circa 1890 available at Aero Studios, 212.966.4700, aerostudios.com Palenque Table available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Pasterly—A giclee reproduction of an original antique painting from the personal collection of Kelly O’Neal. Available in multiple sizes with frame options at Leftbank Art, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Jacobean Table-Ebony available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Art Deco Bench available at Côté France, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

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freshpicks THE MOST CURRENT PRODUCTS IN 200 LEX SHOWROOMS.

Art Gild Playful Movement is a giclee reproduction of a watercolor so close to the original, everyone thinks it is a one-of-a-kind. Leftbank Art prints the giclee on special paper and then gold leaf is applied by hand, giving the image more dimension. Framed under acrylic glass with double-stacked frames. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Desert Bloom Inspired by the towering century plant of the American desert, Currey & Company’s Agave Americana Chandelier branches are hand-forged wrought iron finished in dark contemporary gold. The flowers are made up of clusters of faceted crystals that surround and reflect the light from its 22 bulbs. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

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Coastal Cool Bakes & Kropp's Cucina BK-style custom cabinetry is fresh, contemporary, and coastal. The vertical grain orientation of the Rift White Oak draws the eye skyward, and the light wash finish gives it a loose, beach-inspired texture. The center island, topped in brushed stainless, softly reflects the light and the subtle aquamarine color scheme. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Just One Look One glance at the Mayfair Sofa from Casamilano, available at Lepere, and you can tell it’s built for comfort. Picture yourself cosseted within its deep, gently curved arms and back. The mix of high-density foam and goose feathers ensures that the comfort will last. Choose a contrasting piping for a dramatic effect. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

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Eastern Exposure The Saigon Collection is inspired by the stone-carved lattice screens, or Jali, that are used as ornamental architectural decoration throughout Asia. Studio A Home has reinterpreted the designs in wall panels and lighting. These sculptural pieces add an exotic air to any décor. Available in bronze and nickel finishes. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Channeling Modern The Bright Group’s Adil Lounge Chair is a classic modern chair with a steel base. The channeled upholstery and attractive profile present a dynamic, contemporary approach. Also available as a sofa with wood leg detailing. Shown here in leather with a polished stainless-steel base. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

It's a Cinch With cinch-waist solid mahogany struts and a tempered glass top, the Niemeyer Table from Christopher Guy draws inspiration from Oscar Niemeyer’s 1970 design for the Catedral de Brasilia. A combination of natural forms and pure modernism, this piece makes an ideal side or drinks table. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Diamonds and Pearls Who says kids can’t sleep in style? The midcenturymodern Jewels Bed by Zoya B. was inspired by Sleeping Beauty and classic Hollywood glamour. It is shown here with a diamond-tufted, pearl-upholstered headboard and footboard in pearlescent white with polished nickel hardware. Fully customizable to match her favorite color. Rooms by Zoya B, Suite 433, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

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freshpicks Picture This Elworthy Studio debuts its new collection of wallcoverings at BRADLEY. The collection was inspired by a Getty Museum exhibition of Avant Garde photographers who use alternative processes. Six designs in a total of sixteen colorways capture the unique luminosity of photography. Available in paper and Type II for commercial use. BRADLEY, Suite 802, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

Back and Forth Global Views went and did something amazing—it made the comfy chair very chic. The Retro Recliner is covered in a striking midcentury-inspired pattern, and the fashionforward ebony-cerused wood finish steals the show. Elevate your feet and the entire room to a new level of style. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Zig When They Zag Mr. Brown London’s sophisticated Belmont Day Bed has a bench cushion finished with two rolled bolsters. Shown in silver sage velvet and a rustic white pine frame, the carved zigzag pattern resembles corrugation. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com Ring Bling Artisan-crafted blown-glass jewels, in clear, bronze, or smoke, are set in a ring or linear base to create a dramatic display of light in the Bezel-Gem Ring Chandelier from Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Using integrated LED technology, the faceted gems radiate sparkle and dimension. Offered in a variety of sizes, styles, and finishes. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com Sea Change Natural oyster shells, set into a gray-wash wood frame give the Shell Dining Table at Phillips Collection depth, dimension, and an organic feel. Paired with clean, polished stainless-steel legs, this modern table is perfectly suited for a coastal home with flair. Also available as a side table and coffee table. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com

Continuous Lines Brueton’s Continuum Table Series by designer Gary L. Bowers is a minimalist architectural statement. Simple, elegant, and dynamic, the continuous stainless-steel-tube base is structurally connected with unique detailing at each foot, allowing the upper supporting tubes to float unattached beneath the square or round glass tabletop. In polished stainless steel, bronze, or gunmetal-gray finishes. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Alabaster Light Jean-Louis Deniot’s keen architectural eye and timeless spirit inform his debut collection for Baker Furniture, which includes the Lolite Chandelier. Inspired by 20th-century vintage furnishings, Deniot curates with his signature elegant balance and flirtatious wit. Iolite features five candelabra-base bulbs with alabaster diffusers, and is available finished in antique bronze or polished brass. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Cocktail Hour Aero introduces additions to Thomas O’Brien’s New Vintage Barware Collection comprising Czech cut-crystal decanters and whiskey and double old fashioned highball glasses. Glasses are sold in sets of four patterns for a mixed bar story. It also helps guests keep track of their glass. The collection also includes shakers, pitchers, and stainless-steel tools. Aero Studios, Suite 1500, 212.966.4700, aerostudios.com

Timeless Modern James Stuart Duncan’s Modern Buffet at Profiles is an elegant, simple design that echoes the shape of last-century modern, but with 21st-century aesthetics and a hint of the Far East. It is available in custom sizes in walnut, mahogany, oak, ash, or lacquers. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Contemporary Cuisine The LaSalle Dining Chair by Anees Upholstery, Inc. at Dennis Miller provides simplicity, serenity, and a truly pleasant sitting experience. The chair’s curved back and plush seat provide a contemporary appeal to any dining room setting. It is also available as a bar stool. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Me, Myself, and I The I Daybed at Côté France was created by young French-Asian designer Axel Huynh, for Henryot. The unique bolster and strap design make it a standout statement piece, and the twin bed size makes it truly practical for a nap and even as an extra guest bed. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

Brilliant Path Kozo is from Stephanie Odegard’s Sashiko Collection of carpets, inspired by traditional Japanese textiles. Hand-knotted in Nepal of Tibetan wool with hints of nettle accents that give this piece spectacular sheen. Custom colors and sizes are available. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Ombre Eyes The new collection of hand-printed fabrics from Reagan Hayes features the geometric themes and fashion-inspired elements that the house is known for. Among the new patterns, Eyes is a playful take on our see-and-be-seen culture, while Ombre features a beautifully proportioned progression of shades that creates a subtle sense of movement. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F E ATUR E D HI GHLIGHT S OF CR AFT AND D ES IG N .

1. Flea Find (opposite) Currey & Company’s Arden Chest, with tornado gray reverse-painted top, front, and sides, and solid brass hardware, trim, and clad legs, was inspired by a 1970s Paris flea market find. Also in peony pink. 2. Chequered Past Baker Furniture’s Bombe Chest is a George II walnut commode of Bombé form by George Channon. The top and six lockable drawers are inlaid with cross-banded borders and unusual chequered bands.

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3. Gone to Pieces (opposite top) In the Asken Wall Panel from Phillips Collection, framed pieces of reclaimed wood are puzzled together in a composition that amplifies positive and negative space while showcasing the wood’s natural characteristics. 4. From Any Angle (opposite bottom) Julian Chichester’s Amalfi Sofa is perfect for a cocktail party but comfortable enough for everyday lounging. The lines embrace midcentury styling while the proportions have been adapted for today. 5. Tip-Top Shape A simple silhouette inspired by centuries-old Middle Eastern architecture, the Minaret Accent Tables at Studio A Home have crisp, clean lines. Offered in satin brass or satin nickel. 6. Owner of Dragons This charming Bouton Brass Dragon Door Knob at Côté France was designed around 1770 in Paris as a symbol of the homeowner’s power. 7. The Eyes Have It In Cloche, a fabulous mosaic panel from Christopher Guy, a ’20s flapper girl nonchalantly flouts conventionality, her fine features graced by a black cloche hat shading her eyes. 8. Vintage Italian This Vintage Stilnovo Chandelier at Reagan Hayes is constructed in brass with both aged brass and gunmetal finishes, creating the perfect complement to the round Louis Table that accompanies it. FEB MAR

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9. Staggering Depth A Tribeca hallway becomes a showcase for a homeowner’s favorite treasures, antiques, and vintage keepsakes with Bakes & Kropp Fine Cabinetry. Staggered cabinet depths make for an eye-catching custom-lighted gallery. 10. Photo Finish Mali Azima launches her groundbreaking Fine Art Photography Collages at BRADLEY. Mali’s work is available as single pieces or as a series of acrylic panels creating an artistic installation. 11. Round the Wall Global Views introduces the Globe in Square Floor Screen featuring twelve frosted illuminated orbs. Brass connectors and cups support the grid structure and each globe above a polished black granite base. 12. Lattice Have a Drink The Edmund Bar Cabinet from The Bright Group reveals its interior lacquer surfaces through its unusual pierced lattice doors. The interior features glass shelves as well as optional lighting. Bronze details complete this exquisitely crafted cabinet. Offered in walnut, oak, and claro walnut with lacquered interior and optional lacquer matching tray. 13. Fashion Flair Sister Sister, from Leftbank Art, is a giclee reproduction of an original work by artist Mia Malcolm. It depicts two sisters in 1950s formal wear with cinched waists and A-line flaring. 14. Hex on You Brueton’s Hexto Table is a crisp hexagonal cocktail table with six vertical legs supporting a six-sided top and bottom frame. The polished stainless-steel base holds a set-in, beautifully sparkling plate glass top.

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15. Have a Ball In the Hinsdale Linear Pendant at Metropolitan Lighting, seven lustrous spheres of varying sizes are mounted on a straight clean bar finished in polished nickel, aged brass, or bronze. 16. Shine and Sparkle A little bit of glass and a little bit of gold equals simple elegance in the Birchard Table at PROFILES. Custom sizes and 16 other finishes are available. 17. Baby Makes Three Zoya B’s Soho Three-Drawer Dresser is a midcentury-modern addition to the nursery. It is made of solid cerused walnut with faux shagreen upholstery and polished nickel hardware. An acrylic changing table is optional. 18. Black Tie Optional A complement to the tuxedo style, the Margaux Lounge Chair at Dennis Miller incorporates traditional elements like a show-wood frame and box-tufted back within a confident, contemporary silhouette. 62


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19. Everyday Fascinations Daniel Rozensztroch’s Obsession Collection of wallpaper at LEPERE celebrates collectors of everyday objects, including clothes hangers, spoons, toothbrushes, whisk brooms, and tree ornaments. We’re obsessed too. 20. Deep Dimension Maluk, a handwoven kilim from the Kooches for Odegard Carpets Collection, employs a rarely used compound weaving technique that yields a spectacular, more dimensional appearance than other flat woven rugs. 21. A Magic Number In this Three Winchendon Cabinets set at Aero, a three-drawer cabinet is flanked by two single-door cabinets. Originally designed by Martin Feinman in 1940, they have been reimagined by artist and gilder Carol Leskanic.

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De. FIN.ingPieces I T E MS THAT SUM U P WHAT A SHOWROOM IS AL L AB OUT.

LEFTBANK ART The Emerald Drapery series is hand painted to order in the USA. In an age of reproductions, Leftbank Art still offers original artwork. The colors ombrĂŠ from light at the top to dark blue/green. The center transition point has texture applied with a dusting of glitter to reflect the light. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

JULIAN CHICHESTER A sensual boomerang shape gives Julian Chichester’s Deneuve Cabinet its sophisticated and sculptural shape. Finished in high-gloss lacquered teal vellum, the cabinet is outlined with a sinuous band finished in polished brass. Available to order in a variety of standard and custom lacquered vellums and other finishes. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com FEB MAR

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CURREY & COMPANY The frosted pieces of glass that hang from the wrought-iron Vintner Blanc Chandelier are made of recycled wine bottles individually selected for quality and clarity. The hand-applied silver leaf finish is a cool complement to the white hue of the glass. It is also available with green bottle glass. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

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CÔTÉ FRANCE The Coque Swivel Chair at Côté France is a gem of a French design by D’Argentat Upholstery and is a popular favorite thanks to its compact size and comfort. It can be ordered as shown with the outside back in pewter metal, bronze metal, a variety of finishes and woods, or even upholstered fabric. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com (Left top to bottom) PROFILES The Oliver Sofa by Eduardo Martinez for Marbello is a classic for this century. Shown here with sleigh legs and Colorado walnut trim. Choose from curved or straight with down, feather, and eight-way hand-tied upholstery. Handmade in Los Angeles. Custom sizing and details are available. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com REAGAN HAYES The Sophia Cocktail Table has shapely cast bronze legs that wrap around the top just a little bit. It is shown here with a walnut drift-sawn veneer in alabaster, while the legs are finished in gunmetal. A closer look at the top will reveal a subtle diamond grain direction detail and an all-but-hidden single drawer. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com BRUETON Deliberate sculptural interplay of cylindrical forms characterizes the Tee Console Table. The simplicity of the pedestal base flows into the cantilevered arms, which are sliced to express and reveal the depth of the glass or stone top and sides. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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PHILLIPS COLLECTION Chamcha Wood Dining Tables are made from remnants of old trees, roots, and stumps salvaged from the fields and forests of Southeast Asia. Each example is a one-of-akind piece. Available in natural, gray stone, and ebony finishes. Various leg options are available in stainless steel, polished black, and polished brass. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com

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THE BRIGHT GROUP The Strata Cabinet, designed by Tuell & Reynolds, is truly a showstopper, featuring hand-cut bronze, semiprecious stone accents of lapis lazuli, sodalite, tiger’s eye, and bronze plate. Wood interior cabinet inserts are customizable and replaceable. Shown here in a light burnished architectural bronze with lacquer top coat. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES The Fretwork 42 is a smaller-scale version of Altura’s popular original design. A geometric grid of raised metal overlays the front. Integral tab pulls extend out of the pattern at functionally designed intersections. Metal-capped door ends frame the composition. Available in a variety of sizes, configurations, and finishes. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

BAKER FURNITURE

AERO STUDIOS (opposite right)

The Klismos chair has been evolving ever since it was depicted in 5th-century BC. With the tufted version of his Athens Lounge Chair, Thomas Pheasant pushes this timeless form to the limits of craftsmanship. Never have its sweeping silhouette and lean frame been so exaggerated— or so modern. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

The Fred Chair by Thomas O’Brien for Century Furniture is inspired by a beautifully crafted vintage Swedish wing chair. Keeping the tightly structured wing and the flattering tall back, O’Brien added a more neoclassical wood framing detail to the front of the chair and the leg. In Century or customer ordered fabric or leathers. Aero Studios, Suite 1500, 212.966.4700, aerostudios.com

GLOBAL VIEWS (opposite left) The Quad Block Bedside Table meets so many needs effortlessly. With its just-right size and spacious drawer detailed with four blocks, the table provides ample storage. The compartment under the drawer is roomy enough for your favorite things. Finished on four sides in a warm zebra wood veneer with square brass sabots on each leg. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com FEB MAR

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STUDIO A HOME The Petite Oval Occasional Table is simple and discreet. Its elegant hand-forged tapered legs and clean profile helps it integrate easily into any interior. Made of tempered glass and iron, it is available in antique gold and natural iron finishes. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioahome.com

ODEGARD CARPETS Pangden Plateau is a classic geometric design from Odegard Carpets with an intense depth of color that can bring any room to life. Handmade in Nepal of Himalayan vegetal dyed wool. Custom colors and sizes available. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

CHRISTOPHER GUY The Monte-Carlo Chair is an extraordinary dining or occasional chair with a sweeping low backrest that incorporates Christopher’s signature Chris-Cross legs. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

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METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO. The Diamonds Sconce by Alecia Wesner for George Kovacs is a perfect marriage of Art Deco glitz and glamour with today's best in modern dimmable LED illumination. This innovative fixture can be placed horizontally or vertically to allow your creative design ideas to sparkle with a crystal flourish. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

BRADLEY BRADLEY’s Ronnie Curved Sofa is a perfect example of the company’s growing line of exquisite upholstery. Designers are offered an array of metal veneer finishes for the plinth base, which include: brass, stainless, and copper. The Ronnie is shown in BRADLEY’s own line of Silk Velvet but is also available as COM. BRADLEY, Suite 802, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

LEPERE The Soul Lounge Chair designed by Rafa Garcia for Sancal is discreet, comfortable, and compact— essential qualities in an armchair. An understated mix of gentle curves and dramatic angles, Soul is available with a swivel base or beech-wood legs and covered in fabric or leather. A stylish raked ottoman is also offered. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

ROOMS BY ZOYA B The unique silhouette of the New Yorker Lifestyle Crib was inspired by French Deco style. It can be converted into a full bed, evolving along with your little one. It is pictured here in solid cerused wood with chocolate stain, scalloped detailing, and brass hardware. The headboard is upholstered in white vinyl. Rooms by Zoya B, Suite 433, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

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NEW Showrooms F R E S H FACE S A ND NEW D ESIGNS.

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW LOCATION

OPENING SOON

Archetypal Imagery Corp., Suite 419 Archetypal Imagery is dedicated to delivering unparalleled custom hardwood flooring in all categories, such as antique, modern, and classical. Archetypal is world renowned for its intricate end-grain mosaic wood floors, parquet, and bespoke inlays, as well as super-wide / super-long plank wood floors. Known for its services in installation and finishing, Archetypal is a master of unlimited colors and textures in the job-site finishing field. With use of innovative low VOC burnishing oils that are extremely durable and cure immediately, the company is able to allow customers to use the flooring area instantly.

Elle W Collection, Suite 420 Lorraine Wohl /Elle W collection relocated after 30 years at Lexington Avenue and 65th Street. She offers an array of French midcentury furnishings, an exceptional collection of deco and retro jewelry, and vintage costume jewelry.

OPENING SOON

Circa Lighting, Suite 103 Circa Lighting is proud to announce the opening of its newest location at the New York Design Center in spring of 2017. The 200 Lexington Avenue location will feature a Visual Comfort Lighting Studio. For nearly 30 years, Visual Comfort has produced decorative lighting collections with the most influential names in the design industry, including Ralph Lauren Home, Kelly Wearstler, E.F. Chapman, Alexa Hampton, Thomas O’Brien, and more. Located in Suite 103, the new lighting studio will showcase Visual Comfort & Co’s evergrowing assortment of interior and exterior lighting and incorporate interactive digital displays for a stateof-the-art shopping experience.

Munder Skiles, Suite 436 John Danzer's foray into the field of garden furniture design began as a recreational interest. His curiosity about the design of the furniture for any outdoor space grew into passionate research and collecting. All of his discoveries, which include archives of designers, collections of valuable examples, an extensive library of books, and new and antique catalogs, are organized in a usable digital library of more than 10,000 images along with scrapbooks covering 50+ related topics. In 1991, his reputation in the little-studied field of garden furniture design history expanded even further after he lectured at the Victoria & Albert Museum. Today he regularly addresses decorative arts, design, and horticultural organizations. In 1992, John started Munder Skiles to produce quality garden furniture. Firmly grounded in John's knowledge of garden furniture history and material science, the company is recognized for its artisan-like standards of comfort, craft, and proportion. John's modernist/ergonomic Taconic Chair™ received the 1994 Roscoe Award as the "Best American Chair"—the first time a garden seat had been so honored. The New York School of Interior Design staged a 10-year retrospective of Munder Skiles in 2000 called "Reinventing the Garden Seat," another first in the industry. John was nominated by the Cooper-Hewitt for a 2005 National Design Award in Landscape Architecture.

Woven, Suite 805 Woven is a leading full-service independent contemporary rug gallery specializing in a carefully curated inventory of antique and vintage rugs sourced and hand-selected from around the world. Introduced in 2016, Woven debuted Studio Woven, a series of in-house-designed contemporary hand-woven rugs for the 21st-century home. The new collection is made up of six series of rugs, inspired by the modern nomad and informed by the antique and vintage masterpieces within the Woven collection.

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Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

AERO Suite 1500

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

BRADLEY Suite 802

Celebrating its 20th year, AERO houses Thomas O'Brien's ever-changing selection of refurbished vintage modern furniture and lighting, antiques, fine art, tableware, accessories, and collectibles. AERO stocks Thomas O'Brien brand home furnishings, both ready-made and made to order. It is the only place to find AERO-label goods, from handcrafted, luxury upholstery, and lighting to trays, bedding, and the perennially popular AERO leather tote bags. AERO, Suite 1500, phone 212.966.4700, fax 212.966.4701, aerostudios.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Its new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of the original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

BRADLEY, an innovative, to-the-trade luxury furnishings company specializing in artisan-crafted, American-made furnishings, lighting, fine art, and accessories, opened its flagship NYC showroom in Spring 2016. Distinguished by a range of unique materials and artisan finishes—reclaimed wood, concrete, hand-forged metal, antiqued mirror, painted glass—BRADLEY is sold through major design centers and by design trade professionals around the world. BRADLEY, Suite 802, phone 646.766.1011, fax 646.766.8686, bradley-usa.com

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

BRUETON Suite 910

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

CÔTÉ FRANCE Suite 1201

The Bright Group is a unique collection of hand-crafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Co. with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new contemporary design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, produces a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Christopher Guy’s 20,000-square-foot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

Côté France respects tradition and embraces the future. Renowned for quality, style, and originality, the company’s workrooms proudly boast generations of families continuing a tradition of hand craftsmanship. In addition to reproductions and outdoor teak, collections include Ecart International Furniture, Chêne de l’Est French Oak Flooring, and Maison Fontaine Decorative Hardware. The company specializes in projects for fine residences and luxury hotels worldwide. Côté France, Suite 1201, phone 212.684.0707, fax 212.684.8940, cotefrance.com FEB MAR

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS CURREY & COMPANY Suite 506

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs, and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th–century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections in the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

IN HOUSE KITCHEN BATH HOME Suite 1511

JULIAN CHICHESTER/ MR BROWN LONDON, Suite 604

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LEFTBANK ART Suite 609

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in his New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com, mrbrownlondon.com

Kravet Inc., established in 1918, distributes fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets, and accessories to the interior design trade. Kravet Inc. owns Kravet, Lee Jofa, Groundworks, GP & J Baker, and Brunschwig & Fils, all high-end fabric houses that specialize in style, luxury, and exceptional design. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

Leftbank Art designs and creates artwork through its exclusive team of artists and art partners. It offers diverse subjects and a wide range of design trends. The goal is to bring to market images that look commissioned or one-of-a-kind, but at a fraction of the cost. Leftbank Art’s interactive website allows trade customers to select finish, size, and frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, phone 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

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LEPERE Suite 714

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

ODEGARD CARPETS Suite 1209

PHILLIPS COLLECTION Suite 603

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Its New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, metropolitanlightingny.com

Since 1987, Odegard Carpets has been an innovative leader in the production of sophisticated high-end, hand-knotted carpets. Recently partnered with Kooches Handmade Carpets, Odegard has greatly expanded its distinctive carpet offerings and production capabilities. Odegard Carpets requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising the standard of living for thousands of artisan weavers in developing countries. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, odegardcarpets.com

For more than 30 years, Phillips Collection has been the source for exciting and innovative furnishings. Founded by Larry and Sherry Phillips, it was the natural evolution of their passion for art and travel. Their son, Mark, and wife, Julie, transformed the business into an industry leader in global design. Now, a third generation—Jason and Jessica— brings its brand of leadership to a growing international clientele. Pictured: Broken Egg Wall Art in white resin with gold or silver leaf. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, phone 336.884.9271, fax 336.882.7405, phillipscollection.com

PLEXI-CRAFT Suite 914

REAGAN HAYES Suite 903

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

STUDIO A HOME Suite 614

Plexi-Craft is unique among custom acrylic furniture manufacturers, having been located in New York City since its founding in the 1960s. Many of the midcentury acrylic antiques you see at vintage furniture shops were made by Plexi-Craft. With a sketch or even a written description, your vision can be translated into a custom item. All pieces can also be scaled, modified, or customized. Plexi-Craft, Suite 914, phone 212.924.3244, fax 212.924.3508, signature.plexi-craft.com

Reagan Hayes, Inc. designs and manufactures high-end furniture for interior design and architecture firms. Each piece in the company’s collection is handmade in Los Angeles with the finest materials, craftsmanship, and attention to detail. The company has flagship showrooms in the New York Design Center and the Pacific Design Center, with representation in other locations, including with Jean de Merry in Dallas. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, phone 212.658.1922, fax 310.494.5937, reaganhayes.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has more than 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

Studio A Home’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of its product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A Home is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A Home, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com FEB MAR

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Events at 200Lex A LO OK AT A F E W RECENT CELEB R ATIONS.

WHAT’S NEW, WHAT’S NEXT The New York Design Center presented the record-breaking eighth annual “What’s New, What’s Next” on September 22, 2016. More than 7,500 professionals filled the building to attend what has become the design industry’s most anticipated event, which included more than 80 participating showrooms and upwards of 45 designer conversations, presentations, and panels from the industry’s top names, editors, and manufacturers—all celebrating what’s “new” and “next” in design. The New York Design Center partnered with 23 esteemed media publications and editors from Architectural Digest, Aspire, Atlanta Homes & Gardens, Cottages & Gardens, Dering Hall, domino, Editor at Large, Elle Decor, Esteem Media, Food 52, Galerie, House Beautiful, Interior Design, Luxe Interiors + Design, Magnifissance, Modern Luxury Manhattan, Metropolitan Home, New York Magazine Design Hunting, New York Spaces, Traditional Home, Veranda, and The Wall Street Journal. 2016 marks the New York Design Center’s 90th anniversary. This year’s WNWN celebrated the building’s continued commitment to the industry. The astounding success of this year’s event solidifies 200 Lex as a New York design institution—exemplifying “90 Years at the Center of Design.”

Dan Fink, Architectural Digest Editor in Chief Amy Astley, and Thomas O’Brien in AERO; Anne Maxwell Foster and Suysel dePedro Cunningham of Tilton Fenwick, Lee Cavanaugh of Cullman Kravis, Nick Olsen, Harry Heissman, Marisa Marcantonio, and Young Huh in Niermann Weeks; Elle Decor Editor in Chief Michael Boodro with Russell Groves, Alexandra Champalimaud and Adam Tihany; Windsor Smith with Stacey Bewkes; Allegra Hicks celebrated British Style and Design in Kravet; Philip Thomas, Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club’s Nazira Handal, Matthew Quinn, Elizabeth Pyne of McMillen Inc., and Philip Mitchell in PROFILES; Hearst Design Group Editorial Director Newell Turner with Ann Gish in Global Views/Studio A; Daun Curry and Ryan Korban with Elle Decor Design Editor at Large Mieke Ten Have in CF Modern; Sarah Depalo and Claire Ratliff of Cullman Kravis, Jeanette Hubley-Lasher, Mercedes Desio and Alberto Villalobos of Villalobos Desio, Sasha Bikoff, Brooke Gomez of Gomez Associates, and Jenny Wolf with Dering Hall’s Dennis Sarlo in Odegard Carpets; Phillips Collection’s Jessica Phillips Penn with Tyler Wisler, Marc Blackwell, Andrea Sinkin, Melanie Calder Russo, Nicholas Calder, and Patti Carpenter; New York Magazine’s Design Editor Wendy Goodman and Georgie Hambright in EJ Victor; Alexa Hampton and Mario Buatta in Kindel Furniture; domino Editor in Chief Jessica Romm and Lisa Frantz of Marks & Frantz in The New Traditionalists; House Beautiful Editor in Chief Sophie Donelson and Mark D Sikes. Photos by Social Shutterbug/Matthew Carasella. 76


Design Leadership Network Celebrates 200 Lex’s 90th Anniversary The Design Leadership Network hosted a celebratory dinner to commemorate the New York Design Center’s 90th anniversary on September 21, 2016, the night before What’s New, What’s Next. Members of the DLN gathered at Marta for an evening toasting the design center’s rich history.

200 Lex President & CEO Jim Druckman gave a speech with founder & cohost of the Design Leadership Network Peter Sallick; Barclay Butera and Anthony Baratta; Joan Michaels, Elle Decor Editor in Chief Michael Boodro, and Barry Gorralnick; Publishing Director of Hearst Design Group Kate Kelly Smith and Carey Kravet. Photos by Tiffany Sage/BFA.com.

Holiday Live Benefiting Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club On Tuesday, December 6, 2016, in the Baker showroom at 200 Lex, the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club celebrated Holiday Live! The New York Design Center and Hearst Design Group joined together as hosts to kick off the holiday season with a special event benefiting the beloved organization. The evening included a one-of-a-kind silent auction of wreaths created by top interior designers. Each of these unique items showcased the special talent of the individual designer, and collectively they transformed the room into a pre-holiday wonderland. The night also included performances by the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club members. Proceeds from the wreath and tickets sales benefited Kips Bay’s education and afterschool programs.

Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club members perform carols; 200 Lex President & CEO Jim Druckman and Ellie Cullman of Cullman Kravis; Edie van Breems of Eleish van Breems with her custom wreath; Ron Marvin, Young Huh, Libby Langdon, and Alyssa Kapito of Kapito Muller; Executive Director of Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club Daniel Quintero and Sean Sullivan of Hearst Design Group; Nazira Handal of Kips Bay Girls & Boys Club and Charles Pavarini III. Photos by Edgar Pineda.

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

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SH OWR OOM 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Access to DesignTM AERO Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Archetypal Imagery Corp. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd BRADLEY The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Circa Lighting Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

S UITE 10th Fl 424 1500 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 419 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 433 804 1405 802 902 910 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 103 1405 505 809 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

PHON E 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.966.4700 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.602.3455 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 646.766.1011 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.966.4701 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070

DESIGNLUSH DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune Elle W Collection EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller

415 702 1516 806 715 100 420 814 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 1208

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.472.0191 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 212.684.0070

212.532.5360 212.353.0220

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123

212.213.9843 212.684.0776

646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273

212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641

S H OW RO O M Julian Chichester Karkula Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer Kenneth Cobonpue KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture

SUITE 604 419 611 1101 427 1313 806 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 Leftbank Art 609 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Lobel Modern 915 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 Mr. Brown London 604 Munder Skiles 436 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 1209 Odegard Carpets PALECEK 610 Paoli 1110 Pennoyer Newman LLC 416 Phillips Collection 603 Plexi-Craft 914 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Prismatique 1101 PROFILES 1211 Reagan Hayes 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Skyline Contract Group 1106 SMART 1115 Studio A Home 612 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 TK Collections 410 Todd Hase 425 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woven 805 New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 646.293.6622 212.645.2216 212.421.0220 212.679.0300 212.532.5450 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 646.293.6694 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.242.9075 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.717.0149 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.545.0205 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.924.3244 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.658.1922 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006

FA X 917.591.2413 212.421.0230 212.679.5996 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350 646.293.6695 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.242.9078 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.545.0305 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807

212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 646.293.6628 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 212.871.9075 212.871.9085 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 800.876.2120 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 646.964.4838 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


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DIXON CONSOLE

REPRESENTED AT THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER BY

DENNIS MILLER A S S O C I A T E S W W W. D E N N I S M I L L E R . C O M W W W. C H R I S T I A N G R E V S TA D . C O M FEB MAR

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BACKSTORY LET THE SUNSHINE IN (AGAIN)

B y Te d L a m b e r t

T HE BE EKMAN HOT EL B R I N G S A S LE E P I N G 19 T H -C E N TU RY BE AU T Y BACK TO GLO RIO U S LIFE .

Above left: The Beekman Hotel's nine-story atrium. Above right: The Temple Court, in 1895. Below: The Beekman's reception desk.

ew York is full of high-profile buildings that have been renovated, but rarely does such a rescue operation result in a property surpassing its original glamour. The newly opened (September 2016) Beekman Hotel stands apart as one of the most exciting redos in recent memory. The rebirth of Temple Court, a landmarked Financial District jewel, has breathed new life and a spectacular level of taste into what was already a marvel when it first opened its doors in 1881. Of course, the Beekman is not just a makeover; it’s a reinvention. Temple Court was one of the city’s first skyscrapers. Glorious in architectural details such as cast-iron railings, balustrades, and balcony supports decorated with flowers, suns, and coiled dragons, the building housed only attorneys’ offices at first. Later, it became home to journalists, publishers, and more creative types. In recent years, in a neglected state, the site hosted editorial photo shoots and runway shows, its peeling paint and rusted ironwork providing an eerie backdrop for avant-garde fashion. The transformation team was led by Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel, Architects. First came the restoration of the building, followed by its conversion into a 287-room hotel. The crowning glory of Temple Court has always been its nine-story atrium, capped by an enormous pyramid-shaped skylight, now brought back to gleaming perfection. You can’t help but crane your neck skyward and feast on the marvelous sight of light pouring down, just as it did when the streets outside held horse-drawn carriages, four years before Karl Benz patented the combustion engine automobile. The stunning, sophisticated, and eclectic interior design by Martin Brudnizki Design Studio combines vintage and bespoke details, blending contemporary and historical elements into a posh yet comfortable

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atmosphere that recalls the age of grand ocean liners. A playful collection of art is displayed on the walls of the hotel’s public and private rooms, boasting archival photographs and modern works, sometimes blending the two. The superstar roster extends to culinary offerings at the Beekman, with two spaces, Fowler & Wells and The Bar Room, operated by Tom Colicchio, in addition to 24-hour room service and event catering. A third restaurant, Augustine, from Keith McNally, is a French-style brasserie open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Modern amenities like a dual-level fitness center, and high-speed Wi-Fi and Bluetooth sound systems in each room suit modern travelers, but you can still get a complimentary print copy of the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal or The Financial Times if you want to put away the laptop or iPad for a while. In toto, the achievement is remarkable. The Beekman feels as though it’s always been there. Well, naturally—because it has.


Inside back cover

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K R A VE T® 2017

kravet

Back cover

JAN SHOWERS 82

FABRICS

FURNITURE

TRIMMINGS

WALLCOVERINGS

CARPETS

CURATEDKRAVET

KRAVET.COM

Array Magazine, spring 2017  

Array Magazine - Spring 2017 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offic...

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