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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Contents

48 & 49 On the Cover Kragor Orthodontics Photo by Rebekah Gregg

July 2018

22

16

24

Features

In Every Issue

Contributors

16 Summertime Fun

4 Around Towne 8 Community News 20 Birthdays & Celebrations 34 Rob’s Rescues 38 Everyday Angels 54 TLBA 56 Towne Lake Dining Guide 58 Community Calendar 62 Library Events 74 School News 77 Downtown Woodstock Dining Guide 83 Greenprints Trail Map 86 Recent Home Sales 90 Clubs & Orgs 92 Church Listings 94 Directory of Advertisers

28 Don Akridge

Photographer Darleen Prem caught a few residents enjoying the long summer days.

22 Eagle Scouts Soar

Boy Scout Troop 994 of Hillside UMC celebrated the troop’s 100th Eagle Scout.

24 Striking Gold

Three Girl Scouts earn the Gold Award, others close in on equivalent to the boys’ Eagle award.

70 Gridiron Forecast

High school football coaches share their thoughts on the upcoming season.

24 Gloria Avillar 64 Kyle Bennett 22 Hamlin Boswell 81 Siobhan Brumbelow 40 Michael Caldwell 32 Cherokee Office of Economic Development 46 Dr. Jennifer Dattolo 52 Dr. Bruce Fink 78 Delia Halverson 14 Candi Hannigan 26 Kurt & Sheila Johnson 73 Joseph Lemmo 60 Dr. Michael Litrel 68 Elizabeth Milford 52 Dr. Christa Nelms 30 Joshua Nelson

Advertising

42 Christopher Purvis

Patty Ponder, ALM President 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com www.townelaker.com

66 Susan Schulz

TowneLakerMagazine

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@Townelaker

68 Bill Ratliff 50 Tim Timmons 54 Dr. Amber York townelakermagazine


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AROUND TOWNE

The

From the Page Designer I love being creative and I love to read. Luckily, as a page designer I get to do both! My fondness for creativity began during childhood. I like to think it stems from those peaceful summer days spent at my grandparents house. Most days, I would sit at their table for hours with some paper and a box of crayons. My grandmother would work her creative magic in the kitchen while I would relax and let my imagination flow. As I matured, my creative horizons were broadened and soon my eyes were wide open to the beautiful world of art. I quickly started to enjoy numerous art mediums. Of course, I had my childhood favorites, crayons and markers, chalks and finger paintings - but I was growing. My colorings turned into sketching, my chalks were replaced with pastels, and from there I jumped head-first into acrylic painting. I soon started to realize that creativity wasn't something you applied solely toward artwork; you can be creative in everything you do. Before I knew it, I was experimenting with different displays of creativity, some of my favorites being, cooking and baking, sewing, music, digital design and photography. I like to surround myself daily with creativity. I'm often creating in the kitchen (blessings from my Grandmother), and there's always room for some form of creativity in raising my children. But the most constant in my life is through my role as a page designer. Each month our contributing writers apply their creativity through informative and entertaining stories. I find great joy in reading those stories, not just because I love reading. As a page designer, they give me inspiration to tap into my creativity and communicate the writer’s message through imagery, color and typography, giving their piece visual value and meaning. There are endless ways to grow in your creative potential. You don't necessarily need artistic abilities and it doesn't require a certain type of career. Start with something you love to do. If you have a true passion for something, then it is in that field where your real creativity will bloom. Mine simply grew from a child's love for coloring and took off from there. I promise, yours will too!

L aura L atchford Laura Latchford is the page designer of TowneLaker, Around Woodstock, Around Canton and Around Acworth.

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People, The Places and The Pleasures that make Towne Lake This month, the TowneLaker is celebrating 22 years of being your go-to publication!

Your Community. Your Magazine.

What's Coming J.D.’s Bar-B-Que is opening J.D.’s by the Lake at 6879 Bells Ferry Road, the former Little River Grill that became Blue Cat Lodge for filming the Netflix series “Ozark.” According to Facebook, officials hope to open by July 4 and will offer a menu that includes fish and shrimp, and will feature a full bar. This is not a re-location. The current J.D.’s at 6577 Bells Ferry Road will remain open. www.jdsbbq.com. Chloe’s Auto Repair, owned and operated by women, will open this summer at 6422 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 100, Woodstock. Chloe's provides repairs and maintenance on all makes and models. For updates, visit the Facebook page and www.chloesautorepair.com.

What's Changed Meineke Car Care Center is now SpeeDee Oil Change and Auto Service at 3058 Eagle Drive, Woodstock. 770-627-7660. www.speedeeoil.com.

What's New Wow Pho & Grill has opened at 6422 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. The new restaurant serves Vietnamese food and is open 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily. 678-313-7672. The Outlet Shoppes at Atlanta has announced the opening of several new stores and a restaurant. Kings Toy Store has opened a second location at the Outlet Shoppes. The original store is on Sixes Road. Book Warehouse, Palmetto Moon, New York & Co. and De Allende Mexican Kitchen and Tequila Bar should open this summer. GYN Surgical Specialists and Dr. Rama Rao have opened a fullservice gynecologic practice at the Northside/Towne Lake medical campus, 900 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 302, offering comprehensive women’s health care and routine gynecological care, and treatment for more complex issues. 404-303-3157. gynsurgicalspecialists.com. FireSpark! Choreography​is a dance and fitness studio offering classes and a community-based youth Dance Crew with modest time requirements. FireSpark! offers a variety of dance styles in a Christian environment for ages 3-adult. 2485 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 110, in Woodstock. 678-653-8151. www.firesparkchoreography.com.

Ribbon Cutting Club Pilates Woodstock 1428 Towne Lake Pkwy., Suite 104, Woodstock. 770-400-9557. www.clubpilates.com/woodstock


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COMMUNITY BOARD The TowneLaker Community Board consists of well-respected community leaders from different walks of life. Our board members assist us in many ways, including contributing to our magazine and providing valuable feedback.

Kurt Johnson, co-founder of the Kurt and Sheila real estate team, has been involved in real estate most of his adult life. He and his wife have lived in Cherokee County for more than 13 years, their three children have attended county schools since the oldest started first grade at Bascomb Elementary. Kurt and Sheila work hard to promote Cherokee County and all it has to offer. Ann Litrel is an artist and writer whose nationally

published work includes decorative art, paintings for private and corporate collections, and writing and illustration for a range of publications. Ann lives in Towne Lake with her husband and coauthor Dr. Mike Litrel and their two sons. Ann can be reached at Ann@annlitrel.com.

Publisher Aroundabout Local Media, Inc. ALM President Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com Executive Editor Candi Hannigan 770-615-3309 Candi@AroundaboutMagazines.com Managing Editor Jackie Loudin 770-615-3318 Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Art Director Michelle McCulloch 770-615-3307 Michelle@AroundaboutMagazines.com Page Designer Laura Latchford Laura@AroundaboutMagazines.com Controller Denise Griffin 770-615-3315 Denise@AroundaboutMagazines.com Market Support Associate Christie Deese Christie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Copy Editors Bill King, Eliza Somers

Scott Coleman is the owner of Coleman Home

Services, a residential construction firm based in Towne Lake. He and his wife Lisa have three grown children and have lived in Towne Lake for 23 years. Scott and Lisa are supporters of the local special needs community. Scott enjoys the outdoors, cooking and his annual fishing trip to Alaska.

Bettie Sleeth has lived in Towne Lake for more than 12 years, and helped start the Kiwanis Club in Cherokee County. She's been active in service leadership programs in Cherokee County schools, helping bring Key Clubs to Etowah, Sequoyah and Creekview high schools and a Circle K club at Reinhardt University. She's active at her church, Hillside United Methodist, and serves in many community service projects and activities. Lynne Saunders is the founder and executive director of Papa’s Pantry and The Master’s Training Center. Her employment classes are based on a book she wrote, “21st Century Keys to Employment.” Lynne has been married to Bill for 33 years and has three grown daughters and five grandchildren. Anthony Hughes, raised in St. Petersburg, Fla., has been a special education teacher since 2001. He teaches at E.T. Booth Middle School and moved to Woodstock in 2015 with his wife Jessica and sons Jacob and Gavin. They are excited to be a part of the Towne Lake community. Depending on the season, they spend a lot of time at any of the area’s sport fields or enjoying Lake Allatoona. 6

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TowneLaker, a publication of Aroundabout Local Media, Inc., is a monthly community magazine. The magazine’s goal is to build a sense of community and pride in the Towne Lake and surrounding area by providing its residents with positive stories and timely information. It distributes a total of 16,400 free copies. Approximately 15,600 are direct mailed to homes and businesses and an additional 800 are placed in racks around the community. It also has 2,000+ digital viewers of the magazine online each month. TowneLaker welcomes your comments, stories, and advertisements. Editorial deadline is the 1st and advertising deadline is the 5th of the previous month. Subscriptions are available for $24 per year. Send check or money order to the address below. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the Editor/ Publisher and the Publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. TowneLaker is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the Publisher. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2018. TowneLaker 1025 Rose Creek Drive, PMB 380, Suite 620 Woodstock, GA 30189 For Advertising: Patty Ponder, 770-615-3322 Website: www.townelaker.com Volume 24, Issue 3

America’s Community Magazine


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COMMUNITY

Photo Courtesy of Darleen Prem.

Firework Safety a Top Priority SUBMITTED BY THE WOODSTOCK FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Fourth of July is a time for parades, food, family and fireworks. Many families plan a private display rather than attend a public production. Each year, the Woodstock Fire Department responds to calls for service as a result of carelessness and/or the improper use of fireworks. To help keep you and your friends and family members safe, please consider the following safety recommendations form the National Council on Fireworks Safety.

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• Obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks. • Know your fireworks. Read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting. • A responsible adult should supervise all firework activities. Never give fireworks to children. • Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Save your alcohol for after the show. • Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks. • Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away. • Use fireworks outdoors in a clear area, away from buildings and vehicles. • Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water. • Always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby. • Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them into metal or glass containers. • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks. • Dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day. • FAA regulations prohibit the possession and transportation of fireworks in your checked baggage or carry-on luggage. • Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department. • Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one. • If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe interior room to avoid exposure to the sound. • Make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during a fireworks display.


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Northside Hospital Provides Grant for AEDs Four outdoor Automatic Defibrillation Devices (AEDs) will be installed around downtown Woodstock, thanks to a funding partnership between Main Street Woodstock, Woodstock DDA and Northside Hospital Cherokee. The AEDs are fully contained units that will be placed in high traffic pedestrian areas such as the Market Street trailhead area and The Park at City Center. Local resident Michael Gullicksen brought the idea of accessible AEDs to the attention of city staff. “Northside Hospital Cherokee is a proud neighbor and sponsor of Main Street Woodstock,” Northside CEO Billy Hayes said. “Every day, approximately 1,000 people nationwide – more than 350,000 Americans each year – die from sudden cardiac arrest. Placing AEDs within the community means reaching patients in the first critical minutes following cardiac arrest.” When someone has a sudden cardiac arrest, every minute counts, said Woodstock Fire Chief Dave Soumas. “The American Heart Institute guidelines say that for every minute, the chances of a victim surviving decrease by 7 to 10 percent. These devices being readily available in public areas can help save lives.” The deployment of these four AEDs is about $10,000, which was supplied by Northside Hospital Cherokee through ongoing community relations programs and are expected to be installed mid-summer.

YOUR LOCAL NEWS

Fans enjoy the Swingin’ Medallions’ performance in June.

Enjoy the Music, Skip the Traffic If you want to enjoy a summer concert in downtown Woodstock but are thinking twice because of the traffic, here are a few solutions for you. 1. A free shuttle service runs for each summer concert, 5-11:45 p.m. Six buses will run two routes. Route 1: Meet at the Northside Hospital Towne Lake parking deck at 900 Towne Lake Parkway. Route 2: Meet at Woodstock City Church, 150 Ridgewalk Parkway. 2. For Uber and Lyft rides, the designated pick-up and drop-off location for events at Northside Hospital-Cherokee Amphitheater is the Chambers at City Center parking lot, 8534 Main St. 3. Free ride on the Woodstock Trolley, which will run its normal routes during special events. Visit www.woodstocktrolley.com for destinations and stops.

ALTA City Win An Eagle Watch men’s ALTA team, which played at the B-8 level, recently won the ALTA city championship at the B-8 level, persevering to rise to the top of 60-plus metro Atlanta teams that started the season at that level. Front row, from left: David Flores, Joe Carter, Jason Hunter, Jordan Musser, Britton Crigler and Allen Talbott. Back row: Jon Arendt, Alex Leonard, Rocky Salet, Steve Rabb and Captain Ed Sams. 10

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YOUR LOCAL NEWS Mayors Square Off in Recycling Challenge

Top 10 in 10 Young Professionals The Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce recently recognized the 2018 group of Cherokee County’s Top 10 in 10 Young Professionals to Watch. Front row from left: Jessica Akers, Falany Performing Arts Center director; Tori O’Bryant, practice coordinator for Northside Hospital-Towne Lake Primary Care; Leah Bleisath, Creekland Middle School assistant principal; Julie Peppers, Carmel Elementary School assistant principal, and Jennifer Puckett, co-owner of In Harmony Pediatric Therapy. Back row: Ollie Evans, chiropractor and director for Holly Springs Chiropractic and Massage and member of Around Canton’s community board; Heath Matiak of R & D Mechanical Services; Nick Estes, vice president of Chart Inc.; Brandon Roberts, founder of Branches of Faith, and Michael Manzella, E.T. Booth Middle School principal. The nominees who will be younger than age 40 on Oct. 1 have been nominated for GeorgiaTrend magazine’s 40 Under 40 recognition.

Banner Program Will Honor Veterans The city of Woodstock and American Legion Post 316 are accepting applications for Woodstock's Military Banner Program, designed to salute the brave men and women who are serving, and those who have served, in the military. A light pole banner will be exhibited in Woodstock in their honor, in celebration of Memorial and Veterans days for years to come. The application deadline for the Veterans Day display is Oct. 1. The banners will be on display one week before and one week after Veterans Day. Banners will be displayed again for Memorial Day 2019. If you would like to honor someone you care about who has served in our military, please complete the form below and return to American Post 316. https://bit. ly/2J6xlJ9 (on the www.woodstockga.gov website) 12

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Banners recently lined Main Street on Memorial Day.

The seventh annual Mayors’ Recycling Challenge, underway since June 1, will end July 31. This Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce Going Green Committee initiative is aimed at sparking continued awareness for community recycling while spurring a little friendly competition among the cities involved. During the contest, Cherokee County cities compete to see which can collect the most recycling. Awards will be given for most pounds of recycling collected overall, most improved city, and most pounds collected per capita. Santek Waste Services of Georgia and Waste Management are partnering with the chamber by tracking curbside and large recycling container weigh slips within the participating cities of Ball Ground, Canton, Holly Springs, Waleska and Woodstock. The mission of the Going Green initiative is to encourage the community to implement green practices that conserve community resources while helping businesses thrive. For more information, visit www.CherokeeChamber.com or call 770-345-0400.


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An aerial view of Woodstock with Morgan's Ace Hardware in the bottom left. Photo courtesy of Falcon Aerials.

New City Center

Plans to include additional parking, retail, boutique hotel. BY CANDI HANNIGAN

Woodstock officials recently announced plans to purchase the Morgan’s Ace Hardware property at the corner of Arnold Mill Road and Main Street. The hardware store will be relocated to another site near downtown. Closing on the property is anticipated later this year. This acquisition is the final step needed to move forward on the new Woodstock City Center, a plan that’s been in the works for several years, according to Cheri Morris, president of Morris and Fellows. The firm specializes in developing historic downtowns and was chosen to partner with city officials in Woodstock's development. Woodstock City Center contains seven acres and will be developed in two phases. The first phase involves the southeast quadrant, 3.5 acres on the southeast corner of Arnold Mill Road and Main Street, surrounding the hardware store property. Initial plans include a 400-500 space parking deck, a mix of additional retail, professional office space, restaurant space and a boutique

Mike Morgan, Cheri Morris and Woodstock Mayor Donnie Henriques 14 TOWNELAKER | July 2018

hotel with meeting space. Improvements are planned for the intersection and pedestrian connectivity along Arnold Mill Road. The city also owns 3.5 acres on the northwest corner of Main Street and Towne Lake Parkway. While development of this parcel is the second phase, passersby already can see improvements to the existing parking lot beside the Elm Street Cultural Arts Village and City Center Auditorium. The resulting 200 parking spaces and improved landscaping, signage and lighting, will offer an immediate relief for local visitors and business owners. Construction should be complete over the next two to three months. “Over the years, the city has been presented many plans for this land that we knew our citizens would not like, from big boxes to highly dense projects,” Woodstock Mayor Donnie Henriques said. “We reviewed numerous partner options and proposed plans … we are very focused on creating a lower density City Center in keeping with the existing downtown character and Morris and Fellows shares that vision.” Morgan’s Hardware opened in 1961 as a branch of the original Morgan Brothers, started in Canton in 1939. The owners were Anis and O.E. “Red” Morgan. Red’s son Mike joined the business in the mid-1970s and moved the operation across the railroad tracks in 1978, to the current location. “After looking at options for my property over the last several years, I am pleased that the city has stepped forward to lead redevelopment of the project, which will fit with the overall character of downtown Woodstock. It’s also great that the city has agreed to help me with the relocation of our business to a place that will allow easier access for our customers. I am excited that our store will be able to continue to serve our customers and the community for many years to come,” Mike Morgan said. Project timing, details and renderings will be released in the coming weeks and months, as plans develop. Updates also will be available on the city of Woodstock website — www.woodstockga.gov.


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Norris Jones prepares to kayak to the waterfall.

Fun in the Summer Sun PHOTOS COURTESY OF DARLEEN PREM

We didn’t have to go far to find Woodstock residents enjoying their warm summer days. We’d love to see YOUR photos of your favorite local summertime activities. Email candi@aroundaboutmagazines.com to be considered for an upcoming photo feature.

A cyclist emerges from the trail at Rope Mill Park.

Yasibel Basielo discovers that geese also enjoy a favorite summertime treat: watermelon.

Francis Mora walks 8-yearold Ruby, who just got her summer trim the day before. 16

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Malekai Brooks prepares for water battle.

Fishing supplies for the afternoon.


Isabella Patterson gives a thumbs up as Corey Robertson teaches her to skateboard on Trestle Rock Trail at Rope Mill Park.

Biking and fishing at Rope Mill Park.

Rylan Parks, 6, enjoys rafting on a gator float at Victoria Landing.

Cool waters lured beach-goers from their home base.

Seven-year-old twins Malekai and Mathius Brooks enjoy the lake. Julie Stevens and Gabriel Jones take a stroll across the bridge over Little River.

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102

Years Young! Towne Lake resident Ruth “Aileen” Hambright Cantrell celebrated her 102nd birthday June 9 with friends, family, cake and a visit from Woodstock’s Mayor, Donnie Henriques. She was born in 1916, out in the country near Kings Mountain in Cherokee County, South Carolina. Aileen told us, “That’s the same mountain where my great-grandfather, Lt. Col. Frederick Hambright, fought the Battle of Kings Mountain during the American Revolution.” The second oldest of eight children, she said it was fun growing up in the country. “My seven siblings and I picked cotton and vegetables, and helped Mama do the cooking and cleaning. I remember milking the cow out in the barn, and I would feed the cat while doing so. I had good aim! That

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Woodstock Mayor Donnie Henriques stopped by Aileen’s party to wish her a happy birthday and present her with a proclamation declaring June 9 Aileen Cantrell Day.

milk shot right across the way, into that cat’s mouth,” Aileen chuckled. Aileen and her siblings received their education in a one-room schoolhouse started by their mother. “Education was important to Mama,” Aileen said, so she hired a teacher to teach her and her siblings, as well as the other children in their community. Aileen went on to attend business school in Charlotte, N.C., and on Nov. 8, 1940, she married Alvie D. (A.D.) Cantrell. A.D. and Aileen owned the Western Auto Store in Davidson, N.C., and Aileen was the Western Union representative for the area. They had two children, Al and JoAnn, and Aileen was one of the original parents

involved in establishing the town’s Little League baseball program. She and A.D. remained married until his death in 1968. Today, Aileen enjoys spending time with her children and their spouses, her four grandchildren and seven greatgrandchildren. While sewing and crocheting used to be favorites hobbies, these days she enjoys coloring with colored pencils. When asked about the secret to her longevity, Aileen said, “Genes, good food, a balanced diet, plenty of exercise and being a Christian.” And what wisdom does she want to impart to today’s youth? It’s simple. “Do the right thing, be kind, and don’t hurt anybody.”


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Celebrations!

Congratulations, Skylar Wallace!

She is a 2018 Etowah High School honor graduate, and will be attending the University of Alabama on a softball scholarship, majoring in business law.

Happy belated birthday, Reginald!

With love always, from all of us: Nicole, Grace, Morgan, Macy and James

Amy Collins

Age 9 on July 23 Happy 9th birthday, Amy! We love you so much! Love Daddy, Mommy, Emily and Tommy

Happy birthday, Grace!

We LUV U so much! Keep reaching for the stars, because there are no limits! GBYA: Mom, Dad, Morgan, Macy and James

Emily Collins

Age 15 on Aug. 8 Happy Birthday! Wishing you a wonderful 15th year! We love you! Mom, Dad, Amy and Tommy

Terrence Cheek

June 23 Happy 21st birthday! This is the big one! Love you more than words! Mom, Junior and Kyreonia

Happy 20th birthday, TJ!

We are so proud of you and love you so much! Love always Dad, MamaBear, Juicy, Christian and Lili

Lindsay Bresnan

Age 12 on June 20 Daughter of Mike and Chris. Sister of Brooke.

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Brooke Bresnan

Age 10 on July 11 Daughter of Mike and Chris. Sister of Lindsay.

Jacob Norton

Age 3 on July 3 Happy birthday, Jacob! We love you to the moon and back! Love, Mom and Dad

Rachel Boling

Turns 10 on July 9. Happy birthday, Rachel! Love, Breanna and Daddy

ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE FREE! E-mail to: Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com August deadline is July 10. Please specify TowneLaker.


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Scouting Milestones

Past and present Eagle Scouts and scoutmasters with the Golden Eagle Award.

Number of Eagle Scouts Soars to 100 BY HAMLIN BOSWELL

Boy Scout Troop 994, chartered in September 1994, at Hillside United Methodist Church, recently celebrated its 100th Eagle Scout. To commemorate the honor, the troop organized a special celebration for all prior Eagle Scouts and scoutmasters. Master of Ceremonies Grant Garlinghouse, assistant scoutmaster and former scoutmaster, spent several months organizing the event. Volunteers helped plan the dinner menu, decorate, collect photos from prior campouts, send out invitations, produce the program and clean up. The keynote address was delivered by Charlie Nickens, Eagle

From left, Hayes Thomas, Caden Walker and Eddie Resendez Jr. helped provide some of the evening’s entertainment. 22

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Scout No. 1. He attributes some of his professional success to traits he learned as a Boy Scout. “I learned commitment to finish what you start, to accept hard work with humility, to put others first, to be honest, to earn respect, to be brave and, most of all, to be a leader by service of others – all skills I learned in Scouts.” Local state Rep. Michael Caldwell awarded a proclamation, which is entered in the state archives, recognizing the milestone for Troop 994. The troop leadership, also known as the “Geezer Patrol,” read the names of the 100 Eagle Scouts, with those in attendance honored onstage. Scoutmasters were recognized, in order of service, including: Kendall Nickens, Mark Hess, Matt Jenkins, Grant Garlinghouse, John Salvino, Edward Resendez and Chris Spratt. “Back in 1994, the troop started with five boys and five dads, but great adult participation led to growth,” said Kendall Nickens, the first scoutmaster. “Over the recent years, the troop has grown to 68 boys and has benefitted from seven strong scoutmasters and many active adults.” To date, there have been 103 Eagle Scouts “home grown” at Hillside UMC. The troop participates annually in a high adventure camp, such as hiking at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, canoeing at Northern Tier in Canada, or sailing at Sea Base in the Florida Keys. The rest of the year is filled with local campouts, service projects, meetings for skills development and fun activities. To become an Eagle Scout, a boy must complete seven rank advancements, each with increasing requirements and leadership responsibilities. A minimum of 21 merit badges are required, along with a service project. The service project must benefit the local community (someone other than Boy Scouts). Examples include projects such as outdoor classrooms or enhancements to playgrounds, and building trail bridges and amphitheaters. The Eagle candidate must come up with a project


Master of Ceremonies Grant Garlinghouse.

Current members of Troop 994 at the celebration.

he is passionate about, and get the concept approved by the troop and district committees. The candidate must organize and execute the project, and obtain benefactor agreement upon completion. The final step is passing a board of review at the district level, which has been likened to an intense job interview. All requirements must be completed before the boy’s 18th birthday. Because of the time commitment and difficulty involved, the national average for earning Eagle rank is 4 percent of the boys who start. Troop 994 has averaged around 17 percent, mostly attributed to strong parental involvement and pairing up boys with a Life to Eagle coach. Often, these coaches are a non-family member adult in the troop who can help guide the candidate. Troop 994 accomplishments include: sending crews to all the high adventure camps, donating thousands of service hours to the local community, and winning the Golden Eagle trophy four times at camporee competitions against other district troops. The troop has approximately 600 alumni, and members have attended many colleges, as well as four of the five military academies. The goal of Troop 994 is to develop a program that continually challenges the youth of our community to make a difference where they live. Scouting goes far beyond camping, canoeing, hiking and earning merit badges. Scouting is a way of life, a set of values, and standards of respect, service and reverence. We try to develop leaders who will ensure the world is a better place, and have fun along the way. Troop 994 meets Monday evenings at Hillside United Methodist church in Woodstock.

Rep. Michael Caldwell presented a proclamation to Eagle Scout Philip Cooper (No. 101).

Hamlin Boswell is active in Troop 994 as an assistant scoutmaster. He is leading summer camp in 2018 and Sea Base sailing in 2019. He became an Eagle Scout in 1985.

Current Senior Patrol Leader Nicholas Holley is the 100th Eagle for Troop 994. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Scouting Milestones

Claire and friends brought music to St. George Village as part of her Gold Award project.

Striking Gold in Cherokee County BY GLORIA AVILLAR

In the 11 years I’ve been a Girl Scout leader, the question I get asked the most, aside from “Do you have any Thin Mints?” is, “Do Girl Scouts have anything like the Boy Scouts’ Eagle Award?” Although it’s unfortunate that so many people are unaware, this question gives me the chance to talk about the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest achievement in the Girl Scouts. Our Gold Award recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through community service projects that have a sustainable impact on our community and beyond.

Currently working on their Gold Award are, from left: Lilli G., Alyssa S., Catherine W., Emily H. and Maddie A. The girls are working as counselors at Camp Camellia Rose, the local day camp. 24

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Originally called The Golden Eaglet, this award has been a part of the Girl Scouts since 1916; more than 1 million young women have earned the award. To execute a Gold Award project, a girl must first identify a local issue that she feels passionately about, one she wishes to be positively affected by her program. She must identify the root cause of the issue and create a plan to address it. While working on her project, she also must educate people about the issue and inspire them to get involved. Finally, her project must be sustainable, continuing once her efforts are complete. Just like the Boy Scouts’ Eagle Award, the Gold Award often plays a critical role in the college acceptance and scholarship process. Girls can enter the armed forces one rank higher than other recruits, and recipients usually have higher success rates when applying for jobs. In 2017, three Cherokee County girls were among 93 in the Greater Atlanta area to earn a Gold Award. Olivia D. created the exCHANGE Club at Cherokee High School, which bridged the communication gap between English-speaking and Spanishspeaking students. Alayna D. traveled to Nairobi, Kenya, to help administer free vision screenings to 350 students at Machakos High School, resulting in 87 children receiving free prescription eyeglasses. Claire C. coordinated and performed classical musical concerts at nine assisted-living facilities in Cherokee County. For their efforts, Olivia received a $7,000 college scholarship and Claire was given the Council Young Women of Distinction Award by Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta. This summer, two Cherokee High School seniors will work toward their Gold Awards. Emily H. will create a lesson plan for Cherokee High School photography classes that will teach the students portrait-taking techniques. These new skills will be used by the students to provide senior photo services to fellow students


Cherokee Chamber of Commerce 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton 770-345-0400 • www.cherokeechamber.com

EVENT CALENDAR Ju1y 18

Community Outreach Program: CPR/AED Training

9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the chamber office. Must be 14 years old to receive certification. Taught by a representative of the Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services. $45.

Ju1y 19

Community Outreach Program: CPR/AED & First Aid Training

9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the chamber office. Must be 14 years old to receive certification. Taught by a representative of the Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services. $70. Alayna D. (Woodstock High), Claire C. (River Ridge High) and Olivia D. (Cherokee High).

in need. Maddie A. will create a video program to educate parents of school-aged children about head lice prevention and what to do if their children get lice. She also wants to provide every elementary and middle school nurse in Cherokee County with a lice-prevention kit. In 2019, three juniors currently at Woodstock High will be ready to complete their projects. Catherine W. will create a lending closet of formal band attire for the school. Lilli G’s goal is to educate middle-school students about the advantages and benefits of choosing JROTC as a high school elective, while dispelling the myth that being in the JROTC means a military commitment after graduation. Alyssa S. plans to work with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta to create a support system for families of children going through cancer treatment. The Girl Scouts mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place – and our local Gold Award Girl Scouts truly exemplify this goal. They see a problem and then do their part to make a change, while encouraging others to take action. We all benefit from their efforts. With less than 6 percent of eligible Girl Scouts earning this award nationally, Cherokee County is definitely a great place to strike Gold. For more information about Girl Scouts, visit www.girlscouts.org.

Power Hour

10-11 a.m. at the chamber’s board room. Fast paced networking with fellow business leaders as chamber representatives. Member: $5. Future member: $10, payable at the door.

Aug. 2

August Good Morning Cherokee Breakfast

7 a.m. Breakfast meetings offer both current and future Chamber members the opportunity to conduct business and network with more than 200 fellow business leaders. Advanced single registration: $17. On-site registration: $22. Future member: $30. Advance registration due by 3 p.m. July 31.

Aug. 21

SchmoozaPalooza, a Business Networking Party!

4-7 p.m. at Woodstock City Church, 150 Ridgewalk Parkway. Fun and casual networking environment. Exhibitors will have a table top display that will allow them to promote their business and make new contacts while attendees will enjoy door prizes, food and fun while previewing the latest products and services featured at SchmoozaPalooza. Admission is free and open to the public.

Aug. 29

Leadership Symposium

8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Falany Performing Arts Center, Reinhardt University, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska. One-day conference features four speakers who will share thought-provoking information to be used both on the job and in life! Cost includes continental breakfast, lunch and two networking breaks. Register by noon Aug. 28. $50 members; $75 future members. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Invest in Real Estate With Your IRA BY KURT & SHEILA JOHNSON

Did you know you could invest in real estate with your retirement accounts? That’s right! You can buy real estate for a quick resale, or buy and hold it using your Individual Retirement Account (IRA), Roth IRA or SEP-IRA. With the possibility of the stock market retreating from its current highs, you may want to diversify your portfolio to include an investment in real estate. The cash flow rate of return on single-family rental homes can be more than 20 percent at today’s prices, and when the property sells, the net profit will remain in your tax deferred retirement account. You can find a good IRA custodian by searching “real estate IRA” or “self-directed IRA.” Typically, most IRA custodians will allow you to purchase raw land, residential properties or commercial buildings for The cash flow your portfolio. We prefer single-family residential rate of return because of its relative on singleease to sell or rent for an immediate return on family rental investment. homes can Unfortunately, Internal Revenue Service be more than regulations will not permit 20 percent at you to use the property today’s prices... purchased as your primary residence or as a vacation home. The underlying premise for any IRA fund-purchased real estate investment is that you can’t have any personal benefit or use of the property. To do so may cost you plenty in penalties and taxes, and call into question your other dealings with that IRA account. Your IRA custodian—not you personally—must actually purchase the property. The title will be in the name of your IRA custodian with you as the beneficiary. All repairs, property taxes and rents must only be paid to and from the IRA custodian’s account. Investing in real estate has big risks and the potential for big returns. Before investing, please consult with a certified public accountant, your attorney and a realtor experienced with these types of transactions.

Kurt and Sheila are a top-producing real estate team that lives in Towne Lake and has served Cherokee County for more than 15 years. www.KurtandSheilaTeam.com

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018


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Managing Money Well as a Couple How often will you check up on your financial progress?

DON AKRIDGE, MBA, CFP®, CPA/PFS U.S. MARINE CORPS VETERAN – EMORY UNIVERSITY ALUMNUS

When finances affect two people rather than one, credit card statements and bank balances become more important, so do IRA balances, insurance premiums, and investment account yields. Looking in on these details once a month (or at least once a quarter) can keep you both informed, so that neither one of you has misconceptions about household finances or assets. Arguments can start when money misunderstandings are upended by reality.

When you marry or share a household with someone, your financial life changes – and your approach to managing your money may change as well. To succeed as a couple, you may also have to succeed financially. The good news is that it is usually not so difficult. At some point, you will have to ask yourselves some money questions – questions that pertain not only to your shared finances, but also to your individual finances. Waiting too long to ask (or answer) those questions might carry an emotional price. In the 2017 TD Bank Love and Money survey of consumers who said they were in relationships, 68 percent of couples who described themselves as “unhappy” indicated that they did not have a monthly conversation about money.1

What degree of independence do you want to maintain?

Do you want to have separate bank accounts? Separate fun money accounts? To what extent do you want to comingle your money? Some spouses need individual financial space. There is nothing wrong with this, unless a spouse uses such space to hide secrets that will eventually shock the other.

First off, how will you make your money grow?

Simply saving money will help you build an emergency fund, but unless you save an extraordinary amount of cash, your uninvested savings will not fund your retirement. Should you hold any joint investment accounts or some jointly titled assets? One of you may like to assume more risk than the other; spouses often have different individual investment preferences. How you invest, together or separately, is less important than your commitment to investing. Some couples focus only on avoiding financial risk – to them, maintaining the status quo and not losing any money equals financial success. They could be setting themselves up for financial failure decades from now by rejecting investing and retirement planning. An ongoing relationship with a financial professional may enhance your knowledge of the ways in which you could build your wealth and arrange to retire confidently.

Can you be businesslike about your finances?

Spouses who are inattentive or nonchalant about financial matters may encounter more financial trouble than they anticipate. So, watch where your money goes, and think about ways to repeatedly pay yourselves first rather than your creditors. Set shared short-term, medium-term and long-term objectives, and strive to attain them.

Communication is key to all this.

In the TD Bank survey, 78 percent of the respondents indicated they were comfortable talking about money with their partner, and 90 percent of couples describing themselves as “happy” claimed that a money talk happened once a month. Planning your progress together may well have benefits beyond the financial, so a regular conversation should be a goal.1

continued on page 87

How much will you spend and save?

Budgeting can help you arrive at your answer. A simple budget, an elaborate budget, or any attempt at a budget can prove more informative than none at all. A thorough, line-item budget may seem a little over the top, but what you learn from it may be eye opening.

Don Akridge is president of Citadel Professional Services, LLC, an independent firm, founded in 1994 and conveniently located off Chastain Road between I-575 & I-75 in Kennesaw. 770-952-6707.

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The Impact of Georgia’s New Fiduciary Law BY JOSHUA NELSON

Often, people don’t notice how the yearly legislative session impacts their day-to-day lives. Last March, the Legislature actually approved some sweeping changes to how residents of Georgia should be planning for their future, and the future of their loved ones. The laws changed often are called fiduciary laws, since they deal with how someone acts on another’s behalf, and the standards for those actions. The governor had until May 8 to veto legislation, and, since that time has passed, there will be new legislation that impacts Georgians that becomes effective July 1. Likely, the most impactful for families was that the Georgia Trust Code (HB 121), which hadn’t been changed in a meaningful way since 2010, was broadened and clarified. These changes will allow trustees more flexibility and allow attorneys to draft trusts that can protect more broadly someone’s legacy, as it shifts from them to their children. One of the major things to think about, if you have a trust, is that the new law allows for modification of irrevocable or asset protection trusts, which can protect your family better from the curveballs that life can throw. The next most impactful change to the fiduciary laws was the clarification and improvement of last year’s Georgia

Power of Attorney Act (HB 897). Last year, there were sweeping changes to the power of attorney act and the statutory power of attorney that provided many benefits for Georgia residents. This year’s changes extend those protections, as well as making the process for revoking a power of attorney less cumbersome. Another very impactful change, if you have children, is the Supporting and Strengthening Families Act (HB 129). This is a major legislative change dealing with the adoption process, and allows a parent to transfer the care and custody of their minor child to a family member or other qualified agent for up to a year, or to a grandparent with no stated time limit via a special power of attorney, without the hassle and cost of a court-based process. If you or your family need more detailed information about legislative changes, they can be accessed at https://legiscan.com/GA.

Joshua Nelson is an elder care law attorney with Nelson Elder Care Law, LLC, 2230 Towne Lake Parkway, Bldg. 900, Suite 200, Woodstock, GA, 30189. www.NelsonElderCareLaw.com.

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Cherokee By Choice: A World of Opportunity PROVIDED BY CHEROKEE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

In 2017, the Cherokee Office of Economic Development (COED) launched its most industrious endeavor to date: Cherokee By Choice. The five-year public-private partnership and economic growth campaign transforms big ideas into action. COED has partnered with Power 10, an Atlanta-based capital campaign management group, to raise more than $2 million in pledges over the five-year campaign. This partnership focuses on three goals: • Growing the local workforce. • Growing and diversifying Cherokee’s business and tax base. • Growing building and site inventory for commercial investment. The quiet phase of the campaign began in early February 2018; the public phase began April 13 and ended June 30. Through the collaborative efforts of our community and business leaders, the Cherokee By Choice campaign raised $1,853,750, or 92 percent of the $2 million goal, by June 1. The final investment amount will be publicized on the COED website in July. Even if the goal has been met, there is an ongoing opportunity for investments throughout the five-year campaign. Visit www.cherokeega.org/campaign or call 770-345-0600 for more information. Cherokee By Choice funds will be reinvested into programs and initiatives specifically targeted to ensure businesses prosper and find the talent and resources they need to grow. Some of the investments include: • an interactive mobile workforce training lab geared specifically toward educating our next generation on the wide range of training and career opportunities. • a new, interactive COED website promoting the skilled trades. • a proactive branding campaign that positions Cherokee as the ideal place for business. • a continued focus on smart commercial planning and development.

Keeping Locals Local

One goal we set is to change the statistic that nearly 80 percent of working-age residents leave the county for work each morning. The Cherokee By Choice campaign is working to connect local businesses

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Attending the Cherokee by Choice kickoff, from left: Doug Hooker, Atlanta Regional Commission executive director; Misti Martin, COED president; Mark Goddard, Cobb EMC director of commercial marketing; Tim Fernandez, YANMAR America president; Marshall L. Day, Development Authority of Cherokee County chairman; Steven L. Holcomb, Cherokee County Development Authority chairman, and Buzz Ahrens, Cherokee County Board of Commissioners chairman.

that need enthusiastic employees with qualified, exceptional talent, to reduce the overall out-commute of talent and resources that leave the county. This strategy involves two parts. First, most of the residents who commute outside of Cherokee are employed in high-wage industries like information technology and corporate headquarter operations. Part of our plan will be to launch a more aggressive marketing campaign targeting site consultants and project managers that work with these industries, to let them know that Cherokee is a great place for business relocation. This campaign will include creating a national site selection consultant and corporate headquarters visitation program, and partnering with national and regional organizations that will allow us to market to these targeted prospects. Second, our strategy features an educational component designed specifically to grow awareness in the community about local career opportunities. These initiatives include a state-of-the-art mobile training lab and an interactive clearinghouse of local job opportunities on the new COED website, which is expected to launch by the end of summer. This multi-faceted approach to economic growth will help grow and retain existing industry, recruit new businesses into our area, and open a new world of possibilities for Cherokee residents seeking a career closer to home.

Finding Room to Grow

As local job opportunities are created and businesses become fully staffed, they also need room to grow. Companies looking to locate or expand need move-in-ready space that can serve various needs, such as office space, manufacturing and warehouses. COED is working to make space available for more businesses to expand and make Cherokee home. With room to breathe and space to grow, large corporations and international companies are taking note. Inalfa Roof Systems, Jaipur Living, and the adidas SPEEDFACTORY recently settled into the Cherokee 75 Corporate Park, but they’re not the only ones choosing Cherokee. The Circuit, Cherokee’s first ever co-working space, opened its doors last year to give entrepreneurs a sense of community while launching startups close to home. Great ideas take time to incubate and grow. That’s why COED created Fresh Start Cherokee, an initiative focused on providing entrepreneurial education for our next generation, and growth support for our next wave of innovators and startups. Fresh Start Cherokee provides a comfortable environment where entrepreneurs can collaborate and develop innovative continued on page 87 The Cherokee Office of Economic Development is the leading organization for business and film recruitment and industry retention & expansion. For more information, visit www.cherokeega.org.


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Rob’s Rescues This dog’s name is Bailey. She is a Beagle and about 5 years old and is tricolor. She is not very hyper but does like to sniff around the place. She was very easy to get a picture with, which is not always the case. Bailey is a friendly dog and an owner surrender that was brought into the shelter recently. This cat’s name is Colleen. I have a video of her on my Facebook page making dove noises. That is the sound she makes. She has a stumpy tail and is about 8 years old. She was brought into the shelter as a stray in February, so she has been here a long time. Please adopt her. Last year I went to Spain, and there is a feral cat colony in a town called Lloret de Mar that the community helps keep in shape. It is a park with benches, and actually a bit of a tourist destination. People go and hang out with the cats and don’t disturb them. We have feral cat colonies here. There is one at Whispering Pines trailer park. This is going to be torn down soon, and the cats need help. The Grey Project is only four women in Canton and they do most of the work with all of our feral cat colonies. People often want to know how to help in the community. Contact me or the Grey Project and help with spaying, neutering, feeding and healthcare of feral cats. I believe that we have to help these cats right now. www.facebook.com/thegreyprojectga.

A Guest at Elm Street

Above, one of the feral cat colonies needing help in Cherokee County, Ga. Top right, a scene from a feral cat colony park in Lloret de Mar, Spain.

Follow Rob on Facebook! @robsrescues 34

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

On July 6, at the Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, I am going to be a guest on stage with Joe Lemmo and the iThink Improv Troupe. They say it’s going to be a hilarious night, and I am super excited to be part of it. Please visit www.elmstreetarts.org/ ithink-improv for more information.

I’m Rob Macmillan and I’m on a mission to help shelter dogs and cats. These animals are at the Cherokee County Animal Shelter at 1015 Univeter Road, Canton. Contact me at robsrescues@gmail.com.


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35


Teen Night

at the Aquatic Center PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAREY HOOD, JUST A FAN PHOTOGRAPHY. WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CAREYHOODPHOTOS.

Sponsored by the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency, and hosted by the Cherokee Aquatic Center, Teen Nights (ages 13 and older) are a fun opportunity for local youth to meet up with friends, hang out and participate in different water activities. A pizza dinner is included. The next Teen Night is scheduled for 7-9 p.m. July 13. For more information, contact the Aquatic Center. 678-880-4760.

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EVERYDAY The slower pace of summer is a good time to follow up on a few of our past feature stories, and to see how the journey continues, long after you read about it in our magazine. While summer seems to fly by for most of us, it can move at an agonizing pace if you are trudging through a difficult season. Please continue to pray for them and support them as you feel led.

Heather Miller

Myles Howard

In March, Myles Howard, a River Ridge High School special needs student, suddenly fell ill after celebrating his 18th birthday. Myles was diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. After a code blue emergency, a life-flight helicopter ride and 69 long days in the hospital fighting for his life, Paula and Neal finally took their son home, where he continues to recover and receive therapy. “We have so many people to thank, but first we must thank God for this miracle. There were many days and weeks that we did not feel this would happen. Thousands of friends, neighbors and strangers rallied and prayed for us each day throughout our journey, and we honestly could not have made it through without it. We want to thank the Ruth family for their undying love and support for Myles and our family, and especially Emily, who made it her mission to raise funds for us,” said Neal, Myle’s dad.

'My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.'

— 2 Corinthians 12:9

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

Heather Miller, young mom and wife of Holly Springs Mayor Steve Miller, has battled cancer since age 14. She is now fighting her toughest battle: HER2 positive breast cancer, stage 4. Having reached her lifetime limit of radiation and, because chemotherapy negatively impacts her heart, Heather qualified for Kadcycla, a clinical trial cancer drug that interferes with the growth of cancer cells in the body. She has diligently and creatively managed to remain stable (no growth) with a strict regimen of a plant- and fruit-based diet, essential oils, colonics, acupuncture and other natural remedies, along with her Kadcycla infusions every three weeks. With an unfailing faith, spirit and determination, Heather approaches each new day as a blessing and inspires and blesses everyone she encounters. Please continue to pray for Heather and her family.

Trey Powell

Last month, we featured Trey Powell’s journey with what began as a foot infection and has resulted in numerous surgeries and an amputation. The Powell family’s nightmare continues, as doctors try to get ahead of the infection. Trey has experienced setbacks, secondary infections, kidney complications and all that accompanies aggressive treatment. “Before it’s over, Trey will entirely lose the femur before they can close up the leg, and he now has no chance at a prosthesis. We have done dialysis to remove all excess fluid that the kidneys have been retaining. We are hoping the infection is gone and we can finally close the leg and get him to rehab. We are hopeful that the kidneys and bone marrow will recover. It is just going to take a while. Thank you for all your help and everything you have done for us. I am most thankful,” said Leslie, Trey’s wife. Please pray for relief for this sweet family and complete healing of their dad and husband. www.gofundme.com/supporting-treydiabetic-amputee.

Everyday Angels is a 501(c)3 nonprofit serving Cherokee County since 2000. If you would like to make a tax deductible donation, please visit www.everydayangels.info to donate via Paypal or send your donations to: Everyday Angels, PMB 380, 1025 Rose Creek Drive, Suite 620, Woodstock GA, 30189. One hundred percent of your funds will go to the family you specify. Also, if you know of a special need within your community that you would like to share, please send an e-mail to aaeverydayangels@gmail.com for consideration and qualification.


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Where Is Georgia’s Money Going This Year? BY STATE REP. MICHAEL CALDWELL

The General Assembly of Georgia completed its legislative session March 29. There is only one constitutional requirement that our Legislature has to complete before finishing the annual legislative session: the passage of the upcoming fiscal year’s budget for the state. That doesn’t mean it’s ever the only thing that we do, but there is no question that it is our most important function. Our Legislature spends tens of billions of our hard earned dollars every year, and, as your representative in this process, I take it extremely seriously. I’m proud to report that our state remains among the lowest per-capita spending states in the union, and that, by the numbers, our spending priorities appear to be in order. I’m a firm believer that you can see where someone’s priorities lie by examining their checkbook. The same principle applies to government. As this year’s budget (Fiscal Year 2019) started on July 1, it seems an appropriate time to re-examine the numbers together. This will cover a high-level breakdown of Georgia’s FY 2019 (July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019) budget. 1. Department of Education, 38 percent, $9.8 billion 2. Department of Community Health, 11 percent, $2.8 billion 3. Board of Regents, University System, 9 percent, $2.4 billion 4. Department of Transportation, 7 percent, $1.9 billion 5. Bond payments, 5 percent, $1.2 billion These first five line items comprise 70 percent of the state budget at a total of $18.1 billion. 6. Department of Corrections, 5 percent, $1.2 billion 7. Department of Behavioral Health, 4 percent, $1.1 billion 8. Student Finance Commission, 4 percent, $890 million 9. Department of Human Services, 3 percent, $789 million

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10. Department of Early Care and Learning, 2 percent, $429 million 11. Technical College System, 1 percent, $367 million 12. Department of Juvenile Justice, 1 percent, $316 million These seven allocations comprise an additional 20 percent of the state budget at $5.1 billion and, totaling with the first five, encompass 91 percent of Georgia’s budget. These 12 line items constitute $23 billion in state spending. Remaining 38 agencies, 9 percent, $2.8 billion You read that correctly. Our state’s budget is generally spread over 50 allocations: five of which consume 70 percent of total spending, 12 of which comprise 91 percent of total spending, with the remaining 38 agencies utilizing only 9 percent of Georgia’s expenses. By percentage, this is nearly identical to the previous fiscal year, 2018. Now, we’ve seen the check stubs. What do they tell us about our state’s priorities? As I look over Georgia’s 12 largest expenses, I see four major categories. 1. We spend nearly $13.5 billion dollars on education when including higher education and the technical college system. This constitutionally stated “primary obligation” is covered by more than half of our state budget, and, for the first time, our General Assembly fully funded our QBE (Quality Basic Education) funding formula this year. 2. After education, the state spends nearly $5 billion on health care-related obligations, at 18 percent of total spending. 3. Third in line for spending priorities from the state is transportation. This totals 7 percent of the budget at more than $1.9 billion.

continued on page 87

Michael Caldwell is the state representative for District 20, which includes Towne Lake and Woodstock. He can be reached at 678-523-8570 or email him at Michael. Caldwell@house.ga.gov.


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Staying Safe on the Lake BY CHRISTOPHER PURVIS

Summer is in full swing and what better time to brush up on boating safety? From reminders on wearing life jackets to having your boat voluntarily inspected for proper safety equipment, there are many chances to make this season a safe one for you, your family and friends.

Wear a life jacket.

Wearing a life jacket is critical to surviving a boating accident. Nine out of 10 drowning victims were not wearing a life jacket. This single device may make the difference between life and death for anyone experiencing an emergency on the water. Put it on before leaving the dock and keep it on. Be sure it is properly fitted, in good condition, and securely fastened. Children under age 13 are required by law to wear a life jacket while on board a moving boat (unless the child is in a fully enclosed cabin). Remember: always worn, nobody mourns! About 70 percent of boaters involved in accidents never have taken a safe-boating course and 85 percent of all boating accident fatalities nationwide were due to sudden, unexpected capsizing or falls overboard. We know that education and awareness are the best weapons in preventing boating accidents. Here are some boating safety tips to help you start out right and complete your journey safely:

Take a boating safety course.

Brush up on your boating safety knowledge by taking a certified boating safety course with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 22, which offers handson classroom boating safety courses; you can check their schedule at http://wow. uscgaux.info/content.php?unit=070-02-02 or contact Public Education Officer Greg Fonzeno at flotilla22pe@gmail.com.

Know the laws.

Did you know Georgia boating laws require that you adhere to the 100-foot rule? The 100-foot rule prohibits people from operating all vessels, including personal watercraft (PWC), at a speed greater than idle speed within 100 feet of any vessel that is moored, anchored or 42

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

adrift outside normal traffic channels, or within 100 feet of any dock, wharf, pier, piling, bridge structure, person in the water or shoreline adjacent to a full-time or part-time residence, public park, public beach, public swimming area, marina, restaurant or other public use area.

Don’t drink and operate a boat. Half of all boating fatalities involve alcohol. Research has shown that four hours in a boat on the water being exposed to noise, vibration, sun, glare, wind and other motion on the water produces “boater’s hypnosis” or fatigue. It slows reaction time as much as if you were legally drunk. Adding alcohol to boating stress factors intensifies their effects. Think before you take that drink.

Get a vessel safety inspection.

When you are out on the water, you want to have fun. Before you head out, put your mind at ease by getting a vessel safety check to assure that you have the proper safety equipment and are familiar with safe boating guidelines. Vessel safety inspections are voluntary, free and can be done by a certified inspector with the U.S. Coast Guard

Auxiliary Flotilla 22. Vessel safety check events are scheduled at Blockhouse Ramp on Allatoona Lake, July 28 and Sept. 1; at Victoria Harbor Marina, Aug. 4; at Park Marina Docks, Aug. 11; and Wilderness Camp Marina, Aug. 25. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers these inspections as part of its boating safety awareness campaign. Here are some of the questions that will be answered if you have a vessel safety inspection: • Is your boat in top operating condition? • Is all required safety equipment on board and in good condition? • Is your safety equipment readily accessible? • Do you know how to use your equipment properly? • Is there a properly fitted, good condition, U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket on board for you and every passenger? For more questions concerning boating or water safety, please contact the Allatoona Lake Operations Project Management Office at 678-721-6700.

Christopher Purvis is the lead ranger at Lake Allatoona over Partnerships, Volunteers and Project Security. He has been a ranger on Allatoona Lake since 2005.


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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Protect Your Eyes During Summer Activities BY DR. JENNIFER DATTOLO

Taking steps to protect your eyes is something you should be mindful of year-round. However, summertime and outdoor activities can present added risks. Here are some helpful tips on how to protect your eyes and keep them healthy this summer. The Fourth of July is approaching, and we all know this means fireworks. But, are you aware of the potential eye damage that can occur? Every year, children and adults are seen in hospital emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries, most of which are preventable. Sparklers cause more than 40 percent of these injuries. Studies have found that one in six fireworks-related injuries results in permanent vision loss. Every year, 400 Americans lose their sight in one or both eyes due to fireworks. It is estimated that 30 percent of all fireworks injuries occur in children under age 15. Potential eye injuries include corneal abrasions, chemical and thermal burns, rupture of the globe, and retinal detachment. Almost half of those injured are bystanders, making it important for everyone to take safety precautions, even if not handling the fireworks. Protective eyewear should always be worn when handling fireworks of any kind. Children should never be allowed to light or play with fireworks unsupervised. If you are close to or handling fireworks, be aware of your surroundings, and keep a close eye on children observers.

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

If an eye injury does occur, seek medical attention immediately. Do not rub the eye, rinse with water or saline, apply pressure to the eye, or attempt to remove any firework piece or other foreign body from the eye. These can all cause further and more severe eye damage. Call 911 or go immediately to your local emergency room. Sunglasses are extremely important for summertime eye health and safety. Ultraviolet rays can cause cataracts, macular degeneration and corneal burns, among others, and can affect the eyes even on cloudy days. Look for sunglasses that protect from 99 percent to 100 percent UVA and UVB rays. Wraparounds offer more protection by decreasing the UV entering from the side. For those who spend summer days on the lake, polarization is a must. This reduces the glare reflecting off the water, giving clearer, sharper vision. Lens color is a personal preference and does not matter if the UV protection is there. Children should wear sunglasses while at the pool or on the water, as well. And, for those children and adults playing summer outdoor sports, such as golf and baseball, sunglasses are highly recommended.

Dr. Jennifer Dattolo, FCOVD, optometrist at Eyes on Towne Lake, has been in practice for 17 years and enjoys serving the Woodstock community. 770-702-5996. www.EyesonTowneLake.com.


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

47


Treating Patients Like

Kylie Aguilar

Aryel le King

PHOTO BY ALLISON AGUILAR PHOTOGRAPHY

D

rs. Andy and Ambre Kragor have the extensive education that parents look for when seeking a qualified orthodontist for their children. The Kragors attended a prestigious school and have established their practice in a community that’s near their home and dear to their hearts. Perhaps just as encouraging is the common theme that stands out from the parent and patient reviews: “Thanks for catering to my needs and making me feel comfortable!” One key to comfort is that each patient is treated like a family member, and provided a concierge level of service, according to Ambre. The family-oriented practice is owned by the Kragors — not a large corporation — and has grown at a rapid rate since opening in late August 2016, thanks to referrals from doctors and patients. “We treat our patients as part of our own family. It speaks volumes to us when someone refers another person to our practice. It shows us they are happy and believe in us. We are thankful for the love and support from our community.” Kragor Orthodontics offers services that include braces, retainers and clear aligner therapy, like Invisalign, to children, teens and adults. An advantage

They’re

of the two-doctor practice is that patients get double the opinions and the expertise, and double the fun. Other team members include two clinical assistants, an office manager and two patient coordinators. Andy and Ambre, who married in 2015, were trained at the University of Michigan, which Ambre says is ranked as the No. 1 dental school in the PHOTOS BY REBEKAH GREGG

Kiran Skinnel l Kragor patients 48

TOWNELAKER | July 2018


From left, Kiran Skinnell, Kylie Aguilar, Everlie Aguilar, Lincoln Skinnell and Aryelle King

Family

country. Education for orthodontists is extensive, requiring a four-year undergraduate degree, a four-year dental degree and a two- to threeyear orthodontic residency training. Both doctors have a doctor of dental surgery degree as well as a master’s degree. “We are proud to have had a top-notch education,” she said. “Our office provides some of the most modern technologies, including a digital scanner to replace taking impressions.” Other benefits at Kragor Orthodontics include: • Esthetic options, including clear aligner therapy (Invisalign) and clear ceramic braces. • The latest bracket techniques, including self-ligating brackets that may allow treatment to progress faster. • Affordable treatment with 0 percent interest in-house financing available. All major insurances are accepted. Patients are treated as family, and the doctors are thrilled to see their handiwork ... outside the office as well

as during the workday. “We love going out to dinner and running into our patients. It makes us feel awesome seeing our artwork of beautiful smiles on patients for years to come, and watching our patients grow. We believe community is important, and we are happy to practice where we live.” When Ambre is not seeing patients in Woodstock, she works at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, providing orthodontic care to craniofacial patients, such as those with a cleft lip and/or palate. This work fulfills her passion to help the community and provide access to care for children in need. Sponsored Content

In fact, the Kragors opened their Woodstock practice because each doctor has a passion for creating beautiful smiles. “We want to provide top quality orthodontic care, with unmatched customer service for children as well as adults,” Ambre said. “We strive to connect with our patients, to anticipate their needs. We are not just making cosmetic changes, we are creating life-altering improvements — which leaves an everlasting impression on us as providers. There is nothing more heartwarming than receiving a hug from a patient the day their smile transformation is complete. It is so rewarding.”

The Kragor Orthodontics team, front row from left, Alison Rouse, Brooke Marcotte, Dr. Ambre Kragor, Teresa Hall and Natalie Garrison. Back row: Dr. Andy Kragor and Taylor Garland

1816 Eagle Drive, Suite 100B, Woodstock, GA 30189

770-485-8827

7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays

www.KragorOrtho.com @Kragororthodontics @Kragorortho @Kragororthodontics

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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If you have a round face: steer clear of any type of bob. A jaw-length style Don’t: Definitely will only draw attention to and accentuate any fullness or

roundness around the jaw.

style with soft graduated layers that incorporates height Do: Aandlonger volume will be the most flattering style. This will also lend

itself to movement within the style and will give the illusion of added length to the face. When you’re blow-drying, use a round-barreled brush to give height at the root and prevent hair falling flat at the crown.

If your face is square:

Best Bang For Your Face BY TIM TIMMONS

What do you talk to your stylist about when you're sitting in the stylist chair contemplating your next haircut? Perhaps you mention how greasy your hair gets, whether it tangles easily, how fine, flyaway or coarse your hair type is. All are factors that’ll help your stylist choose the right sort of cut for you, but do you ever talk about your face shape? The truth is, the dimensions of your face play a major role in how well any style will suit you. It’s all well and good to take a picture of Taylor Swift and her new sleek bob with you to the hairdresser, but the length, style and cut might not look quite the way you’d like, unless you have the same sort of face shape. Here are some great tips as to the dos and don’ts of what to ask for and what to avoid the next time you’re at the hairdresser. As with any advice, take this guide with a grain of salt. These rules are basic and meant to help lead you in the right direction. If in doubt, talk with your stylist, who has the experience, education and recommendations to customize the best haircut for you. Tim Timmons is the owner of Salon Gloss Woodstock. Tim’s industry experience includes positions as trainer/educator, celebrity stylist and beauty consultant for the Grammys and MTV video music awards.

50

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

style you absolutely want to avoid is any kind of blunt Don’t: The cut; especially a blunt bang. Any kind of blunt finish will

emphasize the already angular shape of your face.

you have a square-shaped face you can use your hairstyle Do: When to counteract the angles of the jawline to create a softer look.

Sweeping side bangs works really well to do this, as do soft waves. Try using a wide-barreled iron to create movement, being sure to curl the hair away from your face.

If you have an oval face shape: face shapes can wear pretty much any style, but to Don’t: Oval keep it flattering don’t grow your hair too long as it’ll

make your face look longer.

great thing about an oval face shape is that you can wear pretty Do: The much any style, as it’s the most balanced and well-proportioned face

shape. I would suggest going for a textured bob. It looks great against this face shape and it’s incredibly easy to maintain.

If your face shape is long: can wear your hair long, but not too long. If you have Don’t: You a long face paired with long hair that’s parted in the center

your face will just appear longer.

a long face, take advantage of the fact that you can Do: Ifrockyoua have strong bang. Loose waves are also a pretty way to style hair

around a long face as they add width and dimension.

If you have a heart-shaped face: heart-shaped faces the bottom half of your face is Don’t: With narrower than the top half, so avoid a cut that’s top heavy

(like a blunt bang), as this will just dwarf the rest of your face.

of the characteristics of heart-shaped faces usually is good, Do: One sharp cheekbones. You can emphasize these with your cut by

choosing a style with a side-part to help frame the face. Additionally some light balayage around the face will look really pretty.

If your face is triangle-shaped: cuts that end at your jawline or that are too long as Don’t: Avoid this will draw the eye to the lower half of your face and

may make it seem narrower.

pixie cut will help balance your jawline. Make sure you Do: Aaddfringed a lot of volume and width at the temples when you style hair.


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

51


Would You Stop Mumbling? BY DR. CHRISTA NELMS

Many patients who seek firsttime help for hearing loss have been encouraged to do so by a spouse or a family member who has complained that their loved one has hearing loss. Typically, the patient will disagree with their family and say, “They mumble, and, if they would speak more clearly, there would be no problem.” Often, the person with the hearing problem is the last to notice it. Studies have shown that the average person has been having trouble hearing for about seven to 10 years before he or she finally decides to check his or her hearing. Changes in hearing typically happen gradually, over years, and start out subtly. These small changes in hearing can make the person with the hearing loss feel like people are mumbling. The problem isn’t being able to hear, but understanding what is heard. This is very common with presbycusis, or hearing loss due to age. Presbycusis often occurs in the higher frequency ranges, where most consonant sounds, which differentiate words,

are found. One of the first clues to hearing loss is mixing up consonant sounds. An example of this would be confusing the word hit with hip, or cat with cap. It is important to have your hearing tested once you start recognizing signs of hearing loss. Delayed treatment can affect the ability to understand words, as hearing loss worsens over time. Success with hearing aids also can be compromised. Hearing also plays a role in balance, and even mild hearing loss can increase the risk of falling. Furthermore, hearing loss is linked to social isolation and the risk of dementia. If you find yourself telling your loved ones to “stop mumbling,” then it is time to make an appointment for an audiological evaluation.

Christa Nelms, Au.D. is a Doctor of Audiology and provider at North Georgia Audiology in Woodstock. She has been practicing since 2000.

A Smile Restoration in One Day BY DR. BRUCE FINK

Patients looking for a fully restored smile in one day have a good option in All-on-4 dental implants. This is especially good news for the patients who are missing all of their teeth, or have teeth that aren’t restorable because of decay or gum disease. The All-on-4 technique was developed by dental implant company Nobel Biocare, along with clinical trials in Portugal by Dr. Paulo Malo. The name refers to the replacement of a full arch of teeth that is supported by four dental implants, which are fixed in place on the day of surgery. The process is simple, and completed in three steps. Step one happens on the day of surgery, when the teeth are removed, if necessary, and the implants are positioned and a temporary fixed prosthesis is put in place. The next step comes four to six months later, when the implants have fully integrated with the bone and are ready to finalize the full arch of teeth. At this visit, a final impression is taken and, several weeks later, the permanent fixed prosthesis is delivered and attached. The smile restoration is complete. The advantages to the All-on-4 procedure are sameday restoration, immediate stable chewing ability, and the option to use fewer implants for a more affordable 52

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

treatment. Patients whose medical conditions have contributed to their dental issues may be able to access medical benefits to offset the cost. Sedation is available to patients who are fearful. However, the stories of life changing results from patients are always the best part. The father of the bride who could smile with confidence at his daughter’s wedding. The attorney who was able to speak in court with confidence, without concern about a loose-fitting denture. The woman who, after being diagnosed with diabetes and hypertension, was able to feel complete when she could eat a healthy diet of proteins and vegetables that was practically impossible with a partial, and sensitive, broken teeth. And perhaps the best: the 24-year-old bride with a medical condition that caused missing and misshapen teeth. She was beaming in the bridal portraits she desperately wanted. Every smile tells us a story, a brilliant smile opens doors to make more.

W. Bruce Fink, who has been practicing for 24 years, offers general dentistry as well as full mouth rehabilitation and implant dentistry at Dentistry for Woodstock.


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Symptoms and Treatment of Fibromyalgia BY AMBER YORK, DC

You may have heard about fibromyalgia, since it has become a more prevalent diagnosis, especially among women. It is estimated that 3 percent to 6 percent of Americans suffer from fibromyalgia syndrome, despite the fact that the condition remains a mystery. The National Fibromyalgia Association states it can take a patient up to four years to be properly diagnosed, making it a complicated condition. If you, or your loved one, recently has been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, or you think you may have the condition, then you may be wondering what that means for you. Here is a quick look at fibromyalgia and some of its common symptoms. Diagnosis of fibromyalgia typically occurs when a patient has experienced chronic (longer than three months) widespread pain that is present in all four quadrants of the body; and tenderness or pain in 11 trigger points when pressure is applied. These points are commonly found surrounding the neck, shoulders, chest, hips, knees and elbows. Although these are the most classic symptoms, many patients suffer from a variety of other symptoms including: fatigue, sleep disorders, headaches, dizziness, muscle pain, morning stiffness, muscle cramping, irritable bowels, and the sensation of numbness and tingling, to name a few. Because of the widespread variation of symptoms, other conditions must be ruled out before a diagnosis of fibromyalgia can be made. If you have been diagnosed, or

suspect you have fibromyalgia, seeking the opinion of more than one health care provider is always a good idea. If no other underlying conditions are uncovered during your diagnosis process, the following may be helpful in relieving associated symptoms. Dietary changes such as increasing Omega-3 fatty acids with the use of fish, flax and walnut oils may increase nervous system and brain function, improving memory and concentration. While traditional exercise is not recommended, yoga, pilates and tai chi are all great ways to keep your body in motion, without exacerbating your symptoms. Along with other treatments, chiropractic can be an effective option if your pain is caused by a muscle or joint condition. Chiropractic treatment of fibromyalgia may include the use of gentle chiropractic adjustments, massage therapy, ultrasound or electrical stimulation, which may reduce stress, pain and other symptoms. Please consult a trusted healthcare provider if you, or someone you know, suffers from potential fibromyalgia symptoms, or before starting a new diet and exercise regime.

Dr. Amber York is a Life University graduate specializing in low force adjusting at Towne Lake Family Chiropractic.

Towne Lake Business Association As we celebrate our Independence Day and the many freedoms we enjoy, we thank all business owners keeping the entrepreneurial spirit strong in our community! We support all the hard work you do and invite you to join the Towne Lake Business Association to learn from the varied business experts we schedule monthly to help support and grow your business.Join at www.tlba.org for $75/year to take advantage of the benefits of membership. Congratulations to this year’s TLBA scholarship winners! Cory Jeryls EHS and Nathan Shear WHS, in the entrepreneurial category; Nicholas Slacanin EHS, Spencer Hayes EHS, and Thomas Fuller WHS for leadership; and to Amanda Doran EHS, Hailey Hovda WHS, Ashley Hessman RRHS and Tavyn Smith RRHS for work based learning scholarships. All outstanding examples of future leaders in our community! A big thank you to our Golf Tournament Title Sponsor, Christian Brothers Automotive; Elite Sponsor, The Joint Chiropractic; Platinum Sponsors, Cousins Maine Lobster and Chime Solutions; Gold Sponsors, Ursula & Associates and Renasant Bank; and Silver Sponsors, Quick Pro Plumbing and Puroclean and the many hole and raffle sponsors. We could not have done it without you! PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR NEXT LUNCH-N-LEARN WHEN:

Tues., July 17, 2018 12:15 - 2 p.m.

WHERE:

The Tavern at Towne Lake

COST:

$14 (includes lunch)

SPEAKERS: TOPIC:

Brad Stevens Entreholic Innovative Growth Solutions for Entrepreneurs

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT Paragon Accounting & Tax Solutions, LLC, is a team of certified public accountants that specializes in helping small businesses free up time and put more money in their pockets. The Paragon team believes that people and businesses should be able to retain the fruits of their labor and determine the appropriate way to dispense those fruits. The more that Paragon can legally keep the business at a distance from the government, the more control the individual has over his or her money and contributions to society. This is done through careful monitoring and proactive tax planning. (When was the last time your CPA came to you with an idea to help you save money on taxes?) Paragon delights in helping small business owners achieve success by monitoring their financial position, providing education on the financial aspects of business, making suggestions to help improve their business, and allowing them to concentrate on growing their business. To reach Paragon, visit www.paragonaccountingandtax.com or call 770-928-7229.


HOMES FOR SALE Listed by Dolores Wahl

1090 Olde Towne Lane | $1,445,000

2850 Glenburnie Court $399,900

271 Applewood Lane $525,000

DOLORES WAHL,

THE WAHL TEAM

404.428.4262 Cell 770.517.2150 Office Dolores.Wahl@BHHSGA.com www.WahlTeam.com

2017 REALTOR of the Year!

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.® If your home is currently listed with another brokerage, this is not intended as a solicitation to list your property. We cooperate with all brokerages.

ALL-NEW

BUNKERS

WHITE SAND BEACHES We’ve improved our course at Eagle Watch Golf Club so you can improve your game! Join now and rake in the savings with an exciting limited-time membership promotion.*

FOR MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Membership at Eagle Watch offers: • Active golf community with competitive leagues for everyone • Attentive instruction for all skill levels • Savory cuisine offered in a relaxed yet upscale environment • Golf programing and other social activities just for kids • Full access to Bentwater Golf Club Plus, enjoy 50% off dining at both Eagle Watch and Bentwater and access to 25 Atlanta-area clubs and 300 clubs when you travel.*

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*Offer expires 07/31/18 and may not be combined with any other promotion or discount. Membership is contingent on successful completion of Club’s enrollment process. Membership offer may vary depending on category and classification of membership selected and may require a loyalty agreement. The O.N.E. program and corresponding benefits are subject to certain restrictions and exclusions. Alcohol, service charges and applicable taxes are excluded. Participating clubs subject to change. Benefits are subject to the benefit terms and conditions, which may be found on clubcorpnetwork.com. All offers are subject to availability. Other restrictions and exclusions may apply. Call for details. © ClubCorp USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 41333 0618 EA

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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TOWNE LAKE AREA DINING CUISINE

BKFST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAYS SPIRITS RESERV.

Cancun Mexican Grill, 4430 Towne Lake Parkway 770-693-4680

Mexican

no

$

$

open

full bar

no

Cheeseburger Bobby’s, 2295 Towne Lake Parkway 678-494-3200, cheeseburgerbobbys.com

American

no

$

$

open

no

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Soup/Salad/ Sandwiches

$

$

$

open

no

no

American Irish

no

$

$$

open

full bar

6+

Mexican

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Family Tradition, 4379 Towne Lake Parkway 770-852-2885, familytradition.net

Homestyle Cooking

$$

$$

$$

closed

no

no

GameDay Fresh Grill, 2990 Eagle Drive 770-693-6754, gamedayfresh.com

American/Burgers

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Thai/Sushi/ Chinese

no

$

$$

open

full bar

no

JD’s Barbeque, 6557 Bells Ferry Road 678-445-7730, jdsbbq.com

Barbeque

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Jersey’s Sports Bar, 6426 Bells Ferry Road 770-790-5740

American

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Johnny’s Pizza, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-9494, johnnyspizza.com

Pizza/Pasta/ Salad

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Kani House, 2455 Towne Lake Parkway 770-592-5264, kanihouse.com

Japanese Steak/Sushi

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

yes

Sunday $$ $$-$$$ open full bar Brunch

no

China Fun, 1075 Buckhead Crossing 770-926-2671, chinafun88.com Corner Bistro, 2360 Towne Lake Parkway 770-924-1202, cornerbistrotl.com Donovan’s Irish Cobbler, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-693-8763, donovansirishcobbler.com El Ranchero, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-516-6616

Izumi Asian Bistro, 2035 Towne Lake Parkway 678-238-1899, iloveizumi.com

Keegan’s Public House, 1085 Buckhead Crossing #140 Irish/Pub 770-627-4393, keegansirishpub.net La Parrilla, 1065 Buckhead Crossing 770-928-3606, laparrilla.com

Mexican

no

$

$$

open

full bar

LongHorn, 1420 Towne Lake Parkway Steakhouse no $ $$ open full bar 770-924-5494, longhornsteakhouse.com Maple Street Biscuit Co., 2295 Towne Lake Pkwy #160 678-903-2161, maplestreetbiscuits.com

no call ahead seating

Southern

$

$

no

closed

no

no

Mellow Mushroom, 2370 Towne Lake Parkway 770-591-3331, mellowmushroom.com

Pizza/Pasta

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

NY Style Deli & Pizza, 2340 Towne Lake Parkway 678-426-7004

Pizza/Subs/ Bakery

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

no

no

Bakery/Soups/ Sandwiches

$

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Chinese/Japanese

no

$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Panera Bread, 2625 Towne Lake Parkway 678-813-4809, panerabread.com Peking & Tokyo, 200 Parkbrooke Drive 770-591-8858, pekingandtokyo.com Song’s Garden, 4451 Towne Lake Parkway 770-928-8387, songsgarden.com

Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills Drive American 770-592-9969 see ad on pg 31 The Place, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-8901, theplacebargrill.com

Sunday $ $$ open full bar Brunch

no

Bar/Grill

no

$-$$

$$

open

full bar

no

Tuscany, 250 Cinema View Drive 678-453-0888, mytuscanyrestaurant.com

Italian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

10+

Volcano Steak & Sushi, 2990 Eagle Drive 678-498-7888, volcanowoodstock.com

Asian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

no

full bar

yes

WOW Pho & Grill, 6422 Bells Ferry Rd Vietnamese no $-$$ $-$$ open 678-383-6099, wowpho.com see ad on pg 3

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

coming soon

$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

RESTAURANT

Casual and Upscale Restaurants


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Around & About JULY Woodstock Friday Night 6 Live2018 Series The

, presented by Reformation Brewery, offers live music and activities 6-9 p.m. The July 6 theme is Downtown Dance Party. Aug. 3 is Superhero Night, Sept. 7 is Art Night, Oct. 5 is Roaring 20s Night, Nov. 2 is Night of Thanks, and Dec. 7 is Christmas in Downtown. 770-924-0406. visitwoodstockga.com.

Canton Main Street hosts a party in

downtown Canton on the first Friday of each month, 6-9 p.m., featuring live music, a car show, food and activities for the entire family. Island Dreams with music by Sons of Sailors will be featured July 6. Other themes are: Aug. 3: Alumni Night, with music by Anita & Party Life. Sept. 7: ’80s Night, with music by the Breakfast Club. Oct. 5: Jeep Night, with music by Skipper Grace.

7

Second annual Peacocks Fly Virtual Race, sponsored by the Bariatric

Weight Loss Family Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on the importance of good health. The event is set for 9 a.m.-1 p.m., and participants can take part by running or walking in their neighborhoods. For more details, visit www.bwlfamily.org.

7

Woodstock Parks and Recreation and ABC Easel present PaintN-Paws Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Woofstock Park, 150 Dupree Road. Create a special keepsake with your furry friend. Provided: Nontoxic paint, stencils, stamps, colored pencils, oil pastels, a variety of design tools and mat board. $10 per pet, pre-registration encouraged. Contact Angela Kirby at 678-478-3002 or abceasel@gmail.com.

sessions with 9, 23 Art Always Be Creative

(ABC) Easel will be held at the Cherokee Recreation and Parks annex, 7545 Main St., Woodstock. Sessions available for all ages, preschool through high school. Pre-registration is required by calling 770-924-7768. www.crpa.net. Historic Canton Theatre 11 isThehosting dollar movies this

summer, presented by Canton Main Street. “Coco” will play on July 11, “The Jungle Book” (1967 version) will play July 18. Day-of-show tickets are $1 and go on sale one hour prior to showtime. $1 concessions. Two showings daily: 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. The theater is at 171 E. Main St. 770-704-0755. www.cantontheatre.com.

FOURTH OF JULY WOODSTOCK

July 4: The daylong July 4th Spectacular begins at 7:15 a.m. with the 22nd annual Woodstock Freedom Run (Registration details at www.woodstockfreedomrun.com). A parade begins at 10 a.m. at Woodstock Elementary School on Rope Mill Road and travels down Main Street to end at Sam’s Club. A festival begins at The Park at City Center after the parade, and includes food, live music, children’s games, inflatables, arts and crafts, Adam the Juggler and vendors until 3 p.m. Fireworks begin at dusk behind the Target shopping center at Highway 92 and I-575.

CANTON

July 4: Riverstone Shopping Center, 5-10 p.m. Parade, entertainment and fireworks display at RiverStone Shopping Plaza.

ALLATOONA YACHT CLUB

July 3: Fireworks Extravaganza begins at 9:30 p.m. 58

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

Photo Courtesy of Darleen Prem.

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Volunteers are still needed for the 12th annual Give a Kid a Chance — Cherokee Back-to-School Bash, set for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Hillside United Methodist in Woodstock and First Baptist Church in Canton. Sign up at www.giveakidachance.org.

Woodstock Summer Concert Series continues with the band

Departure, 7:30-10:30 p.m. at the Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater. Free admission.

The Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association will meet

at 10 a.m. at the Gordon County Historical Society, 335 S. Wall St. (U.S. Highway 41), Calhoun. Guest speaker is past President W. Jeff Bishop; topic is the Journey to Indian Country. The third presentation in the series commemorating the 180th anniversary of the Cherokee removal from Georgia.

A Novel Idea will feature 18 local authors discussing their

mystery/thriller novels, at East Main Cafe (inside Audio Intersection), 210 E. Main St., Canton, 7-9 p.m. The cafe has sandwiches, salads, desserts. BYOB. Door prizes.


19

Main Street Woodstock announces the return of WDSTK Roots Music Nights. The events will take place 7-9 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month through August, on the Elm Street Arts Village Event Green. July 19: Kurt Wheeler. Aug. 16: Jonathan Peyton. Shows are free. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs, food and beverages.

Workout for Water, 21 hosted by Burn Boot Camp

Woodstock, starts at 9 a.m. at 1105 Parkside Lane, #1100, Woodstock. The fundraiser is collecting money to bring clean water to families worldwide with no access to safe drinking water. For details, or to register, visit www.workoutforwater. com/event/burnbootcamp, email woodstock@burnbootcamp.com or call 843-226-0392.

Movies in the Park in downtown Woodstock are free and begin around 8:50 p.m. at the Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Children’s activities before the movie are provided by BridgePointe Church. Snacks will be available for purchase. July 21: “Star Wars – The Last Jedi,” Aug. 18: “Sherlock Gnomes” (starts around 8:30 p.m.), and Sept. 15: To be determined (starts around 7:50 p.m.).

27 featuring “Paddington 2” Family movie night

at the sports field at First Baptist Woodstock, 11905 Highway 92. Starts at 8:30 p.m. Bring chairs or blankets.

28 Canton’s Brown Park start at Movies in the Park in

dusk. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to enjoy a movie on a big screen with a backdrop of the historic City Hall. Sponsored by Northside Hospital, Southern Outdoor Cinema, Covenant Christian Academy and the city of Canton. The July 28 feature is “Ferdinand.” The Aug. 25 movie is “Sherlock Gnomes.”

VOLUNTEER AGING COUNCIL LUNCHEONS The $5 luncheons are fundraisers for programs that help the nonprofit meet the needs of less fortunate seniors and veterans in Cherokee County. Bring a friend, coworker or family member with you and enjoy lunch while supporting the seniors and veterans of Cherokee County. All luncheons are held 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Dine-in or take out available. RSVP the location, so the chefs have a head count.

July 20: Benton House, 3385 Trickum Road, Woodstock Aug. 17: Autumn Leaves of Towne Lake, 1962 Eagle Drive, Woodstock Sept. 21: Cameron Hall of Canton, 240 Marietta Highway, Canton Oct. 19: The Oaks at Towne Lake, 4580 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock Nov. 16: Brookdale Neese, 756 Neese Road, Woodstock

COED @ THE CIRCUIT 1 Innovation Way, Woodstock 770-345-0600, www.cherokeega.org.

1 Million Cups Cherokee (1MC CHK)

First and third Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m. First Wednesdays are held at The Circuit, third Wednesdays are held in different Cherokee County cities. The free, biweekly coffee gathering helps build startup communities on a grassroots level. Perfect for entrepreneurs looking to practice their pitch skills, gain valuable feedback, or belong to a community.

The Lunch Circuit

July 11, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at The Circuit. A monthly exclusive lunch gathering of aspiring and current entrepreneurs to eat, build community and learn the stories behind successful Cherokee entrepreneurs. An event powered by Fresh Start Cherokee, hosted by Cherokee Office of Economic Development.

Woodstock WordPress Meet-Up

First and third Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at The Circuit. Local WordPress developers, designers and publishers get together to share knowledge and experience, and to meet other WordPress users in the area. Open to all who love WordPress.

Creative Problem Solvers Meet-Up

First and third Tuesdays, 7-8:30 a.m., at The Circuit. Join an innovative, diverse community of creative problem-solvers, entrepreneurs, “want-repreneurs” and innovators dedicated to helping one another work through business challenges. Every other Tuesday, this group meets over doughnuts and coffee to dive deep into real issues from the community and give constructive, supportive feedback and actionable advice.

OTP & Greater Cherokee Tech Pros

Every third Thursday, 7:30-8:45 a.m. at The Circuit. A local community of technology professionals gather to 1) increase awareness of the community and resources available, 2) educate the community on the latest trends affecting our day-to-day lives without commuting to Atlanta, and 3) connect a network of people that can help each other professionally. Topics include AI, machine learning, blockchain, cryptocurrency, drone technology, smart cities and more.

Women Entrepreneurs Meetup

Every third Friday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at The Circuit. A local group of aspiring and current female entrepreneurs. NOT a lead exchange or referral networking program, but, rather, a group for women who want to take action and hold each other accountable for stated goals. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Innovation of Liposculpture: The Next Evolution BY MICHAEL LITREL, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

A woman may diet, shedding half her body weight. She may exercise until she can run a marathon. And, yet, she may still find herself with incredibly stubborn trouble areas of fat that won’t budge. Or, she may be very close to the sculpted look she’s always dreamed of, without reaching her desired results. Liposculpture could be the answer. How does liposculpture differ from traditional liposuction? Like traditional lipo, liposculpture is an office procedure that permanently removes fat deposits from targeted areas. But, liposculpture then utilizes the technique of fat Injections to sculpt the body, and actually add desired curves where there were none before. A minimally invasive technique is used to safely and effectively remove excess fat from the donor site (typically the abdomen, flanks, hips or thighs). The removed fat is then cleaned and processed before it’s re-injected into target areas through a small incision. Essentially, a woman says “Goodbye!” to unwanted fat and “Hello!” to an enhanced look somewhere else.

final pounds off, but she needs some support to help her achieve her ideal final goal. Liposculpture is an innovation in surgical body shaping that can help a woman achieve her desired look when weight loss and exercise fall short. However, liposculpture should not be confused with a weight loss procedure. If a woman needs to lose weight, she first needs to make healthy lifestyle changes before seeking the care of a surgeon to perform this procedure.

What to expect after liposculpture.

After the procedure, a patient can expect some bruising and swelling. She’ll wear a compression girdle for two weeks up to a month, depending on how extensive the procedure and how quickly healing takes place. Typically, all swelling and bruising are gone within about three weeks. Once recovery is complete, a patient can expect her body to have a more sculpted appearance, with consistent reinforcement from regular exercise. While liposculpture is not a weight loss method, it can help a woman get past those final hurdles for a look that helps her feel her best.

The ideal candidate.

A good candidate for liposculpture is a healthy individual who eats nutritious foods, exercises regularly and can manage stress well. The individual is ideally no more than 20-25 pounds from her ideal weight. She’s done all the right things to get or keep those

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018

Dr. Michael Litrel, a board-certified OB-GYN and Urogynecologist at Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, writes books and essays on faith, family and health. www.cherokeewomenshealth.com


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@ the Library ROSE CREEK 4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, 770-591-1491

July 6

Bee Bot Fun at 10:30 a.m. Bee Bots are exciting, fun robots that introduce coding to young children. For ages 3-7; children must be accompanied by an adult.

July 9

Sequoyah Regional Library System 116 Brown Industrial Parkway • Canton, GA 30114 770-479-3090 • www.SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org

Summer Reading Program Lasts through July 31, visit your local library

to participate in the Summer Reading Program. Adults, teens and children may complete activities at the library to win prizes. All through summer, attend shows, events, animal visits and more; all free of charge.

Maker Monday at 3:30 p.m. Get creative in the pop-up

maker space with self-directed making, tinkering and STEAM activities. For ages 7-12; children 9 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.

July 10

Teen Virtual Reality Experience at 5 p.m. Tweens and

teens in grades 6-12 are invited to experience the library’s virtual reality (VR) head gear and educational VR programs in a fun, age-appropriate environment.

July 12

Campfire Songs and Stories at 6 p.m. Get cozy in an

indoor campsite and sing songs, share camp stories and eat a s’more or two. Bring your sleeping bag and wear your favorite pajamas. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

July 17

Sing First at 10:30 a.m. These music and movement classes for children and their parents are provided by music teacher Justine Lemmo. Session one (ages 0-18 months) begins at 10:30 a.m. Session two (ages 19-35 months) begins at 11:10 a.m. Session three (ages 3-7 years) begins at 11:50 a.m. Children must be accompanied by a participating adult.

July 18

Stairway to Heaven: Funeral Planning at 11 a.m. Learn about the steps and advantages of pre-planning your funeral arrangements. Presented by Brian Poole of Poole Funeral Home and Cremation.

July 19

Rock the Block at 10:30 a.m. Enjoy music, food and fun as the Summer Reading Program winds down. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

July 24

Family Art Night at 6:30 p.m. Have fun as a family and create art together. For all ages; children 9 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.

July 25

Hall and Oats at 11 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. Make your own

overnight oatmeal. Ingredients and materials provided. Registration required and opens July 2; call 770-591-1491 to sign up.

The library’s Lego robotics stole the show at the R.T. Jones Technology Fair, where visitors learned about coding, e-library resources, and how to check out eBooks and audiobooks with their library cards. 62

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

July 26

Rock Your Socks Off at 5 p.m. Knit at night and share your latest project.


Visitors from a galaxy far, far away entertained guests at the R.T. Jones Memorial Library’s recent Sequoyah-Con event, a convention with panels, guests and games.

The 2018 graduates of the 1,000 Books B4 Kindergarten program at R.T. Jones Memorial Library. 1,000 Books B4 Kindergarten is a free early literacy program; families can register at their local library any time during the year.

WOODSTOCK 7735 Main St., Woodstock, 770-926-5859

Tuesdays

Teacher Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Join your favorite teachers from Woodstock Elementary as they read fun interactive books. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Wednesdays

The Rose Creek Public Library’s Family Art Night hosted aspiring artists of all ages for an evening of creative fun.

are invited to join the Teen Advisory Board for Summer Reading Club. Club meetings held at the Woodstock Library every Wednesday through July 25.

July 13

Teen Summer Reading Club at 2 p.m. Teens in grades 6-12

Cupcake Wars: Teen Edition at 4 p.m. Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to join the Teen Advisory Board for Cupcake Wars. Teens will compete to craft the best-looking cupcake creation. Registration is required; call 770-926-5859 to sign up.

Historic Haunted Georgia at 6:30 p.m. Spend Friday the 13th at the (haunted?) library! Just in time for summer vacation, Paranormal Georgia Investigations is presenting a program on Historic Haunted Georgia. Discover the sites to see for some thrilling summer fun! For all ages; children 9 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.

July 5

July 19

July 3

Design Your Own Album Cover at 10:30 a.m. If you had a

band, what would your first album cover look like? Take a look at some classic album art and design your own to take home. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

STEAM Water Party at 10:30 a.m. Enjoy outside water fun as the Summer Reading Program begins to wind down. Learn about water using different experiments. Kona Ice provided while supplies last. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

July 12

July 22

What’s It Like to Be a Musician? at 2:30 p.m. Do you have

what it takes to be a musician? Find out when singer-songwriter Kurt Scobie joins us to talk about his career in music. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Woodstock Rocks at 3 p.m. Join in the fun of decorating rocks to hide and seek. Materials provided; all you need to bring is your creativity. For all ages; children 9 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Teams mug for the camera at the Zagster Bike Share location in Woodstock.

Participants of all ages get involved in the annual hunt.

Scavenger Hunt

Annual event returns for another year of fun. BY KYLE BENNETT

Some participants took to the water in order to complete a challenge.

A fun selfie with Tom Cruise. 64

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

Woodstock residents and visitors will have the opportunity to learn about and explore Woodstock during the sixth annual Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt. The hunt begins Aug. 30 and runs through Sept. 15. The event provides a unique experience, as participants team up to gather photographic evidence of their journey through 100 different sites around Woodstock. Whether you live or work in Woodstock, or are visiting, you are welcome to take part in this fun community activity. It will help you get to know the Woodstock area better. Participation in the event is free, and no advance registration is required. The Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt offers a great chance to explore parks, historic sites, stores and restaurants in and around Woodstock. Many locations are hidden gems that even locals might not know exist. This is a perfect event for friends, families and coworkers. Participants will have two weeks to complete as many of the 100 tasks, or challenges, as they can. Teams will compete for a $100 Downtown Dollars gift certificate and other prizes. All teams that complete

Challenges are completed and often documented with a selfie.

a minimum number of challenges will be entered into a drawing to win prizes. Everyone has a chance to be a winner in the Discover Woodstock Scavenger Hunt. Clues for starting the scavenger hunt will be released to teams on Aug. 30, at 10 a.m. on VisitWoodstockGA.com, the Downtown Woodstock facebook page, and hard copies will be available at the Woodstock Visitors Center. For more information, go to VisitWoodstockGA.com or call the Woodstock Visitors Center at 770-924-0406.

Kyle Bennett is the director of tourism for the Woodstock Downtown Development Authority. He can be reached at kbennett@woodstockga.gov.


Dr. Larissa Chismar graduated summa cum laude from Northwestern University. Dr. Chismar attended and graduated from medical school and completed her dermatology residency at the prestigious Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. She subsequently completed a dermatopathology fellowship at the same school, and practiced in that dermatologic field for two years at one of the largest dermatopathology practices in Atlanta, prior to joining Atlanta North Dermatology. Dr. Chismar is fully board certified by the American Board of Dermatology in both dermatology and dermatopathology. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and is a member of the Atlanta Association for Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery and the Georgia Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery. She is the author of multiple publications and has given presentations at local and national conferences. She specializes in general dermatology with an interest in medical dermatology. Dr. Chismar resides in metro-Atlanta with her husband, a professional musician with the Georgia Symphony Orchestra, and their son.

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HELPING HANDS

Above, a combined worship team leads a fifth-Sunday service. Pastors Elbert Davis, top right, and John Valentine, preached at the April Power in Unity service at Church of the Messiah, Canton.

Power in Unity

July 29 Worship Service Promotes ‘One Kingdom in Cherokee’ BY SUSAN BROWNING SCHULZ

Who would have thought a 2,000-yearold prayer would be answered in 2018 in our county? Jesus prayed, “So that they may be brought into complete unity” (John 17:23). It’s a prayer that has come to fruition through the Concerned Clergy of Cherokee (C4), and will be demonstrated by a countywide worship service set for July 29 at the Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater in Woodstock. The mega worship event, currently involving 23 churches, will begin at 5:15 p.m. when participants can enjoy food trucks, inflatables and other activities. Representatives of local nonprofits will

be at display tables in the worship area. At 6 p.m., a combined praise team will kick off the worship service, which will include testimonies, prayer, several speakers and “lots of worship to celebrate that we are one Kingdom in Cherokee,” said Fred Goodwin, senior pastor of Church of the Messiah and president of the Cherokee Christian Ministerial Association (CCMA). Among the churches participating are Allen Temple AME, Woodstock First Baptist, Momentum and Dwelling Place. The spirit of cooperation among the different denominations is unparalleled, and something the organizers hope will continue to grow.

“Two-and-half years ago, after the tragic shooting at the AME church in Charleston, pastors associated with the CCMA asked me to make a concerted effort to connect more fully with our black and hispanic pastors in Cherokee,” Goodwin said. “This gave birth to Concerned Clergy of Cherokee (C4), a network of multi-racial, multi-ethnic pastors and community leaders, who began meeting monthly for fellowship, sharing and prayer.” Kandi Patterson is the ministry coordinator for Power in Unity, and Mike Saunders and his wife, Romanzia, lead the C4 group. “Several years before moving to Canton, God had given me the vision and call of what he wanted to take place in Cherokee County. I was unaware of the who, what and why until I moved here and started attending CCMA meetings where C4 was birthed,” Saunders said. “The vision of C4 is that through the combined efforts and example of the church, we would be unified and equipped to address some of the social, economical, continued on page 87 Susan Browning Schulz is a Bible teacher, author, wife, and mom of three grown children. She lives and plays along the Etowah River and loves serving at Woodstock City Church.

Clergy and spouses during a C4 service represent many cultures and denominations. 66

TOWNELAKER | July 2018


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FAITH

Songs That Shape Our Summer BY THE REV. ELIZABETH LOVELL MILFORD

These hot months bring out a spirit of freedom in our lives, where we can roll down the windows and crank up the volume for a tune that celebrates the season. If it hasn’t been declared already, soon an upbeat and inspiring song will top the charts and be declared the “anthem of summer 2018.” I love just about all musical styles and the ability they have to convey our feelings at a certain moment in time. Whether it is a power ballad to get us through a difficult break-up, or the first dance at a wedding, music shapes our lives. The same is true for our faith. Many times, it is not the words of the sermon or prayers that stick with us, but the hymns and songs we sing to proclaim our faith. Rarely do people experiencing illness or grief ask me for a theological exposition about the Trinity; instead they ask to sing “Amazing Grace,” or to read Psalm 23 (the book of Psalms is often considered the first hymnal of God’s people). This summer, in my congregation, we are exploring some of the great hymns of our faith and the stories in Scripture they proclaim. The stories behind these sacred songs are powerful, tied intimately into the life experiences of the writers. They are more than just music notes and words on a

page; they are compositions of the heart. I am so grateful for the ways they remind us of how faith has been proclaimed throughout the ages. I am also appreciative of the inspiration they give us to consider how we might follow in their footsteps. This summer, as you flip from one station to another, consider what you would add to the mix. What would your melody be like? What words might describe your beliefs and the things you hold sacred? Perhaps it’s a guiding passage in Scripture, or an inspirational quote. Maybe it’s a deeply held belief about what it means to love and be loved, or the hope you have for the future. Then, sing it out - with your choices, your words, your actions. Let your life be reflective of the song that has been put in you to sing, so much so that you won’t even be embarrassed to be caught at a red light with the windows down, singing your heart out!

The Rev. Elizabeth Lovell Milford lives in Woodstock with her family and serves as pastor of Heritage Presbyterian (Acworth), a congregation passionate about local mission.

Marriage Moments

Endurance Wins the Race BY BILL RATLIFF

While perusing some historical data, I came across an interesting character you may have heard of named Buffalo Bill Cody. He was a Union scout, a buffalo hunter and a Pony Express rider. He is well known for his Wild West Show. In 1900, he may have been the most recognized person in the world. In 1866, he married a woman named Louisa Frederici. In his autobiography, Cody declared, “I adored her above any young lady I had ever seen.” After some time, their marriage began to deteriorate. He did his thing by hunting, scouting and acting. She did hers by staying home and raising their children. As he traveled more often, she began to fear infidelity. On one occasion, she showed up while he was on tour, to purportedly catch him in the act. Rumors began to fly and that damaged his reputation. In 1904, he filed for divorce after 38 years of marriage. Regardless of all the accusations on both sides and the intense battle with his lawyers, Louisa wanted to save their marriage. That same year their daughter passed away. As a result, Cody hoped they could put aside their personal differences. 68

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

However, their conflict raged unabated. The court ruled in favor of Cody’s wife on the grounds that incompatibility was sufficient grounds for divorce. In 1910, they reconciled, and she traveled with him to his Wild West shows until his death. During the course of their 51-year marriage, the Codys had much heartache and struggle. Because of their endurance, particularly on her part, their marriage finished well. James 1:4 states, “Let endurance have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete lacking in nothing.”

Date Your Mate Take your mate on a mountain hike. Great places to hike around North Georgia include Kennesaw Mountain, Lake Arrowhead, Stone Mountain and Brasstown Bald.

Bill Ratliff is a pastoral counselor and certified life coach. Contact him at www.billratliffcatalyst.com..


TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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F ORECAST SCHOOL & SPORTS

2018 Football

High school coaches preview the 2018 football season.

Cherokee Warriors

Etowah Eagles

Looking to rebound from a tough 2017 season, the Warriors will lean on the experience of their defense as they break in a young quarterback to lead the offense. With five nonregion contests, the Warriors hope to be clicking on offense and defense as they head into their region schedule with the hopes of returning to the playoffs in 2018. The coaching staff has made a strong emphasis on demanding more attention to detail and increasing their tempo at practice. The hope is to create a tougher atmosphere at practice so that Friday nights will seem easier for the players. While we want to be respectful of the rules of the game, and emulate good sportsmanship, our goal for the 2018 season is to be the toughest and most physical team in the region. Tempo and toughness will be key factors in the success of the offensive unit. With the return of some experienced offensive linemen and running back Miles Garret (senior), the offense hopes to see that toughness pay off in the running game. In the passing game, juniors Landon Ergle and Carson Pickens will battle for the role of starting QB while freshman AJ Swann has shown potential as well. They will be looking to get the ball to senior Brandon Bostick and dynamic junior DJ Bynum in the passing game. Overall, the Warriors will look to force the tempo and get the ball into the hands of their playmakers. Defensively, the Warriors did not have the season they wanted in 2017, but have worked extremely hard in the offseason to return the defense to the top of the region this season. The 2018 Warriors will continue to work to play fast and tough. Warrior defense keys to success: line up, adjust, tackle, create turnovers, and play fast. Defensive coordinator Davis Harvey will lean heavily on the seniors and returning starters to make the defense the best it can be. The future appears to be extremely bright for the Warriors, but they must rely on several underclassmen to step up this year, if they are to return to the playoffs in 2018.

Etowah will be losing several offensive starters this season, but returns some key players as well. Nick Maddox, the leading rusher in the county, returns, as well as twoyear starting receiver Jackson Manns and offensive lineman Dominick D’Antonio, a Northwestern University commit. Porfirio Acosta also returns on the OL. Players such as Zach Meyers (OL, senior) and Jesse Sebring (OL, junior) will be counted on to step up this season. Our receivers will be young, but many of them have shown some athleticism that may help them get onto the field this fall. Defensively, we return three starters up front, including two (Cole Milovanovic and Raymone Devezin) who played as sophomores last season. At defensive end, we return three-year starter Dalton Nicolai. Our biggest losses last season come at linebacker, where we will be looking for three new guys. Evan Arvanitis (senior) has had a great offseason and looks to take one of the positions. The other two are definitely up for grabs. At defensive back, we return starter Justin Sherrer, but look to replace three players. Athletes Ameer Salame and Tyler Freas will be fighting for the starting positions. The schedule this season looks to be fun, but challenging. We open with county opponent River Ridge and follow with nonregion games with North Cobb, South Forsyth, Pebblebrook and Hillgrove. As always, our region really will be talented and will test us every week. Our kids have had an excellent offseason in the weight room, and it will be interesting to see which players are prepared to make the transition from freshman/junior varsity to Friday night football.

Head Coach Josh Shaw

Head Coach Dave Svehla

Creekview Grizzlies Head Coach Adam Carter

This was the first spring practice at Creekview in a few years. We were able to get in nine quality practices and an intrasquad scrimmage. I thought the kids responded very well to putting the pads on in May. We will lean heavily on a strong senior class. On offense, we will use our offensive line and senior RB Cade Radam to establish the run. This is by far the biggest offensive line I have had in my career. We have a good QB competition going on with junior Ethan Dirrim and sophomore Brody Rhodes. On defense, we will be led by senior safety Andy Davis and our defensive line. We have a few new players coming out for football for the first time since middle school who should impact our football team immediately. This summer will be very important for the progression of our football team. We will be involved in 7 vs. 7 tournaments at Kennesaw State, UGA and McEachern. We will host two padded camps at Creekview. I also am excited about our rising ninth grade group. As a program, this spring, we have been able to increase our numbers to 110 9th12th graders. We have been involved in a great fundraiser to bring in money for our program. Our booster club is gaining memberships every day. I am blessed with a staff that has found a way to make it through spring practice, driving from all over the metro area. It is an exciting time here at Creekview, I am very proud of what we have accomplished this spring and looking forward to the summer. 70

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Sequoyah Chiefs

Woodstock Wolverines

The Chiefs look to build on last season's playoff appearance, their fifth in six seasons, with five starters back on offense and six returning on defense. The Chiefs’ wing-T offense will have experienced ball handlers in quarterback Collier Pecht (1,117 yards passing in 2017) and running backs Cole Jacobs (889 yards from scrimmage, 11 touchdowns) and Jackson Smith (274 yards rushing), all returning. Others working to earn a spot in the backfield include senior Mason Webster, 5 feet-10, 160 pounds, wingback; senior DJ King, 6 feet-, 180 pounds; and senior D’Angelo Smith, 6 feet, 175 pounds, wingback. The Chiefs will need to rebuild an offensive line that has two main returners in senior Alex Majeed, a 6 feet-4, 290 pounds, offensive tackle, who was an All-Region pick, as well as the Cherokee Gridiron Offensive Lineman of the Year for 2017, junior Wyatt Hampton, a 6 feet-2, 240 pounds offensive guard. Other players fighting for playing time on the offensive line will be senior Cole Stewart, 6 feet, 230 pounds, center; junior Nick Ballance 6 feet-1, 240 pounds, center; senior Spencer Clark, 6 feet, 280 pounds, tackle; junior Connor Johnston, 6 feet, 240 pounds, tackle; senior Matthew Meyer, 6 feet, 240 pounds, guard; and junior Spencer Smith, 6 feet, 230 pounds, guard. At tight end and wide receiver, the Chiefs look to replace two three-year starters with the loss of Wesley Potter and Patrick Ballance. At tight end, they will look to junior Joshua Estrada, 6 feet-1, 180 pounds; senior Adam LaSelva, 6 feet-2, 215 pounds; senior Jordan Bowers 6 feet-1, 230 pounds and senior Shayne Smith, 5 feet-11, 220 pounds. Senior Emmanuel Jenkins, 6 feet-2, 196 pounds; junior Myles McGee, 6 feet-1, 175 pounds and junior Christian Hodgins will compete at wide receiver. On defense, cornerback Emmanuel Jenkins (37 tackles, nine pass breakups) has more than 10 Division I offers. The defensive line will be a strength, with returning starters Spencer Clark, Connor Johnston and Jordan Bowers (six sacks). Others being looked at on the line will be seniors Cole Stewart, David Traynor and Alex Majeed. Linebacker is another strong area for the Chiefs, with returners senior Adam LaSelva, 6 feet-2, who was an All-Region player last season, and junior Grant Gibson, 6 feet-2, 220 pounds. Other players to keep an eye on at linebacker will be Jackson Smith, who also saw action last season, and junior Tray Bray, 5 feet-10, 165 pounds. In the secondary, the Chiefs will have the most spots to replace. With senior Emmanuel Jenkins, 6 feet-2, 196 pounds, who was also an All-Region player last season, as the only returner, the Chiefs will look at junior Myles McGee, 6 feet-1, 175 pounds; senior Mason Webster, 5 feet-10, 160 pounds and senior Cole Jacobs, 5 feet-10, 175 pounds. The kicking game should be solid with returning punter Tyler Price and sophomore Jordan Campbell.

After back to back Sweet 16 playoff appearances, Woodstock is looking to make it back into the postseason again in 2018. To get this accomplished, some new players will have to step up and fill positions vacated by the 25 seniors who graduated off the 2017 team. We believe that we have the players who can fill these positions and make the plays needed for us to be successful. On offense, we have averaged scoring more than 30 points a game for the last five seasons. With five starters back on offense, we will look to continue this success. Trevor Stephens, Andrew Andon and Jaylen Reid are returning on the offensive line from last year. Along with tight end Drew Sheehan and running back Ryan Martin, this should allow us to run the ball more to take off pressure from first-year starting quarterback Dean Braxton. When we do throw the ball, Braxton is very accurate and will be throwing to a good group of wide receivers. A couple of wide receivers really have stepped up this spring. Sebastian Moss, who started six games last year, returns. Radi Krastev, Wes Bruno and Jabari Overton all have had a great spring catching the ball. So, we look to continue our strong passing attack from years past. On defense, we will replace nine starters off the 2017 team, which allowed the fewest points per game over the last five seasons. Again, we feel we have players who can step in and fill these positions. Hardhitting safety Andrew Bartolero returns, along with corner Amin Davis. Joining them in the secondary will be a very talented sophomore, David Daniel. At linebacker, we have a couple of players in Campbell Price and Caleb Conley who saw lots of varsity playing time last year. Both have really stepped up their play in the spring. Travis Bailey and Holden Mumy will join them. These two have pursued the ball relentlessly this spring, and hit when they get to the ball. We were hit hardest by graduation up front on the defensive line. We are looking for Dillion Shackelford to lead a young group of defensive linemen this season. We also graduated our kicker, but Tyson Giles has been working hard this offseason and is a top-rated kicker for the state of Georgia as a sophomore. Top-ranked snapper Colby Cox will be snapping the ball to him, so the kicking game should continue to be strong.

Head Coach James Teter

Head Coach Brent Budde

River Ridge Knights Head Coach Tyler Winn

Spring practice is about getting down to the basics and making sure everyone is on the same page. We’ve got a group of hardworking upperclassmen who are helping to set the standards for the program. As we look toward the summer and the fall season, we are looking for leadership from some of our returning starters: Chico Ward (senior), Chase Tomlinson (senior) and Kofi Reeves-Miller (junior). We’re especially excited about the addition of new offensive coordinator Cecil Phillips, who joins the Knights after serving the past 10 years as the head coach of Amherst County High School in Virginia. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Phoebe learns the importance of school bus safety.

Campers are ready to roll in Safety Town.

Safety Town Every summer, since 2002, Cherokee County Safety Town has been helping preschoolers make the transition to kindergarten by teaching them how to stay safe in the water, around animals, poisons or strangers, on the school bus, their bicycles, or the sidewalks, in the car, or in case of an emergency. On average, 240 five-year-olds go through the camp each year. Safety Town is sponsored by Safe Kids Cherokee County, led by Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services. The mission is to reduce injuries by offering educational experiences for children and their parents to learn how to protect themselves from potential dangers. For more information, visit http://safekidscherokeecounty.org.

Sergeant Richie Rich adjusts Jackson's helmet.

Safety lessons are reinforced through craft time.

Xena the police K9 helps teach safety around pets.

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Camper Brody practices buckling his life jacket.

Practicing "quills up, quills down" skills on poison safety day.


Teacher’s Journey Continues to New School BY JOE LEMMO

I’m both excited and sad to announce that this is the last article I will write for the TowneLaker. I have taken a fifth grade teaching position at Holly Springs Elementary for the 2018-19 school year, and now will be writing for Around Canton magazine. The decision to change schools was a family decision. The earlier release hours will allow me more time with my wife and son. In this last article, I would like to reflect on the journey that got me here today. I’ll never forget the day I first connected with the TowneLaker magazine. It was the summer of 2009, and I was at a tennis match talking to some people about how I’d like to give my students opportunities to be published. At the time, I thought my students would value their writing more if they saw it published. As fate would have it, the editor of the Townelaker at the time was sitting nearby and overheard. We exchanged numbers and eventually set up a meeting to discuss ideas. The first idea was an attempt to show my students that they could make a difference. I thought it would be great for them to write about things they could do as teens, rather than thinking they had to be adults in order

Lemmo with some of this year’s students who were published in the TowneLaker.

to make a real difference. So, the early articles were titled “You Can Make a Difference,” and they were focused on what the students were doing to make a difference. In 2012, I decided to focus on the concept that “Words Are Powerful.” I hoped my students would be able to see the many positive effects words can have on others in the community. Based on conversations with many of you, it’s clear that they were successful.

From 2013 to 2014, the title of the articles became “Inside the Mind of a Middle School Student.” My hope was to give my students the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas and perspectives about various topics with the community. continued on page 87 Joe Lemmo is a 5th grade teacher and comedian who has taught in Cherokee County since 2000. He performs improv in the Atlanta area. He and his wife have one son.

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YOUR SCHOOL NEWS

Local Graduates Awarded Scholarships

Top Navy JROTC Award Goes to Woodstock Student

Katherine Relick, left, with Linda Lopos, chairperson of Chapter BI’s STAR Scholarship Committee.

Rising Woodstock High School senior Cadet Lt. Commander Anna Fournaris, who serves as the commanding student officer for the school’s Navy JROTC program, was recognized with the WellsPratt Award from the Navy League of the United States Atlanta Metropolitan Council. Cadets from 45 metro Atlanta Navy and Marine JROTC programs were considered for the Wells-Pratt Award, which is named for three former NJROTC Cadets who died during military service. The award included a trophy and $1,500 scholarship.

Katherine Relick, a graduate of Woodstock High School, was the recipient of the the P.E.O. STAR Scholarship. Relick is the daughter of Matt and Christine Relick of Canton, and plans to attend Notre Dame University this fall, where she will begin her studies in neuroscience and behavior. The STAR Scholarship is given by P.E.O. International, and is based on excellence in leadership, extracurricular activities, community service, academics and potential for future success.

Cadet Lt. Commander Anna Fournaris

Woodstock Welcomes New Coach

Josh Pierce

Woodstock High School recently announced that Coach Josh Pierce will take over as head coach for its men’s basketball program. Pierce, who is in his sixth year teaching, and has taught PE and coached at Woodstock High for the past two years, began his basketball career 20 years ago as a First Team All-State player at Lowndes High School in Valdosta. He played college basketball for Tennessee Temple and Cumberland University, where, in his senior year, he helped lead the team to its third-best season ever (22-9). “My goal is to continue the success that our basketball program has developed in the past three years under Mr. Kingston Clark, both on and off the court,” Pierce said.

Service Project Supports Humane Society Students from the Miakoda Tribe team at Clark Creek Elementary School STEM Academy partnered with the Cherokee Humane Society for a yearlong community service project. Activities included a supply drive, making baked dog treats, and hosting a spirit night fundraiser at Moe’s Southwest Grill in Woodstock, which raised $409.52. The check was presented during the school’s last tribal celebration of the school year.

Sarah Jensen, left, with Donna Ratliff, chairperson of Chapter BI’s GA Scholarship Committee.

Sarah Jensen, a graduate of Etowah High School, was awarded the P.E.O. Georgia State Scholarship. Given by the P.E.O. GA State Chapter, the scholarship is based on academics, community involvement, extracurricular activities, awards and/ or achievements, and written skills, as demonstrated in the applicant’s essay. Jensen, daughter of Jesse and Heidi Jensen of Woodstock, plans to attend the University of North Georgia. 74

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

Celebrating the project are, from left: Jolynn Hyatt, Jose Zuniga, Andrea Rojas, Christopher Davila, Willow Fri, Madison Soltes, Finn Windsor and teacher Jama McCartney.


A Fun Day on the Farm First- and secondplace winners of the first grade coloring contest sponsored by the Cherokee County Farm Bureau enjoyed a day at Cagle’s Family Farm. Students and their families toured the farm, where they were able to pet animals and learn about the benefits of dairy products. Jeannie Ross from Ross Berry Farm and Apiaries offered honey tasting, with a live honey bee hive presentation.

Coloring contest winners, from left: Leah Freeman, Hickory Flat Elementary; Camryn Andretta, Sixes Elementary; Peyton Cash, Sixes Elementary; Reagan Basham, Little River Elementary; Taylor Throne, Hickory Flat Elementary; Kaleigh Dickerson, Hasty Elementary; Skye Rowley, Macedonia Elementary; Matheus Lima, Knox Elementary; Jordan Copeland, Clayton Elementary; Emma Durkin, R. M. Moore Elementary; Abby Schluchter, Bascomb Elementary; Abby Rainer, Arnold Mill Elementary; Charli Wallace, Free Home Elementary; Baylee Hofer, Boston Elementary; and Scarlett Sobhani, Little River Elementary.

Donuts for the Win Natalia Opoku-Mensah, a second-grader at Clark Creek Elementary School STEM Academy, designed the winning flavor for Tasty Donuts in Canton, as part of an engineering design process project. Her donut design will be featured on the bakery’s summer menu. The lesson combined the design process with a persuasive writing assignment, and Arturo Howard of Tasty Donuts selected Natalia’s idea as the winner. The summerthemed creation features cinnamon sugar sand, blueberry glazed water, and is topped with Swedish Fish candies. Arturo presented Natalia with the first box of the winning design.

Super Citizens are Neighbors Three students from Carmel Elementary were awarded the Super Citizen Award. They also are neighbors in the Etowah Valley Estates neighborhood.

Cancer Awareness is Student’s Passion Gracye Lamb, a student at E.T Booth Middle School, raised $2,552 for the American Cancer Society and walked in the Relay for Life’s Kids’ Walk. Raising funds and awareness for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life has been a passion for Lamb since her greatuncle died from cancer. She and her family have supported the Relay for Life walkathon for seven years. This year, her fundraising activities included requesting birthday donations from family and friends in lieu of gifts. When asked how long she plans to participate in Relay for Life, she said, “as long as it takes to find a cure.”

From left: Lyla Sanderson, Lorenzo Agosto and Brayden Howells.

Bus Driver Wins District Road-E-O!

Gracey Lamb at this year’s Relay for Life.

Cherokee County School District school bus driver Christine Minter, who drives routes for the Etowah Zone, won first place at the 38th annual CCSD Bus Road-E-O competition. Eighty-eight bus drivers competed in the event, which included driving, pre-trip inspection and written tests. Christine Minter TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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YOUR SCHOOL NEWS Winning Story Featured on GPB Website Clark Creek Elementary School STEM Academy kindergartner Stella Barouch won second place in the Georgia Public Broadcasting PBS Kids Writers Contest. Barouch wrote and illustrated her story, “The Sad, Sad Bird,” which was chosen out of hundreds of entries. She and her parents were invited to GPB’s studios in Atlanta to accept the award, where Stella was asked to record a reading of her story. It can be found at http://www.gpb. org/education/writers-contest. Front row, from left: Ansley Crane, Brooke Brannon, Alyssa Ramsey, Catherine Dunson, Yulissa Jimenez, Casandra Ruiz and Hunter Williams; back row: Casey Millsaps, Kevin Jones, Lukas Freeman, Karina Ballesteros, Brooke Tapp, Paige Laudun and Madeline Smetana.

4H and FFA Graduating Seniors Honored Senior members of the county school district’s 4H and Future Farmers of America recently were recognized by the Cherokee County Farm Bureau. Each student was presented with a certificate and a pen engraved with his or her name. The students had the opportunity to speak about their future plans.

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Stella Barouch


Casual and Upscale Restaurants

RESTAURANT CUISINE BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAY Canyons American no $ $ open 335 Chambers St. 678-494-8868 canyonsresh.com

SPIRITS RESERV. Beer/Wine no

Century House Tavern Modern 125 E Main St. 770-693-4552 American centuryhousetavern.com Copper Coin Coffee American 400 Chambers St. 470-308-6914 coppercoincoffee.com see ad on Inside front

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

8 persons +

$

$

$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Fire Stone Wood-fired 120 Chambers St. Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 see ad on pg 60 firestonerestaurants.com Freight Kitchen & Tap Southern 251 E. Main St. 770-924-0144 freightkitchen.com

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 10:30-3

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

no

Habanero’s Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. 9550 Main St. Brunch 678-498-8243 11-1:30 Ice Martini & Sushi Bar Tapas/Sushi no 380 Chambers St. 770-672-6334 icemartinibar.com Ipps Pastaria & Bar Italian no 8496 Main St. 770-517-7305 ippspastaria.com

$

$-$$

open

Full bar

yes

Fri./Sat. only

$$

open

Full bar

yes

$$

$$

open

Full bar

no

J Christopher’s Diner $-$$ $-$$ no open no 315 Chambers St., 770-592-5990 jchristophers.com J Miller’s Smokehouse BBQ & no $-$$ $-$$ open Beer 150 Towne Lake Parkway Southern 770-592-8295 Sandwiches jmillerssmokehouse.com Mad Life Studios Southern no $-$$ $$-$$$$ open Full bar 8722 Main St. madlifestageandstudios.com Partners II Pizza 8600 Main St. 678-224-6907 partnerspizza.com/woodstock-ga

no

$$-$$$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Pure Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. 405 Chambers St. 770-952-7873 Brunch puretaqueria.com/woodstock 11-3

$$

$$

open

Full bar

6 persons+

Reel Seafood Seafood 8670 Main St. 770-627-3006 reel-seafood.com

Sunday Brunch 10:30-3:30

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 11-3

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

no

Wine bar Tapas

Salt Factory Pub Gastropub 8690 Main St. 678-903-6225

no

no

no

Rootstock and Vine 8558 Main St. 770 -544-9009 www.rootstockandvine.com

Pizza

Weekends only

Semper Fi Bar and Grille 9770 Main St. 770-672-0026 Tea Leaves & Thyme 8990 Main St. 770-516-2609 tealeavesandthyme.com

American

no

$

$

open

Full bar

no

English Tea room

no

$$

no

closed

no

yes

Truck & Tap 8640 Main St. 770-702-1670 truckandtap.com

Variety of Food trucks

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

Craft Beer

no

Sunday Brunch 10-2

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Vingenzo’s Italian 105 E. Main St. 770-924-9133 vingenzos.com

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$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

DOWNTOWN WOODSTOCK DINING


Senior Sense

Georgia Heritage BY DELIA HALVERSON

I have lived in six different states, and it has been an interest of mine to find out what I can about the background of each state. My first experience with Georgia was as a child from the ages 2 to 8. We lived in South Georgia, which is a completely different state from metro Atlanta. One of the places we lived was called the Mill Village of Albany, because the community centered around a thread mill. I remember seeing the machines making thread from cotton, an important product for farmers until the boll weevil ruined most crops. When we lived in North Dakota in 1976, we told our friends we were moving to Georgia, and they said, “Why do you want to live in that swamp state?” All they knew about Georgia was the Okefenokee Swamp. They knew nothing of the North Georgia mountains. Of course, most Dakotans don’t like mountains anyway, because they block their view of the distant horizon. They also didn’t know that we have a great coastline that has lovely barrier islands. My favorite is Cumberland Island, just north of the Florida line. It can be reached only by shuttle boats. It was once the resort home of the rich and famous, but now has wild horses and is a prime example of what the land looked like when the Europeans first landed.

The Downtown Buzz is held at the Chambers at City Center (8534 Main Street) on the last Friday of the month and begins at 8 a.m. unless otherwise noted.

Meeting: July 27 Guest: Chief Calvin Moss, Woodstock Police Dept. For more information on the Downtown Buzz program or to suggest a topic for consideration, please contact Mitzi at 770-592-6056 mainstreetwoodstock.org/connect/#buzz Business, individual and non-profit memberships are available

There are many things that even Georgians do not know. • Georgia is named after George II of Great Britain and was one of the 13 original colonies. • James Oglethorpe envisioned Georgia as a refuge for debtors and the poor, and in 1733 more than 100 settlers arrived in what is now Savannah. • Georgia is the eighth most populous state in the country, with more than 10 million people. • There have been five capitals in Georgia’s history: Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Milledgeville and Atlanta. • Slavery originally was forbidden in Georgia, but the ban was overturned in 1749. • Wesleyan College (in Macon) was the first college for women in the U.S. • During the Civil War, the Andersonville Prison (in southwest Georgia) held 45,000 Union soldiers, 13,000 of whom died of malnutrition, disease, starvation or exposure. • In the 1800s, Native Americans in Georgia were rounded up and became a part of the Trail of Tears to Oklahoma. • The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., was made of marble from Tate, Ga. • Coca-Cola, Delta Airlines, the Home Depot, Turner Broadcasting and United Parcel Service all are headquartered in Georgia.

Delia writes books and leads workshops internationally. She and her husband settled in Woodstock after living in eight states. Their children and grandchildren live nearby.

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Seniors on the Move WILLIAM G. LONG SENIOR CENTER Woodstock Parks and Recreation Dept. 223 Arnold Mill Rd., Woodstock, GA 30188 678-445-6518 Open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily

A group from Wm. G. Long Senior Center visit the historic Chief Vann house, built in 1803.

CHEROKEE RECREATION AND PARKS 7545 Main St., Woodstock, 770-924-7768, www.crpa.net For a $24 yearly fee, the Silver Roamers attend monthly gatherings, discuss events and get discounts on trips and can win prizes.

July 5

Tennessee Valley Railroad and Jason’s Deli. Leaves 8 a.m. from

recreation center, 8:30 a.m. boys and girls club. $40 members/$50 non-members.

July 31

Mercedes Benz, Mollie B’s. Leaves 8

a.m. from boys and girls club, 8:30 a.m. recreation center. $60 members/$70 non-members.

Aug. 2

WSBTV, The Varsity. Leaves 8:30 a.m.

from boys and girls club, 9 a.m. recreation center. $35 members/ $45 non-members

Aug. 30

Sip ‘n’ Strokes, La Parrilla. 1428

Towne Lake Pkwy., Suite 107. $40 members/$50 non-members. Cost includes painting instruction and canvas painting. Lunch is separate. Bring snacks and drinks if desired.

Aug. 27-28

Mystery Overnight Trip. Register

July 26. Cost is $250 double room per person/$350 single room.

1950s Flashback Sock Hop dance, The Varsity food truck. 5:30 p.m.

at The Lodge at Bridgemill. $15 per person. Come dressed for the 1950s (not required) and enjoy good food, live music and dancing.

Bowling at Stars and Strikes, 10 a.m. Cost

is $5 for two hours of bowling.

July 12

Georgia Commission on the Holocaust, 8:45 a.m. Visit exhibit that includes more than 500 stories telling the story of Anne Frank. Bring money for lunch.

July 13

Lunch and Learn at noon. Presented by Southern Cremation and Funeral Home.

11 a.m.

Sept. 4, Oct. 8, Nov. 13

Oct. 11

Aug. 17

July 6

include visits to Stone Mountain, Foxfire Museum, Sulzbacher Roman Holiday Riverboat and more. Call Frankie Sanders for more details.

Aug. 9

Leaves 8:30 a.m. from boys and girls club, 9 a.m. recreation center. $50 members/$60 non-members.

DeKalb Farmers Market, 9 a.m. Bring money for shopping and lunch at The Market.

July 17

Senior Adventure Camp. Trips

Bees Knees Cooking Class. 10:30 a.m. in the recreation center community room. $25 members/$35 non-members. CNN Center, Dantanna’s Downtown.

July 5

Sept. 10-14

Adult Coloring. Noon in the recreation center community room. $5 members/$10 non-members. Cost includes coloring books, colored pencils and lunch. Bring your own if you want.

Aug. 8, Oct. 17

Members of the Woodstock senior center have a variety of fun field trips to attend, in addition to the regular activities scheduled at the center.

Decatur Square Tour with Jim Howe, Sweet Melissa. Leaves 8:30

a.m. from the boys and girls club, 9 a.m. recreation center. $40 members/$50 non-members.

Oct. 21-25

Fall Trip to Thomasville, GA. Non-

refundable $150 deposit due July 9. Final payment due Sept. 1. $600 double room/$900 single room. Membership not required.

Lunch Bunch at Ted’s Montana Grill,

July 19

Rock Ranch in the Rock, 8 a.m. Visit a working cattle ranch south of Atlanta, operated by Chick-fil-A. Tractor-pulled wagon tour, shop at farm fresh market stand, fresh lunch. $29 per person.

July 20

AARP Smart Driver Course. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 770-591-9347 for details and reservations.

July 24

G.B.I. Museum in Decatur, 8 a.m. Guided tour of museum. Bring money for lunch.

July 27

Lunch and Learn at noon. Topic is cancer, and early detection. Presented by S.A.L.T./Triad.

July 31

Pottery making at the Clayground in Roswell. 9:15 a.m. Make a piece of pottery from start to finish. Cost is $29. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Elm Street

Youth Has No Age BY SIOBHAN BRUMBELOW

There’s something magical about being a child. Their sense of play, wonder and imagination unlocks a creative side that many adults have forgotten. Benjamin Franklin is attributed with saying: “We do not stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.” As a parent, I often see this in my child. I’m reminded to slow down, be goofy, play — not to grow up too fast. Today, we are trying so hard to achieve more, or to be greater than others in society, but sometimes our greatest achievements are found in the simplest actions or accomplishments. Why is it that we seek out accomplishments under such grandiose circumstances? Think back to when you were a child. What are some of the memories you hold on to? Nine times out of 10, you probably had fun creating something with your imagination. Imagination is defined as “the faculty or action of forming new ideas, or images or concepts of external objects not present to the senses.” Without imagination, there would be no creativity. Without creativity, there would be no art. Without art, history, our past, even life, would not exist. At Elm Street, we encourage being “extraordinary under imaginary circumstances.” Summer camps are a great reflection of that. Children get to express their creativity through an original production in five days. Camps run throughout the summer and sell out fast. Also, we provide entertainment for children and families to relax and enjoy a fun show. This July, we are presenting “Fancy Nancy the Musical.” This lively show is based on the popular children’s books by Jane O’Connor. The cast is comprised of six young adults who love to perform for children and hope to make a creative connection with all of the families who attend this show. Then, we have a new way to escape the ordinary with our Lantern Series. We invite groups and friends to join us on the outdoor event green to reconnect and enjoy an eclectic array of music. Acoustic pop artist Royal Wood, who comes from Canada, will perform July 21. You can find tickets to all of these events and more information on our website: www.elmstreetarts.org. Pablo Picasso said, “Youth has no age.” Why rush through life? Take a breath and live in the moment, escape the ordinary, and don’t stop playing.

UPCOMING AT ELM STREET

JULY 11-25

WED AT 10:00AM | SAT/SUN AT 2:00PM

Fancy Nancy Presenting Partner: Shoppes at Atlanta

Lantern Series Presenting Partner: Siobhan Brumbelow is on staff at Elm Street. She currently holds a BA in Theatre from Brenau University and toured with Missoula Children’s Theatre.

ELMSTREETARTS.ORG | 678.494.4251 TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Jacqueline Childers of Talking Rock.

Jayden Randall of Canton.

Courtney Bailie of Martinez, and Kellie Cardona of Evans.

On the Trails Again PHOTOS COURTESY OF DASHING IMAGES, LLC

The 2018 Rope Mill Half Marathon and 10K Trail Run drew 275 runners and hikers, and raised $3,000 for SORBA Woodstock, the mountain biking volunteer group that built and maintains the trails at Rope Mill Park and Blankets Creek. A group of 25 SORBA Woodstock volunteers assisted with the race, which was held at Old Rope Mill Park and organized by Mountain Goat Adventures. Summer is a good time to explore local trails. Runners of all ages - and hometowns - came out to play in the woods, with participants ranging in age from 8 to over 70. Trail running events can be completed as a run or a hike; the shady trails offer a reprieve from the heat of the summer. Trail runners enjoy more solitude and escape from vehicles and exhaust fumes on the roads. The Woodstock/Canton area has several parks with great trail systems for those looking to get started. Check out http://sorbawoodstock.org/ for trail maps of the Rope Mill Park Trails (Woodstock) and Blankets Creek Trails (Canton). 82

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Carsten Sievers of Atlanta and David Sholl of Marietta.


GREENPRINTS TRAIL SYSTEM

Sources: City of Woodstock, Esri, HERE, DeLorme, TomTom, Intermap, increment P Corp., GEBCO, USGS, FAO, NPS, NRCAN, GeoBase, IGN, Kadaster NL, Ordnance Survey, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), swisstopo, MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

Visit our website for more information on these or other trail projects. www.greenprintsalliance.org

Noonday Creek Trail - This 1.43 mile paved trail begins at Market Street in Downtown Woodstock one block west of Main Street.

It continues downhill toward Noonday Creek where it intersects with Towne Lake Pass Trail and the bridge to Woofstock Park. The trail continues along Noonday Creek to its current end at Highway 92.

Trestle Rock Trail - This 0.40 mile paved trail is located in Olde Rope Mill Park and is an easy flat trail on the banks of Little River. Towne Lake Pass - This approximately 1.2 mile trail connects the Towne Lake community to Downtown along the banks of Noonday Creek. It runs from the intersection of Towne Lake Parkway and Towne Lake Hills South to Woofstock Park.

Rubes Creek Trail - This .5 mile trail runs along Rubes Creek and will ultimately connect into a larger run of trails. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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2018-19

LANTERN SERIES July 21 Royal Wood Aug. 4 Marc Broussard Sept. 15 Sam Reider and The Human Hands Oct. 6 Landscape of Guitar Apr. 13 Break of Reality May 18, 2019 Huntertones The Barefoot Movement performed June 2.

Lantern Series Inaugural Concert The lawn at the Elm Street Green was dotted with decorated tables and bluegrass fans who enjoyed The Barefoot Movement, the musical group that kicked off the Elm Street Cultural Arts Village’s new Lantern Series. According to the Elm Street website, the Lantern Series is about “conversations and community at its core. This series will strive to introduce Woodstock Mayor Donnie new music, genres, ideas and cultures, Henriques and wife Jan. that aren’t typical for the community.” Elm Street Director Christopher Brazelton hopes that residents will catch on to the Chastain-like vision and will embrace it so that the next generation will think of an event like this as a Woodstock-like series. For ticket information, visit http://www.elmstreetarts.org/ lantern-series/.

Pie Bar owners Cody and Lauren Bolden. 84

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Stacy Brown and Mitzi Saxon.


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TOWNE LAKE AREA HOMES SOLD IN MAY

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Managing Money Well as a Couple

Cherokee By Choice

Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a broker-dealer, member FINRA / SIPC. Advisory services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Adviser. Cambridge is not affiliated with and does not endorse the opinions or services of Peter Montoya, Inc. or MarketingPro, Inc. This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Citation. 1 - newscenter.td.com/us/en/campaigns/love-and-money [1/2/18]

solutions through programs such as the Creative Problem-Solvers meet-up, monthly Lunch Circuit, and 1 Million Cups Cherokee. After all, many of life’s greatest breakthroughs often come over a warm cup of coffee, or lunch with friends. While these programs – and many others – are moving Cherokee forward, there is still more work to be done. Whether you’re part of Cherokee’s highly skilled workforce, an entrepreneur, a local industry leader or a resident, you have a powerful role to play in Cherokee’s next wave of growth. Tell us why you chose to live or work in Cherokee County, using the hashtag #CherokeeByChoice. Cherokee By Choice is more than a catchy tagline – it’s a movement that resonates locally and inspires globally. So, take your seat at the table and tell us why you chose to make Cherokee home. Economic growth and development is a communitywide effort. Thank you to all of the public and private partners who graciously invested their time and financial resources to support Cherokee By Choice. More information about the campaign and a full list of investors can be found at www.cherokeega.org/campaign.

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Where Is Georgia’s Money Going? continued from page 40

4. Finally, the fourth priority in the lion’s share of Georgia’s budget finishes with spending on public safety. This priority takes up nearly $1.5 billion or 6 percent of the total budget. If you have any concerns about Georgia’s budget, or any other issue, feel free to reach out to me at Michael@CaldwellForHouse. com or on my cellphone at 678-523-8570. You also can join us at 9 a.m. on Saturday mornings for our Weekly Coffee With District 20 at Copper Coin Coffee in downtown Woodstock. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for the opportunity to represent our families in our General Assembly.

Power in Unity continued from page 66

spiritual and racial issues within the community. Where there is unity, there is power to change. We have been actively working with local businesses and organizations in Cherokee to build positive relations and improving quality of life. Many churches have shared the vision and are actively involved in bringing more diversity to our community,” Saunders said. In 2017, members of C4 began to worship together on the fifth Sunday of each quarter. A combined worship team and rotating preachers lead the services. The ecumenical effort has launched sharing ministries in the county, including food and toy distribution, a shared build for Habitat for Humanity, and the Power in Unity worship event. In a world where we are constantly barraged with divisive thoughts and actions, it will be exciting to be a part of the Power in Unity celebration! For more information, contact Pastor Fred Goodwin at fred@churchofthemessiah.net.

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Teacher’s Journey Continues continued from page 73

In 2015, I challenged all my students to write a short novel. They placed their writing in a composition book, and, occasionally, I selected excerpts from their work to be published. In the end, after several weeks of editing and revising, three students had their short stories published in an anthology (“The Lost Journal of the Missing Thwarsh”), which ended up being sold for a charitable cause. Along with the three novelists, three other students illustrated the book. The entire process was revealed in monthly articles. In 2016, I focused on the concept of “Effective Communication.” I explained to my students that, “effective communication is essential for any success to occur.” I tried to find a real-world concept that could become the foundation for my teaching that year. During the school year, I was able to connect my students with business leaders in the community, in order to share the value of effective communication in the workplace. As a bonus, the business leaders put together some presentations and joined us in the classroom. This past school year, I continued to focus on effective communication, but I tried to help my students see how their unique talents could help them communicate with others. The goal was for them first to recognize their talents, and then to see how they could use their talents to communicate in different ways. In the end, I’ve been blessed to have the opportunity to share my students’ writing with you over the past nine years. In addition, I’ve shared my wedding proposal story, becoming a dad, reconnecting with former students, and even “The Adventures of Grammar Guy.” Thank you for being supportive over the years! I’m looking forward to introducing the readers of Around Canton to my future fifth grade students, as well as the next landmark moments of my life. I will miss you, but please stop by and see me sometime at the Elm Street Cultural Arts Village for one of our iThink Improv shows. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Cherokee Photography Club Congratulations to the winners in the May competition, "Waterfalls!"

Digital Projection:

1st Donald Newton "Desoto Falls"

2nd Peter Kilpo "Challence"

HM Rebecca Blackwell "Anna Ruby Falls"

HM Vicki Sellers "Beautiful Alaska"

3rd Jim Kirk "Townsend Tumble"

Color Prints:

1st David Johnson "Reverie at the Waterfalls" 88

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2nd David Ferguson "Fall Shower"


The Cherokee Photography Club meets on the fourth Monday of the month, and for those participating in the monthly contest, that meeting is held on the second Monday of the month. Both meetings are from 7-9 p.m. and held at the Cherokee County Arts Center, 94 North Street, Canton. For more information, please contact Kim Bates at 770-617-7595 or email him at kbphotoart@comcast.net.

Monochromatic:

1st Russ Miller "Splash"

HM Karen Beedle "Cascades of Water"

HM Michael Brubaker "Cascade Falls"

2nd Chastaine Kendrick "Memorial"

3rd Rick Sapp "The Pocket Rocky Stream"

HM David Ferguson "Falling Gently"

HM Mike Voltner "Hemlock Falls #2" TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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REFERENCE

TOWNE LAKE AREA CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

Ahimsa House helps domestic violence victims 24-hours a day get their pets to safety. 404-452-6248. www.ahimsahouse.org.

Georgia Animal Project, based in Ball Ground, offers high quality, low cost spay/neuter services for dogs and cats. 770-704-PAWS (7297). www.theanimalproject.org.

Pet Buddies Food Pantry provides pet food, supplies, spaying and neutering, and education through community outreach programs to families in need. 678-310-9858. www.petbuddiesfoodpantry.org.

Angel House Girls Home, residential facility to help girls ages 12-18 learn self-sufficiency. 770-479-9555. www.angelhousega.com.

Give a Kid a Chance – Cherokee sponsors a yearly back-to-school bash, giving children in need filled backpacks to free haircuts. www.giveakidachance.org.

Safe Kids Cherokee County offers free child safety seat inspections by appointment. 770-721-7808. www.cherokeesafekidscherokeecounty.org.

Anna Crawford Children’s Center, dedicated to preventing child abuse and neglect through prevention and intervention services. 678-504-6388. www.cherokeechildadvocates.org.

Goshen Valley Boys Ranch offers a home, care and counsel to young men in the DFCS system. 770-796-4618. www.goshenvalley.org

Bend Your Knees, Inc. raises awareness, helps children with pediatric brain tumors. Bob Dixon, 678-922-1560.

Green Shelters America animal rescue group. 770-712-4077. GreenSheltersAmerica@gmail.com. www.GreenSheltersAmerica.com.

CASA for Children has programs to increase safety and improve educational, social and emotional functioning of children impacted by abuse. 770-345-3274. www.casacherokee.org. CCHS Thrift Store accepts donations, sells used household items to raise money for Cherokee County Humane Society. 5900 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth. 770-592-8072. Cherokee Family Violence Center offers emergency shelter and crisis intervention, affordable housing, education, support services. 770-479-1703. Spanish 770-720-7050 or 800-334-2836 option 2. www.cfvc.org. Cherokee Fellowship of Christian Athletes challenges professional, college, high school, junior high and youth level coaches and athletes to use athletics to impact the world for Christ. Bill Queen, 404-441-3508. www.cherokeefca.org. Cherokee County Humane Society (CCHS) 770-928-5115. admin@cchumanesociety.org. www.cchumanesociety.org.

Habitat for Humanity North Central Georgia, 770-587-9697. www.habitat-ncg.org Healing Hands Youth Ranch offers safe, peaceful environment where abused and at-risk children are paired with rescue horses for hope and healing. 770-633-4451. www.hhyr.org. HopeQuest Ministry Group helps people with life dominating issues related to alcohol abuse, substance abuse and/or sexual brokenness. 678-391-5950. www.hqmg.org. HOPE Center offers support for unplanned pregnancy. 770-924-0864. info@hopectr.com. www.hopectr.com. HOPE Center — Seeds Thrift Store offers men, women & children’s clothing, furniture & other home goods. 770-517-4450. www.seedsthriftstore.com.

Cherokee FOCUS works to improve lives of children and families through collaborative programs and initiatives. 770-345-5483. www.cherokeefocus.org.

Life Connection Ministries provides humanitarian relief in the form of wells and greenhouses to impoverished communities. Mission trips offered. 678-234-1798. www.lcm-ga.com.

Cherokee County Senior Services offers educational, social, leisure and recreational activities for senior citizens. 770-345-5312. 770-345-5320. www.cherokeega.com/senior-services.

Matthew E. Russell Foundation establishes literacy and libraries in rural areas worldwide. 678-234-1798. www.mattrussell.org.

Cherokee Young Life for high school students, meets Monday nights at Bradshaw Farm clubhouse, 7853 Hickory Flat Highway, Suite 104, Woodstock 30188. 678 653-5707. www.cherokeecounty.younglife.org. Community Veterinary Care provides professional veterinary care for pets whose owners have limited financial means. 678-640-3512. www.communityveterinarycare.com. Companion Animal Connection 678-493-9847. www.adoptapet.com.

MUST Ministries provides groceries, hot meals, emergency shelter, supportive housing, clothing, employment services, summer lunch and more from five locations in eight counties, including the Canton office at 111 Brown Industrial Pkwy. www.mustministries.org. National Alliance for Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grassroots organization in America working to build better lives for the millions affected by mental illness. www.nami.org.

Everyday Angels offers financial assistance for local families in need. aaeverydayangels@gmail.com.

Never Alone provides food and clothing assistance to Cherokee families in need. www.neveralone.org.

Feed My Lambs, Inc. provides free Christian preschools in the U.S. and around the world. 770-795-9348. office@feedmylambs.net. www.feedmylambs.net.

Next Step Ministries offers a therapeutic day program, Saturday respite, camps and special events for people with special needs. 770-592-1227. www.nextstepministries.net.

Forever Fed is a mobile food ministry that addresses physical hunger and hopelessness by providing meals and sharing the gospel. www.foreverfed.org.

North Georgia Pregnancy Center offers help and care to young girls and women with an unplanned pregnancy or who need counseling. 706-253-6303. www.ngapregnancy.org.

Funds 4 Furry Friends helps those in need with food, spay/neuter and medical attention for their pets. 770-842-8893. www.funds4furryfriends.com.

Papa’s Pantry, a year-round food ministry that includes the Masters Training Center to help individuals and families in crisis get back on their feet. 770-591-4730. www.papaspantry.org.

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SERV International operates the House of Hope orphanage in Africa, sponsors a clean water program in Dominican Republic and meal distributions worldwide. Offers mission trips. 770-516-1108. www.servone.org The Blue Ribbon Foundation fosters a national dialog toward finding the cause, cure and prevention of ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis), CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome), fibromyalgia and Lyme disease. 478-397-5542. www.theblueribbonfoundation.org. Volunteer Aging Council helps raise funds for seniors in Cherokee County. A list of current needs is available. 770-310-3474. www.vac-cherokeega.org.

SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS

AA Meetings Canton: 9:30 a.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Mondays at Canton First United Methodist, 930 Lower Scott Mill Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at Hillside United Methodist, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway. www.aageorgia.org/14c-meetings.html. Abortion Recovery Helping those who have been impacted by abortion. 678-223-3519. Al-Anon and Al-A-Teen Canton: 8 p.m. Thursdays at St. Clements Episcopal Church, 2795 Ridge Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays Al-Anon at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2208, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-516-3502. American Heart Assoc. - Cherokee Div. 678-385-2013. American Red Cross metro chapter 770-428-2695. A-Typical Parkinson’s Education and Support Group Meets 6:00 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at Ball Ground UMC, 3045 Canton Hwy. in Ball Ground. Contact Norma Schmidt at 770-366-9585. Caregivers Alzheimers Spousal Support Group Meets: 12:30 p.m. first Tuesday of every month for lunch at Benton House of Woodstock, 3385 Trickum Road. 678-494-4500. woodstockinfo@bentonhouse.com. Celebrate Recovery, Christ-centered recovery program for all types of habits, hurts and hangups. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at Woodstock Church of the Nazarene. 770-366-7515. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Sixes United Methodist. 770-345-7644. www.sixesumc.org. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Ministry House, 678-459-2347. www.MinistryHouse.org. Meets: 6:15 p.m. Thursdays at 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton. 678-764-8660. www.celebraterecovery.com. Cherokee County Support Group for people with autoimmune conditions. Meets: 6:30 - 8 pm second Thursday at New Light Baptist Church, 1716 New Light Road, Holly Springs. 404-402-0571, 770-337-0294, jhmom88@comcast.net or christystephenson@msn.com. Cherokee County Special Olympics provides yearround sports training and athletic competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. www.cherokeecountyspecialolympics.org. Cherokee Christian Ministerial Association for pastors and ministry leaders. Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Wednesday at Dayspring Church, 6835 Victory Drive, Woodstock. www.cherokeeministers.org.


Diabetes Support Group Meets: 9:30 and 11 a.m. third Tuesday at Emeritus Assisted Living, 756 Neese Road, Woodstock. 770-793-7818. Georgia Canines for Independence. 404-824-4637. gcidogs@aol.com. www.gcidogs.org. Grace Valley Ministries connects pastors through small group meetings, free counseling and a place to retreat. 727-251-7690. info@gracevalleyministries.org. www.gracevalleyministries.org. Grandparents Raising GRANDchildren Meets: 7:15 p.m. second Tuesdays Transfiguration Catholic Church, Marietta (nursery available). 770-919-9275. Hearing Loss Association of America NW Metro Atlanta chapter for people with hearing loss looking for support and resources, holds free and informative quarterly meetings at the Senior Center on Arnold Mill Road. nwmetroatlantahlaa@gmail.com. La Leche League of South Cherokee Meets: 10 a.m. first Tuesday and 7 p.m. third Tuesday at Bascomb United Methodist Church. 678-315-7686. 770-517-0191. MOMS Club of Woodstock-Towne Lake momsclubofwoodstocktl@gmail.com. www.sites.google.com/site/ momscluboftownelakewoodstock. MOPS — Mothers of Preschoolers (birth — K) Meets: 9:30 a.m. second and fourth Mondays at Hillside UMC, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-924-4777. Unlimited Possibilities, support group for stroke and brain injury survivors. Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday of each month at Kennestone Outpatient Rehab Center. 678-677-2589.

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

American Business Women’s Association, Cherokee Eagles Charter Chapter. Meets: 6:30 p.m. on the third Tuesdays at Dynastic Buffet at the intersection of Canton Highway and Piedmont. 678-493-3618. Cherokee Business Network Meets: 7:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Chick-fil-A, 9728 Highway 92, Woodstock. 770-345-8687. Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce Meets: Various times during the year. Schedule at www.cherokeechamber.com. 770-345-0400. Gini@CherokeeChamber.com. Cherokee Toastmasters Club Meets: Noon-1:15 p.m. Wednesdays at the Bank of North Georgia, 200 Parkway 575, Woodstock. www.cherokeetoastmasters.com. The Joy of Connecting Networking for Women Meets: Various times and locations. 678-7896158. www.xperienceconnections.com/spotlight/ woodstock/.

VETERANS SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS American Legion Post 316 Meets: 7 p.m. third Thursdays at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 678-662-2366.

Cherokee County Libertarians Meets: 7:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday at the Cherokee County Board of Realtors Training Center, 1600 River Park Blvd., Suite 104, Woodstock. www.cherokeelp.org.

Cherokee County Homeless Veteran Program Contact Jim Lindenmayer at Jlindenmayer80@gmail. com or 678-983-7590, or Mike Satterly at 404-680-2412.

Cherokee County Republican Party Meets: 9 a.m. third Saturday at American Legion Post 45, 160 McClure Street, Canton. www.cherokeecounty.gop.

Woodstock VFW Post 10683 Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Woodstock Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 404-663-4663.

Cherokee County Republican Women affiliated with The Georgia Federation of Republican Women. Meets: Monthly in Woodstock/Canton. 770-592-7811. jkconkey@gmail.com.

CIVIC, COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS

AARP Woodstock Chapter is for anyone age 50 and older. Meets: 11:30 a.m. second Tuesdays at Tuscany. Lunch is $15. 770-926-1944. Canton-Cherokee TRIAD/S.A.L.T. (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) Meets: 8:30 a.m. first Tuesday at G.Cecil Pruitt YMCA in Canton (Hall of Fame Room). www.saltcherokee.com. Cherokee County Historical Society 770-345-3288. www.rockbarn.org. Citizen Oversight and Education 678-520-2236. citizenoversighteducation@yahoo.com. Jewish Havurah (Friends) A group of Jewish people who meet for Jewish holidays, special Jewish events and Shabbat dinners. 770-345-8687. Kiwanis Club of Greater Cherokee Meets: 8 a.m. first Monday, at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2107, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock. 678-468-9900. www.greatercherokeekiwanis.org Pilot Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. second Mondays at IHOP on Hwy. 20. 770-393-1766. Lynda@edgoodwinassociates.com. www.pilotinternational.com. Rotary Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 770-480-4179. Rotary Club of Towne Lake Meets: Noon Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills E., Woodstock. www.townelakerotary.com. Rotary Club of Woodstock Meets: 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 678-428-6514.

Grassroots Conservatives of Cherokee Meets: 7- 9 a.m. Fridays at Chick-fil-A, 951 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock by the Outlet Mall. 770-294-0922. Republican Women of Cherokee County 678-520-2236. www.rwccga.com.

RECREATION & HOBBIES

Allatoona Gold Panners. Periodic events, outings. rrkelly@bellsouth.net. Cherokee Amateur Radio Society Meets: 10 a.m. on the second Saturday at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. www.cherokeehams.com. Cherokee Community Chorale 678-439-8625. www.cherokeechorale.org. Cherokee County Arts Center 94 North St., Canton. 770-704-6244. www.CherokeeArts.org. Cherokee County Master Gardeners 770-721-7803. www.caes.uga.edu/extension/ cherokee/mastergardeners. Cherokee Photography Club www.cherokeepc.org. Cherokee County Saddle Club hosts monthly meetings and group rides. www.cherokeesaddleclub.com. Cherokee Hockey In Line League (CHILL) roller hockey. www.cherokeehockey.org. Cherokee Music Teachers Association 770-720-1701. www.cherokeemta.org. Cherokee Soccer Association 770-704-0187. www.csaimpact.com.

Service League of Cherokee County 770-704-5991. www.serviceleague.net.

Cherokee Youth Lacrosse Association www.cherokeelacrosse.com.

South Cherokee Optimist Club Meets: 7:30 a.m. every Friday at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-926-3522.

Christian Authors Guild Meets: 7-9 p.m. first and third Monday at Prayer and Praise Christian Fellowship, 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. www.christianauthorsguild.org.

Towne Lake Optimist Club Meets: 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-715-3375. www.townelakeoptimists.com. Woodstock Jaycees Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday and third Thursday at 216 Rope Mill Road. 770-926-8336.

Kingdom Riders, a chapter of the Christian Motorcyclists Association in Canton. Meets: 8 a.m. fourth Saturdays at Family Tradition restaurant in Hickory Flat.

Woodstock Junior Woman’s Club www.woodstockjwc.org.

Les Marmitons, for men interested in culinary arts. www.lesmarmitons.org.

Towne Lake PowerCore Team Meets: 7-8:30 a.m. Fridays at Freight Kitchen & Tap, 251 E. Main St., Woodstock. 404-816-3377. www.powercore.net.

Woodstock Lions Club Meets: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church. 770-906-2958.

Neighbors and Newcomers of Towne Lake (NNTL) is a social club for residents of 30189 area code. 770-855-9623. www.nntlclub.com.

Women of Woodstock Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. first and third Wednesday at Tavern at Towne Lake. info@womenofwoodstock.com. www.womenofwoodstock.com.

Woodstock Preservation Group 770-924-0406. http://preservationwoodstock.com/.

Sons of the American Revolution - Cherokee Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays at the Rock Barn, 638 Marietta Hwy., Canton. www.cherokeechapter.com.

Towne Lake Business Association Meets: 12:30 p.m. third Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 678-389-3887. www.tlba.org.

Woodstock PowerCore Team Meets: 7 a.m. on Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-952-5000 ext. 20.

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS

Cherokee County Democratic Party Meets: 7 p.m. second Thursday at Holly Springs Train Depot, 164 Hickory Road, Holly Springs. 770-345-3489. www.cherokeedemocrats.com.

William G. Long Senior Center offers activities for seniors at 223 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 678-445-6518. TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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COMMUNITY OF FAITH ADVENTIST

Cherokee 101 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-7304 http://cherokee.netadvent.org/ Canton 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton 678-880-0106 www.cantonadventist.org

AME

Allen Temple AME 232 N. Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-6348 www.allentempleame.org St. Paul 390 Crisler St., Canton 770-479-9691 www.stpaulame-canton.org

Rising Hills Church 615 Mountain Road, Woodstock www.gorhc.org River Church 2335 Sixes Road, Canton 770-485-1975 www.riveratlanta.org Shallowford Free Will Baptist Church 1686 Shallowford Road, Marietta 770-926-1163 www.shallowfordchurch.com South Cherokee 7504 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-0422

BAPTIST

Sutallee 895 Knox Bridge Highway, White 770-479-0101 www.sutalleebaptistchurch.com

Carmel 2001 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock Cherokee 7770 Hickory Flat Highway, Woodstock 770-720-3399 www.cherokeebaptistchurch.org

Toonigh 4999 Old Highway 5, Lebanon www.toonightbaptistchurch.com

Canton Bible Church 94 North St., Canton CantonBibleChurch.org

Cornerstone Community 4206 North Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-439-5108 www.ccchurchonline.org Crossroads Community Church 2317 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-592-7007 Crossroads Primitive Baptist Church 3100 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-710-1068 Faith Community Office: 110 Village Trail, Suite 110, Woodstock Sunday Services: 3075 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-516-1996 www.faithcommunitychurch.org First Baptist of Woodstock 11905 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-4428 www.fbcw.org First Baptist Canton One Mission Point 770-479-5538 www.fbccanton.org First Baptist Holly Springs 2632 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-5349 www.fbchollysprings.com Harvest Baptist Church 3460 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth www.hbcga.org Heritage Fellowship 3615 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-479-9415 www.HeritageCanton.com Hillcrest 6069 Woodstock Road, Acworth 770-917-9100 www.hbcacworth.org Hopewell 78 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-5723 www.hopewellbaptist.com Mt. Zion 4096 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-479-3324 www.mtzb.org

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New Victoria 6659 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-926-8448, www.newvicbaptist.org

TOWNELAKER | July 2018

CHURCH OF GOD

Bells Ferry 6718 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-592-2956 www.bellsferry.com Canton Church 110 Bluffs Parkway, Canton 678-285-3288 www.cantonchurch.com New Life Church 154 Lakeside Drive, Canton 770-345-2660 www.newlifecanton.com Sunnyside 2510 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-693-1018 www.sunnysidecog.org Toonigh 4775 Holly Springs Parkway, Canton 770-926-3096 www.toonighcog.org

EPISCOPAL

Christ the Redeemer Charismatic 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton 404-395-5003 www.ctrcec.com Episcopal Church-Annunciation 1673 Jamerson Road, Marietta 770-928-7916 www.ecamarietta.org Saint Clement’s 2795 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-6722 www.stclementscanton.org

JEWISH

Chabad Jewish Center 1480 Shiloh Road, NW, Kennesaw 770-400-9255 www.jewishwestcobb.com Congregation Ner Tamid Reform Jewish Congregation 1349 Old 41 Highway NW, Suite 220, Marietta 678-264-8575 www.mynertamid.org Congregation Etz Chaim 1190 Indian Hills, Marietta 770-973-0137 www.etzchaim.net

Temple Beth Tikvah 9955 Coleman Road, Roswell 770-642-0434 www.bethtikvah.com Temple Kehillat Chaim 1145 Green St., Roswell 770-641-8630 www.kehillatchaim.org Temple Kol Emeth 1415 Old Canton Road, Marietta 770-973-3533 www.kolemeth.net

MESSIANIC JEWISH CONGREGATIONS Congregation Beth Hallel 950 Pine Grove Road, Roswell 770-641-3000 www.bethhallel.org

LUTHERAN

Celebration of Grace 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-345-8540 www.celebrationofgrace.org Good Shepherd 1208 Rose Creek Drive, Woodstock 770-924-7286 www.gslutheran.org Timothy 556 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-928-2812 www.tlcwoodstock.org

ORTHODOX

St. Elizabeth 2263 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-485-0504 www.stelizabethga.org

PRESBYTERIAN

Cherokee 1498 Johnson Brady Road, Canton 770-704-9564, www.cherokee-pca.org. Covenant South Annex Rec Center 7545 Main St., Bldg. 200, Woodstock www.cc-pca.org Faith 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton www.faithpc.us Grace Church 1160 Butterworth Road, Canton 678-493-9869, www.gracecanton.org Heritage 5323 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-3558 , www.heritagepres.com Trinity 1136 Trinity Church Road, Canton www.trinity-presbyterian-church.org Woodstock 345 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-0074, www.woodstockpcusa.com

ROMAN CATHOLIC Our Lady of LaSalette 12941 Sam Nelson Road, Canton 770-479-8923 www.lasalettecanton.com

St. Michael the Archangel 490 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-516-0009 www.saintmichaelcc.org Transfiguration Catholic Church 1815 Blackwell Road NE., Marietta 770-977-1442 www.transfiguration.com


UNITED METHODIST

Ball Ground 3045 Canton Hwy, Ball Ground 770-735-6247 www.ballground.church/ Bascomb 2295 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-926-9755 www.bascombumc.org Big Springs United Methodist Church 2066 Sugar Pike Road, Woodstock Canton First 930 Lower Scott Mill Road 770-479-2502 www.cantonfirstumc.org CITY ON A HILL 7745 Main St., Woodstock 678-445-3480 www.coahumc.org Fields Chapel 1331 Fields Chapel Road, Canton 770-479-6030 www.fieldschapel.org Hickory Flat 4056 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-345-5969 www.hickoryflat.org Hillside 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-924-4777 www.hillsideumc.org Holly Springs 2464 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-2883 www.hollyspringsumc.com Liberty Hill 141 Railroad St., Canton 678-493-8920 www.libertyhillumc.org Little River 12455 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-2495 www.littleriverumc.info Mt. Gilead 889 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0837 www.mtgilead-umc.org Sixes 8385 Bells Ferry Road, Canton 770-345-7644 www.sixesumc.org Woodstock 109 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-516-0371

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Emerson 4010 Canton Road, Marietta 770-578-1533 www.emersonuu.org

OTHERS

Action Church 271 Marietta Road, Canton 770-345-3030 www.actionchurch.tv Antioch Christian Church 3595 Sugar Pike Road, Canton 770-475-9628 www.antiochcanton.org Antioch Church 9876 Main St., Suite 250, Woodstock 678-494-2193 www.antiochchurch.life

Awakening 180 Parkway 575, Suite 140, Woodstock 770-924-4150 www.awakeningwoodstock.com Branches of Christ 5946 Jacobs Road, Acworth 770-917-4964 www.branchesofchrist.com BridgePointe 233 Arnold Mill Road, Suite 400, Woodstock 770-517-2977 www.bridgepointechurch.org Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 2205 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-529-9572, www.mormon.org Church of the Messiah 4115 Charles Cox Drive, Canton 770-479-5280 www.churchofthemessiah.net Dayspring 6835 Victory Drive, Acworth 770-516-5733 www.dayspring-online.com Dwelling Place Church 110 Londonderry Court #130, Woodstock www.dwellingplacemovement.org Empowerment Tabernacle 507 Industrial Drive, Woodstock 770-928-7478 www.EmpowermentTabernacle.com The Factory 9872 Main St., Woodstock 770-517-7265 www.thefactoryministries.org Faith Family 5744 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-4560 www.ffcacworth.com Fivestones Church 1358 Sixes Road, Canton 770-720-2227 www.fivestonesga.com Fresh Springs Worship Center 1910 Eagle Drive, Suite 100, Woodstock 678-557-9841 www.freshspringsworship.com Fuente de Vida (Fountain of Life) 205 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-880-3135 www.fdvida.org God’s Rolling Thunder Latimer Hall, 103 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock www.godsrollingthunder.org His Hands 550 Molly Lane, Woodstock 770-405-2500 www.hishandschurch.com Hope Church 6576 Commerce Parkway, Woodstock www.HopeChurchAtl.com Iglesia Mana Para Siempre, Inc. Bilingual church Spanish & English 452 Milton Drive, Canton 678-880-8750 www.iglesiamanaparasiempre.com Life Church 300 Adam Jenkins Memorial Drive, Suite 108, Canton 770-847-0170 www.lifechurchcanton.com Ministry House 347 Holly St., Canton 678-459-2347 http://MinistryHouse.org

Momentum 659 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-384-4919 www.MomentumChurch.tv New Covenant Bible 1095 Scott Road, Canton 770-479-6412 www.newcovenantcanton.org North Atlanta Church 6233 Old Alabama Road, Acworth 770-975-3001 www.northatlantachurch.org Oak Leaf 151 East Marietta St., Canton 678-653-4652 www.oakleafcanton.com Prayer & Praise Christian Fellowship 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-928-2795 www.prayerandpraise.org Resurrection Anglican 231 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0040 www.rezwoodstock.org Revolution 125 Union Hill Trail, Canton 770-345-2737 www.therevolution.tv Sojourn Woodstock 8534 Main St., Woodstock 770-769-7495 www.sojournwoodstock.com Sovereign Grace 471 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-494-2100 www.sgcatlanta.org Thrive Chapel 11303 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-835-5795 www.thrivechapel.com Towne Lake Community 132 North Medical Parkway, Woodstock 678-445-8766 www.tlcchurch.com Unity North Atlanta 4255 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 678-819-9100 www.unitynorth.org Victory 4625 Highway 92, Acworth 770-794-7366 www.victoryga.com Woodstock City Church 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock 678-880-9092 www.woodstockcity.org Woodstock Christian 7700 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-8238 www.woodstockchristian.org Woodstock Church of Christ 219 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8838 www.woodstockchurchofchrist.org Woodstock Church of the Nazarene 874 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-366-7515 www.wcnga.com Woodstock Community Church 237 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8990 www.wcchurch.org TOWNELAKER | July 2018

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Advertisers

For advertising rates and information Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com

July 2018

ANIMAL/PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

Animal Atlanta 770-591-0007 www.AnimalAtlanta.com

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Sassy Paws Pet Boutique 678-275-2126 www.sassypawspb.com

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Towne Lake Pet Care 404-907-9778

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ATTORNEYS/LEGAL SERVICES Debranski & Associates, LLC 770-926-1957, ext 306 www.Debranski.com

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Downtown Buzz 78 770-592-6056 www.mainstreetwoodstock.org/connect/#buzz Towne Lake Business Association www.TLBA.org CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Papa’s Pantry 770-591-4730 www.PapasPantry.org

Imbriale Injury Law 678-445-7423 www.imbrialeinjury.com

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Kathleen McGillick 770-591-5956 www.KathleenMcGillick.com

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Ribley Chiropractic 770-592-2505 www.ribleychiro.com

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BEAUTY SALON & SPA élon Salon 770-427-8698 www.elonsalon.com

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Salon Gloss and Spa 770-693-6968 www.salongloss.biz

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Credit Union of Georgia 678-486-1111 www.CUofGA.org

Woodstock Dentistry 39 678-203-2294 www.WoodstockDentistryOffice.com

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Gentle Dental Care and Georgia Dental Implant Center 770-926-2784 www.georgiadic.com

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EDUCATION Furtah Preparatory School 678-574-6488 www.furtahprep.org

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FINANCIAL SERVICES Citadel Professional Services, LLC 770-952-6707 www.CitadelWealthCare.com

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FUNERAL SERVICES Woodstock Funeral Home and Cremations 770-926-3107 www.woodstockfuneralhome.com

(Cosmetic, Family, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics & Pediatric)

Dentistry for Woodstock 770-926-0000 www.dentistryforwoodstock.com

Park Pediatric Dentistry of Woodstock 31 770-926-9260 www.PediatricWoodstockDentist.com

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DENTAL

Baird & Baird Family Dentistry 770-517-0444 www.BairdFamilyDentistry.com

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Williams Orthodontics 770-592-5554 and 770-345-4155 www.DrWilliamsOrthodontics.com

CREDIT UNION

Towne Lake’s Carwash and Detail 39 770-592-8102 www.townelakescarwashanddetail.com Woodstock Quality Paint & Body 770-926-3898

Cherokee Computer Guys 678-889-5900 www.ccrguys.com

Levitt Orthodontics 770-516-6100 www.levittortho.com

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COMPUTERS

AUTOMOTIVE

Etowah Towing 770-926-1711

Hillside United Methodist Church 770-924-4777 www.hillsideumc.org

Cover, 48, 49, 69

Towne Lake Family Dentistry Inside Back 770-591-7929 www.TowneLakeFamilyDentistry.com

CHURCHES

Nelson Elder Care Law, LLC Inside front 678-250-9355 www.NelsonElderCareLaw.com

Christian Brothers Automotive 770-926-4500 www.cbac.com

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CHIROPRACTIC Joint Chiropractic, The 678-214-4449 www.thejoint.com

Aspen Falls Auto Spa 770-591-3630

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Kragor Orthodontics 770-485-8827 www.kragorortho.com

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HEALTH & FITNESS Burn Bootcamp 40 706-289-9762 http://woodstock.burnbootcamp.com R2 Total Fitness 678-809-7833 www.r2totalfitness.com

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HOME IMPROVEMENT & REPAIR Bryan Plumbing Services 770-826-5277

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Casey's Painting 678-445-9661 www.caseyspainting.com

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Rebekah Gregg Photography 33 678-637-7518 www.rebekahgreggphotography.com

CFM Electrical Services 678-614-9661

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PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL SERVICES

ClearView window cleaning & pressure washing 770-926-1960 www.ClearViewAtl.com Coleman Home Services 770-294-9667 www.colemanhomeservices.com

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Cherokee Internal Medicine 678-238-0301 www.cherokeeim.com

South on Main 770-970-0200 www.jwcatlanta.com

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Windsong Properties Linton on Main 678-612-3901 www.WindsongLife.com

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Enhance Floors & More 770-565-3808 www.enhancefloors.com

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Handy Handyman, The 404-316-1490 www.thhmga.com

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Mr. Junk 678-Mr-Junk1 www.MrJunk1.com

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Pike’s Professional Painting 770-516-0045

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Precision Painting & Remodeling 678-234-9668 www.precisionpaintingatlanta.com

26

Reliable Heating & Air 770-594-9969 www.ReliableAir.com

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LANDSCAPING & PEST CONTROL Calvary Landscaping & Irrigation 770-720-1727 or 770-827-0346

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Landscape Matters 770-403-5813 www.LandscapeMattersInc.com

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Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC 770-720-7733 www.cherokeewomenshealth.com

RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT

Governors MedSpa & Concierge Medicine 29 678-888-5181 www.governorsmedicine.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY 85

Cruise Planners, Kathy Faisal 678-445-5235

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Eagle Watch Golf Club 404-960-9225 gary.weller@clubcorp.com

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GYN Surgical Specialists 404-303-3157 www.GYNSurgicalSpecialists.com

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Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 678-494-4251 www.elmstreetarts.org

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Mastermind Neurotherapy Center 770-857-3434 www.mastermindneurocenter.com

Etowah Eagles Golf Classic ww.etowaheaglesbasketball.com

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Modern Dermatology Atlanta 770-250-7199 www.moderndermatl.com North Georgia Audiology & Hearing Aid Center 770-726-8948 www.YourHearingLink.com North Georgia OB/GYN Specialists 770-926-9229 www.NorthGaOBGYN.com

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RESTAURANTS/FOOD 46

Copper Coin Coffee Inside front 770-308-6914 www.coppercoinwoodstock.com

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Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 www.FireStoneRestaurants.com

Plastic Surgery Center of the South 73 770-421-1242 www.plasticsurgerycenterofthesouth.net Rausch Family Practice 678-384-7305 www.judithrauschmd.com WellStar & Mayo Clinic 770-956-7827 www.wellstar.org/mayo

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Atlanta Communities, Tara Daigle 404-925-6351 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Tomlinson Team, The 770-365-6193 www.thetomlinsonteam.com

Smallcakes — A Cupcakery 678-324-1910 smallcakeswoodstock.myshopify.com Tavern at Towne Lake 770-592-9969 www.tavernattownelake.com WOW Pho & Grill 678-383-6099 www.wowpho.com

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RETAILERS/ SHOPPING

REAL ESTATE & RELATED SERVICES

OPTOMETRIST

Darleen Prem Photography 770-354-0675 www.darleenprem.com

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Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 770-974-2390 www.DrFixitPHD.com

Eyes on Towne Lake 770-702-5996 www.eyesontownelake.com

Soliel Laurel Canyon 678-710-9134 www.SolielLaurelCanyon.com

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RPM Landscape & Pavers 770-597-5175 www.rpmlandscapeandpavers.com

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Atlanta North Dermatology & Skin Care 770-516-5199 www.atlantanorthdermatology.com

Diaz Painting & Home Improvement 678-920-7880

Mclellan Excavation & Landscaping 404-520-0710 www.excavationandlandscaping.com

Magnolia Cottages by the Sea www.magnoliadreamcottage.com

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Flag Company, The 770-974-0507 www.Flagco.com

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Woodstock Market 770-517-7771

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SENIOR LIVING/ SERVICES

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Wahl Team, The 55 O: 770-517-2150 Cell: 404-428-4262 www.wahlteam.com

Arbor at BridgeMill, The 770-285-1475 www.ArborBridgeMill.com

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Kurt & Sheila Team, Keller Williams Back Cvr 404-954-2486, 678-494-0644 www.kurtandsheilateam.com

Oaks at Towne Lake 770-592-2195 www.oaksseniorliving.com

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Since 1996, we have brought relevant, uplifting and reader-driven content to readers. We publish Around Acworth, Around Canton, Around Woodstock and TowneLaker. We look forward to serving you, our readers and advertisers, every month. Thank you for your continued support and participation in making this truly your community magazine.

Front row, from left, Laura Latchford, Christie Deese, Patty Ponder and Jackie Loudin. Back row, Carla Caldwell, Michelle McCulloch, Denise Griffin, Candi Hannigan, Karen Flaig and Katherine Amick. Photo by Beth Fornuto.

At Aroundabout Local Media, we believe the world functions at the community level: diverse groups of people living in close proximity, sharing commonality of culture, values and local pride, developing safety nets for those in need, and helping each other to live richer lives. It is our heartfelt desire to contribute to the fabric that helps make a community happen. Through our magazines, we aim to provide everyone in the communities we serve with uplifting, interesting information about the community they are proud to call home. We encourage you to send us your photos, ideas, stories or anything else you think the community would like to know about. It’s your community. It’s your magazine. Look on page 6 for our contact information.

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TOWNELAKER | July 2018