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Page 11

CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Looking back at Italian Futurism, celebrating 1930s fashions, peering behind Japanese screens, and remembering the beginnings of AIDS activism. In the Shadows Presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Shadows Took Shape is a dynamic exhibition exploring contemporary art through the lens of Afrofuturist aesthetics. Coined in 1994 by writer Mark Dery in his essay “Black to the Future,” Afrofuturism refers to a creative and intellectual genre that emerged as a strategy to explore science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, and Pan-Africanism. With roots in the avant-garde musical stylings of sonic innovator Sun Ra, Afrofuturism has been used by artists, writers, and theorists as a way to prophesize the future, redefine the present, and reconceptualize the past. The exhibition features more than 60 works of art that chart the evolution of Afrofuturist tendencies by an international selection of established and emerging practitioners. The 29 artists featured in The Shadows Took Shape work in a wide variety of media, including photography, video, painting, drawing, sculpture, and multimedia installation. Through March 9. The Studio Museum in Harlem, 144 West 125th Street, 212.864.4500, studiomuseum.org.

Left: Cyrus Kabiru, Nubian Mask (from the “C-STUNNER” series), 2013. Mixed media (perforated scrap metal, glass beads, and plastic bottle caps), courtesy of the artist. Center: William Villalongo, Sista Ancesta, (E. Kelly/D.R. of Congo, Pende), 2012. Archival pigment print, courtesy of the artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, New York. Right: Derrick Adams, WE><HERE, 2013. Wood, aluminum, acrylic paint, and fabric, courtesy of the artist. Photo: Adam Reich. Top, left: Fortunato Depero, Heart Eaters (Mangiatori di cuori), 1923. Painted wood, 36.5 x 23 x 10 centimeters. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Vittorio Calore. Top, right: Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (Forme uniche della continuità nello spazio), 1913 (cast 1949). Bronze, 121.3 x 88.9 x 40 centimeters. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Lydia Winston Malbin. © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image Source: Art Resource, New York. Bottom: Giacomo Balla, Abstract Speed + Sound (Velocità astratta + rumore), 1913–14. Oil on millboard in artist’s painted frame. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Ciao, Futurism The Guggenheim Museum is hosting Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe, the first comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism in the U.S. This multidisciplinary exhibition examines the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its conclusion at the end of World War II. The chronological exhibition includes more than 300 works that were made between 1909 and 1944. To convey the Futurists’ myriad artistic languages as they evolved over a 35-year period, the exhibition integrates multiple disciplines in section, representing not only painting and sculpture, but also architecture, design, ceramics, fashion, film, photography, advertising, freeform poetry, publications, music, theater, and performance. February 21–September 1. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, 212.423.3500, guggenheim.org.

The Age of Elegance The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology’s exhibit, Elegance in an Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s, celebrates the most innovative and beautifully designed clothing made in the 20th century. A time of grand transformations, fashion truly began to reflect the streamlined art modern aesthetic in the 1930s. Despite the crippling financial crisis and dire political environment, innovations in textile production transformed what was possible for couturiers: looms were wider, dyeing vats were larger, and fibers were more tightly twisted. New materials allowed dressmakers to rethink and refine draping techniques, while featherweight textiles lent their garments new suppleness and flexibility. Menswear tailoring innovations in London and Naples paralleled breakthroughs in haute couture draping in Paris as well as custom design in New York, Havana, and Shanghai. Hollywood also played a role in defining and popularizing the glamorous new look. The first section of the exhibition displays active wear. The second section examines simultaneous developments in men’s tailoring and women’s couture from around the world. The third section of the exhibition displays the dramatic and varied formal wear of the decade. February 7–April 19. The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, 227 West 27th Street, 212.217.7999, fitnyc.edu/museum. From left: 1) HélèneYrande, negligee ensemble, coral and peach pleated silk chiffon, 1932, France. The Museum at FIT, Gift of Sophie Gimbel. 2) Gardner and Wooley LTD, smoking jacket, green velvet, satin, 1936, London. Collection of Alan Bennett, Davies and Son. 3) McGregor, man’s beach robe, cream printed cotton, circa 1935–1940. The Museum at FIT. Man's swimsuit, wool knit, circa 1929. The Museum at FIT, Gift of Mike Dykeman. FEB MAR

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2014

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Profile for Array Magazine, Inc

Array Magazine, Spring 2014  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

Array Magazine, Spring 2014  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

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