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SUZANNE RHEINSTEIN South x West Coast

SLS HOTEL Glamorous Los Angeles

MICHAEL BERMAN

Barefoot Luxury

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Features

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South x West Coast By Cathy Whitlock New Orleans native Suzanne Rheinstein mixes old world elegance with modern on the West Coast.

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West Meets East By Katie Doyle LA designers add good vibrations to 200 Lex showrooms.

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Barefoot Luxury By Cathy Whitlock Michael Berman designs a modern home in the canyons.

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Glamorous Los Angeles By Catherine McHugh The SLS Beverly Hills serves as the flagship of SBE’s ever-growing series of design-driven lodging.

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Volume 12 Issue 3

32 8 STYLERADAR Designer Reagan Hayes on (and beyond) LA trends.

11 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Something fishy in Battery Park, sweet buildings in Queens, reflections in the Flatiron District, Silk Road caves in New Jersey, and a starry celebration on the Hudson.

14 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock

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Contemporary rooms, transformative color, and the curated house are just a few of the new book offerings this fall. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Katie Doyle Marble takes on Apple, moonshine goes modern, and Granny's humidifier gets a makeover.

38 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle Novel influences from Europe to Asia, plus a resurgence of quintessential New York panache get stirred into Manhattan’s melting pot this season.

40 GALLERY 48

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS 2015/16 Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner Case Study House No. 22 remains an enduring snapshot of mid-century modern design.

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EDITORIAL Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copyeditor

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2015-16 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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CONTRIBUTORS Catherine McHugh Jim Lochner Katie Doyle

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

ON THE COVER Michael Berman photographed by Beth Coller. 6

James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Claire Evans Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing Coordinator/Digital Content Manager Sarah Ferbank Tenant Relations Coordinator/Concierge Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Readers, We’ve done it—we’ve finally gone completely West Coast (well, just for one issue). In the past, we’ve highlighted projects and designers in many other cities—Paris, Miami, Washington, D.C.—but never before have we devoted an entire issue of feature articles about people and designs on the opposite side of the country. But no need to worry, this isn’t a defection or an abandonment of our beloved urban jungle. All of the designers in these pages are also well represented here in NYC too. Los Angeles-based interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein is in love with California sunlight, but she still retains the influence of her New Orleans roots. Her designs always reflect a touch of that famous Southern hospitality, mixing the elegance of the past with today’s lifestyles (South x West Coast, p. 18). It’s hardly surprising that designer Michael Berman’s work feels at home in the heart of Hollywood. Berman began his career, albeit briefly, in show business and his flair for the dramatic, illustrated by a Coldwater Canyon homestead for a present-day movie mogul, proves he would fit right in on any studio lot of the Golden Age (Barefoot Luxury, p. 26). Philippe Starck has been a design superstar for decades, but he hasn’t rested on his laurels. Starck continues to push the envelope and challenge our sense of glamour. The SLS Beverly Hills is a prime example of his eccentric, playful sensibility and the very definition of modern Tinseltown (Glamorous Los Angeles, p. 32). In 2016, Manhattan will welcome a new Starck-designed SLS hotel, just a stone’s throw from 200 Lex. As the leaves begin to cover the ground here on the East Coast, I hope you’ll welcome this brief turn westward and enjoy a little California dreaming.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

Designer Reagan Hayes on (and beyond) LA trends.

What could be more stylish than having LA designer Reagan Hayes curate our Style Radar section for the fall? With her vogue eye, her attention to excellent craftsmanship, and her simple good taste, Reagan pinpoints the hippest must-haves in Tinseltown and beyond. You can also visit her brand new showroom on the 9th floor of 200 Lex. Suite 903, 212.658.1922

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Chloe Hudson Mini Fringe Shoulder Bag “To be honest, I don’t know if fringe ever actually goes out of style here in LA. Sure it comes and goes through runway cycles out in the rest of the world, but we have a way of finding places to fit it in for nearly every fall season. This Chloe fringe shoulder bag hits every fashionable nail square on the head!” bergdorfgoodman.com

Helix Chandelier “I find myself using more and more geometric elements in my design work, like in this vignette from my LA showroom. Somewhere in my hometown of Baton Rouge, my old geometry teacher is nodding his head and doing a slow clap to celebrate that at least one student is actually putting that stuff to use.” reaganhayes.com

“Normandie” by Peter Walker, pencil on paper “I have really loved seeing the rise of modern portraiture with more edgy or abstract details, and no one shows that better than Los Angeles-based artist Peter Walker. It’s the type of talent you come to appreciate when you think, 'Could I do something like that if I just practiced for like a million hours?’ No. No I couldn’t.” peterwwalker.com

Vine Snake Necklace “I’m seeing a beautiful shift away from overly designed, highly tailored, and perfect color coordination to a more free-flowing, loose approach. A great way to pull that off is by fusing natural and modern elements in the same space. This aesthetic resonates in fashion, too; take Biological Jewels’ custom pieces, handmade in LA, as an example. This polished bronze snake necklace on an oxidized silver chain proves nature can inform modern design with surprisingly beautiful results.” biologicaljewels.com

Rustic Canyon Winebar and Seasonal Kitchen “If you’re not having regular dining experiences at a quality farm-to-table restaurant, then I would like to inform you that there is something wonderful missing from your life that needs to be addressed right now. Make a reservation tonight. Seriously. My favorite LA spot for fresh farm food is Rustic Canyon in Santa Monica. The menu is always changing, but if you happen upon this Vanilla Budino, you’ve basically won the culinary lottery.” rusticcanyonwinebar.com STA N D OU T I N ST Y L E

Horsehair Tassel Hat “Without fail, every time I step out for lunch from our West Hollywood showroom, I feel immediately out of place upon realizing that I dared betray the LA foodie uniform… I forgot my hat. We like our hats in all shapes and colors out here, but the must-have for fall is wide-brimmed, dark, and felt. This Free People find is a gorgeous limited edition made in America, constructed in a floppy fedora style with a unique horsehair tassel band.” freepeople.com

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DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Your resource for fine contemporary furniture, lighting & rugs


CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Something fishy in Battery Park, sweet buildings in Queens, reflections in the Flatiron District, Silk Road caves in New Jersey, and a starry celebration on the Hudson. SWEET HOLIDAY HANGOUT For the third year in a row, the smell of gingerbread will fill the New York Hall of Science this holiday season. On November 13, New York City-based chef Jon Lovitch will unveil the mammoth confection he has been drafting, designing, baking, building, and decorating all year long. Lovitch uses only three edible ingredients—royal icing, gingerbread, and candy—and does all the work entirely on his own. GingerBread Lane 2014 had 1,003 houses and used 3,250 pounds of icing, 600 pounds of gingerbread, and 750 pounds of candy. This year’s GingerBread Lane will feature a fire department, a police department, a carousel, an ice rink, a subway, two trains, a university, a hotel, and a collection of various storefronts. It will include over 1,000 houses made from an estimated 3,500 pounds of icing, 700 pounds of dough, and 800 pounds of candy. GingerBread Lane holds the Guinness Book of World Records official title as the largest gingerbread village in the world. When the exhibit ends, Lovitch gives away all of the components for free, on a first-come, first-served basis. Through January 2016. New York Hall of Science, 47-01 111th Street, Corona, 718.699.0005, nysci.org, gingerbread-lane.org.

All of the stores in GingerBread Lane are fantastical but their names are based on people who are important to creator/chef Jon Lovitch. Salyer’s Fine Socks in the forefront (left) is an homage to a very important mentor of his. “He liked to wear his signature red socks, and he gets a gingerbread house annually.” Photo: Hubbard M. Jones.

Top: The nautilus shell pavilion of the SeaGlass Carousel at The Battery in Manhattan, designed by WXY Architecture + Urban Design. Bottom: The Carousel features 30 grand, luminescent fish representing 12 different species. Photos: Filip Wolak.

DELIGHTFULLY FISHY The Battery Conservancy has installed the SeaGlass Carousel, a one-of-a-kind, permanent cultural attraction featuring a colossal nautilus shell and 30 grand luminescent fish at The Battery, the 25-acre public park at the southern tip of Manhattan. WXY Architecture + Urban Design conceived the carousel as a way of recalling The Battery's history as the original home of the New York Aquarium and designed a spiraling pavilion of glass and steel inspired by the chambered nautilus. The George Tsypin Opera Factory designed the magnificent fish figures, which range from 9-feet wide to 13-feet tall. Montreal-based Show Canada fabricated and assembled the structure, and Kyle Chepulis of Technical Artistry designed the lighting. NY Carousel, Ride Entertainment's New York operations team, operates the SeaGlass. The motors lie under the floor, which allow full visibility across and around the shell, with no center post. Instead of riding atop the fish as one would on a typical carousel, visitors sit inside them while gliding through the sights and sounds of a 360-degree aquatic adventure. Presented by SiriusXM, each SeaGlass ride is defined by a distinct piece of thematic music to enhance the mystical experience. Through December 31 (will reopen in March 2016). State Street at Water Street, 212.344.3491, seaglasscarousel.nyc.

JAZZ AGE MODERNIST The Whitney is presenting the first full-scale survey of Archibald Motley’s paintings in two decades. One of the most significant figures associated with the Harlem Renaissance, Motley is best known as being a master colorist and a radical interpreter of urban culture. The exhibition offers an unprecedented examination of Motley’s dynamic depictions of modern life in his hometown of Chicago, as well as in Jazz Age Paris and Mexico. This show highlights Motley’s unique use of expressionism and social realism, and places this underexposed artist within a broader, art historical context. October 2, 2015– January 17, 2016. Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, 212.570.3600, whitney.org.

Archibald J. Motley Jr., Self-Portrait (Myself at Work) (1933). Oil on canvas, 57.125 by 45.25 inches. Collection of Mara Motley, MD, and Valerie Gerrard Browne. Image courtesy of the Chicago History Museum.

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CultureCalendar THOSE DARN CATS

Above left: Gertrude Berg on the set of The Goldbergs (1949–1956) © CBS. Image provided by Photofest. Right: Israel, July 7, 1961—Acknowledging that his offer to ransom doomed Jews for lorries had not been motivated by pity, former Nazi Adolf Eichmann appears to be smirking at his trial. Digital Image © TopFoto, provided by The Image Works.

AS SEEN ON TV As the inaugural episode of The Jewish Museum’s long-term series, “The Television Project,” Picturing a People explores how Jews have been portrayed and how they have portrayed themselves on American television from the 1950s to the present. The exhibition features clips from popular shows such as The Ed Sullivan Show, Northern Exposure, The Twilight Zone, The Simpsons, and My Name is Barbra, as well as related works of art, artifacts, and ephemera. Other highlights include writer and actress Gertrude Berg’s The Goldbergs, a popular comedy-drama based on the home life of a Jewish family in the Bronx, and ABC News’ coverage of the Eichmann Trial, which exposed American and international audiences to stark details of the atrocities of the Holocaust. Through February 14, 2016. The Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Avenue at 92nd Street, 212.423.3200, thejewishmuseum.org.

It’s an undisputed truth—cats “rule the Internet.” Presented by the Museum of the Moving Image, How Cats Took Over the Internet takes a critical look at a deceptively frivolous phenomenon and tells the history of cats online, examining phenomena such as Caturday, lolcats, cat videos, celebrity cats, and more to unearth why images and videos of the feline kind have transfixed a generation of web users. Touching on anthropomorphism, the aesthetics of cuteness, the Bored at Work Network, and the rise of user-generated content, this exhibit will be accompanied by screenings and live events. A multimedia timeline will capture significant moments of cats online, appended with a historical look at the representation of cats in photographs, film, and other visual media. Interactive stations will allow visitors to experiment with creating their own lolcats and to contribute their favorite cat photos, GIFs, and videos to the exhibition. In addition, the exhibition will include a world map of international animal memes by The Civic Beat, a collective of researchers and writers who are focused on civic technology. Through January 31, 2016. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Astoria, 718.777.6888, movingimage.us.

The amphitheater continuously shows a 24-minute selection of cat videos selected by Will Braden, curator of the Internet Cat Video Festival. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou, Museum of the Moving Image.

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Above: Tools used for repair missions to the Hubble Space Telescope are on display at the Intrepid Museum’s HUBBLE@25 exhibition, which celebrates the unparalled scientific achievements of Hubble 25 years after its launch. Left: The immersive “Training Pool” environment allows visitors to get an up-close look at how NASA astronauts trained for their missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope. The simulated water-like room provides the sensation of being in the tank right alongside the astronauts. Photos: Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum.

The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum has opened HUBBLE@25, a temporary exhibition that commemorates the 25th anniversary of the launch of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The exhibit marks the first major temporary exhibition in the Museum’s Space Shuttle Pavilion, which houses the space shuttle Enterprise. Using original artifacts, stellar photographs, Hubble-produced images, immersive environments, and interactive guest experiences, the exhibit showcases the history of the telescope and its unparalleled scientific achievements. Through January 10, 2016. The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, Pier 86, West 46th Street and 12th Avenue, 877.957.SHIP (7447) or 212.245.0072, intrepidmuseum.org.


SECRETS OF THE SILK ROAD

Teresita Fernández, Fata Morgana (2015). Courtesy the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, and Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco. Photo: Yasunori Matsui/Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Since their creation more than 1,500 years ago, the Mogao Caves in northern China have housed the history of religious art and connected the Eastern and Western worlds through their once central location at the gateway to the Silk Road. The Princeton University Art Museum is presenting Sacred Caves of the Silk Road: Ways of Knowing and Re-Creating Dunhuang, a time capsule of objects dating from 270 A.D. to the 1960s that explores the aesthetic and transcontinental nature of this World Heritage Site. The exhibit also features a suite of black-and-white photographs taken by James C. M. Lo and Lucy L. Lo in 1943–1944. The British Museum in London has also loaned two paintings to the exhibition that exemplify the two major schools of Chinese painting. The first, produced in ink and colors on silk in 897, depicts a rare form of the Buddha with the five planets portrayed as human figures. The second features an ink-on-paper monastic portrait from the Tang Dynasty. Manuscripts and fragments in various languages including Uyghur, Tibetan, Sanskrit, and Chinese from the University’s East Asian Library, as well as calligraphic and pictorial scrolls and sculptures from the Museum’s holdings will also be on display. Through January 10, 2016. Princeton University Art Museum, McCormick Hall, Princeton, NJ, 609.258.3788, artmuseum.princeton.edu.

MIRROR, MIRROR ON THE LAWN In June, Mad. Sq. Art (the free, contemporary art program of Madison Square Park Conservancy) installed Fata Morgana by New York-based artist Teresita Fernández. The 2005 MacArthur Fellow, who is best known for her prominent public sculptures and unconventional use of materials, created this sculpture specifically for Madison Square Park. As the Conservancy’s largest and most ambitious outdoor sculpture to date, the installation consists of 500 running feet of golden, mirror-polished discs that create canopies above the pathways around Madison Square Park’s central Oval Lawn. In nature, a Fata Morgana is a horizontal mirage that forms across the horizon line. Alluding to this phenomenon, the installation introduces a shimmering horizontal element to the Park that engages visitors in a dynamic experience. The mirror-polished, golden metal sculpture hovers above the Park's winding walkways and creates abstract flickering effects as sunlight filters through the canopy, casting a golden glow across the expanse of the work, paths, and passersby. By design, these effects will change throughout the seasons. Through winter 2016. Madison Square Park Conservancy, Eleven Madison Avenue, 212.520.7600, madisonsquarepark.org.

Top: Chinese, Tang dynasty, 618–907, Perfection of Great Wisdom Sutra, chapter 329, 8th–early 9th century. Handscroll; ink on sutra paper. Bequest of John B. Elliott, Class of 1951. Left: Parinirvana, Mogao Cave 158, dated Middle Tang dynasty (781–848). Dunhuang, Gansu province. Photograph taken in 1943–44. The Lo Archive.

ROCK OF AGES

Scott Burton, The Rock Chair (1982). Sierra granite, 32 x 50 x 52 inches. Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery; © 2015 Estate of Scott Burton/Artist Rights Society (ARS), NY.

As The Noguchi Museum celebrates its 30th anniversary, it is presenting Museum of Stones, a major exhibition that includes 50 works by 30 different artists. The exhibition looks at the ways in which artists have explored the integral place of rock and stone in the development and disintegration of civilization and culture throughout time and across the globe—from the rock that killed Goliath to the development of mathematics and democracy, from natural “miracles” such as glacial erratics (from which modern science emerged) to the memorials with which we challenge the insignificance of our biological lifespan on a geological timescale. The exhibition will be installed throughout the Museum’s second floor, with a number of objects also inserted into the historic installation of work by Noguchi on the first floor. Museum of Stones will culminate in an installation of 16 centuries-old paintings and objects from China, on loan from The Metropolitan Museum of Art. These will showcase China’s historical role as the place where the practice of thinking about rocks developed into a near religious, scholarly, and aesthetic discipline. Through January 10, 2016. The Noguchi Museum, 901 33rd Road (at Vernon Boulevard), Long Island City, 718.204.7088, noguchi.org.

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Books Mrs. Howard: Room by Room

Parish-Hadley Tree of Life: An Intimate History of the Legendary Design Firm

Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors

A Day at Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte

Phoebe Howard Abrams September 2015 272 pages $50

Brian McCarthy and Bunny Williams Stewart, Tabori & Chang October 2015 288 pages $60

Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller Vendome Press September 2015 248 pages $60

Alexandre de Vogüé, Jean-Charles de Vogüé, and Ascanio de Vogüé Flammarion September 2015 192 pages $34.95

Atlanta and Jacksonville, FL-based interior designer Phoebe Howard’s new book Room by Room is a follow-up to her uber-successful Joy of Decorating. Known as “Mrs. Howard,” her sophisticated Southern style has spawned a legion of fans as her popular stores in Atlanta and Charlotte can attest. Room By Room covers the basics from living rooms and libraries to bathrooms and kitchens, as well as children’s rooms and outdoor living rooms. Howard details what makes her work so unique by dissecting design projects in New York, Nashville, and Atlanta, and incorporating personal stories throughout the book. Patterns, textures, colors, and arrangements are carefully choreographed in a Howard interior, where layering remains supreme. I have both of her books in my library and they are totally “dog-eared” as this is a must-have for any designer’s bookshelf.

Think Parish-Hadley and the term “legendary” comes to mind. The venerable interior design firm has set the gold standard for over 60 years. From the days of designing the Kennedy White House and the homes of the Astors, Gettys, and Rockefellers to today’s more classic pared-down interiors, Sister Parish’s cabbage rose and Aubusson style mixed with Albert Hadley’s more modern approach was a winning combination. Alumni designers Brian McCarthy and Bunny Williams pay homage to the firm’s illustrious history in the new book Parish-Hadley Tree of Life. Through the work of 30 of the most prominent designers working today, the book details how the firm has influenced their styles, tastes, and practice.

Husband and wife design sensation Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller’s refined and sophisticated interiors have garnered a cult following in less than a decade. Named on the coveted Architectural Digest’s AD100, their reputation has established them as one of the top design firms on the scene today. The illustrated Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors, showcases a wide range of work, from a winter home in Florida to a Tribeca loft, and a client roster filled with media heavyweights such as Town and Country editor Jay Fielden and Vogue’s Anna Wintour, who wrote the book’s foreword. Perhaps the designing couple’s work can best be summed by my favorite quote in the book—“timelessness is the love child between modern and traditional.”

Sometimes the best things do come in small packages (5.9 x 9.4 inches to be exact). This delightful illustrated book offers an insider’s look behind the hedges of the greatest chateaux of Europe—Chateau de Vaux-le Vicomte. Designed in 1641 by architect Louis Le Vau, decorator Charles Le Brun, and garden designer André Le Nôtre, the chateau was owned by finance minister Nicolas Fouquet (who was eventually thrown into prison for mishandling funds by Louis XIV). Eventually the property was home to the great chef Vatel. The book traces the chateau’s storied history and grandeur from the days of the Belle Époque through World War I and up to 1968, when it became one of the largest private historic monuments in France. Lavish photography and archival documents tell the secrets of court life and depict the grandeur of the chateau, furnishings, and gardens.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Contemporary rooms, transformative color, and the curated house are just a few of the new book offerings this fall.

Interiors in Detail: 100 Contemporary Rooms

Color: Transform Your Home

Designing Women: Dialogues with Pioneering Women Designers (1850-1950)

The Curated House: Creating Style, Beauty, and Balance

Dominic Bradbury The Monacelli Press September 2015 432 pages $45

Abigail Ahern Quadrille Publishing/Chronicle Books September 2015 240 pages $29.95

John S. Elmo FreisenPress June 2015 275 Pages $24.99

Michael S. Smith Rizzoli October 2015 272 pages $65

English journalist Dominic Bradbury’s new book Interiors in Detail is a wonderful resource for designing contemporary rooms—100 of them, to be exact. Six hundred lavish photographs showcase beautiful interiors in everything from townhouses and farmsteads to mountain cabins and beach houses. The 10 chapters are divided through a host of styles—minimal, global, period, urban, and eclectic— with interiors designed by notable architects and designers such as Jonathan Adler, Rose Tarlow, David Collins, Pierre Frey, and many more. This is one of the more interesting and informative books on the subject of contemporary interiors, with an international flair—Manhattan, Marrakech, Paris, and Hong Kong are just a few of the locations covered. Detailed imagery and ideas on furniture, materials, texture, pattern, and light make this an excellent and much-needed sourcebook.

The book’s tagline says it all—”Banish Beige, Boost Color, Transform Your Home.” For the designer who is suffering from monochromatic fatigue, this is the book. Interior designer Abigail Ahern notes that “color is capable of injecting instant glamour and cool” and backs it up with striking rooms in every hue. Urging the reader to push their color choices and stop procrastinating, Ahern offers instant and transformative room changers with her fail-safe “60-30-10” rule— the dominant color on the floors, walls, and ceilings is 60 percent; upholstery colors make 30 percent; and “blingy accents” comprise the remaining 10. Ahern also delves into the practicalities of color—working with undertones, the seven steps to the perfect paint job, and painting floors. Instructions for the color-challenged reader provide lessons on how to figure out a color palette—from “inky hues,” metallics, brights, black and white, and neutrals—are worth buying the book alone!

Interior and product designer John Elmo takes on a novel twist in his new book Designing Women: Dialogues with Pioneering Women: Designers as he envisions a series of imaginary conversations with fourteen female design legends. Set in the periods of 1850-1950—a time where women were not given proper credit or pay for their work—male interior and furniture designers reigned supreme. Elmo, a 60-year veteran in the design industry and former New York City chapter president of ASID, delves into their backgrounds and gives the reader glimpses into the dynamics at play in their design workplaces. Designing Women marks the author’s third novel. His first book, Room for Enjoyment, details the construction of an estate and a behind-the-scenes look at a Manhattan interior design office in the 1970s.

The Curated House marks interior designer Michael S. Smith’s first collection of new interiors in seven years. His fifth book is one of the celebrated designer’s most personal as it “traces the origins and influences of his design philosophy in depth.” Appointed by President Obama to the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, the California native is known for his work that often blends European classicism with American modernism. Readers are taken on a journey through Smith’s own Los Angeles house, his desert retreat, and his ornate Manhattan apartment, filtered through the lens of his California roots and philosophy. The second part of the book features his varied client projects, including a Manhattan pied-à-terre, Malibu beach house, London townhouse, and a Montana mountain retreat. Smith’s work process—including his use of subtle colors, layering fabrics, patterns, and creating comfort in every room—are just a few of the many topics detailed in this comprehensive book.

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Trove 01

By Katie Doyle

Marble takes on Apple, moonshine goes modern, and Granny's humidifier gets a makeover.

ARCHITECTURAL ANIMAL Some may say this Gaetano Pesce resin belt evokes a thorny crown of biblical significance; others may deem it more on par with Jurassic Park. Reptilian or relic, how to wear the vintage accessory, a rare creation far outside of the Italian architect’s usual repertoire, is equally up for debate. Years after the belt’s debut, the curators at MossPOP decreed it would moonlight wonderfully around the neck. As far as we’re concerned, any Pesce piece this provocative automatically earns its keep. $850. mosspop.com.

02 COPPERTONE TOUCH In Finland’s himmeli folklore, hanging planters like this celebrate the winter solstice, garnering good fortune for the cold months ahead. Each bowl is hand-spun by a master redsmith who works a flat sheet of copper into a perfect hemisphere, following an ancient technique. Hang this bowl by a window to let the winter sun nurse a plant and infuse your home with oxygen—and offer a reminder of warmer days. Lack a green thumb? Succulents will have the highest chance of success in this pot. Small: 4 inches x 2.5 inches, a 32 inches chain. Large: 8 inches x 4 inches, a 32 inches chain. $118. michelevarian.com.

HAUTE HUMIDITY Forget the frumpy, bloated humidifier of stuffy noses and crumpled tissues. This slender, sightly cylinder is a sleek alternative—and also a surprising design accent. Fully-functional and energy-efficient, the ultrasonic nebulizer from South Korea powers down when water depletes and an LED light dims intuitively to indicate its operating status. 3.4 inches x 7.9 inches. $89. gnr8.biz.

03 04 BATHTIME FOR DESSERT These tub truffles look just as delicious on the side of your bathtub as they’ll feel within it. Here’s to indulgence, without the calories. Then again, since these cocoa butter truffles are all about treating yourself, a square of dark chocolate (or a sip of wine) might be the perfect complement to a luxurious bath. With pairings to suit every taste, this set includes rose petal, grapefruit eucalyptus, lavender, rosemary mint, citrus spice, and cafe mocha truffles. 5.5 inches x 3.5 inches x 1 inch. $28. uncommongoods.com. 16


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ROMAN STONE The metamorphic rock favored by ancient Greek and Roman sculptors can now house a “masterpiece” of 21st century technology, the iPhone 6. The world’s first real marble case is crafted from Carrara or Marquina marble, with unique veins that make each edition luxuriously one-of-a-kind. With a lightweight, shatterproof design that retains the cool touch of marble, Native Union’s case chisels an exquisite balance between form and function. 5.5 inches x 2.75 inches x 0.25 inches. $80. nativeunion.com.

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WARM AND FUZZY Not ready to give in and dig out your winter gloves? Try handwarmers instead. Better suited to apple picking and pumpkin carving than shoveling and sledding, this wool boucle pair will keep your mitts feeling warm and fuzzy on those nascent autumn mornings when the air is is still on the crisp side of chilly. $100. shopbird.com.

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TECH WITH TASTE What to do when it’s a faux pas to keep your phone on a table during a meeting or dinner, but you’re expecting an important call? Ringly offers a tasteful solution—by way of black onyx, emerald, pink sapphire, rainbow moonstone, and more. With three micron-plated seettings, this gorgeous ring connects to an app which sends vibrating notifications from your phone. And when you’d like to be bothered selectively (because isn’t your time the most precious resource of all?), you can control who and what can reach you via your ring. Sizes 6, 7, 8. $195-$260. ringly.com.

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MOVE OVER, MAKER’S A new spirit is making its mark on Brooklyn’s most hipster liquor cabinets. Urban moonshiners are reviving the country’s rich history of hooch, and cocktail connoisseurs are paying attention. Surprising? Perhaps not, considering the frequency of buzz words like “home-brewed” and “small-batch” in the vocabulary of the modern-day epicurean. Here, the founders of New York City’s first distillery since the Prohibition reveal how to make, and of course how to drink, your own batch of shine. 9.25 inches x 6.25 inches. $24.95. thestore.madmuseum.org.

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By Cathy Whitlock

South X West coast

New Orleans native Suzanne Rheinstein mixes old world elegance with modern on the West Coast.

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hink “California design� and images of all-white minimalist interiors in modernist architecture with palm-shaded blue-hued swimming pools immediately come to mind. California design is distinctive based on the area one lives in, particularly in Los Angeles. Malibu has its beach aesthetic,

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On a contemporary Montecito terrace, bleached teak banquettes covered in lavender fabric complement the spectacular scenery.

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Santa Monica claims the cottage look, and Beverly Hills often goes for Hollywood Regency. The work of Los Angeles-based interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein is an exception to the rule, representing today’s California look with a signature style that embodies so much more. Rheinstein’s interiors are steeped in history and tradition, with nods to her native New Orleans. The term “elegant restraint” is often associated with her rooms, where a de Gournay-walled dining room harmonizes happily with Neoclassical, and French and English décor get a modern update. Her casual yet sophisticated interiors are both whimsical and luxurious, and it’s not uncommon to see European antiques blended with linen upholstery. On the topic of California design she muses, “California design depends on the people. A bachelor will have a different look than a younger family who is into cottage style, and to me it depends on where the person is in their life, where they travel, and how they want to live.” And for a designer, working in California has its pluses. “I continually fall in love with the California light,” a factor that makes even the most basic beige wall look different than it would on the East Coast. “There will always be people who want to be surrounded by lots of color. I like designer Thomas Jayne’s quote earlier in his career about how everyone wanted bright colors and now they want calmer. My clients are so involved in so many things—children, pets, skiing, volunteering, etc.—when they come home they want a certain calm.” One thing you won’t necessarily see in a Rheinstein interior— minimalism. “No one can live without personal things around them!”

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“No one can live without personal things around them!” Top: Rheinstein took her cues from the colorful hand-painted porcelain for the designs of this cheerful garden-inspired dining room. (Opposite) Top left: A series of columns, photospheres, and lanterns highlight the Italian-style loggia. Top right: A simple pair of Arts and Crafts benches and 19th-century paintings by J. Allen St. John flank the entrance. Bottom: A custom de Gournay wallpaper details the landscape in this California bedroom.


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Left: A Diego Rivera gouache, Girl with Flowers (1950), nestled against a Spanish Colonial mirror reflects the client’s love of Latin American art. Right: A 17th-century English provincial chair and Japanese Tansu red-painted chest provide a focal point in a Bel Air home. The 1950s gouache on paper, The Diviner, is by Cuban artist Cundo Bermúdez.

In an era of following trends and ever-changing styles, Rheinstein dances to her own beat. “I have always kind of followed my own path of doing things. My style is always evolving as I travel a lot; I am mad for certain exhibitions and over time, your eyes see new things and get used to new things. My style has evolved instead of changed.”

Perhaps she learned style through osmosis. “My mother had an antiques store in New Orleans and was very interested in the designs of gardens. I took history of architecture classes and was an English literature major, and was always interested in describing things and how people lived and I loved Russian novelists.” Design was not Rheinstein’s first career; she started at CBS News in Washington, D.C., working for journalist Eric Sevareid. “It was like a graduate degree. He taught me a lot about history,” she notes. After moving to Los Angeles and having a family, she discovered her second career when she opened Hollyhock in the 1980s in Hancock Park. The popular antiques store was a haven for one-of-a-kind furnishings, and one of the few places where a designer like Colfax and Fowler’s Nancy Lancaster would have been at home in Los Angeles. Today, the shop is located in the heart of West Hollywood’s design district on La Cienega, with a wonderful array of antique, vintage, and modern

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furnishings. In addition to her Hollyhock fabric and rug collection with Kravet/Lee Jofa, available at 200 Lex, Rheinstein also caters to a younger crowd. “I am designing a lot of transitional things; I found a great Lucite workshop and carry painted small tables and very special chairs and mixed contemporary art.” A recent Los Angeles installation personifies her sophisticated style. Overlooking the lush environs of the golf course at Bel Air Country Club, Rheinstein used the client’s Mexican paintings by Diego Rivera as a starting point along with a colorful Afghani palace rug. “The art was just kind of lost so I mixed a private color for the walls,” while letting the outside color provide a rich green backdrop. Noted for her talent of mixing in the old and the new, she designed custom upholstery, added a 17th-century English chair and an early 19th-century Italian table, and rehung the art. Her most recent projects include the renovation of the Cypress Point Club in Northern California’s Pebble Beach. Originally designed by George Washington Smith and decorated by the late designer Frances Elkins, Rheinstein says, “I wanted it to be how we live today but honor her work. It’s very much like an American country house and does not look corporate. I recreated spider chairs and even did a riff


on Elkins’ bleached paneling.” On the heels of her best-selling At Home: A Style for Today with Things From the Past, Rheinstein’s second book is due in October. Rooms for Living: A Style for Today with Things from the Past (Rizzoli) focuses on beauty and comfort—from the entry to repurposing the neglected living room. As with all her interiors, Rheinstein’s roots in southern hospitality are a commonality. “ I like my houses to be hospitable, and people in New Orleans think nothing of entertaining and having friends over which is easy to do if you make your house look nice for you. Your house should look great for you first!”

Top: Overlooking the lush hills of the Bel Air Country Club, the designer used Hollyhock’s Catherine chaises and the client’s striking Afghani palace kilim to balance and anchor the room. Book insert: Rooms for Living: A Style for Today with Things from the Past (Rizzoli) marks Rheinstein’s second book.

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By Katie Doyle

WEST meets EAST LA designers add good vibrations to 200 Lex showrooms

Mulholland Cabinet by Kelly Wearstler

Caned Bar/Counter Stool by Barbara Barry

kellywearstler.com

barbarabarry.com

Kelly Wearstler has been called the "the presiding grande dame” of West Coast design, and her creations in the EJ Victor showroom measure up to that grand expectation. The Mulholland Cabinet is a piece of modern art in its own right.

This stool’s elegant rattan-framed caning and half-oval cutout detail is a nod to both the collection’s signature look and Barbara’s design motto—“Simplicity is essence with conviction.”

EJ Victor, Suite 814/816 ejvictor.com

Titan Horn Sculpture by Windsor Smith

McGuire Furniture Company, Suite 101 mcguirefurniture.com

Xavier Cocktail Table by Reagan Hayes

windsorsmithhome.com With a glossy polish of sophistication, Windsor Smith’s horn sculpture scales up the natural, organic feel the West Coast is known for.

Reagan Hayes’ monolith of a cocktail table—all gunmetal and strong, striking angles—marries a modern feel with the classic appeal of geometric design styles.

Arteriors, Suite 608 arteriorshome.com

Reagan Hayes, Suite 903 reaganhayes.com

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Juliet Cigarette Table and Odette Sofa by Windsor Smith windsorsmithhome.com Here we see Windsor Smith’s playful but stately Juliet Cigarette Table in a delightful coupling with the Odette Sofa—a testament to warm West Coast living at its best. Century Furniture, Suite 200 centuryfurniture.com

Presidio Chair by Barbara Barry barbarabarry.com The laid-back, coastal ethos of Barbara Barry’s aesthetic encompasses clean, serene lines and calm, livable fabrics. Her Presidio Chair best speaks to that, with a look to complement anything from LA’s iconic Stahl House to a more contemporary architectural style. Baker Furniture, Suite 300 bakerfurniture.com

Hallam Lounge Chair by Jeffrey Alan Marks

Forte Chair by Robert Willson

jam-design.com

downtown20.net

The Hallam Lounge Chair’s sleek and stolid wrought iron frame is a wonderful contrast to its delicious mint green upholstery, lending a unique and unexpected appeal.

In the Profiles showroom, Robert Willson serves up a softer side of California design with his Forte Chair, an Italian-inspired wingback that is handmade in Los Angeles and delightfully bold in size, shape, and style.

PALECEK, Suite 610 palecek.com

PROFILES, Suite 1211 profilesny.net

Neptune Box by Jeffrey Alan Marks

Hollywood Chandelier by Marjorie Skouras

jam-design.com

marjorieskourasdesign.com

This sea foam box from Jeffrey Alan Marks looks like it could be crafted from glass tumbled smooth by the ocean. Place it somewhere surprising for a delightful nod to maritime living.

In the Dennis Miller showroom, Marjorie Skouras shows us how Mother Earth’s bounty, raw but beautiful, can be so much more powerful than man-made glitz and glamour.

PALECEK, Suite 610 palecek.com

Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210 dennismiller.com/catalog

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Written by Cathy Whitlock Photography by Barry Schwartz

Barefoot Luxury Michael Berman designs a modern home in the canyons.

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Interior designer Michael Berman designed a contemporary home in the canyons of LA.


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this were the 1930s, interior designer Michael Berman would no doubt find himself designing film sets alongside legendary MGM art director Cedric Gibbons. It was the time of Hollywood’s Golden Age where the studio churned out films about the rich and famous at play and introduced Art Deco and Streamline Moderne styles to Depression-weary filmgoers. Glamour and luxury were the orders of the day. It would have been a match made in heaven.

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Touches of Art Deco and Streamline Modern are evident in this sophisticated light-filled sunroom. The curved sofa is by Berman’s mentor, Angelo Donghia, while the Morrow chairs are from his own Michael Berman Limited collection.

Aside from the designer residing in Los Angeles, it’s also fitting that Berman’s first career choice was entertainment. “I had a yearning to break into show business,” says the Detroit native, who landed a job in the 1980s as a dancer in Radio City Music Hall’s iconic Christmas Spectacular. “I realized quickly that was not my calling and soon moved back to Los Angeles where I landed a job at the Donghia showroom and at a time where they were doing window displays like the early days of Barneys.” While studying design at Otis-Parsons, Berman worked his way up the ranks, eventually securing a position working in the furniture department that would provide the blueprint for his career. “Angelo Donghia and John Hutton would come up with an idea and I would work on the prototype process,” he says. “Donghia was such an innovator in the early 1980s and one of the first to do couture furniture. He would sit and talk about how furniture was tailored and how a fabric would lay like a woman’s dress or a man’s suit.” Berman was also inspired by his mentor’s business principles. “He was such an entrepreneur and I liked the way he conducted business, managed the company, and treated his employees. It left an indelible mark on me as an interior designer.” Berman started his own design firm in 1987 and added product development to his resume in the mid-1990s. “I started with a handful of lamps and upholstered chairs and placed a trial run with a showroom on Melrose Avenue. Soon other designers were asking me to design furniture for their projects.” Today he has a myriad of licensed products with the

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“Who’s Who” of the industry—outdoor furniture with Brown Jordan, tile and stone with Walker Zanger, Robert Abbey lamps, ROHL plumbing fixtures, textiles with Kravet and the Michael Berman Limited furniture collection at PROFILES in 200 Lex. “My fabric line will be emblematic of a bright, mid-century modernist approach.” Influenced by his Palm Springs home, he explains, “I used iconic, architectural flora and fauna designs with a bohemian modern take.” His design work is the epitome of California design, an aesthetic that he has ingeniously coined “barefoot luxury.” “There is a real sense of casual indoor/outdoor living that is very in tune to the sunlight. The color palette makes things feel very blonde, particularly with the use of light wood, blanched oak, and gray and blue tones. The light bleaches and blanches, and we get this dappled sunlight all over everything. The color changes almost hourly and mutes any color I can think of.”

Berman feels that California is a catalyst for many of the trends in the industry. “There is an abundance of resources, craftsmen, and workers with Old World experience from all over the globe. There is also a generosity in terms of space here. We are very lucky to have the luxury of space in our environment.” This translates into his penchant for large-scale patterns, oversized club chairs, and organic accessories used in a style he calls “American Trans-Modern.” “It’s the essence of transitional style and refers to historic and classic ornamental designs emblematic of Art Deco, Regency, Streamline Moderne, and recomposing.”


Top: For the dining room, Berman chose an exquisite hand-painted wallpaper from Fromental that is symbiotic with the landscape. Middle left: The designer stepped out of his comfort zone and strategically placed pops of color in every room. Middle right: The modern bath exudes what Berman coins “Barefoot Luxury.� Bottom: Exterior view of outdoor living, California style.

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While a typical Berman interior cannot be placed into any one particular genre, a common thread is his infusion of retro and vintage styling with furnishings from his Michael Berman Limited collection. “I am always looking backward to look forward, and how I can recreate to make it relevant for the present.” It’s a style and aesthetic that has made him an A-list designer with the Hollywood elite. For the recent renovation of the Coldwater Canyon home of an entertainment industry mover and shaker and his family, Berman stepped out of his comfort zone of color. “The client wanted it to be very colorful and stimulating. The family room colors pop with celadon, bright tangerine, and pomegranate. This was a challenge for me as I am not one to throw on masses of color. If I am going to do color, I gotta go big!” For the dining room, Berman used a more minimalist approach with an Asian influence. He designed the room’s hand-painted wallpaper with the British firm Fromental and even lugged back the chandelier from one of the stalls of Marché aux Puces in Paris. The sunroom, complete with Morrow chairs from his own collection available at PROFILES inside 200 Lex and an Art Deco-inspired round back sofa from Donghia are beneficiaries of the incredible expanse of windows and California sunlight. Perhaps one of the biggest showstoppers is the wine room. “I wanted it to be a theater on its own, as it’s essentially about drama and theater when you uncork a wine.” Using parchment finishes with a Streamline Moderne

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style, Berman placed the incredible collection—an oenophile’s dream— behind iron and glass doors. The multi-talented designer has also ventured into hotel interiors with his renovation of 32 bungalows at Santa Monica’s Fairmont Miramar. Describing the spaces as “surf modern,” each room is treated with individuality and originality. “There is a forethought and continuity that runs through the rooms, and you can literally go into another room and have a totally different experience.” As with any Berman interior, they are the epitome of California charm. His work is also influenced by the city’s biggest industry—film. “So much of what we do is influenced by Hollywood—fashion, interior design, and even celebrities.” One wonders if Berman’s next venture might just be on the other side of the camera designing sets. Whatever the next interior, Fred and Ginger would be right at home. Top: Berman added wrought iron and glass doors to a spectacular downstairs wine room. (Opposite page): The multi-talented designer renovated 32 bungalows in Santa Monica’s Fairmont Miramar. Noting the designs are “surf-modern,” he employed an organic color palette to mirror the environment.


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By Catherine McHugh

Los Angeles G

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The SLS Beverly Hills serves as the flagship of SBE’s ever-growing series of design-driven lodging.

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hen the 297-room SLS Beverly Hills, the flagship of Sam Nazarian’s ultra-hip SBE hotel group, opened its doors in November 2008, its highly anticipated debut did not disappoint. Designed by French designer Philippe Starck, who is internationally renowned for his interior, product, industrial, and architectural work, the hotel embodies a cross between playfulness and sophistication. It also marked Starck’s first entry under a 15-year exclusive design deal with SBE for venues in North America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. “The world, and what I call the ‘global tribe’ which travels it, is very different from when I designed

my first hotels,” Starck commented during the design process. “What I am creating for SLS will be incredibly timeless, chic, bold, and ultimately humane, designed only to bring happiness in an elegant way.” The futuristic, minimalist rooms are bathed in soothing tones and offer visitors now-expected high-end luxuries like flat-screen TVs, pillow-top beds, rainfall shower heads, and hypoallergenic amenities. Among the hotel’s more unusual elements are its dual lobbies—a cozy one for overnight guests, and a grander entrance for visitors to the shops, restaurants, and bar.

The Silver Bonze Stool, designed by Philippe Starck and manufactured by Cassina Contract, gazes out on the soothing Ciel Spa.

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Top: White leather couches win by a landslide in the Presidential Suite. Bottom: The Superior King guest rooms include faux fur coverlets and Cassina’s bronze teacup stools. (Cassina Contract manufactured the exclusive Philippe Starck-designed furniture for the hotel chain.) 34


“Nazarian and Starck wanted to deliver a value proposition in the luxury market that took design elements one step further.” “The property was designed to fill the white space in the hotel market between the staid big-box luxury brands delivering outstanding service and the trendy boutique and business properties with little to no service on offer,” explains Jason Cruce, Vice President of Design & Development at Dakota Development, the real estate subsidiary of SBE. “Nazarian and Starck wanted to deliver a value proposition in the luxury market that took design elements one step further.” To that end, the colors in the hotel are warm and luxurious with pops of playful hues in unexpected locations, such as the red mirrored elevator lobby on the ground floor and fluorescent green accents in the minibars. “The hotel was created as an experiential journey through a series of curated spaces, all sharing a common design language but capable of standing alone,” Cruce says. “The guest room furniture was all custom designed by Starck and manufactured by Cassina. Public area furniture was all selected and designed with classical touches updated with modern materials and textures. Playful pieces are thrown into the mix and create fun vignettes and photo opportunities throughout the property.” Apart from its amenities as a hotel, SLS's other big draw is The Bazaar, which Starck also designed and which is run by award-winning culinary innovator José Andrés. With four unique dining rooms, a retail shop, and Bar Centro, Cruce explains, ”the concept behind The Bazaar was to create different dining and retail experiences in one destination restaurant.” “The Rojo room sits just off the kitchen and is framed by the jamón carving station with images of matadors, playing up the meat-centric portion of the menu,” Cruce says. “Blanca has a lighter color palette with a patio opening onto the hotel’s porte cochère; it lends itself well to the lighter vegetable tapas dishes on offer. The Patisserie area is decorated in pink etched glass and has classical French furniture with whimsical detailing over the top of the pastry and chocolate displays.”

Descending from top left: the SLS Beverly Hills exterior; the Altitude Pool & Lounge, the Robert Vetica Salon, and a typical SLS suite.

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Top row: The Rojo dining room at The Bazaar by José Andrés inside the SLS Beverly Hills; a vibrant tapas plate; The Bazaar’s Patisserie room. Middle row: The hidden 40-seat tasting room, SAAM, located in The Bazaar; The Bazaar spotlights both inventive and traditional Spanish tapas. Bottom row: The dining room at Trés features FLOS Gun Floor Lamps.

The SLS pioneered this multi-faceted culinary and lounge concept for hotel lobby spaces, which the creative group has continued to expand on in Miami Beach and Las Vegas. “Working with the SBE Hotel Group is a very exciting new challenge for me,” said Andrés. “Food and beverage is increasingly playing such a pivotal role within the best luxury hotels around the world and it is a very fulfilling next step for my company.”

The next steps for the SLS chain include hotel openings in New York, Seattle, Philadelphia, Cancun, and Cabo San Lucas. While each hotel certainly will be different, they share common design threads. “Starck has a constantly evolving design sensibility and this has been integral in shaping the SLS brand,” Cruce notes. “Certain elements, such as SLS’s large floor-to-ceiling mirrors and tapestries are present in some form in every hotel, but we try to avoid a cookie-cutter approach. For Seattle, some of the stainless detailing has given way to wood and a more naturally oriented color palette. In South Beach, touches of pink were introduced to reflect the more casual vibe and Art Deco touches of Miami Beach. The architecture and interiors of each hotel are representative of its location, while maintaining the integrity of the brand.” The New York installation is set to open in 2016 in Manhattan's NoMad neighborhood on Park Avenue South, a five-minute walk to 200 Lex. Plans include new restaurant and nightlife concepts, and an exclusive rooftop experience to bring something truly dynamic, vibrant, and timeless to the community. “We are tremendously excited to be bringing Philippe and José together again in New York,” Cruce says. “We are learning a lot from the challenges presented as a result of New York’s density and trying to adaptively re-use a post-war office building for a hotel and restaurant. We overcame similar hurdles in the design of our South Beach hotel, and are applying those lessons we learned into our New York property. It’s all about being smart and efficient with your designs, maximizing the impact of each and every element that goes into the building.”

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Eats’N’Sleeps O Ya 122 East 28th Street (212) 204-0200 o-ya.restaurant/o-ya-nyc

The Clocktower 5 Madison Avenue (212) 413-4300 theclocktowernyc.com

Lupulo 835 6th Avenue (212) 290-7600 lupulonyc.com

Tasca Chino 245 Park Avenue South (212) 335-2220 tascachino.com

In 2008, O Ya broke into Boston’s sushi scene with a bang, bagging the blessing of New York Times restaurant reviewer Frank Bruni, who lauded the sushi bar as “the best new restaurant in the country.” Seven years later, Tim and Nancy Cushman, the husband and wife duo who brought O Ya into this world, lay their latest bairn in Gramercy’s Park South Hotel. And so we welcome O Ya New York City, where omakase virgins and veterans alike can experience the restaurant’s inventive menu amidst amber lighting, stained wood, and exposed brick. Here, tradition bends to trend, not just in O Ya’s décor but in its two tasting menus. The “Omakase” incorporates 18 contemporary, avant-garde sushi and sashimi bites for $185, while the 24-course “Okii Ringo” (“Big Apple”) focuses on innovative, seasonal ingredients for $245. Grant yourself two to three hours for these tastings. Linger longer if you dare dive into Nancy’s seductive sake menu.

To call the New York EDITION’s new eatery a mere “restaurant” falls short. The Clocktower is a really a space with a presence of its own, comprising three opulent dining rooms overlooking the park; a billiards room that banks the old school, noir vibe; and a buzzy, gold-leafed bar where the cocktails flow strong. The ambiance here, stately but coquettish, lends well to a business dinner, a flirtatious first date, or an indulgent brunch the morning after. The milieu is due in part to the Rockwell Group’s courtly, quirky design—walls wainscoated in satiny wood and adorned with mismatched portraits, a purple pool table matching a magenta chandelier, plush chairs upholstered in jewel tones, and a salmagundi set of dishware. But don’t let the décor detract from what should be the turret of the tower here—the British-accented menu from London’s Michelin-starred Jason Atherton and restaurateur Stephen Starr. The AngloSaxon selections are almost predictable, but sometimes where experimentation lays low perfection rears its head. Start with the hand-chopped steak tartare, try the macaroni and cheese with wild mushrooms and slow-cooked ox cheek, and don’t forgo dessert. The strawberries and cream with vanilla custard and verjus sorbet is simple but a stand-out.

With a name that translates to “hops” in Portuguese, George Mendes’ second restaurant, Lupulo, is gaining a rap as one of the city’s well-heeled hot spots. Inspired by Lisbon’s famous cervejarias (breweries), Lupolo is a humble, hustling neighborhood joint, complete with tantalizing menu, carefully crafted beer list, and a lively crowd surrounding the wraparound bar. Though the cured Ibérico ham, creamy chicken liver pâté, and organic young chicken are popular choices, the menu draws heavily from the sea. The bold, oven-baked octopus rice flavored with olive, coriander, and lime; the Manila clams dressed in vinho verde, garlic, and cilantro; and the fresh oysters are all frequent fliers from the kitchen or raw bar. Lupulo’s Portuguese roots also appear in the restaurant’s design. Heavy wood and thick rope accents weave a rustic feel, enhanced by tokens procured from the chef’s travels to Portugal. As immersive as it is, Lupulo is a place where you can feel at home, and that feeling seems to be a shared one. Lupulo is busy, even on a weekday night, and doesn’t take reservations. If you come in at a prime time, be ready to take a seat at the bar and enjoy a cold beer, American or Portuguese. In that case, even the wait itself is worth it.

Right off Park Avenue, Chef Alex Ureña is proving “haute-Chinese” is very much a thing, at least when flavors from Spain meld into the mix. Though his menu of tapas and dim sum shows no particular bias, Ureña tends to lean to the West for substance and the Far East for spice. Ponzu sauce, wasabi mayo, and housemade kimchi spice give the classic garbanzo frito a kick. Szechuan pepper aioli lends a savory kick to crispy patatas bravas. The lobster and shrimp is glazed with ginger and adorned with bamboo shoots, thai basil, and red chili. It’s worth noting that if you’re wining and dining a vegetarian, Tasca Chino is a chance to impress, rare in the galaxy of Michelin stars. Herbivores can graze on a robust number of intriguing options, including sweet pea, edamame, and mint dumplings; smoked kale, arugula, and seaweed salad; roasted cauliflower with madras curry; fresh asparagus with miso sabayon; and even a vegetable paella. The coalescence of East-meets-West adds distinct flare to the dishes and to the décor. On one wall, a matador meets a bull in a large painting, while Chairman Mao hovers over diners from the other. The effect is much like the restaurant’s cuisine—a fusion that’s swanky but playful, with a bubbly staff to keep the vibe alive.

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By Katie Doyle

Novel influences from Europe to Asia, plus a resurgence of quintessential New York panache get stirred into Manhattan’s melting pot this season.

The Beekman 5 Beekman Street (855) 523-3563 thompsonhotels.com/hotels/ the-beekman

The New York EDITION 5 Madison Avenue (212) 413-4200 editionhotels.com/new-york

1 Hotel Central Park 1414 Avenue of the Americas (212) 703-2001 1hotels.com/central-park

SLS Park Ave 44 Park Avenue South slshotels.com/newyorkcity

5 Beekman is something like a rare, well-aged wine. Having seen enough history, the time has come for an uncorking. 5 Beekman has been waiting more than 200 years to come into its own, and on February 2016, the wait will end. In 1761, the site was home to the Chapel Street Theater, which debuted Shakespeare’s Hamlet to the United States. In the 1830s, the site contained a massive library where literary legends such as Edgar Allan Poe were known to work. By 1883, construction had begun on Temple Court, the bones of today’s 5 Beekman. Since then, the building has accumulated its share of stories—from a suicidal waiter who jumped to his death in 1911 to the accidental preservation of the ninth-floor pyramidal atrium that was walled off in the 1940s after a change in the fire code. Restoration began in 2013, and three years later, 5 Beekman is finally ready to shed the chrysalis and opens its wings to both a hotel and a handful of private residences. With design by Martin Brudnizki, known for his glamorous but sophisticated interiors, and a rumored two restaurants (by legends Tom Colicchio and Keith McNally), 2016 might turn out to be 5 Beekman’s true golden age.

One of the newest brands in the Marriott brood, The New York EDITION is like the Ritz-Carlton’s ultra-hip, ultra-luxe, but eternally classy sister. And, no surprise, she’s drop-dead gorgeous with 273 rooms featuring oak flooring; high, elegantly curved ceilings; and opulent design accents like a fur throw and curated art. For the crème of the EDITION experience, stay in one of the suites—beautifully furnished with chaise lounges upholstered in imported linen, expansive windows draped in silver silk, stunning walnut coffee tables topped with espresso leather, and black and white portraiture from famous photographer Melvin Sokolsky’s 1963 “Bubble” series—and then make your way to The Clocktower restaurant (see opposite page) for a game of pool, a glass of champagne, and a decadent dinner to round out your stay.

1 Hotels operates on a pure and simple philosophy—“The world around us is beautiful and we want to keep it that way,” or so says CEO Barry Sternlicht. 1 Hotels has built a brand around its eco-friendly practices, which operate both behind the scenes and before your eyes. Its new flagship location, 1 Hotel Central Park, revels in the intersection of sustainability and design, and reveals the overlap to be beautiful and needed. After all, if there was ever a city that could stand a moment of meditation and self-care, this is it. 1 Hotels is something of an oasis inside and out, just a two-minute walk from Central Park, and offering picnic baskets by day or stargazing maps by night should you desire to explore it day or night. Raw, organic textures, recycled materials, repurposed wood, and live plants that thrive on the abundance of natural light create a tangible sense of tranquility. If the experience feels like you’ve stepped into a spa or a yoga studio, you’ll likely leave feeling as good as if you had just stepped out of one, thanks to perks like a lobby farmstand; a complimentary yoga mat in your room; and aromatherapy with notes of cedar, vetiver, and lemons distilled throughout the property.

In 2016, NoMad will add yet another gem to its crown of high-end hospitality establishments in the glimmering, glitzy form of an SLS hotel. With presences already firmly established in South Beach, Beverly Hills, and Las Vegas, SLS is better known as a place to be seen than a place to stay. Decadent parties have drawn the likes of Diddy, Justin Bieber, and Russell Simmons, all under Philippe Starck’s glamorous, energized design. While the New York location is still fogged in mystery, the vibe is already buzzy, trendy, and certainly turned up. Count on 190 rooms that will showcase the brand’s “seriously luxurious style,” while rumor has it that guests will be able to enjoy iconic views in a rooftop bar and intimate ambiance in a basement lounge. And, with SLS having been previously called a “foodie hotel,” expect a heavy-hitting restaurant under the culinary direction of José Andrés to add even more to the tony Park Avenue location.

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GALLERY A PI C T UR E -PE R F ECT SHOWROOM EXHIB ITION .

Facette asymmetric, hand-beaten Copper Mirror Frame available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Alberto Chair available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com OCT

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Gallery

Ocean Twist Lamp available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com Raindrop Rug available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Lloyd Harbor Home available at Bakes & Kropp, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Square Cocktail Table available at Apropos Furniture Showroom, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

DB Daybed Sectional available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com Westbury Dressing Chest available at Kindel Furniture, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

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KINON’s decorative handmade surface material fabricated into various interior applications available at KinonŽ Surface Design Inc., 561.600.2500, kinon.com

Orange Comfy available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Persian Tikria Mirror available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Red Porcelain Zig Zag Side Table/Stool available at Tucker Robbins, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Chest available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

The Hex Table from Brett Designs available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

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Michael Berman Furniture available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com Magenta Armchair available at LEPERE, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

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Radiant Orchid Chandelier available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com Rhodes Chair available at Dune, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com

Fascinate Chest available at Theodore Alexander, 646.293.6628, theodorealexander.com

Hoot (Samurai) available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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freshpicks THE MOST CURRENT PRODUCTS IN 200 LEX SHOWROOMS.

Barrel Fever The interior area of the compact Tonella Lounge Chair from LEPERE can be upholstered in fabric or leather, while the outer fabric shell is quilted to follow the barrel style lines of the base. The steel frame can be enameled in various colors. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com Heavens to Percy The Percy Chest’s neoclassical shape is updated for the 21st century in bleached ivory vellum with three concave brass drawers finished with understated brass pulls and set on tapered brass legs. One of Julian Chichester’s newest designs, it’s shown here with the Whitby Chair and Mr. Brown London’s Blakely Table Lamp. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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freshpicks

Celestial Event Sharp angles and LED sparkles put a modern twist on the Starburst Chandelier from Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Streams of light emanate from the tips, reflecting off a brushed brass finish. In another light, the Starburst is offered in a warm, polished chrome finish. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Arts Channel Octavia, designed by Stanley Jay Friedman for Brueton, is a sleek, light-on-its-feet seating series with a linear upholstery channel that runs its length, making for an interesting aesthetic. The arms are independently attached on the outside and the sled legs are of polished or satin stainless steel. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

Dorothy Doubles Down The Double Bureau from the Dorothy Draper Collection at Kindel Furniture features a new paint color (grey) with glazed silver leaf accents. Kindel Furniture is made to order and finished by hand, so custom paint and wood finishes matching your sample are always available. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

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Fit and Form Parallel Boxes from the Roger Thomas Collection by Studio A Home are studies in both harmony and contrast. The intricate mosaic inlay is achieved by applying hand-crushed duck eggshells in a precise pattern onto the lacquer halfway through the finishing process. Each box is crafted by artisans, so no two are exactly alike. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com


Light Refractions A twist of geometric-shaped pieces form the extraordinary unbeveled Prism Mirror from Christopher Guy. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Expert Panels Inspired by new technologies, Kinon’s newest collection of patterns offers a bold impression and a new perspective to luxury interiors. Linear orientations in metals and decorative, handcrafted resins are trending on feature walls, furniture pieces, and architectural millwork. Kinon Surface Panels are custom made and available in virtually any color. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, 561.600.2500, kinon.com

Clear Spirits The sleek style and dimensions of Louis J. Solomon’s crystal clear Acrylic Bar Cart will fit easily into any space and with any décor. Simple lines and eye-catching materials, along with three shelves and lockable wheels, make this cart perfect for a sparkling display while also being highly functional. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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Baskets of Light Few objects had a more important or far-reaching role in history than the humble basket, having been used to store and carry nearly everything that people need and value. Vintage Philippine bamboo and rattan baskets have been given new life as stunning Bamboo Floor Lamps by Tucker Robbins. Available in natural or painted finish. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

California Dreamer Barbara Barry’s Presidio Sofa from Baker Furniture is defined by a strong silhouette featuring a supportive and comfortable bench seat. Five throw pillows provide an opportunity for creative fabric application and an additional level of comfort. The sofa rests on an exposed wood base with optional brass ferrules on the front legs. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Self Storage The modern and elegant Chic Stack Organizer designed by Barbara Barry at Global Views is a home for all those small yet precious things in life—earrings, jewelry, pens, eyewear, and more. Crafted in bleached walnut with warm bronze oval handles, this organizer features divided drawers lined in a luxurious bronze felt. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Brass By Hand The Morgan Coffee Table from The Bright Group is hand formed from solid brass, combining hand-cut grooves and clean, angular lines to create a strikingly simple yet elegant silhouette. The table is finished with a smoked glass top that complements the antique patina. Available in a variety of custom finishes and sizes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Luxe Life The lavish medley of Modern Luxe Fabrics from Kravet presents unique patterns in varying scales, textures, and styles. Metallics and novelties are blended with fresh designs in a crisp smoky grey palette accented by natural hues in modern embroideries, weaves, applique, prints, sheers, and lush velvets. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

A Different Stripe The quirky Striate Modern Accent Table from Theodore Alexander combines traditional and modern crafts and design. Using centuries-old Asian lacquering techniques, up to 25 layers of lacquer are applied to achieve the deep luster of the top, and twinkling silver striations which subtly glow beneath the surface. Available in two heights. Theodore Alexander, Suite 515, 646.293.6628, theodorealexander.com

Cumulus Comfort The ultra-luxurious upholstered Cloud Sofa designed by Richard Shemtov for Dune is aptly named—as it provides dreamy comfort. The base and legs are wood veneer over steel with many custom wood and metal options available. Manufactured in Jersey City, NJ. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com

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freshpicks

Primal Perspective

Edge of Night For Midnight Edges, part of Odegard’s Artists Collection, Stephanie was attracted to the expressionistic qualities of Mira Lehr’s paintings as well as the colorations and the feelings they evoke. This handknotted carpet is made in Nepal from 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed vegetal wool. It is also available in custom colors. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Inner Glow Agates, formed billions of years ago, now glow in The Pedra Special Edition Lamps by Patrick Dragonette, part of a collection at PROFILES inspired by mid-century masters with a contemporary twist for timeless appeal. With a custom linen shade, the agate is set in a polished brass box and illuminated from inside. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com 54

Constructed of wrought iron and crystal, the organic, six-light Fen Chandelier by Currey & Company is a counterbalance of materials contrasting darkness and light, raw and polished. The firm is known for authentic products that speak to the touch of the human hand through timeless craftsmanship. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Revolves Around You With a sleek, distinctive design, the Galileo Swivel Lounge Chair by Powell & Bonnell at Dennis Miller Associates is all-around stylish. A pleasing tailored back and enveloping seat cushion invites an abundance of comfort, while a finely drawn outline in show-wood imparts attention to detail. Galileo mixes well with others, whether transitional or modern. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com


Heart of the Home For a designer show house benefitting the American Heart Association, Bakes & Kropp Fine Cabinetry transformed the kitchen of a 90-year-old Mill Neck, NY, mansion with a stunning mixture of classic white and walnut cabinetry. The custom range hood features walnut and brushed stainless steel, and the coordinating backsplash and countertops are Silestone by Cosentino. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Unpretentious Comfort Soft, scrumptious, and perfect for flopping and lounging, the seat and back cushions of Apropos’ Stanton Sofa are stuffed full with lovely down feathers, but they are loose so they can be plumped as needed. The flat French welt treatment frames the piece while also adding a sophisticated accent. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F E ATUR E D HI GHLIGHT S OF CR AFT AND D ES IG N .

1. Hides in Plain Sight (opposite) Kravet Carpet introduces Hide Area Rugs in natural colors with plank, chevron, and tile dynamic surfaces. With rich and authentic textures, each hand-stitched piece is unique. 2. Fab Function Quirky yet functional, Mr. Brown’s Banco Bookshelf at Julian Chichester accommodates books and objets d’art in an asymmetrical arrangement of shelves. Hand wrapped in linen and finished with a gold faux bois pattern.

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StyleSpotlight

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3. Solid Perch The Dash Stool by at Dune has a solid wood frame in your choice of ash, oak, or walnut in stained or natural finishes. The stretcher is satin stainless steel. 4. Soft Stone Part of Odegard’s Sari Lights Collection, Amethyst Carpets, in wool and Indian raw silk are hand-knotted into original and exclusive graphic designs on cotton and wool foundations. 5. Natural Centerpiece With its elegant horn shape and striking colorblock design mixing white and black marble, the DwellStudio Marble Flared Bowl at Global Views commands attention at the center of any table. 6. Raining Glass Multiple hand-blown glass raindrop pendants in amber, clear, gray, and blue create a stunning display in the Rain Drops Chandelier from Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co.

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7. Dream Fabricator Kinon Surface Design’s Luxury Decorative Panels are easily fabricated into cabinetry, wall panels, tables, architectural features, furniture, accent pieces, or virtually anything else you can imagine. 8. My Precious The exquisite simplicity of two perfect hand-carved ovals gently brought together by a central pearl makes the Pearl Mirror by Christopher Guy a truly unique contemporary piece. 9. Sculptural Comfort Inspired by 19th-century Biedermeier style, the Fremont Wing Chair by Thor Taber at Theodore Alexander shuns ornament in favor of clean lines and casual modernity.

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StyleSpotlight

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10. Applied Geometry The unique, geometric lines of this Metal Etagere with Beveled Glass Shelves from Louis J. Solomon serves as a beautiful frame for any display items. 11. Steel Band Symphony This handsome custom range hood, designed and manufactured by Bakes & Kropp, features rich walnut adorned with bands of brushed stainless steel.

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12. Gourmet Seating Designed by Bentel & Bentel for the famed NYC restaurant, the Le Bernardin Bar Stool at Brueton is as refined as the menu, yet offers extraordinary support and comfort. 13. Shield Me The China Shield Mirror by Roger Thomas at Studio A Home is an interpretation of a traditional Chinese design. This striking piece is made of bent iron with a luxe gold leaf finish. 14. Le Club Baker Furniture has introduced modern stitching for the entire Thomas Pheasant Collection, including his Paris Club Chair, a contemporized Chesterfield Chair with a tufted back, arms, and seat. 15. Post Modern These Totemic Posts from Tucker Robbins were carved in Cameroon out of antique house posts using traditional designs, yet are wonderfully Brancusi-like in their powerful abstractions.

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StyleSpotlight

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15. Turtle Moon This Demi Lune Table from Kindel Furniture was created in maple to allow for lacquer finishes. Tortoise is a new painted finish requiring hand application and layering of color. 16. Mountain Modern The Charles Chair from Apropos grabs attention by blending elements of Adirondack and mid-century classics. This hand-crafted frame features leather strap armrests with a sling seat and back. 17. Guitar Case Fretwork Casegoods by Altura at Dennis Miller Associates have an intricate, linear pattern reminiscent of Mondrian overlaying on its doors and drawer fronts. The raised metal inlay resembles the frets on a guitar.

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18. Feast on the Sun With fluid lines and a radiating top, The Lindi Table by Randolph & Hein is a 21st-century sculpture at PROFILES. Satinwood veneer in a sunburst pattern with a mercurio finish makes for a spectacular dining experience. 19. Fresh From the Harbor The rustic Oyster Bay Table Lamp from Currey & Company adds coastal charm and style. Hand-selected natural oyster shells inside a wrought iron cage emulate a fisherman's catch. 20. Joint Project Born of their design incubator, the Sternum Chaise at The Bright Group is functional artwork. The sinewy lines, made up of more than sixty joints, shows true woodworking craftsmanship. 21. Taper Forum LEPERE’s Ninna Chair has a handcrafted turned ash wood structure and assembly points are tapered to form a sleek bottleneck shape. Finished in natural varnish, wenge stain, black or grey lacquer. OCT

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De. FIN.ingPieces I T E MS THAT SUM U P WHAT A SHOWROOM IS AL L AB OUT.

JULIAN CHICHESTER Mr. Brown is renowned for his brilliant assortment of lighting: radiant table lamps, floor lamps, sconces, and chandeliers. The Glenwick Chandelier is a traditional drum design inventively updated with rows of dangling frosted glass circles in rounds of gold. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

LEPERE The Don Lounge Chair has a steel base available in gunmetal black or bronze. Seat and back cushions feature a comfy top layer of goose down. Available covered in fabric or leather, and with or without arms to allow sectional seating configurations in concert with the Don Sofa and Chaise. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

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DefiningPieces

TUCKER ROBBINS A Wheel of Life to Buddhists, a Medicine Wheel to Native Americans, a Mandala to Hindus, the wheel has symbolized the circle of life all over the world. Interpreted here by the metal weavers of Honduras, the Wire Wheel Pendant Light brings a sense of serenity and unity to any space. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

LOUIS J. SOLOMON The unique wooden base on this Deep Contemporary Sofa adds contemporary flair, and the generous dimensions will accommodate all of your friends and guests. The sleek lines of the upholstered body of this sofa will fit easily into any existing dĂŠcor, with endless fabric options and nine finishes to choose from. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

APROPOS FURNITURE SHOWROOM A functional and stylish mix of Mid-Century and contemporary design, the Social Desk can be used as a student workstation or an executive desk. Featured here in Zebrano veneer with a complementary paint color, brushed stainless steel accents, and file drawer. Custom sizes, wood species, finishes, and configurations are available. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

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THE BRIGHT GROUP The Dodd Quilted Lounge Chair by Douglas Levine is part of a sleekly designed barrel lounge series featuring petite and wide lounge versions, available in quilted pads as well as settee and sofa versions. Available in all Bright Group finishes and handcrafted in Middletown, NY. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

THEODORE ALEXANDER The Nob Hill Stool/Ottoman is inspired by the craze for all things classical during the Regency period in England. The meticulously handcarved maple lion legs, as well as the saddle seat display movement and energy. The seat has a subtle wooden beading that lightens the design and is technically challenging to execute. Theodore Alexander, Suite 515, 646.293.6628, theodorealexander.com

KRAVET INC. The Waterworks Collection II for Kravet Soleil redefines performance fabrics with stylish and durable options for outdoor or indoor use. Featuring sophisticated designs infused with stripes, terries, waffles, metalassĂŠs, jacquards, and textured solids in rich colors, Waterworks fabrics are the perfect complement to any environment. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES The popular Hampton Sofa by Anees Upholstery comes in three standard sizes with the choice of a wood base and tapered legs. Its rectilinear form gives the piece a formal look, but the three loose back pillows and a tufted seat cushion provide ample room for relaxation. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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DefiningPieces

CHRISTOPHER GUY CURREY & COMPANY Pendant lighting is a highly practical and popular part of Currey & Company’s product line. The rich and authoritative Admiral Pendant commands attention with its versatile dome-shape that possesses charisma in spades. The aluminum body is hand-finished in a warm copper that pairs well with antique brass hardware. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

The Vigne 1 Armchair is an elegant hand-carved occasional chair inspired by the summer vines in Provence, France. Also available are left-hand and right-hand two-seater settees. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

PROFILES Swanky and long, the Tufted Sofa by William Haines is voluminous in length and high on style. First seen as an actor on the big screen, Haines famously later turned to interior design, his work seen in the finest homes in Beverly Hills and Hollywood, and finally in the White House. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Jodrei II, from the Stephanie Odegard Collection, marries the matte texture of wool with the shimmer of silk. Odegard still sets the standard in these combinations with elegant tone-on-tone carpets. Hand knotted in Nepal of 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed wool and Chinese silk. Custom colors are available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

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KINON® SURFACE DESIGN INC. Kinon Surface Design’s custom, handmade patterns and colors have been featured throughout high-end residential, hospitality, retail, and commercial projects. Applications include wall paneling, cabinetry, tables, furniture, doors, shelving, wall units, architectural woodwork, and virtually anything your heart desires. With over 400 available patterns, this cast product can create a bold impression in your design. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, 561.600.2500, kinon.com

BRUETON Deliberate sculptural interplay of cylindrical forms characterizes the Tee Console designed by J. Wade Beam. The simplicity of the pedestal base flows into the cantilevered arms, which are sliced to express and reveal the depth of the glass or stone top and sides. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO. Read in bed, work at your desk, or relax in the living room illuminated by efficient, dimmable LED Task Wall Lamps by George Kovacs. Select the mood using the built-in dimmer that remembers your setting for the next time. Available in table and floor models, four shade styles, and five finish choices. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

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DefiningPieces

BAKES & KROPP Classic white cabinetry in Bakes & Kropp's signature Meridian style sets the foundation for this radiant Hamptons kitchen. The farmhouse-style sink with walnut strip and stainless Sub-Zero appliances coordinate well with polished nickel hardware by Robert Bakes. White and gray Carrara marble tops the counters and island to complete the luminous look. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

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DUNE Enveloping you in your own personal environment, the Climate Sectional Sofa is upholstered over a solid wood frame and coil spring platform. The seat cushions are a poly/down mix, and the back cushions are 50/50 down and feather. The stainless steel legs have a satin finish. Available in custom sizes and finishes. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com


KINDEL FURNITURE Made entirely in Grand Rapids, MI, the Mark Round Pedestal Dining Table from the Dorothy Draper Collection features a slip-matched, veneered top with a solid cherry rim. The pedestal base with four curved legs is based on Dorothy Draper’s original design from the Mark Hopkins Hotel. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com STUDIO A HOME Cambodian Rice Cutters are artfully designed utilitarian tools. The rice is first gathered in the hook part of the tool, then grabbed by hand while the small iron blade is swung through it in a quick, smooth motion. These one-of-a-kind artifacts are sold with a custom acrylic case for an elegant display. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

GLOBAL VIEWS Designed by celebrated architect Michael C. F. Chan, the beautiful, modern Oval End/Slat Back Chair has a high back for comfort, gracefully curved handrails, and a classic slatted back. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2015-16 F R E S H FACE S A ND NEW D ESIGNS.

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW LOCATION

OPENING SOON

OPENING SOON

Aero, 15th Floor aerostudios.com Celebrating its 20th year, Aero is a fixture in New York City’s design community. Thomas O’Brien continually puts forth his latest finds and ideas in a revolving, imagined interior. The store houses O’Brien’s hand-picked, everchanging selection of refurbished vintage modern furniture and lighting, antiques, fine art, tableware, accessories, and collectibles. In addition, Aero stocks the most complete offering of Thomas O’Brien brand home furnishings, both ready-made and made to order. It is the only place to find O’Brien’s custom Aero-label goods, from handcrafted, luxury upholstery and lighting to trays, bedding, and favorites like the perennially popular Aero leather tote bags.

NEW LOCATION

CF Modern, Suite 510 cfmodern.com Less than two years after Irwin Feld and Steve Cassler launched CF Modern, a mid-century-inspired, American-made, custom furniture collection, they have expanded to include a showroom at 200 Lex. CF Modern now offers a full collection of case pieces, tables, lighting, chairs, and sofas, in addition to benches and ottomans.

NEW SHOWROOMS

FAIR, Suite 601 New York Design Center’s newest showroom, FAIR, celebrates expert craftsmanship with local makers whose work is not only well made, but thoughtfully and artfully executed. Curated by designer Brad Ford, this new space features various product lines that collectively have a similar tone and quality level, and can be used in a number of high-end design contexts. Handcrafted pieces carry with them the storied skill, effort, and creativity of the people who made them. Stop by FAIR and meet some of the hand-picked makers to be included in this groundbreaking new showroom and welcome them to 200 Lex.

KARKULA, Suite 419 karkula.com In 1996, Thomas Gibson and John Erik Karkula, an antique furniture restorer and a recent design school graduate respectively, opened a tiny 200-square-foot store on Atlantic Avenue in the brownstone neighborhood of Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. The idea for the store sprouted at a ganja-scented party in the anchorage of the Brooklyn Bridge one summer evening and three months later the store was quietly opened. The name changed to Karkula in 2001 and introduced discerning New Yorkers over the next decade to the work of several important designers such as Paola Lenti, Jim Zivic, Monica Castiglioni, Mark Williams, David Weeks, Lindsey Adelman, Gabriella Valenzuela, and other innovative designers and craftspeople.

Reagan Hayes, Suite 903 reaganhayes.com Reagan Hayes, Inc. designs and manufactures high-end furniture for interior design and architecture firms. Each piece in the company’s collection is hand made in Los Angeles with the finest materials, craftsmanship, and attention to detail. Upholstered products are built with solid hardwood, eight-way, hand-tied springs and the highest grade, down-wrapped cushions. Tables are made with grain-matched, quarter-sawn veneers and masterfully worked metal features. Whether casting molten metals for sculpted table legs or spending hours preparing and applying bleached walnut veneers, Reagan Hayes products are built to stand the test of time.

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

APROPOS FURNITURE Suite 710

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

Apropos is a fourth-generation furniture showroom catering to the design trade for over 30 years. The Apropos team provides friendly, professional services in custom furniture design, interior design, and consultations. Their collections are manufactured in the USA and are environmentally conscious in design. Their goal is to provide clients with furniture that serves as a perfect fit for every project. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, phone 212.684.6987, fax 212.689.3684, apropos-furniture.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Their new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of their original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

BRUETON Suite 910

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

CURREY & COMPANY Suite 506

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, manufactures a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs, and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS DUNE Suite 100

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

JULIAN CHICHESTER/ MR. BROWN LONDON, Suite 604

Dune is an American contemporary design company focused on the development and manufacture of innovative interior products. Since 1998, Dune has built an internationally recognized design brand with its award-winning furniture collection and collaborations with the world’s most cutting-edge designers and architects. Dune’s exclusive American-made furniture collection is only available through their showroom on the ground floor of the New York Design Center. Dune, Suite 100, phone 212.925.6171, fax 212.925.2273, dune-ny.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in their New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

KINDEL FURNITURE Suite 806

KINON® SURFACE DESIGN INC. Suite 1315

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LEPERE Suite 714

Kindel celebrates over a century of American craftsmanship and classic furniture design. Made to order in Grand Rapids, MI, for over 114 years, Kindel has extensive abilities to create custom furniture. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com

For 15 years, Kinon Surface Design has developed some of the world’s most unique and luxurious decorative surface panels. Their custom, handmade patterns and colors have been featured throughout interior spaces in high-end residential, hospitality, retail, and commercial design projects large and small. Numerous applications include wall paneling, cabinetry, tables, furniture, doors, shelving, wall units, architectural woodwork, and virtually anything your heart desires. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, phone 561.600.2500, fax 561.600.2491, kinon.com

Fall 2014 marked the opening of the Kravet showroom at the new Washington Design Center, located in Franklin Court. This showroom features Kravet as well as Lee Jofa and Brunschwig & Fils. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

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LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. has been illuminating fine interiors since 1939. Now part of the Minka Group, the Metropolitan showroom represents lighting from all Minka companies, including George Kovacs, as well as products from other quality lighting manufacturers. Its large showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the US and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

STUDIO A HOME Suite 614

THEODORE ALEXANDER Suite 515

TUCKER ROBBINS Suite 504

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of high-end, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

Studio A Home’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A Home is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A Home, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com

Renowned for exquisite furnishings and unmatched craftsmanship, Theodore Alexander’s collections encompass a diversity of periods and styles featuring thousands of unique lighting, home accents, case goods, and upholstered furnishings, including designs by Jamie Drake for Theodore Alexander, the Keno Bros., and the signature English style of Althorp Living History. TA showcases select pieces at 200 Lex, with 1,300 items in stock for immediate delivery. Theodore Alexander, Suite 515, phone 646.293.6628, fax 336.885.5260, theodorealexander.com

For the past 25 years, Tucker Robbins’ passion has been bringing the spirit and craft from traditional artisans to contemporary life. He has created thriving artisan workshops in Guatemala, the Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Cameroon, working with sustainably harvested or reclaimed materials and incorporating sustainable methods that have been practiced by local people for centuries. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, phone 212.355.3383, fax 212.355.3116, tuckerrobbins.com

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Events at 200 Lex BLOCKBUSTER DESIGN WITH DERING HALL

RISD TEXTILES NEW TALENT EXHIBITION

On April 29, the New York Design Center celebrated Wired & Inspired, the first ever Virtual Showhouse presented by Dering Hall, with a kick-off party—“Blockbuster Design: From the Big Screen to the Design Scene with the Wired & Inspired Virtual Showhouse Designers.” The off-script conversation featured a fun round of fishbowl-drawn questions on topics ranging from design and cinema to New York City.

The New York Design Center hosted the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Textile Department New Talent Exhibition in the 1stdibs® at NYDC® Gallery on June 3. Twelve students transformed the space with their incredible work. Largely hand-produced, their stunning pieces were displayed on walls and draped on life-size mannequins. Two students were recognized with the Sherri Donghia Award of Achievement. Congratulations Emily Winter and Jungil Hong!

The Wired & Inspired Virtual Showhouse launched online and featured designers Brett Beldock, Etienne Coffinier and Ed Ku, Kati Curtis, Celerie Kemble, Lydia Marks and Lisa Frantz, Jayne and Joan Michaels, David Scott, Stefan Steil, and Virginia Toledo and Jessica Geller. Each designer was assigned a digital room to decorate using furnishings selected from 200 Lex showrooms. The designs consisted of a mood board and room renderings inspired by New York film sets.

The Wired & Inspired Virtual Showhouse designers; Jayne and Joan Michaels; Patty Savoie from Kati Curtis Design and The New Traditionalists’ Lauren Gilbert, Jackie Martin, Jessica Hook, and Liz Hirsch; Dering Hall’s Frank Ballabio with Brett Beldock and Lydia Marks; Thomas Burak and Michael Tavano; the Virtual Showhouse displayed on a SMART board. 76

The beautifully displayed work of RISD MFA Textile students; Sherri Donghia Award of Achievement winners Emily Winter and Jungil Hong with Sherri Donghia, center; Denise Maroney’s thesis, Path of the Bees. Photography by Karen Cattan.


AD LOVES 200 LEX On Thursday, June 4, Architectural Digest Editor-in-Chief Margaret Russell partnered with 200 Lex to host “AD Loves”—Architectural Digest’s favorite finds from the New York Design Center. Guests explored the eight participating showrooms, including The Bright Group, Century Furniture, Dennis Miller Associates, Dune, Phillips Collection, PROFILES, SA Baxter, and Studio A, to view the editor-chosen AD Picks.

Richard Shemtov of Dune with Margaret Russell, Editor-in-Chief of Architectural Digest; Dennis Miller and Harris Rubin with his Intercept Console table; Steven Stolman signed copies of his book, 40 Years of Fabulous: The Kips Bay Decorator Show House, in Dennis Miller Associates; Architectural Digest’s Bill Pittel, Chuck Chewning, Christina Juarez, and Harry Heissmann; Mercedes Desio and Alberto Villalobos of Villalobos Desio with Kati Curtis; Thom Filicia and Nick Olsen; Burnt Edge Console Table from Phillips Collection; Drew McGukin and Stephen Fanuka; Parker Bowie Larson, Elizabeth Blitzer, and Hadley Keller.

THE 11TH ANNUAL FIRST LOOK™ WITH INTERIOR DESIGN The 11th Annual first LOOK™ event at the New York Design Center took place on July 21st with 29 top contract showrooms highlighting new products. This year’s event included a partnership with Interior Design Magazine. Over 1,500 design professionals attended the event, including principals, architects, and designers from NYC’s established and emerging A&D firms. The evening included an engaging panel moderated by Cindy Allen, Editor-in-Chief of Interior Design, with product visionaries Brad Ascalon, Jhane Barnes, Michael Vanderbyl, and Ghislaine Viñas.

Cindy Allen, Editor-in-Chief of Interior Design, with Ghislaine Viñas of Ghislaine Viñas Interior Design and textile designer Jhane Barnes; New York Design Center’s Dennis Cahill and panelist Michael Vanderbyl; new products highlighted in Aristeia Metro; Ray Martes and Katerina Vanaova of Labelium. Photography by Lev Avery-Peck Photography. OCT

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

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SH OWROOM 1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design AERIN Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

S uite 10th Fl 424 816 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 433 804 1405 902 910 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 1405 505 809 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

PHONE 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.679.4341 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Julian Chichester Karkula Kasthall Rugs USA Inc.

415 702 707 1516 806 715 100 814 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 604 419 611

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 646.293.6622 212.645.2216 212.421.0220

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434 646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 917.591.2413 212.421.0230

S H OW RO O M Keilhauer Kenneth Cobonpue KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture

Suite 1101 427 1313 806 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 La Bastille 1305 1412 LaCOUR Lee Jofa 401 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 Mr. Brown London 604 802 M. Topalian, Inc. Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 PALECEK 610 1110 Paoli Pennoyer Newman LLC 416 Phillips Collection 603 Porcelanosa 609 Potterton Books 431 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Prismatique 1101 Profiles 1211 Raul Carrasco NYC 511 Reagan Hayes 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 1600 Saladino Furniture Inc. 400 SANFORD HALL Sedgwick & Brattle 815 1106 Skyline Contract Group Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A Home 612 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 TK Collections 410 Todd Hase 425 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor 426 New York Design Center

P H O NE 212.679.0300 212.532.5450 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 866.570.9690 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.684.0735 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.252.7370 212.644.2292 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.966.6112 212.658.1922 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006

FA X 212.679.5996 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.684.7350

973.227.3544 212.684.7350 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.725.2185 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.966.6113

212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 646.293.6628 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 212.871.9075 212.871.9085 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 800.876.2120 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


SALADINOSTYLE.COM


BACKSTORY CASE HISTORY

By Jim Lochner

CASE ST U DY HOUSE N O . 2 2 R E M A I N S A N E N DU R I N G S N A P S HO T O F MID -CE N TU RY MO D E RN D E S I GN .

Left to right: Julius Shulman's photo of the Stahl House interior; the view of Los Angeles today (photo: Charlotte Wiederholt); Shulman's iconic 1960 image.

High in the Hollywood Hills, 200 feet above Sunset Boulevard, sits one of the most iconic design destinations in Los Angeles. Located at 1635 Woods Drive, Case Study House No. 22, as it is known in architectural circles, is simply referred to as the Stahl House to the family that has lived there for the last 55 years. In 1954, Buck Stahl, a purchasing agent for Hughes Aircraft and a graphic designer and sign painter by trade, was renting a house nearby when he spotted grading equipment on an empty lot nearby. Two hours after going over to investigate, he had purchased the lot for $13,500 and a handshake. On weekends, Buck and his wife Carlotta carted leftover broken-up concrete from local construction sites in the back of their Cadillac convertible to keep the land in place and grade the property. Stahl’s daring vision for his house—a curved, L-shaped design over a cantilevered foundation with one wing precariously jutting out ten feet in mid-air—needed an equally daring designer. After interviewing a number of candidates, Stahl hired Pierre Koenig, a graduate of the University of Southern California, who had worked with noted California architects Raphael Soriano and A. Quincy Jones. Koenig went to John Entenza, editor of Arts & Architecture magazine, to inquire about including the house in the magazine’s Case Study House (CSH) program. The CSH program began in January 1945 in response to the housing boom that was looming in the waning months of World War II. Eight nationally known architects were commissioned to “take a plot of God’s green earth and create ‘good’ living conditions for eight American families” and “to fulfil [sic] the specifications of a special living problem in the Southern California area.” The project eventually spanned 20 years and encompassed 30 designs (including two apartments), many of which were never constructed. Case Study House No. 22 was adopted into the program in early 1959, one month before groundbreaking. Koenig flattened Stahl’s original curved design,

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making it a true “L” shape, with a single hallway connecting the two wings separating the private and public spaces. To honor Stahl’s insistence on a 270-degree uninterrupted view of the city below, Koenig installed dramatic floor-to-ceiling plate glass windows on three sides using the largest pieces of glass available at the time. Radiant-heated concrete floors helped warm up the interior’s cool, sleek look. Thirteen months later—and for a mere $37,500—the 2,200-square-foot, 2-bed/2-bath house was move-in ready. As part of the CSH program, the house was open to the public for two months. (Tours can still be booked today.) The house gained nationwide prominence when architectural photographer Julius Shulman snapped his now-iconic photo in 1960. Shulman’s striking black-and-white image features two women seated in the home’s living room seemingly floating in mid-air, engaged in cool, casual conversation while the nighttime lights of the Los Angeles basin twinkle below. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013, and its classic mid-century modern look and spectacular views have been featured in over 1,200 newspaper and magazine articles, journals and books, films, television shows, and even video games. Shatterproof glass eventually replaced the more fragile pane glass windows, while the concrete floors have been covered with wall-to-wall carpet and a narrow walkway was added around the living room’s perimeter to accommodate window washers. “[I]t is our guess,” Entenza said in his Arts & Architecture editorial about the Case Study House program, “that after all of the witches have stirred up the broth, the house that will come out of the vapors will be conceived within the spirit of our time, using as far as practicable, many war-born techniques and materials best suited to the expression of man’s life in the modern world.” After 55 years, the legendary Case Study House No. 22 has certainly “come out of the vapors” to serve as a case study in “the expression of man’s life in the modern world.”


C U R A T E D K R AV E T T M 2 0 1 5

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX . -JONATHAN ADLER

D E S I G N . C L I C K . D E L I V E R E D .T M TO T H E T R A D E

Array Magazine- Fall 2016/2016  

Array Magazine - Fall 2015 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices...

Array Magazine- Fall 2016/2016  

Array Magazine - Fall 2015 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices...

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