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Jeffrey ALAN Marks California Casual

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Mobile Luxury CHANGO & CO.

Feathers Their Nest

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The quietest, most efficient ceiling fan is now the smartest. Big Ass Fans® reinvented the ceiling fan with the silent, hand-balanced and energy-efficient Haiku®. In fact, Haiku holds the top 11 ENERGY STAR® rankings for efficiency, and its patented LED module offers 16 unique brightness settings. Winner of more than 25 international design awards, Haiku brings both form and function to the ceiling fan. With the introduction of SenseME™ technology – an on-board computer and array of sensors designed to automate your fan’s speed for effortless comfort – Haiku is now one Smart Ass™ fan.

Visit bigassfans.com/INFO and use promo code AR1014 to receive a free Haiku info kit.

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New York’s premier cabinetry showroom for kitchens, baths, and all of the rooms throughout your home. 200 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1511, New York, NY 10016 t. 212.686.2016 • f. 212.686.2048 • www.inhousekbh.com

Cabinetry • Appliances • Countertops • Decorative hardware


Features

Volume 11 Issue 3

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California Casual By Cathy Whitlock The designs of Jeffrey Alan Marks.

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Luxury for the Mobile Citizen By Cathy Whitlock A new oasis in Times Square.

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Building & Feathering a Nest By Catherine McHugh Chango & Co. set up home and office in a historic Brooklyn brownstone.

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Departments

Volume 11 Issue 3

8 STYLERADAR What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

11 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Strutting with peacocks up the Hudson, taking tea in Princeton, checking in with Chuck Jones, and celebrating the winter holidays at Lincoln Center.

14 BOOKS&BLOGS By Cathy Whitlock

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Books from a few first-time designers-turned-authors are among this fall's offerings. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Jim Lochner From a bird’s-eye view to under the sea, designs that are off (and on) the wall.

38 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Jim Lochner From ancient Mexico to the Jazz Age and beyond, you’ll find a mixture of scaffolding, Scandanavia, and skulls.

40 GALLERY

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Great grains. Fabulous textures in wood, stone, glass, and fabrics. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS 2014 Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The tenants of the Brill Building were at the forefront of American music for nearly 40 years.

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Array Magazine, Inc. 261 Madison Avenue 9th Floor New York, NY 10016 Phone 212.929.2733 Fax 212.929.0983 arrayny.com ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

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Editorial Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copy Editor

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2014 All rights reserved The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

Contributors Michele Keith Catherine McHugh

New York Design Center

on the cover Jeffrey Alan Marks photographed by Douglas Friedman. 6

James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Alana Moskowitz Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing Coordinator/Digital Content Manager Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager Sara Marsh Concierge


letter from the editor

Dear Readers, Modern life is a balancing act, and we are all called upon to manage our private lives with our public personas, work with play, creativity and practicality. This issue offers several diverse examples of what it takes to strike that sort of equilibrium. The M in the name of Amsterdam-based hotel chain citizenM stands for mobility, and their new Times Square location captures the fluidity of modern life and connectivity. Rooms are designed for work as much as relaxation, and the common areas and soaring lobby area create a cozy refuge while inviting the Crossroads of the World right inside, blurring the lines between indoors and outdoors. It’s a perfect place for those seeking a haven right in the center of everything (Luxury for the Mobile Citizen, p. 26). In building a home for herself and her husband as well as a home base for her firm, Chango & Co., designer Susana Simonpietri placed herself at the crux of three old Brooklyn neighborhoods. A real estate pioneer at the start of her multi-year project to transform a classic old townhouse back into a single family home and office, her gamble paid off big. The result is now a showplace for her mix of historical detail and relaxed modernism (Building & Feathering a Nest, p. 30). Meanwhile, on the opposite coast, the subject of our cover story, Jeffrey Alan Marks, blends contemporary ease with classic architecture (California Casual, p. 18) in everything from luxurious homes and rustic getaway cottages to eateries frequented by bold-faced names. Marks and his Santa Monica-based design firm, JAM, bring a restrained, light touch to all they undertake. While filling projects with interesting objects and unexpected combinations, Marks always leaves room for those who will inhabit them. He knows that lives continue to expand to fill any empty spaces. Here’s to finding that perfect balance in all things. Happy reading!

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

Robert Couturier (Robert Couturier Inc.) “Love the latest Fortuny floor lamp as they remind me of Eileen Gray—‘spot’-on for my new book coming out from Rizzoli this fall.” Available at 1stdibs.com.

Laura Kirar (Laura Kirar Design) “Before you have to stop, drop, and roll on your brand new cowhide rug, make sure you're prepared with some stylish safety accessories!” Available at fire-design.fr.

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Tamara Eaton (Tamara Eaton Design LLC) “These clear lucite boxes mix the trendy vibe of acrylic and the organic nature of agate and onyx. As a single box or a cluster, the Adorado boxes from RabLabs are a perfect for a coffee table, bathroom, or nightstand.”


Thom Filicia (Thom Filicia Inc.) Robert Passal (Robert Passal Interior & Architectural Design) “I have to confess: I have such a soft spot for colored glass (particularly cobalt). There really is no better way to energize a tepid table setting and I think the confidence it takes to forego the classic clear for a more whimsical alternative is infinitely appealing. The next time you invite friends and family over to dine, consider setting the table with tinted glass water goblets (like these curvy beauties from Billy Cotton) or using a colorful centerpiece (like this handsome devil designed by the iconic Ettore Sottsass).”

“Just as the seasons change, so should your interior. Pillows and throws are an easy and impactful way to transition from summer to fall!” Available at Sedgwick & Brattle.

Barry Goralnick (Goralnick Architecture & Design) “I have designed dream kitchens for clients who dare to cook for Eric Ripert of Le Bernadin. But most people in New York just need a good place to shake up a good martini. These pendants from my Visual Comfort collection are great over an island. They provide light so you can measure the least whisper of Vermouth.”

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Strutting with peacocks up the Hudson, taking tea in Princeton, checking in with Chuck Jones, and celebrating the winter holidays at Lincoln Center. IDENTIFY YOURSELF The Queens Museum is presenting Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art, an exploration of changing attitudes toward self-expression, attribution, and identity in contemporary Tibetan art. Traditional Tibetan culture placed little emphasis on individuality or artistic self-expression. Art adhered to a formal system of production to support religious culture. But in the global contemporary market, the creativity of the individual has become the primary basis by which we produce, interpret, and consume art. Within the new social reality, as part of the People's Republic of China, art is becoming a vital medium of self-expression for Tibetans. Artists are increasingly focused on the experience of the individual and a cautious 21st-century visual language steeped in irony, metaphor, and allusion has fully emerged. Rather than proposing a defined set of answers, the exhibition seeks to provide opportunities for curatorial, artistic, and audience discovery. The artists explore themes of identity and self-expression through various mediums and their individual styles. Through January 4, 2015. Queens Museum, New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, 718.592.9700, queensmuseum.org. Robert Gober, Untitled, 1994–1995.
Wood, beeswax, brick, plaster, plastic, leather, iron, charcoal, cotton socks, electric light, and motor. 47 3/8 x 47 x 34 inches. Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Photo: D. James Dee, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery.

Artist and Curator The Museum of Modern Art is presenting Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, the first large-scale survey of the 59-year-old artist’s career to take place in the U.S. Gober rose to prominence in the 1980s with deceptively simple sculptures of everyday objects—sinks, playpens, beds, and doors. In the ’90s, his practice evolved from single works to theatrical, room-sized environments. The exhibition includes around 130 works across several mediums, including individual sculptures, immersive sculptural environments, and a distinctive body of drawings, prints, and photographs. Gober, a curator himself, collaborated closely with the museum on the loosely chronological presentation, which highlights themes and motifs that emerged in the early 1980s and continue to inform his work today. Through January 18, 2015. Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 212.708.9400, moma.org.

Left: Kesang Lamdark, Dorge Drakkten and Kiss, 2012, Melted plastic, metallic foil, and acrylic diptych. 94,5 x 50.75 inches. Right: Benchung, Ascetic, 2012, Acrylic canvas. 47 1/4 x 31 1/2 inches. Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection.

STRUT & SHINE

Jessie Arms Botke, Black Peacock, 1930. Oil on canvas on board. 32 inches x 26 inches. Courtesy of Associated Artists, Southport, Connecticut.

The Hudson River Museum is presenting Strut: The Peacock and Beauty in Art, the first scholarly survey of the peacock in art, exploring the world’s fascination with this most glamorous of birds. Strutting about with its sapphire-blue and emerald-green feathers, the peacock has symbolized all things vain and beautiful in centuries of painting, sculpture, in books and myth, and on clothes that swirl and shine like the iridescent bird itself. Highlights include Robert Henri’s full-length portrait of Ruth St. Denis in the Peacock Dance (1913), William Baxter Palmer Closson’s Feeding the Peacocks (1910), and Aubrey Beardsley’s The Peacock Skirt, created for Oscar Wilde’s Salome. Peacock feathers are extracted into beguiling geometric patterns in the lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany and gilded Crown Derby porcelains. Through January 18, 2015. Hudson River Museum of Art, 511 Warburton Avenue, Yonkers, 914.963.4550, hrm.org. OCT NOV

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CultureCalendar Representing Brooklyn

Top, pictured from left to right: New outer box for Chigusa, late 19th–early 20th century, Meiji period, Japan. Wood with brown stain, cotton cord. Middle storage box (former outer box) for Chigusa, 1615–1868, Edo period, Japan. Cedar stained with persimmon tannin, iron fittings. Inner storage box for Chigusa with nesting tray used to store documents and accoutrements, 1615–1868, Edo period, Japan. Lacquered paulownia wood with copper reinforcements and silver lacquer inscription on lid, figured paper lining, cotton cord. Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Reflecting the rich creative diversity of Brooklyn, Crossing Brooklyn: Art from Bushwick, Bed-Stuy, and Beyond at the Brooklyn Museum presents works by 35 Brooklyn-based artists and collectives. While acknowledging Brooklyn’s heightened profile, the exhibit seeks to present a multigenerational picture that recognizes the borough’s long-established role as a creative center. The exhibition and related programming take place in the galleries and on the grounds of the Museum, as well as off-site in the borough’s streets, waterways, and other public spaces. Emphasizing artistic practices that engage with the world, the exhibition includes artists who aim to expand their focus and have an impact beyond the studio and the museum. Alongside the drawings, paintings, photographs, sculptures, installations, videos, and performances are several site-specific works. Through January 4, 2015. Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, 718.638.5000, brooklynmuseum.org.

Bottom: Chigusa, tea leaf storage jar with mouth cover and ornamental cords, mid-13th to mid-14th century, Southern Song or Yuan dynasty, probably Guangdong Province, China. Stoneware with iron glaze. Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution. Above: Nobutaka Aozaki, Smiley Bag Portrait, 2011. Participatory performance. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Yuriko Katori.

Teatime in New Jersey The Chigusa and the Art of Tea in Japan exhibit at Princeton University Art Museum features an extraordinary tea-leaf storage jar named Chigusa. Though made in China in the late 13th or 14th century, it spent the next 700 years in Japan, where it was used as a jar for storing tea leaves while gaining prestige and value as a Chinese jar, karamono chatsubo. Chigusa’s name, chosen from court poetry, distinguishes it from all other tea jars and helped trace its documentation through the centuries as well as its status as an unrivaled object within the Japanese tea tradition. Centering on this single object, the exhibition will explore the ways of appreciating, displaying, using, and documenting this prestigious Chinese antique turned tea jar. Through February 1, 2015. Princeton University Art Museum, McCormick Hall, Princeton, 609.258.3788, artmuseum.princeton.edu/art.

Left: Sebastião Salgado, In the Upper Xingu region of Brazil’s Mato Grosso state, a group of Waura Indians fish in the Puilanga Lake near their village. Brazil, 2005. Right: Sebastião Salgado, View of the junction of the Colorado and the Little Colorado from the Navajo territory. Arizona, 2010. 12

Left: Nina Katchadourian, Topiary (from the Seat Assignment series), 2012. C-print, 45 1⁄2 x 35 1⁄2 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery.

IN THE BEGINNING . . . The International Center of Photography (ICP) is the first venue in the U.S. to exhibit Genesis, a project by world-renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado. Curated and designed by Lélia Wanick Salgado, this multi-year survey draws together more than 200 black-and-white photographs of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes, and indigenous peoples, with the goal of raising public awareness about environmental and climate change. Salgado’s quest to capture nature in its original state began in 2004. During his travels across the globe, he documented arctic and desert landscapes, tropical rainforests, marine and other wildlife, and communities still living according to ancestral traditions. The exhibition is divided into five geographical regions—Sanctuaries, Planet South, Africa, Amazonia and Pantanal, and Northern Spaces. Through January 11, 2015. International Center of Photography, 1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street, 212.857.0000, icp.org.


What’s Up, Chuck? Museum of the Moving Image is hosting What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, celebrating the animation director/artist responsible for some of the most enduringly popular cartoons of all time. In a career spanning three decades, Jones directed more than 300 animated films, featuring the wisecracking Bugs Bunny, the exasperated Daffy Duck, and a host of other characters, including Pepé Le Pew, Wile E. Coyote, and the Road Runner. Featuring 23 of Jones’ animated films, interactive experiences, and more than 125 original sketches and drawings, storyboards, production backgrounds, animation cels, and photographs, the exhibit demonstrates how Jones and his collaborators worked together to produce some of the greatest cartoons ever made. His creative genius, the influences Jones drew on from the fine arts and popular culture, and the legacy of his work on the field of animation is also featured. Through January 19, 2015. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Queens, 718.777.6888, movingimage.us.

Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square kicks off with a tree lighting ceremony that includes live music (left) at New York City’s Upper West Side’s Tree Lighting at Broadway and 63rd Street, which draws hundreds of revelers (right). Photo: Lincoln Square Business Improvement District.

WINTER LIGHT New York City's largest outdoor holiday festival, the 15th Annual Winter's Eve at Lincoln Square, will be held on Monday, December 1st, to kick off the season. Hosted by the Lincoln Square Business Improvement District, this year’s highly anticipated event is expected to attract thousands of people to the Lincoln Square area and light up the entire Upper West Side. There will be over 20 live performance areas, more than 30 restaurants offering tastings, children’s activities, and more. The events begin with the Upper West Side’s Tree Lighting ceremony at Broadway and 63rd Street, which will be held rain, snow, or shine. The Parks Department will run a free trolley up and down Broadway during the event. Admission to Winter’s Eve is free (there are nominal costs for food tastings). December 1st only. Broadway from Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle to 68th Street, 212.581.3774 (Lincoln Center Business Improvement District), winterseve.org.

Left: Mourning Dress, 1902-1904. Black silk crape, black chiffon, black taffeta. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of The New York Historical Society. Photo: Karin L. Willis, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Middle: Evening Dress, 1861. Black moiré silk, black jet, black lace. Lent by Roy Langford. Photo: Karin K. Willis, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Right: The “Black Ascot,” 1910. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Getty Images.

Widows’ Weeds

Top: Drawing of Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. Courtesy of The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. Bottom: Film still, Beep Beep (1952). Courtesy Warner Bros.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is presenting Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire. This Costume Institute exhibition will explore the aesthetic development and cultural implications of mourning fashions in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Approximately 30 ensembles, many of which are being exhibited for the first time, will reveal the impact of high-fashion standards on the sartorial dictates of bereavement rituals as they evolved over a century. The chronological exhibition will feature mourning dress from 1815 to 1915, primarily from The Costume Institute's collection, including mourning gowns worn by Queen Victoria and Queen Alexandra. The calendar of bereavement's evolution and cultural implications will be illuminated through women's clothing and accessories, showing the progression of appropriate fabrics from mourning crape to corded silks, and the later introduction of color with shades of gray and mauve. October 21, 2014–February 1, 2015. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, 212.535.7710, metmuseum.org.

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Books&Blogs Elements of Style: Designing A Home & A Life

Robert Couturier: Designing Paradises

Jean-Louis Deniot: Interiors

Design in the Hamptons

Erin Gates Simon & Schuster October 2014 336 pages, $35

Robert Couturier Rizzoli September 2014 224 pages, $60

Diane Dorrans Saeks Rizzoli September 2014 288 Pages, $65

Anthony Iannacci The Monacelli Press September 2014 320 Pages, $75

Rising interior designer Erin Gates is publishing her first book Elements of Style: Designing A Home & A Life. Based on her uber-popular go-to blog of the same name, the book is chock full of design inspiration and advice on how to decorate a home that truly reflects your personality and style. More than just a design tome of beautifully illustrated interiors (there are those as well), Gates gives an intensely personal account of her personal struggles, renovation disasters, and secrets for starting such a successful blog. The book is organized by room by room and features both Erin’s home as well as her clients. From choosing a sofa to decorating a nursery, lots of practical advice abounds. And the extensive Resource and Shopping Guide at the end of the book is highly useful for any designer’s Rolodex.

A favorite designer of ours (he was featured in an Array cover story last summer), it is high time the acclaimed international architect and interior designer Robert Couturier wrote a book. The New York-based designer’s work blends Old World elegance with a continental aesthetic and witty sensibilities. No stranger at mixing treasures from different eras (pairing a Louis XVI commode with a 1960s lamp is not uncommon), his work has garnered accolades and a legion of fans. Designing Paradises opens with a tour of the Architectural Digest 100 designer’s country retreat in Kent, Connecticut, which is filled with his vast collection of European art, furniture, and decorative objects. Neoclassical architecture is the order of the day. Other projects of inspiration include an English manor, Mexican villa, and contemporary apartments.

Jean-Louis Deniot: Interiors represents the first book about the designer whose classical interiors represent the epitome of French style in the spirit of Jean-Michel Frank. Design author and Style Saloniste blogger Diane Dorrans Saeks profiles the international architect, who started creating models of miniature structures at age ten. Deniot is already being compared to Jacques Grange and Alberto Pinto, and his process is akin to a fashion designer creating couture. The Paris-based designer’s work layers a variety of textures and materials with flea market finds and contemporary art. His restrained Neoclassical approach to décor is devoid of formality and trends which makes him a sought-after interior designer from New Delhi to Beverly Hills. Deniot’s work can also be found through to-the-trade antiques at his gallery in France, and his furniture line with George Smith and Jean de Merry. The book features a refreshing look at a sophisticated classical style synonymous with a Deniot interior. His credo is one every designer should follow— “architecture comes first, paintings and sculpture, furniture third, fabrics last.”

Design in the Hamptons offers that rare peek between the hedges of homes in one of America’s most exclusive and prestigious beach retreats. As a sequel to his Designing the Hamptons: Portraits of Interiors, author Anthony Iannacci features the work of design luminaries such as Thad Hayes, Todd Merrill, John Barman, Jonathan Adler, Roman & Williams, and Joe D’Urso in what can be coined “Hamptons Style.” The book features the designs and architecture of 19 private houses that personify the best in oceanside living. Many of the residences are occupied by the designers themselves, and combine both the history of the tony beach towns and modern, personalized spaces against a backdrop of the sea. A variety of architectural and design styles are represented, from cozy cottages to grand manors and vibrant looks to classic neutral color schemes.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Books from a few first-time designers-turned-authors are among this fall's offerings.

Simplicity

Veranda: A Passion for Living: Houses of Style and Inspiration

Simplifying Fabulous

Cococozy

Nancy Braithwaite Rizzoli October 2014 296 Pages, $50

Carolyn Englefield Hearst Books October 2014 288 Pages, $60

Robin Baron simplifyingfabulous.com

Coco cococozy.com

Fall is filled with “first” books for interior designers. Next up is acclaimed Atlanta designer Nancy Braithwaite whose work has graced the covers of shelter magazines for the past four decades. Touted as a “striking tutorial in the power of the simplicity of design,” the beautifully illustrated book does not disappoint. While Braithwaite’s work runs the gamut from art deco to country (depending on the client, of course), the common thread throughout her designs is a level of luxury minimalism that can be found in her use of color and repetition of elements. Full of information and inspiration, the book highlights the three styles—country, classic, and contemporary—and how to achieve them. Case studies from her portfolio range from a seaside retreat in South Carolina’s Kiawah Island to her country house in Atlanta.

Author Carolyn Englefield worked as Veranda’s European editor for 13 years where she covered some of the most incredible interiors on the Continent. As the magazine’s Interiors Editor, the talented author is considered to have one of the best eyes for detail in the business. Veranda: A Passion for Living features an insider’s view of 30 stunning homes from France and Italy to Belgium and Sweden. Axel Vervoordt, Christian Liaigre, Kathryn Ireland, and Jacques Grange are just a few of the international tastemakers whose work graces the pages. Combining personality and passion, the designers share their tips on creating sumptuous interiors that reflect the owners’ voice and style. Fans of the popular shelter magazine will not be disappointed as the homes chosen reflect the elegance and beauty of interiors we have come to expect in Veranda.

While thousands of design blogs dot the Internet landscape and often cancel each other out, Simplifying Fabulous caught our eye at Array. The creative work of New York interior designer Robin Baron, the blog is a great source for design inspiration, trend forecasting, and in her words, offers “a peek behind the multifaceted curtains of the interior design world.” And more than just an interior design blog, Baron also fuses information from the worlds of fashion and pop culture, all with her trademark credo “confidence begins at home.” Urging readers to empower themselves through décor, the frequent HGTV star notes, “When you feel good about your home, you feel good about your life.” One of my favorite segments is “Fab Friday” where she interviews some of the biggest names in the interior design industry such as Elle Décor’s Editor in Chief Michael Boodro, designers Barbara Barry and Vicente Wolf, and bloggers from P.S. I Made This and Belle Maison.

Design enthusiast turned übersuccessful blogger—who goes by single name of Coco—started a “little décor and interior design blog” several years ago while keeping a day job that requires a “suit.” Based in Los Angeles, Coco admits she lives a double life of sorts—executive by day, interior design junkie by night. The blog, which has garnered a huge following, is a “cozy” tutorial on how to make your home beautiful and chic with a sense of style. While many toil away on their blogs with no monetary gain, Cococozy’s successful posts have turned into gold. She is now designing a line of candles, accessories, rugs, pillows, and throws that are available to the trade and consumer. Inspired by her some of her travels, the line is fresh and contemporary with bold, textured patterns, and a few linen and grey tones mixed in. (One of my favorites—her quatrefoil pattern rug in peacock and ivory.) And if her blog is good enough for superstar Katy Perry, then it’s good enough for me.

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Trove

By Jim Lochner

From a bird’s-eye view to under the sea designs that are (and on) off the wall.

01 Whale of a Tail Spanish artist Maximo Riera has created a striking set of animal-inspired chairs. Each richly upholstered black leather piece is made from compressed foam sections of high-dense polyurethane and contains an internal metallic frame, which holds the structure and weight of the composition. Each piece is manufactured to order, hand-built and hand-painted by a team of over 30 professionals. The Animal Chair Collection is a limited edition project and only 20 pieces of each chair will be produced. In addition to the Whale and Octopus chairs (shown), other animals available in the collection include Beetle, Rhino, Walrus, Toad, Elephant, and Hippopotamus. Prices range from approximately $53,000–120,000. maximoriera.com.

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GAME ON The Tetris Chair’s playful design is inspired by the classic videogame and Deconstructivist architecture. Composed of five pieces made of recycled materials, this unique piece of furniture is reminiscent of the videogame translated into 3D, inviting you to become another piece of the puzzle. Also available in black and white. 36 inches x 27 inches x 27 inches. $3,000 ecofirstart.com.

03 SHELL SHOCK Created using a mathematical program and origami techniques, this beautiful Mendori Lamp is Japanese fashion icon Issey Miyake’s first lamp design. Made in Italy out of PET fibers sourced from plastic bottles, the gentle spirals of this seashell lampshade display the same tasteful elegance as Miyake’s pleated clothing designs. 17.5 inches x 19 inches x 19.75 inches. $1,200 momastore.org.

04 UP LINKS These hi-tech cufflinks deliver cutting-edge connectivity to any mobile office. One cufflink houses a 2GB USB Flash drive to store digital files, while the second serves as a personal Wi-Fi hotspot for laptops, smartphones, tablets, and other wireless devices. Impress your coworkers at your next meeting, or use the cufflinks to discreetly avoid annoying additional Wi-Fi fees. Router is compatible with Windows and Mac. 7/8 inches x 3/4 inches. $249.95 brookstone.com.

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Balls In Your Court You’ll have a ball arranging the Feel Seating System Deluxe. Made of 120 soft foam balls covered in a special stretch fabric, the oversized dimensions of the Feel Seating provide plenty of room for couples, families, or just yourself. Mold it, fold it, scroll it, or roll it into whatever shape you desire. Available in red, blue, brown, and grey. 86 inches x 70 inches x 8 inches. $7,950 nimicausa.com

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ON THE FLY E.T., drone home! This Flying Bicycle will give you a bird’s eye view of the world. The para-wing combines with a powerful two-stroke gasoline engine to power the craft’s three-bladed carbon fiber propeller for airspeeds up to 25 mph. The craft is designed to cruise at altitudes below 4,000 feet with a range of approximately 75 miles from a full tank. It can also be used as a conventional bike on the ground and folds to fit in the trunk of your car for easy transportation. 8 1/2 feet x 4 feet x 5 feet. $45,000 hammacher.com.

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Foos Paradise This line of beautiful Cristallino foosball tables gives the classic table game a touch of elegance. The case is made of low iron crystal glass, with a crystal playing field and aluminum players, handles, and accessories. The playing fields come in black, green, and transparent. A 24-carat goldplated limited edition is also available. 29.1 inches x 47.2 inches x 36.2 inches. Prices begin around $15,700. teckell.com.

08 GET ReeL Designed by Breck Armstrong, the Film Reel Side Table brings a touch of Hollywood glamour to any room. Made with an original 1930s aluminum 35mm film reel sandwiched between two sheets of glass, the table rests on a steel base made of salvaged gear parts. The side handle allows the table to be adjusted to a height of 19 to 26 inches. 15 inches diameter (with glass 20 inches). $850 uncommongoods.com.

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California CASUAL The Designs of Jeffrey Alan Marks

It

appears the roots of interior designer Jeffrey Alan Marks’ signature style can be traced to his days as a model in Paris and Milan coupled with schooling at London’s Inchbald School of Design. His trademark California casual interiors infused with sophisticated European accents has permanently placed him on the map as one of the most interesting designers working today.

Pale blue walls and furnishings reflect the serene setting of a pool house in Los Angeles. 18


Written by Cathy Whitlock Photography by Douglas Friedman

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Top left: A Swedish rococo grandfather clock and Gustauvian bench is just a few of the worldly elements that comprise the design of the main hallway. Bottom left (house): Architect Thomas Proctor designed the perfectly symmetrical and classical American house in Brentwood. Bottom right: Available through the New York Design Center's Palecek showroom in Suite 610, the Green Oaks Pendant light is intricately woven with rattan and natural rope.

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Vintage American lead lanterns and benches, and campaign chairs by Richard Wrightman were used for the outdoor dining area.

“My European experience is fundamental to my fabric, my furniture, and the many houses I design around the world,” says the Santa Monica-based designer. “I immersed myself in the culture of every location throughout

Europe and Asia that modeling took me. I still draw from these experiences every day.” Marks’ penchant for timeless design, sourcing unique elements from around the world, and his keen eye for combining “subdued traditional elegance with contemporary edgy accents” are mainstays in his work.

He began his design firm JAM 16 years ago, decorating residences all over the U.S. and U.K., along with commercial projects such as restaurants and retail stores. Perhaps one of his most notable designs was for The Tavern, a Brentwood spot known for its light-filled atrium and power lunch. “The first thing I do when I visit a new city is look up the best restaurants and check out their interiors,” Marks says. “I have always been a great lover of food and exploring different restaurants throughout the world. It was one of my aspirations as a designer to do a restaurant

and when Tavern came up, I jumped at the opportunity. Now my creation The Larder at Tavern is expanding all over California.” His restaurant design received a following and influenced a young couple that wanted a “Tavern”-like feel for their classical American home located just up the street from Marks. “This scheme started as a balancing act between traditional architecture, the client’s existing antiques, and the couple’s youthful disposition,” Marks notes in his book The Meaning of Home. “She wanted Tavern, and

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Opposite page: The octagonal ceiling provides a spectacular focal point in the library.

This page: Top: Contemporary designer Lindsey Adelman’s Knotty Bubbles chandelier is balanced with a primitive bowl and French metal bread trays in the dining area. Middle: Black granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, and white tile and cabinets provide a clean simplicity to the kitchen’s design. Right: Available through the New York Design Center's Palecek showroom in Suite 610, the Green Oaks Pendant from the designer's line provides both function and a conversation piece.

because I instantly liked her, I said that I would oblige, although I know that you cannot copy and paste a design scheme from one space to another.”

reflective metallic-backed grass cloth. The client “still jokes that she prefers Tavern,” Marks humorously notes, “but now their friends call and ask me to copy their home.”

Influenced by the outdoor California lifestyle, Marks started with a light color palette, placing “cheeky pieces of art, a playful light, a rug with my signature fish motif” as accents. The designer “underdecorated” the house on purpose so the home could expand as the tastes of the clients and their collections followed suit. Sleek yet comfortable sofas from the designer’s own collection are symmetrically placed in the living room that showcases a collection of American ceramics from the 1960s and ’70s. The simple white linen curtains with a geometric applique in bold electric blue give the windows added interest while the walls are covered with a

Marks’ use of color is also a signature of his work. “I don’t necessarily use a color palette when designing,” he details. “I begin with bold colors and vary their intensities. This process creates a rich color scheme and not unlike a watercolor painting.” While his bathrooms and kitchens favor an all-white scheme, his interiors use pops of color sparingly. His cozy and comfortable collection designed for A. Rudin can best be described, he says, as furniture for a “tailored beach house.” Perhaps the designs are a nod to an earlier time, as he humorously notes: “My ‘aha’ (design) moment came when I was at Arizona State at my fraternity house in business

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Top left: The bathroom ceiling is painted a pale shade of green to pull in the colors of the outdoors. Top right: A dark stained walnut becomes the main design material for the vanity area. Bottom: The multi-stripe rug balances and anchors the various design elements used in the bedroom.

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school. In those days you didn’t decorate your dorms or fraternity houses like you do these days but I had mine looking like a designer’s pool house!” He uses furniture from A. Rudin in almost all of his projects and has two lines with Palecek as well. Readers and Bravo television fans will no doubt recognize Marks from his stint on the reality show Millionaire Decorator, which depicted the hectic days in the life of a designer and co-starred colleagues Martyn Lawrence Bullard, Kathryn Ireland, Nate Turner, and Mary McDonald. While the popular show is no longer on the air, Marks explains, “I’m very happy living my own reality for now. I’ve been offered many shows in the design arena. You will not see me on TV again unless the show is fresh, lively, and allows me to contribute to the growth of young designers. Unless there is a show that educates and deals with the everyday reality of an interior design firm in a constructive way, I am not interested in portraying designers in a dramatic light.” Named as one of Los Angeles’ most soughtafter designers by The Hollywood Reporter, Marks is content these days to spend his time on construction sites all over the West Coast, designing residential work from the ground up, and working on a sustainable lodge deep in the jungles of Belize.

Right: An Art Deco French bar showcases a collection of green glass demijohns.

Right: An Art Deco French bar showcases a collection of green glass demijohns.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Luxury obile Citizen for

the

A New Oasis in Times Square

The edict from the Amsterdam-based hotel chain citizenM for their first U.S. location in Times Square was clear cut: “design a destination that blends into the local context—architecturally, culturally, and [with] the vibe—and still is typical and recognizable as citizenM.” Such was the task at hand for Erikjan Vermeulen, head of architecture and partner of the architectural and design firm concrete. Considered one of the hottest and trendiest brands in the hotel industry, citizenM faced stiff competition in the already crowded Manhattan hospitality market. How to set yourself apart and still stay true to the brand was just one of the many challenges the team of nine architects and interior designers (also based in Amsterdam) faced for the 83,300-square-foot hotel that opened in April 2014. Associated with affordable luxury (rooms run a mere $200 a night), the citizenM customer is a “mobile citizen of the world” (the M stands for mobile)—think entrepreneurs and business people with a love of technology, and a need for ease and convenience. “In the life of the mobile citizen, work and pleasure merge,” explains Vermeulen. “They work and have meetings in the same places where they relax and meet friends, both at any moment of the

British artist Julian Opie’s Walking People creates a powerful design impact in the hotel lobby. 26


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day.” To accommodate their needs, the design team created a communal space similar to a comfortable, homey living room. “It is a transformational space in which guests can work, meet, eat, drink, and relax. Within one space we try to create different areas and seating configurations so everyone

Left: The floor to ceiling bookcase filled with artwork and objects is extended to the outside seating area. Middle: Function and “less is more” are the order of the day for the interiors. Opposite page: The Times Square hotel marks the first U.S. location for the Dutch hotel chain.

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can do what they want or need to.” This translates into high bar-size tables and stools for active seating, tables for work, and comfortable sofas in a living room setting for relaxation. The designers segmented each area with its own furniture, lighting, materials, and colors. Google Maps images in the carpet designs act as another nod to the mobile citizen.

The living room lobby greets you with a wall of objets d’art (or knickknacks, depending on your perception) from all over the world. British artist Julian Opie’s show-stopping 26-foot installation Walking People, carved out of the elevator’s granite cladding and gold leaf, is both eye-catching and functional as it divides the room in two. “The living room plaza serves as a communal hybrid and culturally expressive space that connects all local and mobile citizens,” says Vermeulen. He also notes that the distinctive ceiling cabinet “is filled to inspire—books to grab and browse through, great pieces of contemporary art, and items related to New York.” Sleek, classically lined furniture from Swiss designer Vitra also act as the centerpiece of the space and provide bold splashes of color. The high-end luxury design elements continue with


artwork and sculptures (many from Vermeulen’s private collection) such as Andy Warhol’s screen print of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands and David LaChappelle’s photographic take on Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper. The hotel also offers high-tech elements such as lobby kiosks with high-speed touchscreens for quick self-service check-in. The rooms are equipped with Samsung Galaxy tablets that control everything from the lighting and blinds (romantic, movies, or party themes) to the room temperature. Guests can even choose the artwork for the room via a digital frame on the wall from the art company Sedition. The citizenM brand also acts as a personality. Vermeulen describes the brand’s character as “fun, playful, worldly, dynamic, multi-disciplinary, and honest,” integrating these qualities into the design. Witty elevator and hallway slogans such as “Welcome to floor 16 which enjoys slightly better views than floor 15” or “citizenM says, ‘Get It Together’” are just a few of the many whimsical touches. Each

of the hotel’s

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(170 Quality and function are the order of the day, and “less is more” trumps clutter. Every square inch is utilized, from under-the-bed storage compartments to the cool cubicle shower, with pre-fab main rooms come in only one size

square feet) and have the same layout.

elements (wet room, bed, and vanity table) and colorful contemporary designs. To create distinction for the exterior, the architects (also known for their work on the Mercedes Benz Museum in Stuttgart) employed several design elements to set apart the space. “By setting back the building from the street, making a small plaza, and by creating a double height space, we have tried to draw the New York dynamics and street life into our building,” says Vermeulen. “This is emphasized by the large canopy, using the same lamps in both the exterior and in the interior, and especially by the 24-foot-high cabinet which runs from the sidewalk and plaza into the rear courtyard.” Other key areas include the panoramic rooftop Cloud Bar and terrace that were created as a “pocket park,” serving as an urban oasis to escape the noise and hustle of the city. The design team utilized lanterns, cabinets filled with plants, a tree-trunk bar, green sofas, picnic tables, and a fireplace to creating a perfect respite from the world down below. With properties in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, London, Glasgow, and Paris, citizenM plans to open another New York hotel later this year on the Lower East Side, as well as further expansion elsewhere in the U.S.

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Building & Feathering

A

Nest

Chango & Co. set up home and office in a historic Brooklyn brownstone.

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By Catherine McHugh

I

n Puerto Rico, the Antillean grackle, a tiny, crow-like bird with iridescent blue feathers, is called the chango. So, as a nod to her heritage and a favorite essay she had read that argued for making it the national bird of Puerto Rico, Susana Simonpietri decided to appropriate it as her newly launched interior design firm’s name and logo.

“It’s a beautiful bird and I always thought the essay was really funny,” she says. “I felt that Chango & Co. rolled nicely off the tongue—and it is much easier to pronounce than my last name!” “Doing the work of ten people,” Simonpietri was the entire company when she started off. And one of her first projects was buying a home from where she could also run her business. Since 2009, Chango & Co. has been perched on a quiet street in what she calls

The library’s bookshelves are home to Susana’s current and previous ambitions, Design and literature.

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Left top: Five antique African ceremonial masks (of over fifty in their collection) are featured prominently above the den sofa. Left middle: A clear amber-colored vinyl album bearing productions credits by Josh Kay, Susana’s partner, sits atop a turntable in the library, evidence of his past as a musician and record label owner. Left bottom: The library shelves serve as an orphanage for valuable artwork, sculptures, wooden saints, and flea market finds. The large red book laying on its side, entitled La Ciudad Infinita, was published by Susana’s mother, an art professor and noted lecturer. Right top: A sculpture of painted cardboard by Costa Rican artist Roberto Lizano, affectionately referred to in the office as “The Pineapple Girls,” adorns the wall next to Susana’s desk. Next page: A large painting by Anna Martén greets visitors in the main entry.

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the Bermuda Triangle of Brooklyn. “We are in Bedford-Stuyvesant but also on the edge of where the neighborhood coincides with Bushwick and Williamsburg,” she explains. “It was a very good investment because all of Bed-Stuy is transforming very quickly.” Simonpietri knows a little something about quick transformations, having gutted and restored her circa-1899 townhouse into a chic home and office in the space of 10 weeks. While she was shopping for apartments at the height of the housing market in 2007, her visiting father circled several brownstones in the newspaper. “These properties all needed a lot of work,” she says, “but I had just finished redoing a huge brownstone in the West Village on Charles Street (that actually used to be Hilary Swank’s) for the owner of Books-A-Million. So I thought, ‘Why don’t I do that for myself?’ So I did.”

This decisiveness has served her well throughout her career. Born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Simonpietri readily admits to an early obsession with Lego building blocks and being teased by her brother for constantly rearranging her room when she was a child. But her path to becoming an interior designer and architect was actually a bit circuitous. “I think it was always in me,” she says. “But for my undergraduate degree I chose comparative literature and modern languages, and I picked up another two languages, other than English and Spanish. That has been very helpful to me in the design world.” Simonpietri began her studies at the University of Puerto Rico, continued them at the University of Warwick in England, and finished at La Sorbonne in Paris. “When I was living in Paris, I totally fell in love with design so I decided to go in that direction.”

Her application to pursue a master’s degree in interior design and architecture was accepted at Pratt Institute and she has never looked back. While working on her master’s at Pratt, Simonpietri worked three jobs—a weekend retail gig in SoHo, an internship at a design firm, and a post at the Pratt library. Before she even earned her degree, Simonpietri had been promoted from intern to junior designer at Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz’s BNOdesign. “That was a great learning experience as they allowed me to escalate very quickly,” she says. “I was doing pretty intense, junior- to mid-level design and I worked with them on the W hotels, as Benjamin had just started doing hospitality design at that point. “I learned everything from the beginning of a project—choosing fabrics, doing conceptual

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The wraparound butcher-block island and exposed ledges, left as easily accessed open shelves, combined with the backyard herb garden, creates the environment of a test kitchen for Susana’s daily culinary experiments.

and schematic drawings and taking them into actual production drawings,” she continues. “I was part of the process of purchasing for everything—ordering for projects and updating budgets. So I got kind of thrown into the deep end of the pool right away—but I swam, so it worked out.” By the time she graduated, Simonpietri had a full-time job as a senior designer. “I don’t know how I got through all of it, but I had a vision in my head of what I wanted to do and I didn’t want to waste any time.” Simonpietri went on to work at Studio GAIA.

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“Although it was a small firm, the projects were immense,” she says. “I was able to take the reins and run with my work. I had the opportunity to work with the head of the company, Ilan Waisbrod, who is a technical genius. I learned so much from him. I can only hope that some of his talent rubbed off on me!” Simonpietri then went to work for South African-born designer Mark Zeff of Zeff Design. “He specialized in high-end residential projects with high-profile clients, including Annie Leibovitz and Hilary Swank,” she says. “When I started there, we were a

firm of 12 and in the three years that I was there, the firm exploded into 75 people. Alan Barr was the VP of the company and he was a genius at hiring. I met an amazingly talented group of people there and made many long-lasting friendships.” But when a previous client approached her about designing a new restaurant, the Mermaid Oyster Bar in the West Village, Simonpietri decided it was time to strike out on her own. “That project was well received but then I started taking on a lot of residential design and we have continued to specialize in that area,”

she explains. “We

do a little bit


of everything now.

I

have explored so many

different ways of designing that anything.

But

I could tackle

our clients who keep coming

back want to get their houses done.”

Perhaps that’s because her own home/office is such a showcase for her talent. “It was in really bad shape when I bought it,” she says. “We knocked a lot down but tried to keep the original integrity of the building—the architectural details, the tin ceiling, and whatever plaster or moldings were intact. It was mostly a restoration project and a very big cleanup to bring it back to its dignity.

“There were three to four layers of tile over concrete over tile,” Simonpietri continues. “The house is from 1899 so it has all this character. And the subflooring of buildings back then was not plywood—it was actual wide wooden planks of pine or oak.” One of the biggest challenges was getting the subflooring refinished. “I brought in five or six different guys and they all looked at me like I was insane because it looked like garbage,” she says. “Finally, one guy said he would do it if I guaranteed to pay him, but he could not warrantee the work. That was fine with me because I knew they were going to

be gorgeous. We stained them in ebony and they look amazing.” At some point, previous owners had split the house into two apartments in an illegal conversion. “We kept the meters separated, just in case we may ever want to convert it back,” Simonpietri explains, “but we opened everything up and returned it to a singlefamily use. We knocked down several walls and got rid of a whole kitchen. So now we have a 20-foot-wide kitchen.” Gleaming white subway tiles cover an entire wall of the kitchen now. “We added floating

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Chango & Co. Visit New York Design Center Creative Director Susana Simonpietri names her favorite items.

1. Throws

2. Baroque

Lamp

3. Hand-shaped Stool

1. I loved these throws from the Stephanie Odegard showroom and the selection of Dhurries they have on display. stephanieodegard.com 2. This Arteriors Baroque lamp has been a long-time favorite. We used it some years ago in a project, which you can see in our online profile. arteriorshome.com 3. We just finished a house in Litchfield, Connecticut, and used two of these matte white, hand-shaped stools made by Studio A in the main entry foyer. They are so playful and the kids of the family adore sitting in them. studioa-home.com

4. Swedish Chair

stainless steel shelves,” she says. “Everything is very open and airy, which is how I think a kitchen in this era would originally have been done.” For the bathrooms, she again thought about what the house would have looked like when it was built. “So I used a white Thassos marble for all the floors and the showers,” she says. “We also used little mosaic tiles. The walls in the bathroom are bead board and white subway tile. I just wanted to keep it really classic and sort of timeless. Of course, I was

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The house was renovated in a record 10 weeks. “Everybody worked really hard and I did a lot of the work myself—the tile work in the bathroom, the back splash in the kitchen,” she says. “I was here on nights and weekends, just rolling up my sleeves. It was fun though.” Furnishing the house took quite a bit longer— about three years. “I lived on one sofa for a while because I couldn’t afford to buy anything,” she says. “I parked it in front of the fireplace and I would sit there enjoying my expensive fireplace on my cheap sofa!” That sofa has since been replaced with Louis-style settees covered in grey linen and a worn-wood coffee table where they store all of the firewood. “Downstairs, we have a 14-foot table with 16 chairs covered in linen,” she says. “We also have these huge hutches that flank that fireplace wall.”

4. This Swedish chair from the 10th floor 1stdibs, especially the Swedish Rococo selection of stripe fabric in red and white, is particularly lovely. 1stdibs.com 5. We loved this whalebone replica from Studio A so much we used it in one of our recent projects. studioa-home.com

director) the brownstone is very much a live/work situation. “The top floor of the house is our private residence and all the bedrooms are there,” she says. “The floor below has a big living room and we have taken over that space with our office. It used to be more contained but it’s been like an octopus growing tentacles and it just keeps spreading everywhere. Downstairs has the huge kitchen and a huge dining area where the interns work. In the basement, we set up our materials library and a utility room and workshop for anything that we need to produce.”

5. Whalebone Re

plica

also thinking about the resale value of the property, so I wanted to make sure it would appeal to a lot of different people.” Simonpietri also opened up all the nonworking fireplaces and had them relined and converted from their original coal operation to wood burning. “It is such a pleasure,” she says. “In the wintertime, we have the fireplaces going all the time.” For Simonpietri and her husband Josh Kay (who is also Chango & Co.’s managing

Simonpietri’s favorite room is the bedroom. “It’s such a pleasure to spend time there,” she says. “The two nightstands are actually dressers and I love the giant painting behind the bed, which is essentially my headboard. It was done by a painter from Costa Rica and it’s such a prized piece. My parents have a giant art collection and they didn’t have a place for it. I knew it very well and was very happy to take it off their hands for them! Plus, it’s also nice that it came from my parents whom I love so much.” “This is the best investment I have ever made, that’s for sure,” Simonpietri concludes. “And now we have this huge property and we run our business out of it. That’s been a blessing because I never had to rent a space, which has kept my overhead lower. Plus, it is also our home and we have our pets here. It’s wonderful.”


Left top/bottom: Master bathroom. Right top: A Fabio Herrera painting serves as a headboard in the master bedroom, flanked by dressersized night tables and antique celadon lamps. Right middle/bottom: Chango staff graffiti fills the walls of the powder room.

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Eats’N’Sleeps Dear Ivring dearirving.com 55 Irving Place

Root & Bone rootnbone.com 200 East 3rd Street (646) 682-7080

Narcissa narcissarestaurant.com 21 Cooper Square (212) 228-3344

Sachi Asian Bistro sachinyc.com 713 2nd Avenue (212) 297-1883

This new cocktail parlor in Gramercy takes its inspiration from Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris. Interior designer Delphine Mauroit incorporated elements of time travel that can be found throughout the four rooms and Meaghan Dorman created cocktails that are meant to be enjoyed in each time period. You can sip drinks in a JFK ’50s-inspired room, featuring black leather chairs, wood paneling, and Marilyn Monroe-themed zebra wallpaper. Other rooms pay homage to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Queen Victoria. A golden countertop, velvet banquets, and beaded curtains highlight the bar, while guests can lose their heads over the gold molding and pink banquets of the Marie Antoinette Room, complete with luxe chandeliers and wall-lined floral patterns. Try the Madame George combo of Irish whiskey, cherry heering, ginger, lime, and club soda or stick with a classic Gibson martini. When you’re ready to order another round or some nibbly bits like sour cherries, just ring the bell that can be found at each table. Reservations are encouraged and can be made only through dearirving.com, though walk-ins are welcome.

Rural America has taken root in Alphabet City. Top Chef alums Jeff McInnis and Janine Booth cater to the East Village neighborhood with seasonal, locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients. Root-based appetizers include corn on the cob (“husk and all”) with roasted rainbow roots, honey parsnip puree, pickled raisins, toasted seeds, and puffed Carolina rice. Carb comforts like McInnis’ Grandma Daisy’s Angel Biscuits, served with honey-roasted chicken jus, fresh thyme, and toasted benne seed-sea salt, and a fried chicken sandwich topped with whiskey maple syrup, pickled green tomato, and watercress, and stuffed into a cheddar cheese waffle make up the “Bread Service” portion of the menu. The “Bucket of Bird” offers four, eight, or twelve pieces of chicken, or try the short rib meat loaf from the “Bigger Plates” section. Classics like banana cream pie and Mississippi mud pie round out the dessert menu. The restaurant was designed by Chef Booth in partnership with McInnis’ brother and sister-in-law, Johnny and Natalia McInnis of SAI Designs, featuring white brick and subway tile throughout. The pickled wood is taken from repurposed NYC scaffolding, and seating includes vintage school chairs and bar stools.

Named after the dairy cow who presides over André Balazs’ Hudson Valley farm, Locusts on Hudson, Balazs and Michelin-starred chef John Fraser bring California cuisine to their new East Village restaurant, with new techniques of roasting, rotisserie, and slow-cooking. Fraser incorporates seasonal, local, and organic produce from Balazs’ farm into his American menu. Cherries and Vermont gouda are mixed into the Narcissa Salad’s farm greens while fall is the perfect time to gnosh on potato gnocchi, served with ramps, parmesan, and fava beans. A variety of meat, fish, and poultry are available for the mains, or try the Carrots Wellington with bluefoot mushrooms, sunchokes, and gremolata if you’re in a vegetarian mood. Desserts include such temptations as roasted fennel cheesecake with grapefruit and chartreuse, and a warm apple tart tatin with goat milk ice cream and pepper caramel. Balazs worked with designer Shawn Hausman to create the simplicity and purity of Scandinavian décor mixed with Shaker elements and subtle Japanese rudiments.

Chefs Andy Yang and Pichet Ong transform familiar Asian classics and street food dishes by using prime ingredients, high heat, and little oil. Everything is made from scratch, and organic and gluten-free whenever possible. The menu items—all designed to be shared—range from dim sum to noodles, sushi and sashimi, and main courses include influences from China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, and Singapore. Organic chicken bones form the broth of the tomato egg drop soup, while chicken lo mein is prepared with house-made hand-pulled noodles and house-made tofu. Other classics include Vietnamese beef stir-fry bo luc lac and lemongrass chicken. Ong created an original dessert menu that features Asian accents, such as flourless chocolate cake with matcha cream and yuzu meringue pie with coconut. These accents can also be found in the drink menu, which incorporates Lapsang souchong Chinese black tea, matcha green tea, jasmine, and other Asian flavors. Phakkapol Pasuthip designed the space with strong vertical lines, natural wood, and red leather banquettes while the bar is built of zinc with a golden patina. The restaurant’s logo, which reflects the number 8, a symbol of good luck, was also incorporated into the design.

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By Jim Lochner

From ancient Mexico to the Jazz Age and beyond, you’ll find a mixture of scaffolding, Scandanavia, and skulls.

The Black Ant blackantnyc.com 60 2nd Avenue (212) 598-0300

élan elannyc.com 43 East 20th Street (646) 682-7105

The Ludlow ludlowhotel.com 180 Ludlow Street (212) 432-1818

Ace Hotel acehotel.com/newyork 20 West 29th Street (212) 679-2222

The Black Ant takes its name from the Mexican god Quetzalcoatl, who transformed into a black ant and gave to man the corn and seeds he found in the mountains, forming the basis of Mexican cuisine. Chef Mario Hernandez shares his vision of contemporary Latin cuisine, paired with owner and mixologist Jorge Guzman’s handcrafted agavebased cocktails. Hernandez traveled throughout Mexico and Latin America picking up ideas from family recipes and antique techniques used for generations. Tacos are given a twist incorporating unusual meats like cod cheeks and free-range goat. You can also find surprises like Buñuelos de Pato, crisy roasted duck dumplings with mole negro and cotija cheese, and the braised rabbit in the Enchiladas de Conejo. For dessert the Black Ant Nest with poegranata panna cotta coated with cacao crumble, vanilla sauce, chocolate truffle, and Granada pop rocks gelée will get you in the spirit of the décor. Designer Welly Lai combined wood, tile, metal, glass, and a multitude of plants with more offbeat elements like skulls and hand-painted ceramics, stencils, and a mural that keep the ant theme alive. And don’t be surprised if chicatanas, dehydrated and imported from Mexico, dust your plate or cocktail.

Chef David Waltuck and co-owner George Stinson bring their experience at former downtown mainstay Chanterelle to the Flatiron District. The à la carte dinner menu, rooted in classical French technique, draws inspiration from America and abroad. Sea urchin guacamole and roast rabbit salad make for tasty shared starters and appetizers. For mains, there’s everything from grilled mackerel with clam-dashi risotto and yuzu to General Tso’s sweetbreads, made with leeks, orange, and chilies. Waltuck tips his hat to Chanterelle with a handful of menu items, including the iconic Grilled Seafood Sausage. The restaurant’s full bar (made of concrete) includes clever cocktail names like “M.F.K. She’s a Peach,” made with bourbon, peach, and lemon verbena. Andrew Wilkinson Architects designed the bar space with rich chocolate browns and smoky grays, while the dining room features banquettes, large mirrors, and white brick walls. Two art walls will feature a new installation by an established or emerging artist every six months as well as an homage rooted in classical French technique. Though élan is only open for dinner as of this writing, lunch and brunch service will follow in the coming months.

This new 184-room Lower East Side hotel evokes everything from the area’s “Gangs of New York” era to Jewish immigration to the 1980s art and music scene. The hotel occupies a once-derelict building that owners Sean MacPherson, Ira Drukier, and Richard Born rescued when its original developers abandoned it after the financial crash. From its solid brick façade and factory casement windows, steel and glass doors open to oak-paneledwalls and marble mosaic floors in the hotel’s red-brick entryway. A distressed-limestone fireplace dominates the lobby lounge, which also features glass walls leading to the bluestone-paved back courtyard. The bedrooms feature furniture and artisan touches hand-picked by MacPherson, including hardwood floors and handmade silk rugs, artisan-crafted Moroccan pendant lamps, Indo-Portuguese-style beds, and “tree-trunk” nightstands in petrified wood from Brooklyn’s Organic Modernism. Heavy wooden doors help muffle noise and add to a sense of place and history. A “Rockstar” suite with wraparound windows and 1,100-foot terrace, and “Skybox Loft” with designated sitting area, offers amazing views of New York’s bridges and landmarks.

The Ace Hotel is housed in the former Breslin Hotel, built in 1904. “Diamond Jim” Brady was once a regular, and photographers Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen were neighbors. The hotel’s ecosystem of boutiques, dining, cultural events, and thriving bar scene bring new life to the NoMad neighborhood. Roman & Williams designed the hotel with a combination of vintage and custom furnishings and objects, mixing original industrial patinas with felt, wool, and suede. Lobby focal points include an 18-foot laboratory table and a graffiti mural by collage artist Michael Anderson. The library combines a French bakery table, school chairs, and English wing chairs for a unique feel. For the lobby bar, Roman & Williams took the library of a Park Avenue apartment and installed it like a stage set. The rooms were designed with mid-century efficiency in mind—clothes racks instead of closets, constructed from bent plumbing pipes with hanging steel boxes; turntables with a collection of new and used records; and full- size vintage Smeg refrigerators, stocked with real food.

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GALLERY GR EAT GR A I NS. fabulous textures in wood , stone, glass, and fabrics .

Kai Bookshelf available at Arteriors, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Marlow Lounge Chair and Rosewood Cocktail Table from the Mannerist Collection available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com OCT NOV

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Nogal Accent Table available at Baker Knapp & Tubbs, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com Thor Sideboard available at Tucker Robbins, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Rhinelander Sideboard available at Kindel Furniture, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

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The Nolita Bench available at DESIRON, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Tito Tall Cabinet from Mr. Brown London available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Hanh Lounge Chair available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Chez Harrods nightstand/side table available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Night Stand with Stone Top available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Wilson Chair available at Studio A, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Ellipsis Dining Table available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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The Claudo available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com

Basket Weave Media Cabinet available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com Louise Rosewood CafĂŠ Table available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

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freshpicks T H E M O S T C U R R E N T products in 2 0 0 lex showrooms .

Solid Sleeper Contemporary yet timeless, the Arris Bed by Altura Furniture at Dennis Miller Associates combines a distinctively profiled solid wood frame with the softness of an upholstered headboard and rails. The Arris side table is also made from solid wood with a convenient drawer and bookshelf. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Chrysalis Clear The extraordinary hand-blown glass Cocoon Pendant at Metropolitan Lighting evokes the brilliance of a butterfly’s transformation. The elliptical shape is formed using traditional mouth-blowing techniques. Then the pendant is kept fire-hot while an artisan uses delicate strokes of heated glass rods to create a soft, natural texture. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

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freshpicks

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The Tucker Robbins Heartwood Dining Table, made from a reclaimed kumbuk log, reveals the heart of the tree. Growth rings expand outward from the center, each year of the tree’s life adding to its beauty. Set on a blackened steel tripod base, the cross-section slab is displayed like a precious jewel. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Urban Escape The Charles Mirror at DESIRON was inspired by the clean, industrial feel of fire escape ladders in New York City. The back features a refined ladder-back detail and the standing frame allows the mirror to be positioned as needed. The walnut backing and front details add a natural element to the sleek aesthetic of the piece. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Côté Floor Côté France is proud to feature fine French Oak Flooring from Chêne de l’est. Founded in 1960, Chêne de l’est is a family-owned, certified PEFC company that promotes sustainable forest management. There are over 100 different finishes, including smoked, antiqued, sawed, parquet, herringbone, chevron, and metallic. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

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Look, Up in the Sky In the Cloud Mirror from Studio A, streams of cloud-like shapes of iron follow one another in rings to surround a central mirror. The handtorched iron creates a brilliant selection of colors—copper, antique brass, and deep graphite. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Reflecting On Louis J. Solomon mixes glass from Italy, metal, and wood to create a striking Two Door Cabinet that is a true conversation piece. The dark walnut finish complements the bronze-finished metal base and unique, fresh mirrored doors. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Second Species The Penelope Coffee Table has now been created in oak as an alternative to the standard cherry. Kindel has the ability to change the wood species on any product they make and offers limitless capabilities for custom furniture, including dimensions, functionality, veneer, finishing, and decoration. Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

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freshpicks

DVF Forever Grill Me

Diane von Furstenberg brings her legendary sense of print and color, as well as her confidence and boldness in mixing unexpected patterns and scales, to an exclusive collection of fabrics for Kravet. The collection features signature animal prints combined with geometric and abstract patterns available in both neutral and bold color palettes. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

A new collection from Global Views includes this beautiful rectangular Quatrefoil Cocktail Table with matching round side table and pendant. The quatrefoil decorative grill base is made of aluminum with a bronze epoxy finish, the legs are iron with a rich brass finish, and the tabletop is made of white honed marble. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Stylish Four-Door With clean, elegant lines, the Quattrocento Console by Robert Marinelli at PROFILES is as handsome as it is versatile. Choose from rich covers including leather, lacquer, or wood. The strong, defining legs are available in bronze or stainless steel. Behind four doors you’ll find a world of storage. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

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Iron Man The Mathew Chandelier by Mark Moussa at Arteriors is constructed of hand-formed cubes in dark natural iron. This piece exhibits many classic characteristics of Brutalist design—repeated geometric or abstracted organic forms, arranged asymmetrically, featuring rough textures and a dark, earth-toned palette. Five lights tucked inside create a glow from within. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Mystical East While working with a textile archive in the late 1990s, Stephanie Odegard discovered an old indigo robe created by an ancient and mysterious eastern ethnic group. Inspired by the bold and sophisticated patterns of their woven, appliquéd, and embroidered fabrics, Stephanie created her Shio Collection, which includes the Mystique II Runner. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com Triple Play The Trèfle Accent Table by Baker is a lighthearted application of a motif borrowed from a vase in Jacques Garcia's personal collection. The stylized cloverleaf shape creates a sturdy base. The top is a patchwork white gold and fonderie. The horizontal texture is a scratch work pattern borrowed from handcrafted jewelry. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Big Easy Celebrating their introduction into The Bright Group showroom, Hellman-Chang introduces the Nola Round Table, which serves smartly for dining or an entry foyer. The hand-sculpted legs feature elongated coved facets meeting in a gently carved concave base. The saucershaped top tapers to a slim, low-profile edge. Shown in jet black with gold leaf details. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Well Replayed Remix, a new collection by Maxwell fabrics is an updated take on a classic—embroidery on a linen-like ground—and was conceived as an easy-to-live-with staple. Captured in a soft, understated color palette, Remix emphasizes serenity in a modern, tailored environment. This is an effortless style for every drapery or bedding application. Maxwell Fabrics available at Flourishes, Suite 414, 212.779.4540, maxwellfabrics.com

Side by Side Slick, sleek, and slender, Brueton’s Parallelo Table designed by Stanley Jay Friedman is unique in its style. With its narrow parallel bars, the two tiers feature a crisp-cut, lacquered frame and polished stainless steel feet, topped with the flush sparkle of a glass top. Offered in all Brueton metal finishes and opaque colors. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Fairest of All Christopher Guy has made a host of exciting additions to its widely acclaimed Mademoiselle Collection, including the Pepite D’or mirror. Dramatically shaped and elegantly presented, this beveled mirror features an unforgettably decadent frame redolent of glamour and prestige. An impactful piece, it is ideal as a central decoration in a range of settings. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

The Warmest Metal A contemporary spin on a classic Greek column, the Copper Fluted Column Table from Global Views has a concave top inset with flat, tempered glass. The warm, earthy copper-plated stainless steel finish keeps this new table on trend this season. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Scaled to Perfection The Fry Cabinet is an exquisite introduction from Julian Chichester. Wrapped in vellum, the cabinet’s two doors are covered in aged brass with an iconic fish-scale pattern etched on the door fronts. Inside, Fry is fully finished in handrubbed sycamore, with drawers and shelves lined in red leather. Also available in ivory and black vellum. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. Grace of my Heart (opposite) State of Grace is a collection created by Maxwell Fabrics, available at Flourishes, that assembles embossed chenille designs in damask, diamond, stripe, and scroll patterns, and embraces the maxim, “traditional is the new modern.� 2. Pillow Cut Diamante, a jewel in Brueton's upholstery collection designed by Stanley Jay Friedman, features clean, simple modernist lines with diamond tufting. Diamante lounge chair, sofa, chaise, and sectionals can also be customized. OCT NOV

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3. Tint Type (opposite) Global View’s best-selling Ada’s Beveled Rectangular Mirror gets a new colored tint. The focus here is on the season’s new metallic—copper. 4. Coloring Books Kravet has introduced eight pattern books in partnership with Pantone, the global color authority and provider of professional color standards for the design industries. 5. Poke Me Fireplace accessories are a new product category for Arteriors. Classic, modern, and chic, the crystal Loyd Andirons, accented with polished nickel and black iron, add impressive style. 6. Bead It or Strip It Studio A’s Karana Woven Pillow is made of soft hand-woven strips in varied widths. The Ubhari Beaded Pillow is hand-beaded with strips of velvet woven in a geometric pattern. 7. Ocean Crossing The form of Tucker Robbins’ Zig Zag Stool/Side Table was interpreted by the Oku tribes of Cameroon before being reinterpreted by the ceramic artisans of Peru.

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8. Look Skyward Stars and a glowing celestial ball make the Walnut Lane Chandelier the latest sky object in a growing collection of hanging pendants by artist Kenneth Nilsen at PROFILES. 9. Gilded Ribs Gold or silver leafing on the delicate ribbed arms of Baker’s Signature Lounge Chair adds allure and sophistication. Exquisite upholstery and deep seat float over a round tapered leg. 10. Spanish Swivel The popular Madrid Swivel Lounge Chair by Anees Upholstery at Dennis Miller comes in a standard and smaller size with the option of a fully upholstered or finished wood-veneered outside back. 11. Blossom Time In Indian mythology, the lotus is a revered symbol of divine beauty. Inspired by nature, the Lotus Side Table from Stephanie Odegard was designed and hand made in India using sustainable raw materials.

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12. Spin Me Right ’Round Modern, hip, and dynamic are the buzzwords for the Aviation Ceiling Fan by George Kovacs for Minka Aire, available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. The piece is architectural sculpture for your ceiling and the epitome of form meeting function. 13. Hands-on Architects The Robert A.M. Stern Collection at Kindel features designs by architects from the world-renowned firm. The Stuyvesant Chairs require hand tools to execute the swag motif and the gold pin striping.

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14. Live from New York Côté France’s new Live Edge Collection is their first line made in the U.S. Different colors and materials are mixed with live edge slabs to create the angled LE Table. 15. Ring Ceremony The Sotille Chandelier by Charles Loomis at Bright combines the sparkling drama of crystal clear, hand-cut, fused Palisade glass with the richness of polished stainless steel. 16. Cozy Fan Tutte With its intricately hand-carved mahogany folds, the masterfully executed ruche-back Lili Dining Chair from Christopher Guy is fluid and graceful.

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17. Comfortable Curves This Lounge Chair with Nailhead Trim from Louis J. Solomon has generous proportions and curves. The legs and trim can be customized to complement many different fabric choices. 18. Sugar Is Sweet This stunning bentwood-arm chair by Julian Chichester, an homage to a 1930s original, is aptly called the Sugar Chair. Modern and shapely, the chair sweetens almost any design plan. 19. Benched By Invitation The DESIRON Workshop program invites designers to create custom pieces in their factory. Tim Button of Stedila Design kicked it off with the laser-cut steel and channel-tufted Tim Button Bench.

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Machine Age lighting heralds an historic era of innovation and progress with fresh design interpretations. The Gaines Collection applies industrial details, such as studded rivets, perforated metalwork, and heavy brass extrusions to 21st century fixtures that are sure to turn heads. Available in brass, bronze, historic, and polished nickel finishes. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Studio A Studio A’s new Ellipse Collection is a stunning example of true artistry and craftsmanship. It starts with a perfect oval shape, adds ivory hand-crackled linen and tops it off with a beveled antique mirror. This piece looks great from all angles or can house media equipment with grommets discreetly placed underneath. Studio A, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com OCT NOV

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Arteriors Arteriors' most important product category is lighting, and the Dallas Chandelier, designed by Mark Moussa, greatly reflects the aesthetic of the entire brand. Inspired by mid-century design and the Sputnik satellite that kicked off the Space Race, it features 12 adjustable arms with 18 glass lights and a brown nickel finish. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Dennis Miller Associates The gracefully shaped Kudu Wing Chair by Powell & Bonnell looks beautiful from any angle and boasts a wonderfully supple buttontufted inside back and loose down envelope seat cushion. A feature of the show-wood base, the seat deck cantilevers forward slightly on its own platform to allow generous seating depth. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Christopher Guy Captured in a moment of adoration and excitement, the divine diva in Le Bouquet shimmers and glistens thanks to the 17,000 handcolored glass pieces created specifically for her design. One of the exquisite mosaics handmade in the Christopher Guy factory in Java, she is available in two sizes. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Louis J. Solomon This Transitional Sofa sits big and comfortable. Based on a hardwood frame and steel springs, it is filled with only the finest upholstery materials. This sofa, like most of Solomon pieces, can be custom sized and finished, and is available in a vast selection of fabrics. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

The Bright Group The Elana Series, designed by Douglas Levine, represents the core of Bright’s esthetic. Dining, lounge, benches, and now the Elana Daybed epitomize the strength of a thirdgeneration, owner-operated manufacturer of finely tailored wood upholstered seating. Only the finest hardwoods are used, sourced from their regional FSC SmartWood supply chain. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Global Views Inspired by the best-selling Gemstone Votive, the new Gemstone Lamp is bound to be an important piece in an ever-growing line of electrified lighting. Strong attention to detail and quality are evident as stacks of brilliantly faceted crystal shapes create this stunning tableside lamp. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Julian Chichester While the Tambour Table is a new introduction, it is quintessentially Julian Chichester. With a sleek cylindrical base, this piece makes a quietly sophisticated statement, perfect for small spaces such as a New York apartment. The sole ornamentation is a subtle vertical reveal on opposite sides of the drum base. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS The Patricia Series celebrates the feminine side of modernism—grand, glamorous, and shapely. With Thomas Pheasant's eye for scale and proportion, a tightly upholstered reverse camelback sofa becomes something entirely new. With the addition of a curve to the back, it becomes the one bespoke object that turns every head. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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Tucker Robbins The use of rattan is as old as human inhabitation of tropical forests. Used by the Toraja women of Sulawesi, Indonesia, to create fishing baskets, and repurposed here in the Teardrop Chandelier, these baskets now provide for Sulawesi families by catching light instead of fish. Available with or without rice paper lining. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Stephanie Odegard Collection Cloud Oushak was inspired by a Turkish design and interpreted into Stephanie Odegard’s proprietary Abu quality. Made in Nepal from 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed Himalayan wool, it has a charming rustic quality emulating the look and feel of an antique Tibetan carpet. Custom colors are available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Côté France Originally a dramatic and grand Baroque banquet table, the bespoke Elephant Table takes on an even more exciting and unusual character. The gold leaf-finished elephant head and foot carvings were custom replacements for the original acanthus leaf scrolls and lion’s paw feet. Côte France will modify any existing piece to the designer’s specification. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

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DefiningPieces

MAXWELL FABRICS Maxwell Fabrics introduces their seventh collection in the Studio series, offering highwearing upholstery style inspired by the global diversity of exotic locales. Studio Marrakesh features multi-colored chenilles in medium- to small-scale geometrics layered with complementing solids in palettes ranging from rich and spicy to cool and metallic, providing an option for any scheme. Maxwell Fabrics available at Flourishes, Suite 414, 212.779.4540, maxwellfabrics.com

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Brueton The sculptured stainless steel arch defines the stunning Selina K Table, designed by Louis A. Lara. Selina K tops are available in stainless steel grid, glass, wood, or stone, providing enough variety to make this a suitable choice for any installation. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

DESIRON The Soho Credenza is a perfect example of DESIRON’s use of metalwork to create a piece of functional design. The Soho Collection as a whole has grown over time to feature a myriad of products but the credenza has remained a popular favorite. Available in over a dozen metal finishes. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Kindel Furniture The Seymour Armchair from the Winterthur Collection clearly reflects Kindel’s commitment to hand craftsmanship and complex design. Contrasting veneer is inset in the top rail and legs. The reeded arms, and hand-carved rosettes and back rail require superior skill to execute. Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

PROFILES This 21st century design is fast becoming a classic. Walnut, zebrawood, and a rainbow of lacquers make the Zebra Table by Eduardo Martinez of Marbello a perfect companion next to seating in any surrounding. In a choice of two sizes, it’s the perfect place to rest an after-work cocktail or an evening snack. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

KRAVET INC. Heirloom India, Echo Design’s latest collection with Kravet, is a wonderfully eclectic ode to India’s rich history of textiles. The prints, inspired by traditional block prints and woven ikat techniques, have been interpreted into a modern statement of color and pattern that layer beautifully with sophisticated wovens, ranging from plains and hand-loomed stripes, to washed and embroidered geometrics. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2014 F resh faces and new designs.

new showroom new location opening soon

AERIN, Suite 816 phone 212.679.4341, fax 212.679.4935, aerin.com AERIN, the global luxury lifestyle brand inspired by the signature, effortless style of its founder, Aerin Lauder, will open on the 8th floor of the New York Design Center this fall. The showroom will highlight various components of AERIN home décor, including timeless case goods and upholstery pieces, elegant lighting, fabric, and decorative home accessories. Based on the premise that living beautifully should be effortless, the AERIN brand develops curated collections in home décor, with Aerin’s own lifestyle serving as a focal point of inspiration for the brand. Classic but always with a modern point of view, every piece is created to make life more beautiful, with a sense of ease and refinement.

Dune, Suite 100 phone 212.925.6171, fax 212.925.2273, dune-ny.com Dune, an American contemporary design company focused on the development and manufacture of innovative interior products, has announced their relocation from SoHo to the ground-floor of the New York Design Center. Since 1998, Dune has built an internationally recognized design brand with its award-winning furniture collection and custom collaborations with the world’s most cutting edge designers and architects. Dune furniture and custom commissions have become a leading choice for important residential, institutional, retail, hospitality, and corporate interiors.

EJ Victor, Suite 814 phone 212.679.4341, fax 212.679.4935, ejvictor.com Follow the leading lights in design to the new EJ Victor showroom, a venue where style transcends trend and excellence is an everyday pursuit, and where furnishings of heirloom quality are created by state-of-the-art construction techniques. Catering to the design trade, EJ Victor delights in special projects, large and small, employing premium hardwoods, distinctive veneers, a broad line of exquisitely tailored fabrics, and a palette of finishes befitting the most discerning. EJ Victor is the furniture licensee for AERIN and Ralph Lauren, and has collections with designers Allison Paladino, Jack Fhillips, Randall Tysinger, Cecilia Berber-Thayer, and Sarah Kammlah.

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KI | Pallas Textiles, Suite 1313 phone 212.337.9909, fax 212.337.1090, ki.com, pallastextiles.com KI | Pallas Textiles is excited to relocate its New York showroom to the New York Design Center, with occupancy by the end of the year and a grand opening celebration in Q1 of 2015. KI manufactures innovative furniture and movable wall system solutions for education, healthcare, government, and corporate markets. KI tailors products and service solutions to the specific needs of each customer through its unique design and manufacturing philosophy. Pallas Textiles takes its knowledge of the ancient art of textiles manufacturing and fuses it beautifully with today’s modern techniques and fibers, creating upholsteries, panel fabrics, and cubicles that are timeless yet continually evolving in color, pattern, and texture. Pallas Textiles are perfect for corporate, healthcare, higher education, and hospitality markets.

LEPERE, Suite 714 phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, The Netherlands, and Spain. A purveyor of high design and superior craftsmanship, the collection is meticulously curated and refined. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. Out of a lifetime pursuit of exacting and innovative design, Dominic Lepere has curated a collection that embodies his core design principles—beauty, quality, functionality, and refinement. The result is a collection that embodies the vibrancy and sophistication of his hometown of New York.

Potterton Books, Suite 425 pottertonbooksusa.com Potterton Books will relocate to the New York Design Center this fall. The designer favorite offers new and rare titles on interior design, architecture, gardens, antiques, and the decorative arts.

Studio A, Suite 614 phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com With more than 4,000 square feet of space neighboring Global Views on the sixth floor of 200 Lex, Studio A brings their unique, handcrafted, high-design items from around the world into the marketplace. In an environment filled with massproduced product, Studio A strives to deliver a piece of history and meaningful interest to each and every product it sells. The new space presents Studio A more thoroughly to their New York customers and expands the Global Views line, mixing the two together with relevant lifestyle merchandising among eight wonderfully appointed vignettes.


ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

ARTERIORS Suite 608

BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS Suite 300

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

BRUETON Suite 910

Founded by Mark Moussa in 1987, Arteriors is a Dallas-based company that specializes in decorative accessories, furniture, and lighting that appeal to design lovers with up-to-date sensibilities. Launched with a focus on traditional accessories in classic materials, the company collaborates with experienced artisans and manufacturers around the world, producing a full spectrum of styles in luxury materials and finishes. Arteriors, Suite 608, phone 646.797.3620, fax 646.786.4818, arteriorshome.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Knapp & Tubbs remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Brueton, a U.S. manufacturer based in New York, manufactures a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

CALGER LIGHTING INC. (HAIKU) Suite 434

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

CÔTÉ FRANCE Suite 1201

COUTURE SHOWROOMS Suite 715

Backed by years of research and development, and hundreds of prototypes, Haiku reflects the attention to detail the Big Ass Fan Company is known for worldwide. Its industry-leading efficiency, silent motor, tops-in-class airflow, sustainable materials, quality craftsmanship, and minimalist design combine to create the perfect airmoving machine. With eight patents worldwide, Haiku is a true original. Haiku (at Calger Lighting Inc.), Suite 434, phone 212.689.9511, fax 212.779.0721, haikufan.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Pictured: Dandelion Wall Mirror. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

Visit Côté France for quality, style, and originality. The company’s French workrooms proudly boast generations of families continuing a tradition of fine handcraftsmanship. In addition to classic French reproductions in authentic finishes, Côté France brings tradition into the 21st century with vibrant colors and unique painted designs. Recently introduced is a collection of 18th-century reproduction outdoor teak furniture and a solid bronze lighting collection. Côté France, Suite 1201, phone 212.684.0707, fax 212.684.8940, cotefrance.com

Couture Showrooms is now on the 7th floor. In addition to carrying the wellknown Vladimir Kagan Couture line, the company has now expanded its offerings to encompass other prestigious names such as A.S. Morris, Spectrum West, Ron Seff, Axis Mundi, and Custom Designs by Luigi Gentile. Fabric and leather lines are available for your selection from their local workroom. Couture Showrooms, Suite 715, phone 212.689.0730, fax 212.689.1830, coutureshowrooms.com

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ShowroomPortraits DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

DESIRON Suite 702

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon, Suite 102

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Desiron, designed by Frank Carfaro, is a highly celebrated luxury furniture design company with a focus on benchmade, fully customizable home furnishings. The company’s 4,000-square-foot showroom concentrates on a contemporary clean aesthetic with strict attention to detail and finishing. Desiron manufactures its pieces in Kenilworth, New Jersey, at their state-of-the-art facility, just 19 miles from downtown NYC. DESIRON, Suite 702, phone 212.353.2600, fax 212.353.0220, desiron.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home decor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, LaneVenture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com

Julian Chichester Suite 604

Kindel Furniture Suite 510

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in their New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

Made 100% in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and established in 1901, Kindel upholds a mission of flawless execution and iconic design in modern, classic, and traditional styles. Craftsmanship through hand-carved decoration, hand-rubbed finishes, beautifully tailored upholstery, and customization defines Kindel as a true American luxury furniture brand. (Pictured: Mark Round Ped Table, Empire Dining Chairs, and Espana Bunching Chests) Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com

Diane von Furstenberg for Kravet Collections features the iconic designer’s signature animal prints combined with geometric and abstract patterns and is available in both neutral and bold color palettes. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

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Maxwell Fabrics (Flourishes) Suite 414

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

Maxwell Fabrics is a third-generation, family-run business with a distinct reputation for offering modern classic fabrics to the interior design trade. Built on unprecedented quality and service, they continue to provide committed support to today’s design professionals. While innovation and evolution drive its growth, Maxwell Fabrics owes its enduring success to the principles of authentic and timeless design. Available through maxwellfabrics.com or visit Flourishes, Inc., Suite 414, phone 212.779.4540, fax 212.779.4542, maxwellfabrics.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. has been illuminating fine interiors since 1939. Now part of the Minka Group, the Metropolitan showroom represents lighting from all Minka companies, including George Kovacs, as well as products from other quality lighting manufacturers. Its large showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the U.S. and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720 x31, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

STUDIO A Suite 614

TUCKER ROBBINS Suite 504

WOODWRIGHTS WIDE PLANK FLOORING, Suite 436

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of highend, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

Studio A’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com

For the past 25 years, Tucker Robbins’ passion has been bringing the spirit and craft from traditional artisans to contemporary life. He has created thriving artisan workshops in Guatemala, Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Cameroon, working with sustainably harvested or reclaimed materials and incorporating sustainable methods that have been practiced by local people for centuries. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, phone 212.355.3383, fax 212.355.3116, tuckerrobbins.com

Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring offers an extensive selection of wide plank floors—from traditional to modern—in both classic and prefinished varieties. The durability and uniquely American character of wide plank floors have influenced generations of designers, architects, and builders seeking to recreate the distinctive, elegant look. The company firmly believes that responsible stewardship of natural resources is not just business, it’s a good investment in the environment. Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring, Suite 436, phone 212.390.8944, woodwrightswideplank.com OCT NOV

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Events at 200Lex A look at a few recent celebrations. Check-in to 200 Lex with Interior Design

On April 23rd, The New York Design Center and Interior Design magazine joined together for the seventh annual Check-In to 200 Lex, a guide to the industry’s best hospitality product resources and insights from leading designers in the field. Guests explored the world of hospitality products at 200 Lex through self-guided tours curated by designers and Interior Design editors. Over 50 showrooms participated, showcasing everything from luxury lighting to the finest outdoor furniture. This year’s presentation headliners, interviewed by Cindy Allen, Editor in Chief of Interior Design, included Cass Calder Smith, owner and founding principal of CCS Architecture; Hayes and James Slade, founders of Slade Architecture; Karen Daroff, president and design principal of Daroff Design; and Italian architect, designer, art director, and interior designer Paola Navone. With thousands of top hospitality products and four designer presentations, Hospitality Day provided an in depth exploration of unexpected hospitality.

Left to right: Karen Daroff of Daroff Design with Interior Design’s Cindy Allen; Architect David Ling poses with Interior Design’s Tina Brennan; James and Hayes Slade, founders of Slade Architecture; Cass Calder Smith of CCS Architecture; Interior Design editors selected their top picks from participating showrooms, pictured The New Traditionalists; Paola Navone’s final presentation drew a full house. Photos by Matthew Carasella/Social Shutterbug. 76

RISD Textiles New Talent MFA Exhibit

The New York Design Center hosted the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Textile Department New Talent Exhibition in the 1stdibs® at NYDC gallery on June 4th, where 12 students transformed the space with their incredible work. Largely hand-produced, their stunning pieces were displayed on walls and draped on life-size mannequins. Two students were recognized with the Sherri Donghia Award of Achievement. Congratulations Amruthavalli Adusumilli and Cristina Sirbu.

The beautifully displayed work of RISD MFA Textile students; RISD’s Brooks Hagan poses with Sherri Donghia and New York Design Center President & CEO Jim Druckman; Sherri Donghia Award of Achievement winners Cristina Sirbu and Amruthavalli Adusumilli; student artwork covers the gallery walls. Photos by Alana Moskowitz/ Mosko-Clicks.


AD Loves 200 Lex

On June 12th, Architectural Digest Editor in Chief Margaret Russell partnered with 200 Lex to host AD Loves, Architectural Digest’s favorite finds from participating showrooms. Guests explored the New York Design Center, enjoyed cocktails and light hors d’oeuvres, and participated in a tweet-to-win opportunity. Participating showrooms included Arteriors Home, Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Christopher Guy, Dennis Miller Associates, Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon, McGuire, Porcelanosa, and SA Baxter Architectural Furniture.

Designer and July cover star Thom Filicia with AD’s Margaret Russell and Giulio Capua; Arteriors’ Karrington Chandelier; author and photographer Pieter Estersohn signs copies of his book Kentucky: Historic Houses and Horse Farms of Bluegrass Country; Hickory Chair’s Brighton Bar Table; designer Jiun Ho poses on his Colina Sofa in Dennis Miller Associates; AD’s Bill Pittel with designer Cobus Gauche of David Easton Interiors; Atrium Chair from Baker Knapp & Tubbs; designers David Easton and Matthew Patrick Smyth. Photos by Will Ragozzino/ Social Shutterbug.

Tenth Annual first LOOK™

Twenty-six top contract showrooms showcased new products at the New York Design Center’s tenth annual first LOOK™ event on July 16th. Principals, architects, and designers from NYC’s established and emerging A&D firms attended the event, with product introductions such as innovative benching, ergonomic seating, intriguing textiles, and pioneering interactive technology. Attendees dropped their business cards for the chance to win Samsung Galaxy Gear watches and MoMA memberships for two.

Yuyu Bu and Kristen Lambert of Array Architects with Aristeia Metro’s Jessica Perez Castillo and Andrea Reay of Tobin | Parnes Design Enterprises; NYDC’s Dennis Cahill with Carol Symchik of Primason Symchik and Michael Maltz of CRF Furniture; Kevin Kennedy and John Duffy from new showroom KI; ANDREU WORLD highlights the Agora Low Back Chair; Gordon International shows off their newly renovated showroom; attendees view new fabric samples in HBF & HBF Textiles. Photos by Karen Cattan. OCT NOV

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex SHOWR OOM

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S uite

PHON E

FA X

S H OW RO O M

1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design AERIN ANDREU WORLD Antique Rugs, Jerry Livian Collection Apropos Inc. Aqua Creations Lighting & Furniture Atelier Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills, Inc. Baker Knapp & Tubbs Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Couture Showrooms/Valdimir Kagan Couture Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

10th Fl 424 816 1111 806 710 427 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 422 433 804 1405 902 910 401 434 200 419 1601 1106 1405 505 809 1201 715 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.679.4341 212.679.0300 212.683.2666 212.684.6987 212.219.9922 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0007 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.689.0730 877.768.6428 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.679.4935 212.679.5996 212.683.2668 212.689.3684 212.219.4042 212.751.2434

Kasthall Rugs USA Keilhauer Kindel Furniture KI | Pallas Textiles

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Australia HBF & HBF Textiles Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group John-Richard Julian Chichester & Mr. Brown

415 702 707 1516 510 701 100 814 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 1501 102 1511 916 417B 1514 603 604

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.686.3142 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 646.293.6668 646.293.6622

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.684.0776 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123

212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 212.689.1830 678.533.1499 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.679.4935 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711

212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 646.293.6669 917.591.2413

S uite

611 1101 510 1313 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 La Bastille 1305 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 M. Topalian, Inc., Antique Carpets 802 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 Orrefors Kosta Boda 602 PALECEK 610 Paoli Inc. 1110 Pennoyer Newman, LLC 416 Phillips Collection 601 Potterton Books 425 Porcelanosa 609 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Profiles 1211 RAUL CARRASCO

1502

912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rocky Mountain Hardware 903 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture, Inc. 1600 Sanford Hall Carpets 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A 614 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Tectonic Flooring 1316 Ted Boerner 903 Thom Filicia Inc 815 TK Collections 410 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode/T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor New York Design Center 426 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES

P H O NE

FA X

212.421.0220 212.679.0300 646.293.6649 212.337.9909 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 866.570.9690 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 212.684.0735 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.684.5455 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271

212.421.0230 212.679.5996 646.293.6657 212.337.1090

212.252.7370 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.689.6903 212.966.6112 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.675.5665 212.726.0006 800.407.4295

212.684.3720 212.684.4217 212.685.0600 212.696.9762 212.545.0205 212.725.8439 212.213.2703 888.748.7319 212.675.5665 212.685.0600 212.213.2470 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 800.876.2120 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.679.3535 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500

212.684.7350

973.227.3544 212.684.7350 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 212.725.2185 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.684.5665 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.685.1807 212.966.6113 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.675.5654 212.726.0061 888.713.6042 212.684.3257 212.545.8376 212.244.9131 212.696.2729 212.545.0305 212.679.4927 212.231.2708 212.675.5654 212.244.9131 212.213.2464

212.355.3116

212.532.6440 212.725.3847

212.447.1669


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backstory Face the Music

By Jim Lochner

T he tenants of the B rill B uilding were at the forefront of A merican music for nearly 40 years .

Nestled on the upper edge of Times Square sits an unassuming 11-story office building that changed the face of American music. At its peak in the 1960s, the Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway and 49th Street, was the home to over 160 music publishers, songwriters, performers, vocal coaches, and agents, while the so-called “Brill Building sound” became synonymous with many of early rock and roll’s most memorable songs. The building was named for the Brill Brothers—Samuel, Max, and Maurice—who leased the site in 1909 and opened a branch of their chain of men’s clothing stores the following year. On October 3, 1929—three weeks before the stock market crash— real estate developer Abraham Lefcourt announced plans to build the world’s tallest building on the site. But Lefcourt wisely submitted plans for a much lower structure, with a modest $1 million estimated cost, and construction was completed in November 1930. When Lefcourt later failed to meet the terms of their agreement, the Brills foreclosed on the property, removed his name from the nearly complete structure, and changed it to the more harmonious Brill Building.

Top to bottom: The Brill Building (photo: Times Square Alliance); Brill tenants Hal David, Dionne Warwick, and Burt Bacharach; songwriters Gerry Goffin and Carole King (photos: Michael Ochs Gallery/Getty Images).

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Architect Victor A. Bark, Jr. designed the building in the Art Deco style, dividing the Broadway and 49th Street facades into three distinct sections—a three-story base, a sevenstory shaft, and a penthouse. The Broadway main entrance consists of three brass-finished doors flanked by polished black granite piers, topped with brass cruciform details and surrounded by a grid of windows that resembles a ziggurat. In the niche, flanked by elaborate scrollwork and crowned by a keystone, sits one of two brass sculptures that most likely portray Lefcourt’s son, Alan, who died of anemia as the building was being planned. Brown pilasters flank the corners of each façade, while pink, yellow, and blue recessed terra-cotta panels and foliate reliefs above the three center window bays draw the eye upward. The 11th-floor penthouse incorporates a large terra-cotta bust set into a niche, flanked by round arched windows.

From its early days, the primary Brill Building tenants consisted of Tin Pan Alley music publishers and songwriters such as Buddy De Sylva, Lew Brown, and Ray Henderson (“The Best Things In Life Are Free”). Lyricist Irving Caesar (“Tea for Two”) leased space until the 1970s. The vast 15,000-square-foot second floor was home to various cabarets and clubs over the years, a space that featured the orchestras of Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, and Dizzy Gillespie, and headliners like Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, and Louis Armstrong. The building’s most lasting contribution comes from the songwriters and performers who created what became known as the “Brill sound” in the early days of rock and roll. The walls resounded with the songs of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller (“Hound Dog”), Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich (“Leader of the Pack”), Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil (“You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling”), and Gerry Goffin and Carole King (“One Fine Day”), and the sounds of fellow tenants Dionne Warwick, Bobby Darin, Lesley Gore, Darlene Love, The Shirelles, and Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons. Composer Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David met at Famous Music in 1957 and would continue to write in the same little room at an upright piano nearly every day for 17 years. According to the Times Square Alliance, roughly a third of the 1,200 songs performed on Your Hit Parade between 1935 and 1958 originated with Brill Building tenants, and in 2010 the building was granted landmark status. Though many of the entertainment tenants moved to Los Angeles in the late 1960s and ’70s, at one time, Hal David remembered, “the preponderance of songwriters were in the Brill Building, the energy was in the Brill Building, the publishers were there, and if you had to be someplace else, you always wound up back at the Brill sometime during the day.” So the next time you pass by 49th and Broadway, don’t just “walk on by”—turn and face the music.


ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

Photograph by Antoine Bootz

SALADINO FURNITURE INC. 200 LEXINGTON AVENUE, SUITE 1600, NEW YORK, NY 10016 TEL 212 684 3720 FAX 212 683 3257 SALADINOSTYLE.COM TO THE TRADE


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Profile for Array Magazine, Inc

Array Fall 2014  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

Array Fall 2014  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...