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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Contents

48 & 49 On the Cover

Governors Med Spa & Concierge Medicine Photo by KariBeth Gentry. Special thanks to Pineapple Park

December 2018

14

32

36

In Every Issue

Features 14 Happy Holidays!

You’re sure to find something you like on our 12-page festive collection of Christmas events, recipes and ideas.

4 Around Towne

56 Don Akridge

8 Community News

79 Paul Baumgartner

12 Celebrations

83 Siobhan Brumbelow

50 Everyday Angels

60 Cherokee Office of Economic Development

54 TLBA

32 Local Ties to the Big Screen

Meet a Woodstock screenwriter (pg 34), a Canton resident (pg 32) who’s the subject of a recent movie, and learn more about the film industry in Cherokee County (pg 60).

66 Towne Lake Dining Guide 70 Community Calendar 72 School News 76 Library Events 81 Recent Home Sales

36 Co-working Spaces

Check out a list that can help you find your office away from home. On page 38, we list the many networking opportunities for the business-minded.

Contributors

82 Downtown Woodstock Dining Guide 84 Rob’s Rescues 88 Greenprints Trail Map 90 Clubs & Orgs 92 Church Listings 94 Directory of Advertisers

46 Leana Conway 18 Claire Frost 62 Dr. James Haley 71 Barbara P. Jacoby 40 Dan Jape 44 Drs. Andy & Ambre Kragor 30 Kurt & Sheila Johnson 42 Dr. Sarah Licht 58 Ann Litrel 43 Deidre Parker 34 Cheryl McKay Price 80 Bill Ratliff 64 Dr. Syed W. Rizvi 78 Lynne Saunders 52 Elisabeth Stubbs

Advertising

14 Teddy the Spaz Man

Patty Ponder, ALM President 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com www.townelaker.com TowneLakerMagazine

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

@Townelaker

63 Dr. Amber York 68 Shelley Winter 36 Ashley Valez townelakermagazine


TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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AROUND TOWNE

The

People, The Places and The Pleasures that make Towne Lake

Letter From the Editor

What's New

This year, for the first time, the Christmas decorations went up before Thanksgiving. That’s how eager I’ve been for the holiday that will bring our family together for the first time in quite a while. Why is it that we raise our children to be strong, independent adults who go off to make a name for themselves in the world, yet when they do, we want them back home? At least that’s the case in my world. Our youngest daughter Becca has lived in Denver for more than two years now. It fits her to a T; the girl loves rock climbing, camping, hiking, biking and walking almost everywhere she goes. We are happy for her as she builds her writing and editing portfolio, and contemplates grad school. But it’s tough not having her nearby, like her sister Julie, a journalist who lives in Decatur, and brother Drew, a teacher who’s homesteading it near Chattanooga. That’s another story for another day. In late October, I walked into the local grocery store and was struck, out of the blue, by how much I missed my kids. I was surrounded by moms and their little ones, dressed in their Halloween costumes, “trick or treating” up and down the grocery aisles, enjoying samples and collecting candy. As I read through our Christmas calendar, I’m hit with another wave of nostalgia. I miss attending school holiday parties and chorus concerts, taking the obligatory Santa photos (some with tear-stained faces), and sneaking presents in the house when they were sleeping. Luckily, my kids are good at keeping in touch. A call from my cheerful Denver girl, just to say hello as she walks through the snow to meet a friend for coffee, brings me back to reality and keeps me grounded. And thankful that long distance calls are free! I hope the collection of holiday stories and events in this issue will bless you this season. Each of us at Aroundabout Local Media wishes you a holiday filled with special memories that will last a lifetime. Christmas, I’m ready for you!

Woodstock Workspace has opened at 145 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 303, offering private workspaces to group meeting spaces. 678-814-8219. www.woodstockworkspace.com.

Candi Hannigan is the executive editor of TowneLaker. She has lived in Cherokee County since 1987. Send your comments or questions to Candi@AroundaboutMagazines.com.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Northside Hospital is expanding its newly launched Sports Medicine Network with the addition of Dr. Daniel Charek, a specialist in assessing and treating concussions, to the Woodstock practice at 900 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 320. www.sportsmedicine.northside.com/Woodstock. Cherokee Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cuttings

Corrective Chiropractic Woodstock

1910 Eagle Drive, Suite 100, Woodstock 678-490-8176 www.correctivechiropractic.com/woodstock

Threads On MainStreet

6380 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 103, Acworth 678-398-7073 www.threadsonmainstreet.com


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COMMUNITY BOARD The TowneLaker Community Board consists of well-respected community leaders from different walks of life. Our board members assist us in many ways, including contributing to our magazine and providing valuable feedback.

Kurt Johnson, co-founder of the Kurt and Sheila real estate team, has been involved in real estate most of his adult life. He and his wife have lived in Cherokee County for more than 13 years, their three children have attended county schools since the oldest started first grade at Bascomb Elementary. Kurt and Sheila work hard to promote Cherokee County and all it has to offer. Ann Litrel is an artist and writer whose nationally

published work includes decorative art, paintings for private and corporate collections, and writing and illustration for a range of publications. Ann lives in Towne Lake with her husband and coauthor Dr. Mike Litrel and their two sons. Ann can be reached at Ann@annlitrel.com.

Publisher Aroundabout Local Media, Inc. ALM President Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com Executive Editor Candi Hannigan 770-615-3309 Candi@AroundaboutMagazines.com Managing Editor Jackie Loudin 770-615-3318 Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Art Director Michelle McCulloch 770-615-3307 Michelle@AroundaboutMagazines.com Page Designer Laura Latchford Laura@AroundaboutMagazines.com Controller Denise Griffin 770-615-3315 Denise@AroundaboutMagazines.com Market Support Associate Christie Deese Christie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Copy Editors Bill King, Eliza Somers

Scott Coleman is the owner of Coleman Home

Services, a residential construction firm based in Towne Lake. He and his wife Lisa have three grown children and have lived in Towne Lake for 23 years. Scott and Lisa are supporters of the local special needs community. Scott enjoys the outdoors, cooking and his annual fishing trip to Alaska.

Bettie Sleeth has lived in Towne Lake for more than 12 years, and helped start the Kiwanis Club in Cherokee County. She's been active in service leadership programs in Cherokee County schools, helping bring Key Clubs to Etowah, Sequoyah and Creekview high schools and a Circle K club at Reinhardt University. She's active at her church, Hillside United Methodist, and serves in many community service projects and activities. Lynne Saunders is the founder and executive director of Papa’s Pantry and The Master’s Training Center. Her employment classes are based on a book she wrote, “21st Century Keys to Employment.” Lynne has been married to Bill for 33 years and has three grown daughters and five grandchildren. Anthony Hughes, raised in St. Petersburg, Fla., has been a special education teacher since 2001. He teaches at E.T. Booth Middle School and moved to Woodstock in 2015 with his wife Jessica and sons Jacob and Gavin. They are excited to be a part of the Towne Lake community. Depending on the season, they spend a lot of time at any of the area’s sport fields or enjoying Lake Allatoona. 6

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

TowneLaker, a publication of Aroundabout Local Media, Inc., is a monthly community magazine. The magazine’s goal is to build a sense of community and pride in the Towne Lake and surrounding area by providing its residents with positive stories and timely information. It distributes a total of 16,400 free copies. Approximately 15,600 are direct mailed to homes and businesses and an additional 800 are placed in racks around the community. It also has 2,000+ digital viewers of the magazine online each month. TowneLaker welcomes your comments, stories, and advertisements. Editorial deadline is the 1st and advertising deadline is the 5th of the previous month. Subscriptions are available for $24 per year. Send check or money order to the address below. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the Editor/ Publisher and the Publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. TowneLaker is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the Publisher. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2018. TowneLaker 1025 Rose Creek Drive, PMB 380, Suite 620 Woodstock, GA 30189 For Advertising: Patty Ponder, 770-615-3322 Website: www.townelaker.com Volume 24, Issue 8

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COMMUNITY

YOUR LOCAL NEWS

From left, Kendall Jones of MUST Ministries, Elissa Wallace with Papa’s Pantry and Millie Hughes of Never Alone divide items to prepare for pick-up by the food pantries.

Competition Restocks Community Food Pantries The Leadership Cherokee Leading by Feeding campaign ended with a tie between the classes of 2018 and 2017 (each gathered 1,111 items), in a competition to see who could collect the most food to fill area food pantries. The result: 3,100 donated items ranging from fruits and vegetables, to diapers and paper products. “Leading by Feeding supported those in our community who need a helping hand by filling the pantries of both the organizations who coordinate the pantries and the families in need,” said Pam Carnes, president and CEO of the Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce. The local chamber-member food pantries supported by the initiative included MUST Cherokee, Never Alone and Papa’s Pantry.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Unity Breakfast Set for January The 21st annual Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Breakfast will take place 9-11 a.m. Jan. 19 at the Northside Cherokee Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway in Canton. The keynote speaker will be retired Bishop Philip Cousin Sr., a friend and classmate of the late Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. This year’s theme is “Unity — the Work Continues.” The event is sponsored by Allen Temple AME Church Woodstock. The breakfast typically is attended by more than 500 county residents from all racial, political, social and religious backgrounds. Guests enjoy breakfast, speakers and musical performances. The MLK Unity Award will be presented. For ticket information and more details, contact the church at 770-926-6348.


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YOUR LOCAL NEWS Moose Lodge Honors Public Safety Officials The Canton Moose Lodge recently presented its annual awards to firefighters and staff members with Cherokee County Fire & Emergency Services. Rob Cox, an administrator with the Moose Lodge, and Tim Prather, Cherokee County fire chief, made the presentations. Battalion 1 Firefighter: FAO Eric Parr Battalion 2 Firefighter: Lt. Sarah Love Battalion 3 Firefighter: FF Emily Goss Volunteer Firefighter: Don Maloney EMS Employee of the Year: Destiny Labossiere Fire Administration: Laura King Special Operations: Lyle Harp Explorer of the Year: Dalton Hamby

Attending the Moose lodge presentation were, front row from left: Destiny Labossiere, Lt. Sarah Love, Don Maloney and Laura King. Back row from left: Fire Chief Tim Prather, Eric Parr, Canton Moose Lodge administrator Rob Cox, Dalton Hamby, Lyle Harp, Emily Goss and Assistant Fire Chief Eddie Robinson.

Firefighters’ Donation Helps Foster Children Cherokee County firefighters donated $1,056 to the Cherokee Children’s Haven, money they raised by raffling off their time, talent and resources. Some even made breakfast for others to earn funds to help the nonprofit better serve foster children. “Each year, the officers of the first battalion host a dinner for the firefighters and their families just to show our appreciation for their hard work. We decided to do something for a local organization, so our chiefs donate prizes for a raffle that we do at the dinner, and the money we receive goes to the Cherokee Children’s Haven,” Capt. Nathan Roper said.

Firefighters with representatives of the Children's Haven. 10

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

GHA President and CEO Earl Rogers, left, and GHA Chair John Haupert, right, presented the Hospital Hero Award to Kyle Porter.

Hospital Employee Honored for Compassionate Service Cherokee patient relations representative Kyle Porter was awarded the prestigious Georgia Hospital Heroes Award at the recent Georgia Hospital Association’s (GHA) annual Hospital Heroes Awards luncheon. Porter, one of only five health care workers statewide to receive the award, was recognized for her innovative efforts in bringing a family together for a funeral. Porter’s generosity is seen in her care for the patient, who was in intensive care. The patient was going through a difficult recovery process and was simultaneously dealing with grief over the recent death of a parent. While recovering, the patient also unexpectedly lost a brother. His grief worsened his condition, and he became frustrated and anxious at the thought of not being able to see his brother put to rest. Because the patient was in such fragile health, he could not leave the hospital. Porter explored several means of transporting him to the funeral, from having him ride in an ambulance to having the funeral procession with immediate family come to the hospital. Eventually, Porter thought to use modern technology to bring the funeral to the patient. She obtained permission for the first-time use of Skype by the hospital and found a family member who agreed to hold up a cellphone during the funeral. She also worked with the hospital chaplain to secure the chapel so her patient could watch the funeral in a private and peaceful space. Since then, the hospital has used Skype multiple times to allow patients to be part of family milestones while hospitalized. “Kyle Porter’s innovative ideas and ability to think outside the box have taken patient care to another level,” said GHA President and CEO Earl Rogers. “She has a remarkable ability to connect with her patients, and we are pleased to recognize her outstanding efforts with this award.”


Any parent with young athletes knows that youth sports can get pretty intense. They train and play hard and sometimes that can lead to injuries. The Northside Hospital Cherokee Sports Medicine Program works with young athletes and local schools to help prevent and treat injuries. Our board certified orthopedic physicians are helping to keep athletes in our community playing the games they love. For information visit Northside.com/Cherokee-Sports. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Celebrations!

Happy birthday, Moe!

We LUV U so much and thank God everyday for bringing you into our lives! Love, Mom, Dad, Grace and Mac.

Dec. 9

Happy first birthday Honor and Adore! Love Mom, Dad and family.

Dec. 28

Happy 40th birthday, Tim! Love, Your Revillion Crew.

Dominick James Bruley

3 years old on Dec. 25. Happy birthday! We love you! Nana and Papa.

Happy December birthday!

Happy sixth birthday, Karrington!

To our amazing daughter Eva and our incredible granddaughter, Lorelei! Love Bubbie and Paw-Paw!

We love you to the moon and back!

Happy 10th birthday, Brooklyn! Love you more! The 4 Burritos and Lucy.

Happy seventh birthday, Caelan! You bring such joy and adventure to our family. Love Mommy, Daddy and Landon.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Taylor and Jarrett Thompson

Married on Nov. 3 in Perry, Georgia at The Retreat of Southern Bridle Farms.

Dec. 30

Happy 12th birthday, Emilee! We love you BIG! Momma, Daddy and Landon.

Nov. 23

Happy 13th birthday, Christian! Love Dad, Mama, Joscie, TJ and Lili.

ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE FREE!

E-mail to: Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com January deadline is Dec. 10. Please specify TowneLaker.


TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Why I Love Christmas BY TEDDY THE SPAZ MAN

Christmas is my favorite time of year and it’s just around the corner! There’s so much to do: the presents, the howliday parties, friends and family dropping treats … I mean dropping by. Friends and family dropping by. Heh, heh, I crack myself up. I especially like it when my Aunt Tedwina comes to visit. I actually was named after her because we look so much alike. Every year, she insists on making us her famous rum cake. As it bakes, the delicious aroma fills my greedy hound snout and I drool in anticipation. Unfortunately, I’ve yet to taste it, because she always forgets where she puts it. Come to think of it, she always forgets where she puts the bottle of rum, too. Hmm? I’m also super excited to see all the pretty Christmas decorations! The lights, the music, it’s all so magical! It’s our first Christmas here and we can’t wait to see downtown Woodstock all lit up! Kinda like Aunt Tedwina. And I can’t wait to spend Christmas without my old nemesis neighbor, Mr. Johnson. Boy, was he ... we’ll be sure to a pain in my fur pants! One time, I was walking spread more love with a hot little she-dog and happiness, and he yelled out, “Hey little lady! Did you know because that’s that Teddy here wants 10 what it’s all about. kids?” She shot me a look of complete horror, yelped and hightailed it outta there faster than a jackrabbit on a date. I hollered, “Not those kinda kids! I want goats! I want 10 GOATS!” So, yes, I’m thrilled that Mr. Johnson’s outta the picture. Although, I did spot him on the trail the other day. Probably my favorite part of the holidays, though, is giving back. Last year, mom and I organized a Christmas card drive with my social media fans and we ended up hand-delivering more than 300 holiday cards, all personally addressed with a little note inside, to local senior citizens. They appreciated them so much, and our hearts were so full I thought they’d burst. As I write this, I’m not sure what we’ll be doing this year, but we’ll be sure to spread more love and happiness, because 14

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Above, Aunt Tedwina, Teddy’s namesake, gets ready for some holiday baking. Left, Teddy laughs at his jokes, even if no one else does.

that’s what it’s all about. That, and rum cake. Definitely rum cake. Aaawooooooo! P.S. If you didn’t catch it, you can read all about me in the October issue of TowneLaker. In a nutshell, I’m the new man — er, dog — about town. You’re welcome, ladies.

Teddy the Spaz Man is a social media dog and not-sohumble Hallmark star living in downtown Woodstock with his pawrents and fur family. Facebook/Instagram: @teddythespazman.


Top 5 Light Displays Worth the Drive!

Pack the car with family, friends, snacks and put on your favorite Christmas music for a de-LIGHT-ful time. A visit to these sites, some of the biggest and brightest holiday light displays in Georgia, surely will get you in the Christmas spirit.

1.

Lights of LIFE on the campus of Life University

2.

Stone Mountain Christmas at Stone Mountain Park

3.

Garden Lights, Holiday Nights at Atlanta Botanical Garden

4.

Fantasy in Lights at Callaway Gardens

5.

Magical Nights of Lights at Lanier Islands

Every night, rain or shine, through Dec. 31. Introduced in 1989, the display has grown into one of the most popular light shows in the Southeast. Cruise through the illuminated campus, stopping along the 1.5-mile drive to enjoy seasonal entertainment. Costs are $5 per car Mondays-Thursdays, $10 per car Fridays-Sundays, as well as Dec. 15-31. Display opens at dark every night and runs until 9 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays and 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. www.life.edu/events/lights-of-life.

Open through Jan. 6. Millions of lights, Christmas shows and Rudolph create a night to remember. Don’t miss the Singalong Christmas Train, featuring a satellite message from Santa’s elves, and a track-side show about the first Christmas. Experience the new Enchanted Tree Lighting Ceremony, and end the night with the Snow Angel Snowfall Finale. 1000 Robert E. Lee Blvd., Stone Mountain. 770-498-5690. www.stonemountainpark.com.

Open through Jan. 6. Orchestral Orbs glow harmoniously with holiday tunes. A Tunnel of Light from the radiant Ice Goddess to the Glittering Galaxy embraces visitors in enchanting light. Named one of the top 10 holiday light shows in the country by USA Today. 1345 Piedmont Ave. N.E., Atlanta. 404-876-5859. www.atlantabg.org.

Through Jan. 5. Bundle up for a Jolly Trolley ride, or drive your car through more than 8 million lights. Named one of the top 10 places to see holiday lights by National Geographic Traveler. 17800 U.S. Highway 27, Pine Mountain. 706-663-2281. www.callawaygardens.com.

Through Jan. 3. Drive through larger-than-life light displays while listening to songs of the season on your radio or smartphone. Enhance the experience with the companion app, and stop at the Holiday Village to visit Santa, shop for gifts, and ride carnival rides. This year, enjoy License to Chill Snow Island at Margaritaville. With one of the fastest snow rides in North America, ice skating, snow play area, fire pits, and s’mores, carnival rides and more, Snow Island is one of the best Southern snow attractions and fun for all ages. 7000 Lanier Islands Parkway, Gainesville. 770-945-8787. www.lanierislands.com.

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Holiday Happenings Dec. 1

Dec. 4

Dec. 7

Bascomb United Methodist Church is 9-11 a.m. The church is at 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock. 770-926-9755. www.bascombumc.org.

6 p.m. at Ball Ground Public Library. Get your holiday picture taken with Santa Claus! Refreshments and activities for all ages are provided. Don’t forget to pick up your Winter Literacy Challenge log while you’re there. For all ages.

6 p.m. Location to be determined. www.cityofwaleska.com.

Breakfast, photos with Santa at

The 16th annual Run for the Children Reindeer Run 5K begins with a fun run at 8 a.m. and a 5K at 8:30 a.m. at Etowah River Park in Canton. Awards will be given to the top three overall male and female 5K runners. A prize will be awarded to the school with the most participants. For more information, email serviceleaguerunforthechildren@ gmail.com.

Christmas Jubilee in Woodstock begins at 2 p.m. with Elm Street Theater’s performance of “A Christmas Carol” at 4:30 p.m. at The Park at City Center, 101 Arnold Mill Road. Food vendors will be available for parade-goers who want to eat while watching the 5:30 p.m. parade. After the parade ends, Santa Claus will be at the gazebo, ready to meet children; the tree lighting will take place with Santa and the mayor, and the Citizen of the Year award will be given to Bonny Keheley. Lots of activities for the children. www.woodstockga.gov.

Canes and Cocoa 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for ages 1-9 at Valley playground at JJ Biello Park. Check in at 9:30 a.m. for the 10 a.m. candy hunt. $10 per child. Sleigh (tractor) rides, snacks and hot cocoa. Sponsored by the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency. Call 770-924-7768 to register.

Dec. 3

Hickory Flat Holiday Open House at

5:30 p.m. at Hickory Flat Public Library. Pictures with Santa Claus, a tree-lighting, crafts, and entertainment provided by the Hickory Flat Elementary School Chorus. Refreshments are provided. Don’t forget to pick up your Winter Literacy Challenge log. For all ages. 16

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Ball Ground Holiday Open House at

Dec. 5

R.T. Jones Holiday Carnival and Open House at 6 p.m. at R.T. Jones

Memorial Library. Welcome the holiday season with the R.T. Jones Carnival. Enjoy crafts, carnival games, refreshments and the annual Festival of Trees. There is a special visitor coming: Santa Claus! Don’t forget to pick up your Winter Literacy Challenge log. For all ages.

Dec. 6

Rose Creek Holiday Open House at

5:30 p.m. at Rose Creek Public Library. Enjoy Holiday festivities with music from the Bascomb Elementary School Chorus, refreshments and a special visit from Santa Claus. Don’t forget to pick up your Winter Literacy Challenge log. For all ages.

Foster children can visit Santa for

free from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Liberty Hill United Methodist Church, 141 Railroad St. in Canton. Sponsored by Santa “Pop” and Teena Coogle Photography, in cooperation with the Cherokee County Foster and Adoptive Association.

Dec. 7-23

Holiday Lights of Hope at Hobgood Park in Woodstock is a Christmas celebration benefiting the Anna Crawford Children's Center. Open nightly at 6 p.m. Features a huge walk-through Christmas light display with more than 1 million lights, concessions, vendors, games, Santa, children's activity area, music and more. www.cherokeechildadvocates.org. holidaylightsofhope.com.

Christmas Tree Lighting in Waleska at

Dec. 7-24

“A Christmas Carol” is an Elm Street

holiday tradition that will put every Scrooge in the spirit of the season. Friday and Saturday shows at 7:30 p.m., Sunday shows at 2:30 p.m., and Monday show at 2:30 pm. Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, 8534 Main St., Woodstock. Bring nonperishable food items for a collection for Papa’s Pantry; food will be delivered Dec. 17. www.elmstreetarts.org.

Dec. 8

Christmas Craft Fair at Timothy Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. More than 25 vendors will showcase jewelry, aromatherapy oils, Christmas decorations and gift baskets, candles, crochet items and more. The church is at 556 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. www.tlcwoodstock.org. Ho Ho Horses. Santa is coming to BEATS (Bethany’s Equine and Aquatic Therapy Services) at Mariposa Farms, 75 Red Gate Trail, Canton, 1-5 p.m. For a $10 donation, Santa invites kids, families and pets to visit him and his horse pals, take a picture, have a cookie and hot cocoa. Santa elves ensure a positive experience for those who may need extra help. Santa has lots of experience with our friends with special needs. All proceeds will go to BEATS Inc., a nonprofit that provides therapy for kids and adults with special needs.

A holiday pancake breakfast, sponsored by the Cherokee County Homeless Veteran program, at the county’s senior center, 1000 Univeter Road, Canton. All veterans and their families are invited to enjoy the free meal and photos with Santa. Contact Jim Lindenmayer at jlindenmayer80@gmail.com or 678.983.7590.


Dec. 8

Christmas-themed scavenger hunt while hiking at Lewis Park, sponsored by the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency. Begins at 10 a.m. For all ages. Cost is $15. www.cherokeega.com

Dec. 8-9

Atlanta Christmas Musical at

ONGOING Dec. 1-16

Santa’s Mailbox. Children can

drop off their letters to Santa at the gazebo in The Park at City Center, 101 Arnold Mill Road, in downtown Woodstock. Santa will respond with a personalized letter!

Through Dec. 31

Holiday Lights at Veterans Park,

open nightly at 6 p.m., is a 2-mile drive-through light show. Admission is $20 per car. Five charities benefit from the event. The park is at 7345 Cumming Highway, Canton. www.holidaylightsatveteranspark.com.

CHRISTMAS PARADES Dec. 1

Holly Springs: Begins at 1:30 p.m. Free photos with Santa, Christmas crafts and sweet treats available after the parade at the train depot. www.hollyspringsga. us/ChristmasParade. Canton: Begins at 6 p.m.,

sponsored by the Optimist Club. Other holiday activities leading up to the parade begin at noon. 770-704-1500. www.cantonga.gov.

Woodstock: Begins at 5:30 p.m.

at Woodstock Elementary and ends at Sam’s Club on Highway 92. www.woodstockga.gov.

First Baptist Woodstock. A cast and crew of more than 400 will present a new original musical, “Soli Deo Gloria.” Performances at 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Ticket information at www.atlantachristmasmusical.com.

Dec. 9

“The Polar Express” at 2 p.m. and 5

p.m. at Falany Performing Arts Center on the Reinhardt University campus. Moviegoers can enjoy crafts, snacks and a visit with Santa Claus. Adults $10, seniors and children $5. www.reinhardt.edu/fpac/ performing_arts.

Dec. 13

The Ball Ground Polar Express at 5:30 p.m. at Ball Ground Public Library, 435 Old Canton Road. Bring your blanket and wear your best pajamas to experience the magic of Chris Van Allsburg’s classic holiday tale come to life through this annual readaloud. Everyone’s favorite conductor will be on hand to give you a ticket to an evening of story time and refreshments. For all ages.

Dec. 15

Swim with The Grinch 1-3 p.m. at the

Cherokee County Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. Event includes underwater tree lighting, crafts and a chance to meet the Grinch. $10 per child. Children who are non-swimmers or in a life jacket must have a paid parent in the pool within arm’s reach. www.crpa.net.

Dec. 15-16

at Bascomb United Methodist Church, featuring the chancel and youth choirs, children and orchestra. The church is at 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock. 770-926-9755. www.bascombumc.org.

Cherokee Chorale presents "A Feast of Carols," two performances of holiday music directed by Scott L. Martin set for 5 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Canton First United Methodist Church, 930 Lower Scott Mill Road. The concerts will feature guest choirs from Dean Rusk and E. T. Booth middle schools. Tickets are $15 for adults, $5 for students. www.cherokeechorale.org.

Dec. 10

Dec. 17

“Were You There on That Christmas Night” is the Christmas cantata at 7 p.m.

Merry Grinchmas Party at 3:30

p.m. at R.T. Jones Memorial Library, 116 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton. Children of all ages are welcome to celebrate the season with a party featuring fun games, activities and a special craft pertaining to Dr. Seuss’ beloved “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Dec. 12

The R.T. Jones Polar Express at 6:30

p.m. at R.T. Jones Memorial Library, 116 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton. All Aboard! Come in your jammies and bring the whole family for a dramatic evening as the traditional reading of “The Polar Express” is presented. Begin with hot cocoa and cookies. The reading will promptly start at 7 p.m., and end with a special commemorative craft. For all ages.

The Hickory Flat Polar Express at 6:30 p.m. at Hickory Flat Public Library, 2740 E. Cherokee Drive, Canton. Bring your blanket and wear your best pajamas to experience the magic of Chris Van Allsburg’s classic holiday tale. For all ages.

Dec. 18

Warm Up: A VoicePlay Holiday begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Falany Performing Arts Center on the Reinhardt University campus. VoicePlay re-creates the orchestrated sound of an entire musical production with nothing but the human voice. Adults $40-45, seniors $35-40, children $10-15. www.reinhardt.edu/fpac/ performing_arts.

Dec. 21-22

Live nativity, 6-8 p.m. at Bascomb United Methodist Church, 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock. 770-926-9755. www.bascombumc.org. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Help for Heading Home for the Holidays BY CLAIRE FROST

It’s that time of year! Time for joyous family gatherings, big laughter, delicious smells, indulgent meals, games around a fire. Here’s the problem: You have to drive hundreds of miles over the proverbial river and through the woods to get to Grandma’s house to have all this family fun. Maybe you pack into a crowded plane or perhaps you cram your family into a car that - let’s face it - never seems to have enough room. Between “are we there yet” and “I’m hungry,” traveling during the holidays can be challenging. Here are some helpful ideas to make your trip a little easier.

Snacks

Packing one more bag is the last thing you want to think about, but taking an extra moment to throw together a few snacks for the kids, and you, can save time and money on a long trip.

Toddlers

• Puffs, Goldfish or Annie’s Bunnies, dried fruits.

Big Kids

• Trail mix, animal crackers, turkey slices/jerky, string cheese, pita chips, mini muffins, apple slices, oranges/ clementines, yogurt tubes (like Gogurt), granola bars.

Airplane Snacks

• Goldfish or Annie’s Bunnies, raisins, string cheese, Wheat Thins, pretzels. • No nuts or peanut butter! You never know when a friendly flight attendant’s voice will come over the speaker and say “This is a nut-free flight,” when you packed nothing but celery and peanut butter.

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Games

I’m certain most of us have memories of riding in a car and picking out license plates from other states, or finding letters of the alphabet. If you choose to forgo screen time while traveling, consider playing an old-fashion game of ABCs or try one of these other fun time-passing travel games. • I Spy. It’s a classic! • 20 Questions. • Rest Stop Olympics. I thought of this after a mishap at a rest stop where my husband dropped me and our daughter off in front, and went to look for a parking space, only to realize that the parking lot led him back onto the highway until he was able to turn around at the next exit. Panic set in and we ended up skipping around until he pulled back in the entrance. Make up your own activities and work off that pent up energy. • Mad Libs-style storytelling. Each family member makes up a portion of the story. When I play this with my daughter, we always end up with a princess in our story. You can even record the story on your phone and transcribe it into a printed book, a cute idea for a holiday gift. • Animal Name Game. Everyone names an animal that starts with the last letter of the animal said before them. So, donkey could lead to yorkshire terrier, which could lead to reindeer, which could lead to rhinoceros, which could lead to sloth, which could lead to hippopotamus, etc. Safe travels and happy holidays!

Claire is the editor of House of Frost, a blog juggling family, fashion, food and furnishing with a little sparkle. HouseFrost.com.


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Helping Hand

Lend a

Because many of our friends and neighbors struggle financially every day, there are many charities that work hard to help people in need. Here’s a list of local nonprofits that have additional needs for the holidays. While you’re at it, consider bringing a basket of homemade goodies, fresh fruit or colorful flowers to show your appreciation for the staff and volunteers at these nonprofits. To learn about many other ways to help throughout the year, visit www.volunteercherokee.org.

Adopt a Vet

Cherokee Family Violence Center

Each Christmas, the Cherokee County Homeless Veteran program reaches out to veterans living in assisted living facilities, nursing homes or at home alone. Last year the program supported more than 220 veterans in senior facilities, 25 veteran families who were financially challenged, and more than 15 homebound veterans who live alone. To request aid for a veteran in need, or to support the program, contact Jim Lindenmayer at jlindenmayer80@gmail. com or 678-983-7590, or Betty Lewis at 770-318-6451.

Items are needed year-round. The center has a transitional housing complex with 72 units for single moms and their children, an emergency shelter that accommodates 12 women and children, and a legal department providing services for victims of intimate partner violence. Donations requested: new pots and pans, plates, cups, mugs, silverware, Tupperware, sheets, etc. to establish a new household. Craft materials for the children’s program, such as glue sticks, bottles of glue and craft kits. And, for the emergency shelter: white towels and washcloths, white twin sheet sets, pillows, new socks, undergarments, and pajamas in a variety of sizes. For delivery details, call 770-479-1704, ext. 101 or email stephanie@cfvc.org.

www.legion.org

Cherokee County Senior Services www.cherokeega.com

Registration for Adopt a Senior will be open until Dec. 8. The following items are needed to fill gift bags: two bath towels, $25 grocery gift cards and a book of stamps. Other items also are accepted, but nothing perishable. Drop off donations at the Senior Center at 1001 Univeter Road, Canton. 770-704-2320.

www.cfvc.org

Cherokee Youth Works www.cherokeefocus.org

Cherokee Youth Works (CYW) is a program of the Cherokee FOCUS collaborative. CYW works with youth and young adults ages 16-24 to help them gain and retain employment, and obtain an education. The wish list includes gifts that assist and support the goals of the participants, such as monetary donations or gift cards for items such as: gas cards, GED testing fees, college admission fees, transportation, child care, temporary housing, clothing for work and other supportive gifts. Contact Katie@cherokeefocus.org or call 770-345-5483.

The Children’s Haven Hugs for Seniors www.crpa.net

The Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency is collecting items for nursing centers in Cherokee County until Dec. 7 for the first Hugs in a Blanket campaign. Individuals can bring a warm blanket and a pair of unisex slipper socks to the rec center at 7545 Main St., Building 200, Woodstock. For more information, call 770-924-7768 or email lcollett@cherokeega.com. 20

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www.CherokeeChildrensHaven.org The Children’s Haven promotes the health and happiness of children in Cherokee County who are affected by abuse. The group works to ensure their safety, advocate on their behalf and respond to their needs. Holiday needs include: new coats, socks, pajamas and underwear. Target or Walmart gift cards are welcome. Items can be dropped off at 1083 Marietta Highway, Canton. 770-345-3274.


Forever Fed

MUST Ministries — Cherokee

Forever Fed is asking for donations of non-perishable food items (canned soups are always needed), coats and laundered blankets and towels in good condition. To donate, contact Susan@ForeverFed.org or phone 678-883-3314.

The annual MUST Toy Shops, including one for Cherokee County residents, are collecting new items for children living in poverty. Toys, stuffed animals, games, bikes, dolls (every ethnicity), sports equipment, underwear, socks, T-shirts, hats, scarves, gloves and blankets are in particular need. Gifts for tweens and teens are particularly helpful. Drop off donations at 111 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton, or email ToyShop@munstministries.org if you would like to volunteer! Toy shops will be open by appointment only Dec. 1-15.

www.foreverfed.org

www.mustministries.org

Never Alone

www.neveralone.org The Woodstock nonprofit, which helps area residents in need by distributing food and personal hygiene items, is seeking sponsors for their Christmas Assistance Program. This program is still open to applicants. Please visit their website to learn how you can become a sponsor, or click the donation tab and make a monetary donation to help purchase gifts.

North Georgia Pregnancy and Family Resource Center www.babyontheway.org

Goshen Valley Foundation www.goshenvalley.org

The holidays can be difficult times for the foster youth who are served by Goshen Valley. The youth can use a little extra support from their community, and area residents can help by providing meals for the young people and house parents. “Frozen casseroles are a huge blessing for our house parents, who are having to prepare three meals a day when the boys are out of school,” says Zach Blend, CEO of Goshen Valley. Individuals or small groups are encouraged to donate frozen meals. You even can deliver them in person and take a tour of Goshen Valley. Gift cards from Walmart, Target and Amazon also can help to fill many Christmas wish lists, and gas cards are encouraged. The executive director at Goshen Valley Ranch, Stacy Cooper, is putting together an Amazon wish list for the youth. If you would like to purchase a specific gift for one of young people, please email Stacy at scooper@goshenvalley.org or call 770-796-4618.

Hope Center

www.hopectr.com The pregnancy diagnosis and support center can use donations of new, unwrapped toys for children up to age 18 for the Christmas toy closet. Donations accepted through Dec. 11 at The HOPE Center, 295 Molly Lane, Suite 120, Woodstock. 770-924-0864.

The Jasper agency serves North Cherokee, Pickens and surrounding counties. Free and confidential services include pregnancy tests, first semester ultrasounds, parenting classes and much more. The nonprofit, which serves pregnant moms and families with children up to 5 years old, needs diapers, wipes, baby clothes size 0-3T, pack-n-plays, baby shower items and financial contributions. 706-253-6303.

Papa’s Pantry

www.papaspantry.org The pantry is accepting donations for holiday meals, including turkeys, hams, produce and nonperishable food items. A list of seasonal needs is kept up-to-date on the website. Papa’s Pantry is a food and stability training organization for those in need. For details, call 770-591-4730.

Secret Santa

www.cherokeesanta.com The Secret Santa program of the Department of Family and Children Services for Cherokee County offers a way for individuals, businesses or larger groups, such as Sunday school classes or Scout troops, to help the more than 300 children in foster care this year. Sponsors can donate as much or as little as they can afford. All size donations are appreciated. For more details, visit our website, call Secret Santa at 470-235-0753 or email cherokeesanta@yahoo.com. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Recipes

Some of your favorite Woodstock chefs were generous enough to share their favorite holiday recipes with us. Give them a try and let us know how you like them!

Honey Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Craisins Provided by Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza and Grill

Stephen Welch is the new chef at Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza and Grill, and the author of this recipe. It will make a delicious and beautiful addition to your holiday table.

Sausage, Apple and Cranberry Stuffing Provided by the Copper Coin

Copper Coin’s executive chef, Chris Morgan, also known as the 6-Foot Cook (the6ftcook.com), specializes in grilled goods, and, this time of the year, smoked turkeys. It really doesn’t work well to stuff a turkey that is going to be smoked, and a lot of foodies recommend no longer cooking dressing in your turkey for safety reasons. Morgan uses this recipe for all his holiday turkey feasts. • • • • • • • • •

16 cups 1-inch bread cubes (day old), try sourdough 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter 2 medium-sized yellow onions, diced 1 cup (2 stalks) medium diced celery 2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled, cored, large-diced 2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley, chopped fine 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ¾ pounds bulk Italian sausage (sweet or spicy), or use link sausage and remove casing • 1 cup chicken stock • 1 cup dried cranberries

Directions

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Place the bread cubes in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 7 minutes. Remove the bread cubes and put in a large mixing bowl. Raise oven temperature to 350 degrees. In a large sauté pan, melt the butter and add onions, celery, apples, parsley, salt and pepper. Sauté over medium heat, stirring occasionally until the vegetables are soft, but not browned (about 10 minutes). Add to the bread cubes. Using the same sauté pan, cook the sausage over medium heat, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes or until browned and fully cooked. Break up the sausage with a fork while it is cooking. Add to the bread cubes and vegetables. Add the chicken stock and cranberries to the mixture and mix well. Pour into a 9-by-12 lightly greased (or use cooking spray) baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes, until browned on top and hot in the middle. Serve warm. 22

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• 3 pounds Brussels sprouts, ends removed and sliced in half • 2 cups craisins • 2 tablespoons olive oil • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar • 2 teaspoons raw honey

Directions

Start by preheating your oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet tray with parchment paper, to keep the Brussels sprouts from sticking. Lay the Brussels sprouts out evenly on the baking sheet. Add the olive oil, sea salt, ground black pepper, balsamic vinegar and raw honey. Toss well to coat the Brussels sprouts. Place into the oven and roast until the Brussels sprouts are tender and caramelized, about 1820 minutes. During the last 5 minutes, add in the craisins, just to warm them and incorporate with the Brussels sprouts.


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Sweet Potato Gnocchi Provided by the Tavern at Towne Lake

From head chef Jeremy Smith to your holiday table. • • • • • • •

2 large sweet potatoes 2 cups of gluten-free flour (all purpose flour also will work) 2 teaspoons of salt 1 teaspoon of white pepper 1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese dash of nutmeg 2 dashes of cinnamon

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Take the sweet potatoes and poke a few holes in them with a fork, bake for 40-50 minutes or until tender. You'll know they're done when a fork can easily pass through the center. Set aside to cool so you can easily handle them. Combine the dry ingredients. Flour a work surface and pour flour mixture onto the surface. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture. Once the sweet potatoes are cool enough to handle, remove the skin and place them, one at a time into a potato ricer. Rice both potatoes on top of the flour mixture. Flour your hands and work the sweet potatoes into the flour mixture. Once fully combined, roll the dough into a ball and cut it into eight even pieces. Roll each piece into a long log about 1/2 an inch thick. Cut pieces of the gnocchi into 1-inch pieces. Gently toss each piece into flour to ensure that it's dry and has no sticky edges. Continue until you've used all the dough. Using a fork, press grooves into each piece of gnocchi. The gnocchi can be stored in the refrigerator for three days, in the freezer for a few weeks, or cooked right away. To cook the gnocchi, bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add in the gnocchi and let cook for a couple minutes. Once the gnocchi floats to the surface of the water, let it boil for 30 seconds, and then remove from the water using a slotted spoon.

Balsamic Brown Butter • • • •

1 pound unsalted butter (room temperature) 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 8 sage leaves, cut into long, thin strips 1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions

Heat balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan, bringing slowly to a simmer. Whisk butter into pan to emulsify, add salt and sage. Pour sauce over the gnocchi and garnish with shaved Pecorino Romano cheese.

Melissa’s Southern Caramel Cake

Provided by Smallcakes a Cupcakery • • • • • • • • • •

2 sticks unsalted butter at room temperature 1/3 cup vegetable oil 2 ½ cups granulated sugar 6 large eggs at room temperature 2 large egg yolks at room temperature 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract 3 cups cake flour 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup sour cream

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix together butter, oil and sugar with hand or stand mixer on high until fluffy, approximately 5-6 minutes. Turn mixer to medium speed and mix in eggs and egg yolks one at a time. Add vanilla extract and mix. Sift cake flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl. With mixer on slow speed, alternate adding flour mixture and sour cream until mixed together. Do not over mix. Add sugar mixture to flour mixture. Spray three 8-inch cake pans with cooking spray. Pour or scoop batter into pans evenly. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake bounces back in the center when touched or a knife comes out smooth. Remove cake from pans and let cool completely.

Caramel Icing • • • •

1 ½ sticks unsalted butter 2 cups granulated sugar 2 cans evaporated milk 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Directions

Add butter, sugar and evaporated milk to saucepan over medium heat until everything has melted. Leave on medium to low heat, stirring occasionally, for about 1 ½ to 2 hours. (You will want to watch this the whole time and make sure it does not burn.) You will know it is done when it turns a golden brown color and the caramel can thickly coat the back of a spoon. Remove from heat and add pure vanilla extract. Cool for about 20-25 minutes before icing cake. Enjoy!

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Home For The Holidays? Here’s What’s Happening!

GINA ANN RIGGS, REALTOR® 404-860-0159

GinaAnn.Riggs@HarryNorman.com

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Roasted Cherries and Goat Cheese Salad Provided by Rootstock and Vine

“So many holiday salads are really very boring,” said Todd Webster, executive chef at Rootstock and Vine “We can spice up this course with a little imagination and even less effort.”

HolidayTour of Homes 2018

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ABIGAIL PEYTON

Sponsored by the Woodstock Junior Women’s Club, this year’s tour benefited the Cherokee Family Violence Center, Georgia Canines for Independence, Georgia Care, and the Letter Project. The Angelwood model home at Heritage at Towne Lake (above) was decorated by Brenda Facchinetti with Affordable Elegance, Canton. The Richardson model home at South on Main (below) was decorated by Ella Huysamen with Southernite Interiors, Canton. continues on page 28

• • • • • • • •

1 head frisée 1 head endive 1 head baby lola rosa 3 cups stem-on cherries, roasted 1 bulb fennel 1 pound baby beets, roasted 2 cups hazelnuts, toasted and crushed 1/4 pound goat cheese (CalyRoad recommended) • 1 bunch parsley, finely chopped • olive oil • salt and pepper

Directions

Cut the greens away from the stems using biased (angled) cuts. Rinse the greens in cold water and place in a salad spinner to remove all excess moisture. Toss the cherries in olive oil, salt and pepper. Place on a cooking sheet and put in the oven at 400 degrees for 5-7 minutes. Toss the baby beets in olive oil, salt and pepper and wrap tightly in foil. Place in the oven at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until a knife pierces them easily. Take care not to let them become too soft. Remove from oven and peel using a towel while they are still hot, so the skin is easier to remove. Put them in the refrigerator to cool. Shave the fennel into thin strips using a mandoline. If you cut it too thick, it will have a strong flavor of licorice. Roll the goat cheese into small ½-ounce balls and roll in the chopped parsley. Combine the lettuces, fennel and beets in a mixing bowl and season with salt and pepper. Toss in the vinaigrette. Place salad on chilled plates and add a few cherries, hazelnuts and goat cheese.

Pomegranate Vinaigrette Dressing • • • • 26

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3 ounces olive oil 2 ounces hazelnut oil 3 ounces champagne vinegar 3 ounces pomegranate molasses


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Holiday Tour of Homes 2018

Th e

Ri c at ha So rds ut on h m on o M del ai h n om e

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF ABIGAIL PEYTON

e m e o l h Lak e od e m wn d To oo at w el ge g a An erit e Th at H TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Top Five Buyer Turn Offs BY KURT & SHEILA JOHNSON

Yes, it is still a seller's market, but that doesn't mean that you can expect buyers to make offers regardless of how your home is presented. To get your home sold for the most money and in the shortest time frame, you need to be mindful of what most likely will turn off prospective buyers.

1.

Price. With plenty of information available online

about the details of recent sales, it's much easier for prospective buyers to have a good sense of the value of your home, and know if it is priced correctly. We have seen listings go from no showings to six showings per week with a $5,000 price reduction. In a seller's market, buyers are less inclined to assume they can get a home at a discount. Buyers may shy away from homes that are only slightly overpriced

2.

Poor first impression online. More than 80 percent of homebuyers nationally bought a home that was found online. The first impression of a property in this market usually is made online. Professional staging and photography are more important than ever to compel buyers to call their agents for a showing of your property.

3.

Poor curb appeal. If you have a strong first impression online, the next hurdle is the buyer's first impression of the property. We have worked with plenty of buyers who could not shake a negative initial impression of the outside of a home, regardless of how nice the interior might have been. The condition of a home's exterior is important, because the buyer is anticipating the first impression of their friends and family members. You only have one chance to make a great first impression.

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4.

Pet, mildew and smoke odors. Have you ever noticed

how your home smells after you have been away on vacation? That smell is an amplified version of what buyers will smell when they visit your property. We all grow accustomed to how our homes smell over time, and sometimes it takes an objective third party to call our attention to it. Don't be offended if your agent mentions it. Solve it.

5.

Dirt and clutter. This turnoff is the most affordable to address, with good old elbow grease and advice from a professional home stager. With advice about what to eliminate, and a few refinements using furnishings and decorations you already have, a room can be transformed to look larger and more inviting. Failure to have your home as clean as you can get it can cost you unnecessary days on the market and a lower selling price.

Kurt and Sheila are a top-producing real estate team that lives in Towne Lake and has served Cherokee County for more than 15 years. www.KurtandSheilaTeam.com


Brewing Up Innovation in Woodstock’s Backyard Research and development is at the heart of Reformation Brewery’s new downtown Woodstock location. With a dedicated five-barrel brew house, two beer bars, a large deck and an outdoor beer garden, Reformation Brewery’s newly opened taproom and events space at 105 Elm St. is designed to invite the community to taste, see and celebrate the innovation brewing in Woodstock’s backyard. “Serving 16 to 24 unique beers at any given time, this space gives us a much needed place for small-batch experimentation that will shape the future for Reformation,” said Spencer Nix, CEO and co-founder of Reformation Brewery. “We’re excited for our guests and local community to enjoy a fresh, new space with ample room to create moments that matter.” And, for Woodstock residents, the opportunity to help shape that vision is on their doorstep. When it comes to crafting a menu of options, brewmaster and co-founder Nick Downs said serving up inspiration might just be a two-way street. “Several of our core beers have yeast-forward flavor profiles that wine drinkers gravitate toward, so more experimentation in that area was a

natural fit,” Downs said. “We’ve grown a lot in the last five years, but if one thing has remained the same, it’s the knowledge that we serve our community. We want to hear what people like or don’t like. The next big idea just might be the one you serve us across the bar.” A recent emphasis on hybrid and wineinspired fermentations — beers like their rosé ale (Alani), a champagne-style India pale ale (part of the rotating series, Nolan the Wanderer), and a pinot noir barrel-aged version of their flagship Belgian-style ale (Pinot Cadence) returning this year in celebration of their fifth anniversary — offer a taste of more to come. The brewery says the future includes bottling some chardonnay variants, conducting deeper research into honey beers, and exploring cocktail-inspired crossovers that blend traditions and styles across a range of Sponsored Content

flavors and drinking traditions. Along with these inspirations, the dedicated brew house allows for kettle sour fermentations, such as a recent strawberry lemonade-inspired collaboration (a fruited Berliner weisse brewed with yuzu and strawberries) with local Georgia beer enthusiasts Beer Guys Radio. “Bringing the community in for collaboration is a key part of that story. We owe a lot to the ideas and inspirations of those around us,” Nix said. The space is not only an opportunity to experiment, but also a chance to dig deeper into the why behind their story. “We’ve always believed that why you drink is as important as what you drink. For us, the community is behind what we do.” In addition to bringing new jobs to the area, Nix said the location also is a chance to breathe life into an ignored piece of downtown. “This speaks to the very heart of Reformation. We are excited to invest in our hometown to revitalize a piece of property that has been empty for years. Woodstock is home, and we couldn’t be prouder to share this piece of our future with our Woodstock neighbors.” For more information about Reformation Brewery, visit reformationbrewery.com. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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"Indivisible"

Canton Connection

From left: Director David Evans, Chaplain Darren Turner, lead actor Justin Bruening and producer Darren Moorman. Photos courtesy of Provident Films and The WTA Group.

Sharing Struggles to Help Others "Indivisible," a movie about Canton native Darren Turner’s Army service and the effects on his marriage, had a run in theaters nationwide this fall. While no longer playing on the big screen, the movie has launched a ministry led by Turner and his wife Heather (www. darrenandheatherturner.com). Although the film will be released on DVD at some point, that information wasn’t available at press time. Keep checking the Turners’ website for updates. In the meantime, Darren answered our questions about his life, and being in the national spotlight.

What is your Cherokee County connection? When did you join the Army?

“I grew up in Canton, and went to Cherokee High School. I also graduated from the University of Georgia and continued to live in Athens for several years. I met my wife in Athens, and we got married and started a family there. After a few years in campus ministry at UGA, 32

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I decided to become an Army chaplain. I joined the Army in 2007, and deployed a few months after my first day of active duty. It was fast. "'Indivisible' is focused on 2007-2008 during that deployment, and several months after returning home from that deployment. That was a long 15-month deployment to Iraq. I have since then deployed multiple times for shorter durations to many different parts of the world. I absolutely love serving soldiers and their families. They have signed up to give their lives, if necessary, for you and me, and it's an incredible privilege to be in their ranks.”

How did the movie come about? How does it feel to see your life portrayed by actors on the big screen? “The movie producer first contacted us in 2011, after he had read some online articles about the deployment, and he also found a blog I kept during the deployment, where I exchanged notes and pictures with Heather and

Actress Sarah Drew, left, portrayed Heather Turner, right.

the kids. He already had an idea in mind to create a faith-based film about a military chaplain, so, when he read our story, and heard further about our marital crisis and recovery after deployment, he was convinced this would make a good movie script. We hesitated initially, thinking our story wasn't unique, or very interesting, but he had a passion to tell this story of crisis and redemption. Once the military gave him the green light to make 'Indivisible,' we agreed to give him permission to use our names and tell this story. It's still surreal to see characters playing us, hearing continues on page 89


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"Indivisible" Woodstock Connection Price on the set of “Indivisible.”

Woodstock Screenwriter Part of National Film Project Woodstock resident Cheryl McKay Price is an author and screenwriter who was part of the “Indivisible” project. We asked her to tell us how she became involved.

in Canton today. Where are you?" I was ecstatic to find he was only about 6 miles away from me in Woodstock. So, we had the opportunity to meet in person. I had a couple of hours to ask them questions about how they met, fell BY CHERYL MCKAY PRICE in love, their favorite memories, what their marriage was Our director and co-writer, David G. Evans, and his wife, like, and becoming parents. And then, of course, we got Esther, heard about Darren and Heather's story, and strongly into the dynamics of what happened during his time in Iraq, felt like it should be a movie. They worked on this heart and after he returned home. I loved getting that firsthand project for years, then found production companies that account. Whenever I work on true stories, I like to bring caught the same vision and were interested as much authenticity to what the true life in partnering with them on making the film. have been through as possible. They What drew me people I was very honored to be brought on board were lovely to meet in person right before to the story by one of those companies that wanted my starting work on their story. help on the female side of the story, and My husband and I relocated here from was that, at what was going on back home with the wives Los Angeles in 2015. We decided we wanted its heart, it and kids. I loved working with David, and his to be closer to family and find a better passion for this family was evident. What quality of life. Unless God should choose to was a "save a drew me to the story was that, at its heart, relocate us, we have found our forever home marriage" story. in Woodstock. I lived in Los Angeles for 15 it was a "save a marriage" story. I had just co-written “Extraordinary” earlier that same years. But I've been truly thankful to be able year, another true life "save a marriage" story. to continue to write movies from here in my What I loved about the Turners’ story is the irony that Darren office at home. I didn't need to stay in California to work in set out to help others with their marriages, yet almost lost the film industry. We also hope to make movies here, too, his own. with a lot of local talent. And, as much as possible, we'd like The week I started the job, I was supposed to have a Skype to keep those in Cherokee County. This is a beautiful place call with Darren and Heather. Darren called me and said, "I'm we have come to love. 34

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AT WORK IN CHEROKEE

Networking Exchange of Information, Ideas Business owners have many opportunities to gather together in Cherokee County. No matter where you live or work, there likely is a group that meets nearby. We’ve compiled a list for easy reference; more business-related networking opportunities can be found on pages 90-91.

Cherokee Chamber of Commerce 3605 Marietta Highway, Canton 770-345-0400 www.cherokeechamber.com

The Circuit Woodstock

Co-Working in Cherokee Is Here to Stay BY ASHLEY VELEZ

Co-working spaces are growing in popularity, especially with the increase in freelance and remote work. While working from home has its benefits, many times people find themselves needing to get out of the house to be in the company of other people. Some coworking spaces have been available to residents of Cherokee County for a while, but more options have opened as the gig economy (a trend toward temporary, flexible work rather than full-time, salaried positions) and rising level of entrepreneurship continue. So, where are some of the best places to co-work? Here are a few that offer free space. Some rent cubicles and office space; contact each location for more details.

Copper Coin

Copper Coin opened its doors in 2011. Originally a coffee bar inside a financial institution, it soon became the meeting place for people in downtown Woodstock, convenient to everything and everyone. Now, on any given day, Copper Coin is full of patrons of all kinds — students, business owners and families. With an expansive list of hot and cold drinks as well as breakfast and lunch options, you can expect to run into someone you know. Copper Coin has a community room that can be reserved for group meetings at an hourly rate. 400 Chambers St., coppercoinwoodstock.com, 470-308-6914.

The Circuit Woodstock

The Circuit is home to startups, entrepreneurs and business owners looking for a collaborative space to create, as well as the official Student Center for students attending Chattahoochee Technical College. With 3,000 square feet of co-working, collaboration and innovation space for students, entrepreneurs and local community members, The Circuit is free, open to the public and offers free WiFi. The Circuit is the first iteration of Fresh Start Cherokee and the 36

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continued on pg 38

Power Hour

A monthly event that’s held 10-11 a.m., offering networking with fellow business owners at the chamber board room. The cost for members is $5, future members are $10 each.

Business After Hours

Held in a different location each month, this gives business owners an afternoon opportunity to meet, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Members $5, future members $10.

Woodstock www.inwdstk.org

YPOW AM

Young Professionals of Woodstock meet 7-8:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Copper Coin. inwdstk.org.

Downtown Buzz

Meets on the last Friday of each month at 8 a.m. Breakfast is served. The event includes a brief presentation that focuses on updates given by greater Woodstock or Cherokee County officials on important issues or services offered that affect the community.

Main Event

Quarterly meeting takes place after business hours in various downtown Woodstock locations.

Small Town Creatives (STC)

STC is for creative professionals (designers and makers), and alternates between a morning event and an evening event every other month. The morning events are on the third Friday and the evening events are on the fourth Tuesday.


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AT WORK IN CHEROKEE

Canton Main Street Mixer

Downtown Canton business owners meet every other month at various businesses. 770-704-1548.

COED @ The Circuit 11 Innovation Way, Woodstock. 770-345-0600 www.cherokeega.org www.facebook.com/cherokeeofficeofeconomicdevelopment

1 Million Cups Cherokee (1MC CHK)

First and third Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m. First Wednesdays are held at The Circuit, third Wednesdays are held in different Cherokee County cities. The free, biweekly coffee gathering helps build startup communities on a grassroots level. Perfect for entrepreneurs looking to practice their pitch skills, gain valuable feedback, or belong to a community.

The Oak House

collaborative partnership between the college, the Cherokee Office of Economic Development and the Woodstock Office of Economic Development. 1 Innovation Way, circuitwoodstock.com, 770-345-0600.

Reformation Brewery

With the opening of their downtown Woodstock space on Elm Street this fall, Reformation’s new upstairs Study Bar area offers plenty of space to host meetings and gatherings, or study. With free Wi-Fi, seasonal craft beer and the recent introduction of nitrobrewed coffee, Reformation brings a new twist to co-working and creating moments together. 105 Elm St., reformationbrewery.com, 678-341-0828.

The Oak House

If you find yourself in downtown Canton, The Oak House is a coworking space with a public coffeehouse that is open to everyone to hold meetings, do work and gather together. They have private membership options as well, but encourage folks to feel free to sit at the tables up front to take advantage of the free WiFi and grab a cup of coffee. 151 E. Marietta St., theoakhouse.com, 678-653-6625.

Thrive CoWorking

Coming to Canton in early 2019. In October, Thrive CoWorking was announced as the second tenant for The Mill on Etowah, near downtown Canton. Thrive CoWorking will join Reformation Brewery (who announced its move just a few weeks prior) in this mixed-use development inside the former Canton Textile Mill No. 1 on Railroad Street. Thrive will offer 12,000 square feet of private office, meeting and open workspaces, focused on the same collaborative and creative design at current Thrive locations. 141 Railroad St., pennhodge.com/property/ the-mill-on-etowah, www.workatthrive.com.

The Lunch Circuit

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. on the second Wednesdays. A monthly exclusive lunch gathering of aspiring and current entrepreneurs to eat, build community and learn the stories behind successful Cherokee entrepreneurs.

Woodstock WordPress Meet-Up

First and third Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Local WordPress developers, designers and publishers get together to share knowledge and experience, and to meet other WordPress users in the area.

Entrepreneurship 101 Book Club

Every other Wednesday, 6:30-7:30 p.m. This new meet-up is a partnership with Creative Muscle Studios.

Creative Problem Solvers Meet-Up

First and third Tuesdays, 7-8:30 a.m. Join an innovative, diverse community of creative problem-solvers, entrepreneurs, “wantrepreneurs” and innovators dedicated to helping one another work through business challenges.

OTP and Greater Cherokee Tech Pros

Every third Thursday, 7:30-8:45 a.m. A gathering of local technology professionals.

Women Entrepreneurs Meet-Up Ashley Velez is the social media director for YPOW and is a digital marketing expert and proud resident of Woodstock, where she lives with her husband Oscar and their two sons. http://atlantaseo.pro.

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Every third Friday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. For aspiring and current female entrepreneurs who want to take action and hold one another accountable for stated goals. NOT a lead exchange or referral networking program.


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#DoYouCU TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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The Importance of HVAC Maintenance BY DAN JAPE

Regular annual HVAC maintenance can extend the life of heating and cooling equipment, effectively driving a higher return on investment. That means you not only get more value from the money you invest in the equipment, but you’ll also receive the maximum life span an HVAC system can allow. Those who don’t service their HVAC systems regularly experience more equipment failures and higher repair costs, along with higher operating costs. An air conditioning system that’s clean and well-maintained operates more efficiently, so you’ll save money on cooling energy costs each month. A system that operates efficiently generates a higher level of home comfort, too. Because residential A/C equipment generally consists of an indoor and outdoor unit, there are several components a technician will check, including the outdoor unit and coil, the indoor air handler and the indoor cooling coil. Servicing the indoor and outdoor units involves: • Comprehensively cleaning the entire A/C system, including cleaning the outdoor condenser coil, motors and heat exchanger. • Inspecting the entire HVAC unit for damage, wear and tear, and signs of failure. • Checking wires, controls and capacitors, and checking all amp draws. • Assessing the overall condition of the compressor, condenser, tubing, heat exchanger, burner and cleaning the condensate drain.

Heating-Specific Tasks

• Checking the heat exchanger for cracks. • Ensuring the gas lines are in good shape and all cutoffs work properly, and do not leak.

Cooling-Specific Tasks

• Checking the unit’s refrigerant charge. If any HVAC refrigerant leaks are noted, the tech will advise you on a proper course of action. • Inspecting and cleaning the condensate pump system. • Checking the indoor and outdoor coils, removing dirt that inhibits heat transfer.

The Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) agrees that homeowners benefit significantly when they regularly schedule service for their HVAC systems. The investment helps you avoid the consequences of neglecting the system, which include higher air conditioner repair costs, premature system failure, higher monthly energy costs and poor comfort in the home.

Dan Jape is the founder of Reliable Heating & Air. He can be reached at 770-594-9969.

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Implant is an Option If Hearing Aids Fail BY DR. SARAH LICHT

When traditional hearing aids are not the answer to hearing loss, a cochlear implant (CI) might be. A hearing aid amplifies everyday sounds, and relies on damaged hair or nerve cells to transmit the sounds to the brain. If there is enough damage to the auditory system, adding more volume through a traditional hearing aid may not provide sufficient benefit. The CI is a device that is placed surgically, and is distinctly different from a hearing aid. It utilizes a unique electrical signal or pulse to help patients hear. Most cochlear implant users have a severe to profound sensorineural or permanent hearing loss. While people using hearing aids may need some time to adjust to the new sounds, cochlear implant recipients can take months, up to a year, to relearn how to hear. It is important to note that, while effective, a CI is not a quick fix. To determine if you are a candidate for a CI, an audiologist will need to assess your hearing history, and test your hearing with and without hearing aids. The testing typically involves listening to sentences and words in a quiet environment with background noise, to determine if the hearing aids are providing enough benefit. It is important for the hearing aids to be powerful enough and verified for your hearing loss, before proceeding with the aided testing. If you are audiologically identified as a candidate for a CI, you must meet with a neurotologist (an ear, nose and throat physician who specializes in the connection between the ear and the brain) to determine if you are medically fit for surgery. Typically, the preoperative workup involves a scan or an X-ray to evaluate the anatomy of your ear. The surgeon will discuss the surgical procedure, and risks involved. The cochlear implant has two components: the external device and the internal electrode array. The internal implant is placed by the neurotologist inside of the snail-shaped structure for hearing called the cochlea. Patients do not hear immediately. It takes about three to four weeks for the incision site to heal, after which patients meet with the audiologist to activate the external processor. The internal and external devices communicate to send sound from the environment into the patient’s auditory system. Once the external processor is programmed or mapped, the journey to better hearing begins. Everyone’s journey is different, and the process of learning to hear takes time. With the right team of neurotologist, audiologist and speech pathologist for aural rehabilitation, outcomes usually are positive.

Sarah Licht, Au.D. is a Doctor of Audiology and provider at North Georgia Audiology in Woodstock. Â She has been practicing since 2016.

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Car Engines Need Regular Cleaning BY DEIDRE PARKER

Everyone knows you need to change your car’s oil, tires and fluids. What you may not realize is that modern cars have new maintenance requirements that will make sure your vehicle is operating at its best. One of the most overlooked maintenance tasks is a fuel delivery system cleaning. While it may sound technical, a fuel delivery system cleaning is a process that removes harmful carbon deposits that, over time, build up on the inside of your engine. Modern engines are engineered with highly precise specifications. Carbon deposits negatively affect how everything performs together, causing serious damage to the internal components of your engine. There are two kinds of engines: port induction engines and gasoline direct injection (GDI). Of all new light-duty vehicles, 38 percent have engines that are gasoline direct injection. While both engines require a fuel delivery system cleaning, the frequency differs because the engines are designed differently. In a conventional port induction engine, air and gasoline are mixed together above the valves and, when the valves open, this mixture is pulled into the engine for combustion. This mix of air and gas washes the valves as it crosses them, and helps to minimize carbon build-up.

However, in a GDI engine, the air and gas do not mix until they are inside the combustion chamber. While the difference is subtle, the effect is pretty dramatic. A GDI engine is more efficient, and can create more power than its port injected counterpart. But, with no washing of the valves taking place, carbon begins to build up on the top side of the valves. Without a fuel delivery system cleaning, this will cause serious engine damage. Carbon also builds up over time on the inside of the combustion chamber, which is why it is recommended to get a fuel delivery system cleaning on port injected engines. The recommendation is to have this service performed on port injected engines every 30,000 to 45,000 miles, and every 15,000 to 20,000 miles on GDI engines. If you are unsure which type of engine your vehicle has, contact a trusted repair facility with people who will take the time to answer your questions and show you what is happening with your vehicle. Staying on top of your vehicle’s maintenance will help prevent costly breakdowns.

Deidre Parker, owner-operator of Chloe's Auto Repair, holds an ASE certification and has extensive experience in the area of automotive repair.

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Why Orthodontists Love Expanders BY DRS. ANDY AND AMBRE KRAGOR

One of the most common orthodontic appliances used with young children is palatal expanders. Palatal expansion widens the upper jaw or palate, guides bite correction, allowing for easier breathing, and can help create space to reduce crowding. Palatal expansion is best done when a child is young, to accommodate the development of the teeth and midpalatal suture, and open nasal passages. This treatment can begin as early as 6 or 7 years old, once the six-year molars have erupted. Expanders take advantage of a child’s natural growth process. The upper jaw develops as separate halves, and these halves do not fuse until after puberty; the upper jaw can be easily manipulated until then. The lower jaw, however, does not have a suture that can be expanded after birth. This suture is fused at birth, so lower jaw expansion typically is not done by an orthodontist.

Benefits of Palatal Expanders. Correct crossbite. In a patient with a narrow palate, the

upper teeth can bite on the inside of the lower teeth, on one side or both sides, which can cause lower jaw displacement and asymmetrical growth into the adult years Widen narrow palates. This allows esthetic improvements in a smile and displays more teeth on the sides of the mouth when smiling.

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Improve breathing. By widening the nasal passage, mouth breathing can be reduced or sleep apnea symptoms can improve, with adjunct therapy with an ear, nose and throat specialist.

Reduce or eliminate dental crowding and/or teeth extractions. By widening the palate, more space is created in

the front of the mouth, to allow more teeth to fit into the jaw. Shorten overall orthodontic treatment time. Early orthodontic treatment often shortens the overall treatment time in a noninvasive way. Eliminate impacted teeth or high canines. Palatal expanders are an easy way to prevent impacted teeth (or teeth under the gums that will not come into the mouth passively, and often require surgery) in a non-invasive, non-surgical way. It is possible for any child to develop bite issues. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends every child be seen by the age of 7 for an orthodontic evaluation. Do not wait until it is too late to help your child.

Dr. Ambre Kragor, and her husband Andy, are orthodontists who practice in the Towne Lake/Woodstock area. 770-485-8827. www.KragorOrtho.com.


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*Offer expires 12/31/2018 and may not be combined with any other discounts or promotions. Dues discount is available for Golf ONE and Associate Golf categories only, is valid for up to 3 months and a 24 month loyalty agreement is required. 24 month loyalty agreement required for social membership offer. 50% off initiation fees apply for 12-month loyalty agreements. Free driving range offer is valid until 3/1/2019. Dues discount and free driving range offers are contingent on Member maintaining his or her membership in good standing. Membership is contingent on successful completion of the Club’s enrollment process. The O.N.E. program and corresponding benefits are subject to certain restrictions and exclusions. Alcohol, service charges and applicable taxes are excluded. Participating clubs subject to change. Benefits are subject to the benefit terms and conditions, which may be found on clubcorpnetwork.com. Other restrictions and exclusions may apply. See Club for details. © ClubCorp USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 42636 1018 EA

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It Isn’t Perfect, But Woodstock Is Home BY LEANA CONWAY

It’s me again, local Woodstock resident Leana Conway, back to chat with you about living in Woodstock. It’s morning and time for walking Daisy, our adorable lab. People constantly ask if she is a service dog. Of course she is! After all, she is cute, cuddly and friendly! If that isn’t a service to the world, I don’t know what is? Dennis walks her every day. No trip is complete without several visits with neighbors, shopkeepers, and other dog friends they have made. It’s so cute. Dennis doesn’t know any of these people’s names. They are: “lady with the black poodle,” “giant wolf-looking dog guy,” or “sausagedog dad.” During Dennis and Daisy’s strolling time, I may take the opportunity to meet a friend for coffee at Copper Coin. Maybe it’s “Treat Yo Self Day” and I’m at Woodstock Hair Salon and Spa getting a mani/pedi, or getting my hair done at Salon and Spa Vanessa. I’m more of an extrovert/ introvert; Dennis is an extrovert/ super extrovert. So, he can enjoy people, while I enjoy reading, writing my blog, a lot of fairly lame poetry, and all things Masterpiece Theater. In the evenings, we may be at a cooking class at The Leaning Ladder, attending an author signing at FoxTale, seeing a play at Elm Street Cultural Arts Center (“Spamalot” had me snort laughing, and I’m loving The Lantern Series), or at one of the many restaurants in town. One of our favorite things to do is pop by Ipps for a drink. The staff (especially the manager Sarah, whom I lovingly refer to as Dennis’ younger wife because she helps out so much with Dennis) is like family. Sometimes, it’s Mayor Donnie Henriques we run into; he doesn’t even mind if we want to talk about handicap accessibility problems that need attention. Jeff Moon, the city manager, and Preston Pooser, director of parks and recreation, also have been outstanding in trying to make Woodstock as accessible as possible. 46

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Leana and Dennis Conway. Photo courtesy of Hello Honey Portraiture.

Also, big props to Reformation Brewery for being extra super and going above ADA requirements at their swanky new digs on Elm Street (we’re hoping it becomes a trend)! Unfortunately, in the five years we have lived here, Dennis’ disease has progressed significantly. I don’t think I’m exaggerating when I say, I don’t know if Dennis would still be with us if we hadn’t made the move to Woodstock. This community has given us a whole new world to explore, new friends to meet and love, and has given us new purpose and passions.

So, when I hear griping about the traffic, the construction, or whatever, I just nod and smile. I smile because, to us, even though this little town isn’t perfect, Woodstock is home, and by the grace of God, both Dennis and I are here to enjoy it! See you around town during this festive time of year. Merry Christmas!

Leana Conway is a full time caregiver, massage therapist and blogger. Leanaconway. wordpress.com.


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Get the Glow I Doctors Heath and Ashley Trowell are launching an array of new services at Governors MedSpa and Concierge Medicine, each designed to help patients Get the Glow in the New Year. New services being offered at Governors MedSpa include: • Miroblading • Eyelash Extensions • Spray Tan organic, with no chemicals • Hair growth with platelet-rich plasma injections • Pain relief through stem cell injections • Bioidentical hormones • Vasectomies • IV Hydration Get the Glow Bundles, Rewards. Governors MedSpa is carrying a new skin care line called Lumivive by Skin Medica, which addresses the damage caused by blue light from computers, cellphones and tablets. “New research shows that we need to be concerned about the radical damage, down to the mitochondrial level, cause by our electronic devices,” Dr. Ashley said. “Studies show that, daily, the average American spends 10 hours exposed to blue light, and checks his or her cellphone 46 times. Blue light causes retinal damage as well as aging the skin.” The Skin Medica line offers reward points: the more you purchase, the more credit you get for future products. Lumivive has a morning (protective) and evening (reparative) serum; the products generate a glow, and a reduction in wrinkles and fine lines, after only eight to 12 weeks. Another “glow bundle” available includes a free bottle of Lumify (makes the eyes whiter) with each purchase of Latisse, an eyelash lengthener. RegiMEN is a kit that’s new for men, and includes a facial gel for shaving and a topical moisturizer that helps with fine lines and wrinkles, and has a sunscreen. Purchases count toward the Brilliant Distinction reward system.

2019 Get the Glow Events For information on events, check www.governorsmedicine.com, and www.facebook.com/GovernorsMedSpa

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In the New Year Concierge Medicine + MedSpa Service The doctors established the Acworth practice in 2017 to provide innovative and personal medical care, as well as the latest in medical spa services, all under one roof.

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EVERYDAY

As 2018 winds down, we’ve been reflecting on a few of our past feature families and wanted to give you an update on their progress and continued needs. Everyday Angels is so grateful to have the medium to share these stories with our readers, who do much more than simply read: you act. We could not make a difference without you!

Savannah Donley

Savannah and the Donley family have experienced a challenging year. Savannah became very ill in May and was given a 50 percent chance of survival. Her parents put everything on hold to save her life, spending 78 days in hospital and rehabilitation facilities until she was able to return home. Savannah continues her hard work and therapies to get back where she was, but it will take time and funding. The Donleys are thankful for the support and love of our community. “We are so ready to be back on the giving side of life, but it sure has been humbling to be on the receiving end. We are so thankful,” Michele Donley said.

Howard Family

In May, Justin Howard, 35, husband and father of two, experienced a right occipital stroke caused by a malformation of his heart. Consequently, he was unable to work, and the family was forced to sell their home. Today, Justin is back at work and Rebecca is working with a steady income. “The support of our community is absolutely the reason why we are still able to live in our home after the personal struggles we experienced. We could not have survived this without the overwhelming support and kindness from you and our donors through Everyday Angels. We are blown away by the unbelievable outreach and love from people in our community that we've likely never even met. We feel so blessed and cared for and wish we could personally thank each one of them,” Justin’s wife, Rebecca, said.

Rui z Family

In October, fire destroyed the Hidden Falls home of the Ruiz family. The family of five has been living with their grandfather until their new home is ready. Our generous community has offered furniture and household items to assist them, but more help is needed. While they have found a home in their neighborhood, it requires 4-6 weeks of extensive repair work to make it livable. They must come up with unbudgeted deposits as well as household items. 50

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Everyday Angels is a 501(c)3 nonprofit serving Cherokee County since 2000. To make a tax deductible donation, visit www.everydayangels.info to donate via Paypal or send your donations to: Everyday Angels, PMB 380, 1025 Rose Creek Drive, Suite 620, Woodstock GA, 30189. One hundred percent of your funds will go to the family you specify. If you know of a special need in your community, e-mail aaeverydayangels@gmail.com


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Bathroom Updates That Are on Trend • Paint colors. White and gray are the

BY ELISABETH STUBBS

top bathroom choices, followed by blue.

Thinking about updating your bathroom, and wondering about the latest trends? Bathrooms are looking more natural, and feeling more comfortable. Vanities are being made to look more like furniture. Wainscoting is gaining popularity in the bathroom, as are clever storage niches, tucked into the wall between the studs. Quartz countertops with undermount sinks are stylish, and matte tiles — not glossy — that look like stone or wood, with minimal grout lines, continue to be popular.

• Large, walk-in showers with a

seat or bench are very desirable. They can have a rain shower head that is mounted into the ceiling over the center of the shower. They also may include multiple body jets spaced along each side wall.

• A spa-like atmosphere. A

freestanding or soaking tub will help create a spa-themed bathroom. One factor to consider when choosing a freestanding tub for your spa bathroom is that this type of bathtub is about five to 10 times more expensive than a traditional tub, once the plumbing is factored in. If you have a larger budget, consider a steam shower.

Other important details to remember when updating a bathroom include:

• Large tiles. The traditional 4-inch x 4-inch bathroom tiles rarely are used anymore. Look for tiles that measure at least 18 inches x 18 inches. Rectangular shapes (for example 12 inches x 24 inches) are popular choices for, not only the floor, but the walls as well — sometimes installed vertically, sometimes horizontally. And texture, texture, texture is very much on trend.

• Vanities. Larger vanities with double sinks or one extra long trough sink are in vogue. A standard double vanity is 60 inches long; however, more people are making space for a 72-inch (or longer!) vanity. If you're willing to spend a little extra for custom work, you can have any length (and shape) you want.

• Toilets. If you have to share your bathroom retreat, you may want a toilet that is separated by a half-wall, or is located in its own room. High tech toilets also are available. • Lighting. Today’s lighting options include chandeliers, instead of standard overhead light fixtures, wall sconces, recessed lighting with dimmer switches, and an overhead light source in the shower. • Storage space. Make sure to

include plenty of cabinet space and open shelving in your bathroom renovation. You also can maximize space by using barn doors.

• Fixtures. Choose plumbing fixtures

that are practical as well as beautiful. Brushed nickel, chrome and satin nickel fixtures blend with almost any type of decorating style and are subdued enough to avoid drawing attention. One trend to watch for is rose gold finish.

Elisabeth Stubbs is one of the owners of Enhance Floors and More, one of Atlanta’s top-rated flooring dealers, located in Marietta.

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105 Arnold Mill Park Woodstock, GA 30188

770-516-2654 @gaallstars www.ga-allstars.com

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

The business. •Georgia All-Star Gymnastics offers programs for all ages and skill levels, whether

your child is starting out in gymnastics, wants to work on tumbling or is interested in competition. The programs are designed to help students develop the skills they need to take them where they want to go. Programs include pre-k classes, girls’ gymnastics, Ninja (with a fully customized obstacle course), tumbling classes, competitive team, birthday parties, parents night out, toddler open plan, summer day camp, Krav Maga and silks, and trapeze.

The difference. •Georgia All-Star Gymnastics has been in business for nearly 25 years in the

Woodstock area, offering many programs in a facility that accommodates children of all ages and skill levels, and providing a positive and memorable experience. The staff is a group of trained professionals who use proper progressions and fundamental skills to equip athletes with the ability to progress and reach their personal goals and potential. The philosophy is to use the sport of gymnastics to help each child gain self-confidence, a positive attitude and build a stronger work ethic.

• The customers.

“This place is awesome, my daughter is having a blast. She begged to take gymnastics, and I am so glad I let her try it. Everyone here is very nice and professional, the gym is huge with lots of equipment and space. There is a nice big lobby and viewing area for the spectators.” - Kathy Williams “I don't know much about gymnastics, but my daughter loves her classes and I am enjoying watching her learn something new. Her teacher is very enthusiastic, encouraging and keeps my daughter excited about coming to class each week. That's about as good as it gets.” - Claire Houghton

Towne Lake Business Association Members of the Towne Lake Business Association would like to wish everyone a wonderful holiday season and a happy, successful new year! There is a lot to celebrate in December between the holidays and time with family and friends. It is also a time to reflect on business and personal accomplishments as well as looking forward to new goals to achieve in the coming year. We are grateful for our Towne Lake community. Without your help reaching our goal of raising scholarship funds for local high school seniors would not be possible. The TLBA would like to thank you for your continued support. We invite you to join us for our annual Christmas Party that will replace this month’s lunch ’n ’learn. PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY WHO: Everyone is welcome! WHEN: Dec. 11, 6 - 9 pm WHERE: The Tavern at Towne Lake Hills East COST: None! REGISTER AT: https://tlbachristmasparty2018.eventbrite.com Thank you for supporting our community by “Keeping Towne Lake dollars in Cherokee” www.tlba.org 54

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

TLBA SPOTLIGHT Charlie Currie is an adviser with TimeWise Financial, LLC, a local firm that helps clients with comprehensive financial planning based on the eight wealth management issues. Currie is a certified financial planner and enrolled agent. Individuals and families who don’t know where to begin can bring information about their 401(k)s, 4013(b)s, IRAs, insurance policies, and other investment vehicles, to TimeWise Financial advisers, who will work with clients to help put the pieces together and help them create a retirement income stream. Charles H. Currie III, registered representative, securities offered through HD Vest Investment Charlie Currie Services®, Member FINRA/SIPC, advisory services offered through HD Vest Advisory Services®, insurance services offered through HD Vest Insurance Agency LLC. 6333 N. State Highway 161, Fourth Floor, Irving, Texas, 75038, 972-870-6000. TimeWise Financial, LLC is not a registered broker/dealer or registered investment advisory firm.


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55


Tolerate the Turbulence DON AKRIDGE, MBA, CFP®, CPA/PFS U.S. MARINE CORPS VETERAN – EMORY UNIVERSITY ALUMNUS

Volatility always will be around on Wall Street, and, as you invest for the long term, you must learn to tolerate it. Rocky moments, fortunately, are not the norm. Look beyond this moment and stay focused on your long-term objectives.

Since the end of World War II, there have been dozens of Wall Street shocks. Wall Street has seen 56 pullbacks (retreats

of 5 percent to 9.99 percent) in the past 73 years; the S&P index dipped 6.9 percent in this last one. On average, the benchmark fully rebounded from these pullbacks within two months. The S&P also has seen 22 corrections (descents of 10 percent to 19.99 percent) and 12 bear markets (falls of 20 percent or more) in the post-WWII era.1 Even with all those setbacks, the S&P has grown exponentially larger. During the month World War II ended (September, 1945), its closing price hovered around 16. At this writing, it is above 2,750. Those two numbers communicate the value of staying invested for the long run.2 This current bull market has witnessed five corrections, and nearly a sixth (a 9.8 percent pullback in 2011, a year that also saw a 19.4 percent correction). It has risen roughly 335 percent since its beginning, even with those stumbles. Investors who stayed in equities through those downturns watched the major indices soar to all-time highs.1

As all this history shows, waiting out the shocks may be highly worthwhile. The alternative is trying to time the market.

That can be a fool’s errand. To succeed at market timing, investors have to be right twice, which is a tall order. Instead of selling in response to paper losses, perhaps they should respond to the fear of missing out on great gains during a recovery, and hang on through the choppiness. After all, volatility creates buying opportunities. Shares of quality companies suddenly are available at a discount. Investors

effectively pay a lower average cost per share to obtain them.

Bad market days shock us because they are uncommon. If pullbacks or corrections occurred regularly, they would discourage many of us from investing in equities; we would look elsewhere to try and build wealth. A decade ago, in the middle of the terrible 2007-09 bear market, some investors convinced themselves that bad days were becoming the new normal. History proved them wrong. As you ride out this current outbreak of volatility, keep two things in mind. One, your time horizon. You are investing

for goals that may be five, 10, 20 or 30 years in the future. One bad market week, month or year is but a blip on that timeline, and is unlikely to have a severe impact on your long-run asset accumulation strategy. Two, remember that there have been more good days on Wall Street than bad ones. The S&P 500 rose in 53.7 percent of its trading sessions during the years 1950-2017, and it advanced in 68 of the 92 years ending in 2017.3, 4

Sudden volatility should not lead you to exit the market.

If you react anxiously and move out of equities in response to short-term downturns, you may impede your progress toward your long-term goals. Securities offered through registered representatives of Cambridge Investment Research Inc., a broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors Inc., a registered investment adviser. Cambridge is not affiliated with and does not endorse the opinions or services of Peter Montoya Inc. or MarketingPro Inc. continues on page 89 Don Akridge is president of Citadel Professional Services, LLC, an independent firm, founded in 1994 and conveniently located off Chastain Road between I-575 & I-75 in Kennesaw. 770-952-6707.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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TheLodgeatBridgeMill.com Facebook.com/TheLodgeatBridgeMill TOWNELAKER | December 2018

57


A Guardian Spirit, a Gift for All BY ANN LITREL

ART BY ANN LITREL, ANNLITREL.COM

I climb into John Trussell’s old truck. On the floor at my feet is a pile of what looks like misshapen rocks. “This is a fossilized whale vertebrae.” John reaches a long arm over to pick up one of the lumps and hands it to me. Hmmm. It does look like a huge vertebra. He puts the truck in gear and we’re off. John narrates along the way. “Where we’re going, we’ll find sea fossils from around 100 million years ago, when half of Georgia was under the ocean.” I have to interject here that we are currently nowhere near the ocean. We are smack in middle Georgia, just south of Macon. I’m here to see Oaky Woods Wildlife Management Area, a 13,000-acre wilderness labelled one of “35 Natural Wonders of Georgia.” Trussell, a retired law enforcement officer and longtime outdoor enthusiast, has worked for 25 years to raise awareness of this place. Silver haired, tall and energetic, he doesn’t project “retired.” When I emailed to say I wanted to paint Oaky Woods, he immediately offered a tour. If there is such a thing as a guardian spirit of a place, John Trussell is that for Oaky Woods. Born and raised here, he became a champion for its preservation in the 1980s. Later, forging a partnership of locals, politicians and conservationists, he spearheaded the Save Oaky Woods campaign that eventually led

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Oaky Woods Wildlife Management Area is one of the "35 Natural Wonders of Gerogia."

to the states’ land purchase in 2010, permanently creating the Oaky Woods Wildlife Management Area. To visit Oaky Woods is to walk through 100 million years of natural history. Embedded in its 13,000 acres are treasures found together nowhere else on earth: pockets of rare blackland prairie with its unique wildflowers; crumbling bluffs of ancient sea fossils from the earth’s Cretaceous period, and the largest black bear population between the Blue Ridge Mountains and Okefenokee Swamp. Wildlife biologists estimate there are more than 300 black bears living in Oaky Woods. Trussell seems to know every nook. We hike to the ocean fossil beds among the pines and find in almost every rock the impression of a mollusk, the fossil of a sand dollar. Farther on are the remains of a century-old still, its huge vat ruined in an explosion, the lid landing across the stream. We stop beside the water to inspect the animal tracks and to stand inside Old Sequoia, a pine with a hollow large enough to hold a man. Trussell says he has given this tour perhaps hundreds of times – Cub Scouts, hiking clubs, conservation groups. Finally, we emerge into the blackland prairie. Blooming under the sun are acres of goldenrod, blue aster, and – miraculously – billowing pink clouds of

native grass in full bloom. I have never seen this in the wild. Driving out, we climb the 100-foot tall historic fire tower, where rangers once kept watch during the fire season. From the top we can see miles of forest all around. Trussell relates one last story, about a group who called him from the Flint River Area. “‘We want you to lead our effort to save this place, like you did Oaky Woods.’ I told them I could give them pointers – but the effort can’t come from an outsider. That’s your place – I can tell you how to do it, but it needs to be you.” He says that many, many people worked to save this piece of Middle Georgia for posterity. But I have no doubt that this gift to Georgia – her people, her wild creatures - would not have happened without the love and efforts of this one man, John Trussell - Oaky Woods’ guardian spirit. Resource: Visit or read more about this unique Georgia treasure in the book “Saving Oaky Woods” by John Trussell. Ann Litrel is an artist, writer, and certified Master Naturalist. She works in her studio, Ann Litrel Art, in Towne Lake. She lives with her husband, Dr. Michael Litrel. Email her at ann@annlitrel.com.


TOWNELAKER | December 2018

59


Playing the Long Game PROVIDED BY CHEROKEE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Community doesn’t happen overnight. Community, and all its facets, by nature takes time. It requires listening, trusting and building, and then listening some more. Cultivating community takes a willingness to be in it for the long game. Founded 187 years ago, Cherokee long has been a community of innovators, entrepreneurs and creatives starting from scratch: digging for treasure, grinding out plans and hatching bold dreams. How did they do it? They listened, they trusted and they built. The film industry is no exception. Ten years ago, our state leadership determined that, in order to play host to the film production industry, bold changes were necessary. Both sides of the aisle worked together to create the Georgia Entertainment Industry Investment Act of 2008 that skyrocketed Georgia’s film industry. Listening to the needs of the newly thriving industry, the Georgia Film, Music and Digital Entertainment Office launched the Camera Ready Program in 2011 — a statewide initiative that entrusted an appointed county liaison with the responsibility of assisting visiting film teams with locations and permitting. Since adopting this program in 2012, Cherokee has served as the backdrop for more than 100 film projects. From the northern mountain vistas seen from the Salacoa Valley to the urban vibe of Woodstock, Cherokee has a vast array of natural features, architectural styles and charming cities frequently considered — and chosen — for filming. We frequently hear that teams love filming in Cherokee. Due to forethought and planning, our cities, county and public safety agencies work together seamlessly to permit and assist film teams. Scouts recognize this as unique and, over time, our reputation for listening to needs, established trustworthiness and ability to build relationships has won us many return projects. Our community does an excellent job of playing the charming host, but our intrigue goes far beyond our hospitality and beauty. We are not one-note players, forever typecast to only play that background role … no, indeed. Cherokee is not just the host for film. It is the home. 60

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

A wide variety of film industry professionals live and work in our community. Some, like Cheryl McKay Price (screenplay writer, “Indivisible”), relocated here from California. Others, like Judd Brannon (director, “Champion”) grew up close by and, for them, staying here just made sense. Entrepreneurs like Irina Hall and Greg Patten (storytellers, Creative Muscle Studios) became members of The Circuit, because our community is a great place for a business to start up. In each case, these folks are in Cherokee by choice. Cherokee is a dynamic community of creatives and innovators, film industry professionals and enthusiasts, extras and leads, and property owners willing to allow filming, with business owners and service providers ready to support and invest. And all are living in a county known for its deft ability to host film. The players are here. It’s time to connect them.


Above, director of photography Wes Llewellyn, director Judd Brannon and camera operator Pritchett Cotten setting a shot for the movie "Champion," as the crew (left) prepares for an exterior scene.

The next big move for Georgia’s film industry is to create more original content, and Cherokee’s next big move is to build relationships with the creatives who call Cherokee home. It is with that in mind that COED has organized the first annual Cherokee Film Summit to be held Jan. 24. The Summit is designed to cultivate our film community by bringing business partners, film industry professionals and local creatives together to create meaningful connections. In partnership with our presenting sponsor, the Yanmar EVO//Center in southwest Cherokee, this power-packed event will feature networking, break-out sessions, speakers and panels, as we showcase successes and opportunities for business and film in Cherokee. It will be an opportunity for listening to our neighbors, trusting our instincts and building relationships that will enable us to make our next big move — after all, isn’t that what community is all about? Somebody should make a film about that.

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To purchase your tickets to the first Cherokee Film Summit, visit the Filming in Cherokee page on our website at cherokeega.org, or contact Molly Mercer, film project manager for the Cherokee Office of Economic Development, for more information at 770.345.0600 or mmercer@ cherokeega.org. The Summit is open to film professionals, community business and property owners, creatives, college students and film enthusiasts age 18 and up.

The Cherokee Office of Economic Development is the leading organization for business and film recruitment and industry retention & expansion. For more information, visit www.cherokeega.org. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

61


Put On Your Party Face BY JAMES HALEY, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

Holiday parties are here. Yes, it’s great to see friends and family, but it can be exhausting and sometimes downright stressful. Whether you’re getting ready for family photos, the annual work party or a neighborhood get-together, a quick cosmetic treatment with Botox and fillers might be the best gift you could give yourself this holiday season.

Three reasons to consider a holiday pick-me-up. 1. Erase crow’s feet and frown lines.

Those pesky lines between your brows, or those little wrinkles at the corners of your eyes, are your badge of honor for living life to the fullest. But, sometimes you might want them to be less noticeable. One treatment of Botox can help smooth those lines. Botox is one of the most extensively studied esthetic treatments, used for facial injections to freeze muscles so they can no longer form habitual lines and wrinkles. The most amazing benefit of Botox is that facial lines and tell-tale signs of age are wiped away.

treatment will restore plumpness and fullness for the look of your more youthful face.

3. Chase away the holiday blues.

One of the most surprising effects of Botox has emerged from several recently published studies: the potential to relieve some depression (and not just because you look better). Studies performed in Hanover Medical School in Germany in 2012 found that Botox injections in facial muscles involved with emotion eased the symptoms of depression. There appears to be a link between the emotions expressed by the face and the brain, a feedback cycle transmitted through the nerves. When Botox is injected into facial muscles, frown lines are not able to physically form. Our brains interpret the feedback from our facial nerves as more positive feelings. Three small subsequent studies from a researcher at Georgetown University appeared to confirm these findings. Whatever your reasons this season, Botox and dermal fillers can help refresh you for the holidays.

2. Restore plumpness and fullness to your face.

As we age, fat may accumulate on the body, but it actually diminishes in certain areas such as the face, neck and shoulders. Dermal fillers help restore plumpness and lost fullness to relieve facial “furrows.” A filler is an injectable, FDA-approved substance designed to take the place of lost fat beneath the skin. A single filler

James Haley, M.D. is a double board certified OB/GYN and urogynecologist with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists. www.cherokeewomenshealth.com.

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Avoiding Stress and Enjoying the Holidays Don’t try to do too much.

BY AMBER YORK, DC

This is the time of year when many people suffer from increased stress and emotional demands. Studies have shown that as many as 38 percent of people are inclined to have an increase in stress and depression around the holidays. For many, the holidays can be a hectic time of celebrations, meal prep, decorating, added financial burden. When added to stress from work and family, the hype and commercialism of the season are sure to cause an increase in stress. It’s easy to see how physical stress, such as falling, lifting or repeated motions, can cause damage to the spine and nervous system. On the other hand, it can be hard to see how chemical and emotional stresses can have a similar effect. We can connect the link between emotional stress and ulcers, heart disease and headaches, but what about the spine? Similar to physical stress, emotional stress can result in spinal misalignment (subluxation), along with muscle tension and nerve impacts, turning your holiday season into a literal pain in the neck. What can you do this season to help bear the burden of the holidays and keep yourself healthy?

Keep your expectations balanced.

Things are not going to be perfect and you can’t worry about those that are out of your control.

Learn to say no and delegate responsibilities as much as possible, leaving you with more energy to spend quality time with friends and family.

Don’t overspend.

There is so much pressure to get the newest and fanciest everything. Set a budget and stick to it. In the end, it is always about your presence, not the presents.

Maintain your health.

Get plenty of sunshine and fresh air, maintain a balanced diet and exercise. These things are crucial this time of year. The increase in fats and sweets from holiday parties and meals can leave you feeling more stressed out and run down. Take time for a family walk before or after festivities. It can help boost your mood. And, as always, keep your spine aligned by making time for regular chiropractic adjustments.

Dr. Amber York is a Life University graduate specializing in low force adjusting at Towne Lake Family Chiropractic.

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Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes With These Tips BY DR. SYED W. RIZVI

Maintaining a healthy weight, eating healthy, and physical activity often are associated with a healthy lifestyle, but these are also the recommendations to help ward off Type 2 diabetes — the most common. More than 29 million U.S. adults have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of those affected, 25 percent, or one in four, doesn’t even know they have diabetes. If left unmanaged, diabetes could lead to complications such as kidney disease, lower limb amputations, adult-onset blindness, and heart disease and stroke. In addition, 86 million U.S. adults have prediabetes and 90 percent are unaware. Prediabetes is a condition where insulin produced in the body is no longer used effectively, leading to slightly elevated blood glucose levels. The risk of complications associated with diabetes is thought to begin in prediabetes. When people with prediabetes participate in healthy lifestyle changes, they tend to reduce their chance of developing Type 2 diabetes by as much as 60 percent. Healthy eating involves consuming nutritious food choices and appropriatesized portions to improve your overall health.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Studies show that regular physical activity provides a variety of health benefits, and may prevent or delay prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes. It’s recommended that physical activity is increased gradually with a moderateintensity activity such as walking. The recommended minimal physical activity is 30 minutes five times a week. A weight loss of as little as 7 percent of body weight may prevent or delay the development of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes.

The combination of healthy eating and increased physical activity will promote naturally a gradual weight loss to help prevent diabetes. Healthy lifestyle goals constantly evolve and change. It’s important to identify barriers that potentially may delay achievement of your goals. Resources such as the YMCA, local gyms, weight loss programs, diabetes education programs and your health care professionals are available to navigate you toward achievement of your long-term goals.

Dr. Syed W. Rizvi provides preventive, acute and chronic illness care to adult and adolescent patients at Newtown Medical Associates. 3400 Old Milton Parkway, Building A, Alpharetta. 770-740-8550. www.newtownmed.com.


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TOWNE LAKE AREA DINING CUISINE

BKFST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAYS SPIRITS RESERV.

Cancun Mexican Grill, 4430 Towne Lake Parkway 770-693-4680

Mexican

no

$

$

open

full bar

no

Cheeseburger Bobby’s, 2295 Towne Lake Parkway 678-494-3200, cheeseburgerbobbys.com

American

no

$

$

open

no

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

American Irish

no

$

$$

open

full bar

6+

Mexican

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Family Tradition, 4379 Towne Lake Parkway 770-852-2885, familytradition.net

Homestyle Cooking

$$

$$

$$

closed

no

no

GameDay Fresh Grill, 2990 Eagle Drive 770-693-6754, gamedayfresh.com

American/Burgers

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Thai/Sushi/ Chinese

no

$

$$

open

full bar

no

JD’s Barbeque, 6557 Bells Ferry Road 678-445-7730, jdsbbq.com

Barbeque

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Jersey’s Sports Bar, 6426 Bells Ferry Road 770-790-5740

American

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Johnny’s Pizza, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-9494, johnnyspizza.com

Pizza/Pasta/ Salad

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Kani House, 2455 Towne Lake Parkway 770-592-5264, kanihouse.com

Japanese Steak/Sushi

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

yes

Sunday $$ $$-$$$ open full bar Brunch

no

China Fun, 1075 Buckhead Crossing 770-926-2671, chinafun88.com Donovan’s Irish Cobbler, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-693-8763, donovansirishcobbler.com El Ranchero, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-516-6616

Izumi Asian Bistro, 2035 Towne Lake Parkway 678-238-1899, iloveizumi.com

Keegan’s Public House, 1085 Buckhead Crossing #140 Irish/Pub 770-627-4393, keegansirishpub.net La Parrilla, 1065 Buckhead Crossing 770-928-3606, laparrilla.com

Mexican

no

$

$$

open

full bar

LongHorn, 1420 Towne Lake Parkway Steakhouse no $ $$ open full bar 770-924-5494, longhornsteakhouse.com Maple Street Biscuit Co., 2295 Towne Lake Pkwy #160 678-903-2161, maplestreetbiscuits.com

no call ahead seating

Southern

$

$

no

closed

no

no

Mellow Mushroom, 2370 Towne Lake Parkway 770-591-3331, mellowmushroom.com

Pizza/Pasta

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

NY Style Deli & Pizza, 2340 Towne Lake Parkway 678-426-7004

Pizza/Subs/ Bakery

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

no

no

Bakery/Soups/ Sandwiches

$

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Chinese/Japanese

no

$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Panera Bread, 2625 Towne Lake Parkway 678-813-4809, panerabread.com Peking & Tokyo, 200 Parkbrooke Drive 770-591-8858, pekingandtokyo.com Song’s Garden, 4451 Towne Lake Parkway 770-928-8387, songsgarden.com

Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills Drive American Sunday $ $$ open full bar no see ad on pg 35 770-592-9969 Brunch The Place, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-8901, theplacebargrill.com

Bar/Grill

no

$-$$

$$

open

full bar

no

Tuscany, 250 Cinema View Drive 678-453-0888, mytuscanyrestaurant.com

Italian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

10+

Volcano Steak & Sushi, 2990 Eagle Drive 678-498-7888, volcanowoodstock.com

Asian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

no

full bar

yes

WOW Pho & Grill, 6422 Bells Ferry Rd Vietnamese no $-$$ $-$$ open 678-383-6099, wowpho.com

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

coming soon

$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

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ASK YOUR WELLSTAR PHYSICIAN ABOUT THE MAYO CLINIC CARE NETWORK. WellStar is the first health system in Georgia to become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network.

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Helping Elders During the Holidays BY SHELLEY WINTER

The holiday season is a time to give back to others, and often our seniors can benefit from a little help. Older family members may feel overwhelmed with the festivities. Physical limitations can put a damper on their ability to get everything done. When donating toys or food to those in need, remember our seniors, who may experience loneliness and isolation. Memories of past holidays and family members who no longer are around can compound these feelings. It’s important to remember what the holiday season truly is about. Simplify some of your holiday preparations and look for ways to help our elders. • When making a holiday shopping list, add a few older adults in need. Some seniors live alone and care for themselves. A sweet little gift of lotion or socks can mean a lot. • Look at family photos, watch holiday movies, listen to seasonal music or cook together. Perhaps you can go for a car ride to see holiday lights or go window shopping to see the festive displays. • Set up their Christmas tree or add decorative holiday touches to the house. Many seniors enjoy reflecting on past holidays as they unpack cherished decorations. • Invite them for a walk around the block, if weather permits. If the weather is not cooperating, drive to the mall and walk a few laps while window-shopping.

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• Offer a ride for a shopping trip. Some seniors no longer drive, and can’t easily get to the store. • If older relatives are visiting your home for the holidays, declutter and remove items that possibly could cause a fall, such as an area rug. If possible, consider having your relative sleep on the first floor of your home, and in a room close to the bathroom. Use nightlights in the hallway. • Anticipate the fact that they may need a break from all the activity. Offer a quiet room where they can nap or relax for a little while, or perhaps have a one-on-one conversation with a family member. • Seniors want to feel purposeful. Even elders with physical limitations can be given simple tasks such as peeling vegetables or placing napkins on the table. Use one of their favorite recipes, and let them supervise the preparation. • For those of us who know seniors who are alone, invite them over for a meal. We all have older family members and neighbors in our lives. Remember, it’s the thought that counts. Let’s make sure everyone has a joyous holiday season!

Shelley Winter, community relations director at Oaks at Towne Lake, has worked in assisted living/memory care communities since 2008. 770-592-2195. shelley@oaksseniorliving.com.


Silver Roamers

Cherokee Recreation and Parks 7545 Main St., Woodstock 770-924-7768 • www.crpa.net For a $24 yearly fee, the Silver Roamers can attend monthly gatherings and discuss upcoming events. Members get discounts on trips and events, and win prizes through the Roamers Mileage Club. Non-members can take part in day and overnight excursions, but the cost is a little more. Most trips are handicap accessible. Monthly meetings are held at 11 a.m. on the first Mondays at the recreation center community room. Contact Frankie Sanders with questions.

Wednesdays through Dec. 26

Never Roam Alone Water Club meets 2-3 p.m. at the Cherokee County Aquatic Center. A time to stay active and healthy, socialize and have fun. Free for members only.

Dec. 12

Bees Knees Cooking Class includes cost of the food.

At 10:30 a.m. at the recreation center community room/ kitchen. $25 members, $35 nonmembers.

Dec. 18

The Cottage on Main/Payne Corley House Tour. Leaving 8 a.m. from the recreation center, 8:30 a.m. from the boys and girls club. $45 members, $55 nonmembers.

Dec. 20

Mercedes Benz/Mollie B’s includes admission, guided tour and food. Leaving 8 a.m. from the boys and girls club, 9:30 a.m. recreation center. $60 members, $70 nonmembers.

Jan. 17

The Fox Theatre Tour/The Varsity includes admission, a

guided tour and food. Leaves 9 a.m. from the boys and girls club, 9:30 a.m. from the recreation center. $35 members, $45 nonmembers.

Jan. 31

William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum/For All Occasions Catering leaves 8 a.m. from the boys and girls

club, 8:30 a.m. from the recreation center. $45 members, $55 nonmembers.

Feb. 7

Center for Puppetry Arts includes guided tour and lunch. Leaves 8 a.m. from the boys and girls club, 8:30 a.m. from the recreation center. $40 members, $50 nonmembers.

Feb. 28

Mystery Trip, departure times to be determined. $60 members, $70 nonmembers.

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Around & About DECEMBER Afternoon Out 1, 22 isMom’s 1-5 p.m. at the Cherokee

County Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. $15 early registration, $20 late registration. Kids will have fun playing, eating pizza, making crafts and watching a movie. www.crpa.net.

Parent’s Night Out 5:30-10 7, 21 p.m. at the Cherokee County

Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. For ages 5 and older. $15 early registration per child, $20 late registration. Includes pool games, crafts, pizza and a movie. www.crpa.net.

3 softball

Registration begins for spring youth at the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency; registration ends Feb. 1. Opening day is March 16. For details on cost, location, player assessments, contact Sammy Long at 770-924-7768 or slong@ cherokeega.com.

Registration opens for spring youth lacrosse through the Cherokee Recreation

and Parks Agency. First week of practice is Feb. 4; first games in late February/early March. Contact Bill Firnbach at bfirnbach@ cherokeega.com for details.

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begins at 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church Woodstock. Other artists performing include Mark Lowry, The Martins, The Nelons, Lynda Randle and Angela Primm. www.fbcw.org.

Splash Camp 26-28 atSplish the Cherokee County

Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. Participants must be able to swim 25 yards unassisted. $105 persession fee includes field trips, games and swim lessons. www.crpa.net.

seminar at 10 a.m. at 1 Gardener’s the senior center at 1001 Univeter

Road, Canton. Presented by the UGA master gardener extension volunteers. Make a holiday wreath from natural materials found in your yard. Bring some supplies. Class size limited. Call 770-721-7803 or email uge1057@uga.edu to register.

Gaither and The Gaither 14 Bill Vocal Band Homecoming

in Unity Praise and 30 Power Worship Service at 6 p.m.

Across America will place 12 Wreaths wreaths at the Georgia National

Ceremony; a prayer will be offered at 11 a.m. and a short program begins at noon at the assembly area. The speaker is American Legionnaire Jim Lindenmayer, director of the Cherokee County Homeless Veterans. The objectives are to remember our fallen U.S. veterans, honor those who serve, and teach children the value of freedom. Numerous youth groups, scouts, young Marines, Civil Air Patrol, and ROTC assist in unloading and unpacking wreaths and provide support. Contributions for the live wreaths can be made at http://ganationalcemetery.org.

at the Historic Canton Theatre. The countywide, multi-church service will feature a combined worship team and choir as well as a featured guest speaker, testimonies and communion. A ministry of Concerned Clergy of Cherokee County (C4), these services have been held on the fifth Sunday of each quarter at various locations since July 2017. Pastor Mike Saunders at 404-483-2515 or concernedclergyofcherokee@gmail.com.

31 softball

Registration begins for adult spring and adult spring flag football through the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency. Softball and football at Hobgood Park. cthomas@cherokeega.com.


You Won’t Find Rectangle Pizza in Our Schools BY BARBARA P. JACOBY

My memories of school lunch in the ’80s and ’90s include rectangle pizza, fries and applesauce: not a lot of choices, and probably not the best nutritional value. I certainly never tried kale at school. Fast-forward to today and our school district’s cafeterias: What a positive difference! Every day, students choose from a selection of lunch entrées – more than 30 each month – which always includes a fresh meal-size salad, a fruit, cheese and yogurt plate, and a PBJ or SunButter sandwich. Each entrée is paired with several sides of fruits or vegetables that include sliced oranges, kale-and-apple salad (with homemade vinaigrette), grapes, and baby carrots. Breakfast menus are stacked with healthy choices, too, and at both meals, there’s a choice of low-fat milks and 100 percent fruit juices. It’s equally impressive that these menus meet challenging federal guidelines to ensure nutrition and controlled sugar, salt and fat levels, and the cost to students is kept low: $1.50 for breakfast; and for lunch, $2.35 for elementary, $2.60 for middle and high schools. (If you’re struggling financially, please apply for our free or reduced-price meals. This program is here to help you and your family through challenges.) For the past three years, our school nutrition program has earned state and USDA recognition – including top platinum awards - for its outstanding commitment to the farm-to-school movement, using locally and Georgia-grown fresh ingredients

(some harvested from school gardens), and teaching students about where their food comes from and making healthy choices. Of course, we still serve favorites like pizza and chicken nuggets, but we use the same brands you may use at home, like Gold Kist chicken, and we serve pizza by the slice (triangleshaped!) and personal pan pizzas. We teach children about a balanced diet, and we hope parents do their part at home. Ultimately, it’s up to each of us, as parents, to teach our children about healthy choices. We’ve created a brief “Welcome to Your School Cafeteria” video, available on our school district’s YouTube channel, to give students and parents a better understanding of how our cafeterias work and the choices offered. You also can find a video about our farm-to-school program and a Thanksgiving video about the homemade recipes we make year-round in our kitchens. P.S. The price for visitors is $1.75 for breakfast and $4 for lunch. Why not make plans to share lunch with your child? And try the kale salad!

Barbara P. Jacoby serves as chief communications officer for the Cherokee County School District, and is a CCSD parent with four children.

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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YOUR SCHOOL NEWS Sir and Lady Cherokee Crowned Cherokee Christian Schools crowned its first Sir and Lady Cherokee. Olivia Burns and Caleb Clayton were chosen by their peers and teachers, as students who exemplify Christ in their academic and personal lives.

Veterans Day Celebration at Bascomb Schools throughout the Cherokee County School District celebrated Veterans Day with special programs and lessons. Activities included breakfasts for veterans, invited by their children or grandchildren who attend the hosting school, guest speakers, musical performances by students and the presentation of colors by students active in Scout troops. Students also made special displays to honor veterans, including those in their families who have passed away and soldiers considered missing in action. Right, Boy Scouts from Bascomb presented the colors at the school's Veterans Day breakfast. Below, Bascomb Elementary School students greeted veterans in the halls.

SafeSchools Alert System: There’s an App for That In August, the Cherokee County School District (CCSD) launched the new SafeSchools Alert system, which allows students, parents, school staff and community residents to report safety concerns to CCSD school police and administrators by text, email, online message or phone call, with the option to do so anonymously. The system includes a free smartphone app for greater accessibility. Through SafeSchools Alert, there are five ways to submit safety concerns to CCSD. 1. By phone: 1-855-4ALERT1, ext. 1695 2. By text: Text #1695 and your tip to ALERT1 or 253781 3. By email: 1695@alert1.us 4. By online message: http://1695.alert1.us 5. By mobile app. Download the SafeSchools Alert app for free from the iPhone App Store and Google Play for Android phones. The app icon is a life preserver. The first time you open the app after downloading, you’ll need to enter 1695 for the ID and confirm your school district is the Cherokee County School District. You can use the SafeSchools Alert system to report information about threats to school safety, bullying, harassment, drugs, vandalism, concerns about a classmate’s well-being or any other safety issue. If you are experiencing an emergency, please continue to call 911.

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Zombie Fest 2018

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAXTER STREET FILMS

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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@ the Library Dec. 12

116 Brown Industrial Parkway • Canton, GA 30114 770-479-3090 • www.SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org

WOODSTOCK

ROSE CREEK

7735 Main St., Woodstock 770-926-5859

4476 Towne Lake Parkway Woodstock 770-591-1491

Homeschooler’s Book Club at 1:30 p.m. Join a community of readers who

meet once a month to enjoy lively conversation about literature. This month’s theme is winter. Children should read a book independently or with a caregiver, and share a brief talk about their book with the group. Refreshments provided.

Dec. 13

Teen Gingerbread Cookies at 6 p.m. Teens grades 6-12 are invited to join some gingerbread decorating fun! Materials are provided. Call to sign up.

Dec. 27

Book-Walking in a Winter Wonderland. Drop in anytime for a winterthemed book walk through the Youth Services department. Participate in a winter activity and stop at the children’s desk for a prize (while supplies last). Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Dec. 31

Noon Year’s Eve Countdown at 11:15 a.m. Calling all kids! Bring an adult or your whole family, and celebrate the New Year with a countdown to noon party. Play games, make a special craft, enjoy party foods and a balloon drop at noon. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

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Sequoyah Regional Library System

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

Dec. 11

Dishes and Wishes at 11 a.m. Before you deck the halls, celebrate at the library! Bring your favorite dish and recipe to share with others.

Dec. 27

Lego Robotics Club at 6 p.m. Teens grades 6-12 are invited to join in on some Lego fun by taking apart, re-building and programming Lego Mindstorm robots.

All Sequoyah Regional Library System branches will be closed Dec. 24-26, and will close at 5 p.m. on Dec. 31.


R.T. JONES 116 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton 770-479-3090

Dec. 6

Drop-In VR: Intro to Virtual Reality at 4 p.m. Drop-in and explore the basics of virtual reality. The librarians will walk you through using a VR headset, VR controllers and set you up on an immersive adventure to help develop your skills. For all ages.

Dec. 13

Senior Citizen Winter Ball at 10 a.m. It’s a Winter Ball for all senior citizens. Enjoy live holiday music, holiday crafts and tasty treats. For ages 55 and older.

Dec. 16

D.I.G. (Drop-In Genealogy) at 2 p.m. Enjoy

an afternoon with the D.I.G. group researching and learning about various topics. Ancestry.com is available for use within the library, as well as other research tools.

Dec. 17

The Canton Eclectic Readers meet at 6 p.m. This month, the book club for unconventional readers will be reading “Mistress of the Art of Death” by Ariana Franklin.

Dec. 18

DIY Sock Snowmen at 4 p.m. Make a sock

snowman, perfect for decorating your home during the winter months. Materials will be provided.

Dec. 20

Drop-In VR: Google Earth at 4 p.m. Travel

the world from the comfort of the library. Experience Google Earth images with virtual reality headsets. You choose where you want to go! Adventure awaits for all ages.

Dec. 31

HICKORY FLAT Dec. 8

2740 E. Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-345-7565

DIY Candlesticks at 3 p.m. Make a beautiful wood candlestick photo or message board Call to sign up.

Dec. 11

Fun with Kindermusik at 10:30 a.m. Join in for a special program that uses engaging musical experiences to help your child grow.

Dec. 18

Manga Club at 5 p.m. Teens are encouraged to read and discuss

different manga series and related topics. This program will encourage reading and group discussion in a fun and innovative way. Refreshments and manga are provided.

Noon Year’s Eve Countdown at 11 a.m. Calling all kids! Bring an adult or your whole family, and celebrate the New Year with a countdown to noon party. Play games, make a special craft, enjoy party foods and a balloon drop at noon. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Top, Out-of-the-Box Art Studio visited the Hickory Flat Public Library to help guests create beautiful fall leaf print clay bowls during Kid’s Crafts. Left, a group of families plays games before Lap-Sit Storytime at R.T. Jones Memorial Library. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Christmas Through the Eyes of a Child BY LYNNE SAUNDERS

The air has changed. It’s chilly now, so bundling up is just part of the new season. It’s a race from the car to indoors as we brace against winter. Parents rush their little ones sometimes beyond the pace that little legs can manage. Older kids are expected to keep up! Then, woosh, everyone is inside, in the warmth at last. Stores are full of welcoming Christmas greetings this time of year. Even parking lots are dotted with Christmas cheer. Toys! Trees! Lights! Happy music! For a child, what’s not to love? Everything is new and shiny. The season has brought another year of make-believe possibilities. What will Santa bring? What fun is just around the corner? I enjoy watching my grandchildren during this time of year. Their sense of optimism is contagious. One cannot help but feel radiance inside brimming What holiday to the surface, even if the mood and pressure have weighted the legacy do you moment. Bright, happy, innocent want to leave faces with eyes and smiles full of joy and wonder. What have we for those grownups lost? As adults, we know that this is around you? not the total picture of Christmas merriment. After all, we have bills to pay, shopping to conquer, and all those special cookies and fattening goodies to make and eat. The pressure is sometimes too much. As we each ponder personal insights, let’s turn that around to recapture lost moments of childhood wonder. To do this successfully, however, we will need to use some adult time and task management tools. What holiday legacy do you want to leave for those around you? Do you love to bake, but somehow lose the motivation to produce beautiful mouth-watering treats because you are too busy or too stressed? Perhaps you love to decorate everything, but the cost or time gets in the way. Some strive to send out Christmas cards to friends and family, but find themselves on Christmas Eve accepting that this is another year missed. Stop what you are doing and get out a calendar, paper and pen. There is time, but you may need to find it. What items do you need to resource? How much time will you need to prioritize? And best of all, what child can you recruit to help make your Christmas dream come true? Keep making progress!

Lynne Saunders is director of Papa’s Pantry (www.papaspantry.org) and the Master’s Training Center. She can be reached at 770-591-4730.

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Glory to God and Peace on Earth BY REV. DR. PAUL W. BAUMGARTNER

I am so ready for Christmas. Not the secular parts— they mean very little to me. What I’m ready for, is to hear again the good news the angels proclaimed on that first Christmas long ago: “Glory to God in the highest, and peace to God’s people on earth.” The very thought of peace on earth thrills me to my core. Can you imagine it, peace on earth? Here we are 2,000 years later, though, and there isn’t peace on earth. Every day we hear news of violence and hatred, abuse and oppression, and war. Where is the peace of which the angels sang? Were the angels wrong? Was Jesus not the Prince of Peace? Was the good news fake news? No, no and no. When Jesus started his ministry, he said that the Kingdom of God was at hand. Surely, God’s Kingdom is a kingdom of peace. That Kingdom has not come in its fullness yet, however. We Lutherans like to say it is now, but not yet. The fullness of the Kingdom of God will come in God’s own time. In the meantime, Jesus calls his followers to live as though the Kingdom of God is fully present right now. We’re called to live according to the teachings of Jesus—which clearly means living as people

of peace. Didn’t Jesus say we were to love and pray for our enemies? Didn’t he say we were to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, welcome the stranger, clothe the naked, take care of the sick, and visit those in prison? Didn’t he say, “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God?” Yes, yes, and yes. If the angels were correct, and if Jesus is the Prince of Peace, and if the good news is true, then maybe those who claim to be followers of Jesus are a big reason why there’s no peace on earth yet. Maybe we’re not living like citizens of God’s Kingdom. My Christmas prayer is that every time you hear the words “peace on earth” during the holiday season, you will be thrilled to your core. I pray we will be so thrilled that we will seek to be instruments of peace on earth, that all people may give glory to God in the highest!

The Rev. Dr. Paul Baumgartner has served as senior pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church since January 2004. He can be reached at pastorpaul@gslutheran.org.

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k b g p h o t o g r a p h y s t u d i o @ g m a i l .c o m www.kbgphotographyblog.org TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Marriage Moments

A Reflection on the Birth of Christ BY BILL RATLIFF

Again this Christmas, I am drawn to the couple who raised the child who is the reason for this season. Their relationship started out as a betrothal, which usually lasted from six months to a year. We have no direct information about how long Mary and Joseph were betrothed before God used an angel to give them his plan. We do know from Matthew 1:24 that Joseph obeyed God by taking Mary home as his wife, after finding out that she was pregnant but not by him. The discovery of her pregnancy probably occurred around her third or fourth month. This implies that they would have lived together as a married couple, without having marital relations, for about five or six months before the birth of Jesus. I wonder how they communicated with their family about their impending bundle of joy during those months before he was born? Did they withhold the truth about this special baby? Did they tell their family who the baby’s father was? I do not believe any of those options occurred. I believe God told Mary and Joseph’s families the good news. In Luke 1:43, Elizabeth, one of Mary’s cousins, knew Mary and Joseph’s situation and who their child was going to be. While they had her support, they may have felt like the world was against them; I’ve talked to many couples who feel that way. Mary and Joseph faced many things that were not going their way. Their

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pregnancy occurred outside their marriage. They discussed and considered divorce as an option early on. There was not a suitable place for the birth of their child. They had to lay the baby in a feeding trough after the birth. Some homeless men came to visit the baby. The baby’s life was threatened, and they had to move to another country. Mary and Joseph’s Christmas was filled with stress and anxiety from the world, but the Prince of Peace was born to them, and they chose to trust God. What will you do as a couple this Christmas: submit to angst, or trust the Savior?

Date Your Mate The Christmas story and our materialistic celebration of Christmas are antithetical. The Bible contains the real story. I encourage you turn on the Christmas lights, build a roaring fire, gather your spouse and family together, and read the accounts of Jesus’s birth in Isaiah 9:6, Matthew and Luke.

Bill Ratliff is a pastoral counselor and certified life coach. Contact him at billratliffcatalyst@gmail.com or www.billratliffcatalyst.com.


TOWNE LAKE AREA HOMES SOLD IN OCTOBER

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Casual and Upscale Restaurants

RESTAURANT CUISINE BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAY Canyons American no $ $ open 335 Chambers St. 678-494-8868 canyonsresh.com

SPIRITS RESERV. Beer/Wine no

Century House Tavern Modern 125 E Main St. 770-693-4552 American centuryhousetavern.com Copper Coin Coffee American 400 Chambers St. 470-308-6914 coppercoinoodstock.com see ad on Inside front, 37

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

8 persons +

$

$

$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Fire Stone Wood-fired 120 Chambers St. Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 see ad on pg 41 firestonerestaurants.com Freight Kitchen & Tap Southern 251 E. Main St. 770-924-0144 freightkitchen.com

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 10:30-3

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

no

$-$$

open

Full bar

yes

$$

open

Full bar

yes

$$

open

Full bar

no

Habanero’s Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. $ 9550 Main St. Brunch 678-498-8243 11-1:30 Ice Martini & Sushi Bar Tapas/Sushi no Fri./Sat. 380 Chambers St. only 770-672-6334 icemartinibar.com Ipps Pastaria & Bar Italian no $$ 8496 Main St. 770-517-7305 ippspastaria.com

J Christopher’s Diner $-$$ $-$$ no open no 315 Chambers St., 770-592-5990 jchristophers.com J Miller’s Smokehouse BBQ & no $-$$ $-$$ open Beer 150 Towne Lake Parkway Southern 770-592-8295 Sandwiches jmillerssmokehouse.com Mad Life Studios Southern no $-$$ $$-$$$$ open Full bar 8722 Main St. madlifestageandstudios.com Partners II Pizza 8600 Main St. 678-224-6907 partnerspizza.com/woodstock-ga

no

$$-$$$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Pure Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. 405 Chambers St. 770-952-7873 Brunch puretaqueria.com/woodstock 11-3

$$

$$

open

Full bar

6 persons+

Reel Seafood Seafood 8670 Main St. 770-627-3006 reel-seafood.com

Sunday Brunch 10:30-3:30

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 11-3

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

no

Wine bar Tapas

Salt Factory Pub Gastropub 8690 Main St. 678-903-6225

no

no

no

Rootstock and Vine 8558 Main St. 770 -544-9009 www.rootstockandvine.com

Pizza

Weekends only

Semper Fi Bar and Grille 9770 Main St. 770-672-0026 Tea Leaves & Thyme 8990 Main St. 770-516-2609 tealeavesandthyme.com

American

no

$

$

open

Full bar

no

English Tea room

no

$$

no

closed

no

yes

Truck & Tap 8640 Main St. 770-702-1670 truckandtap.com

Variety of Food trucks

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

Craft Beer

no

Sunday Brunch 10-2

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Vingenzo’s Italian 105 E. Main St. 770-924-9133 vingenzos.com 82

TOWNELAKER | December 2018

$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

DOWNTOWN WOODSTOCK DINING


Elm Street

Tradition is Part of Our DNA BY SIOBHAN BRUMBELOW

What makes a tradition? Is it something passed from generation to generation, family to friends, culture to culture? For 15 years, Elm Street has produced “A Christmas Carol” every holiday season. We’ve watched the story through many generations, from young to old. Tiny Tims have become Scrooge’s nephews, Scrooge’s nephews have become directors, and now previous cast members have their children in the show. Needless to say, “A Christmas Carol” has become a part of the Elm Street DNA. So, why do people come to see this show every year? What makes this show a holiday tradition? Is it because you know the heartwarming, redeeming story of Ebenezer Scrooge? Because Christmas is a time for giving? Because the holidays are spent with the ones you love? I could share multiple answers to that question, but there is one thing that makes seeing any theater show something special; because it’s live. Stella Adler said, “The play is not in the words. It’s in you.” Our DNA is ever changing and growing. Fifteen years later and this organization has evolved from a small 5,000-squarefoot warehouse building to the large auditorium in the heart of downtown Woodstock. Our programming has expanded to include theater, education, visual arts and a concert series. Our shows have grown in quality, production elements and talent. Because of this, we have developed new ways to present our traditions to our community. The story of “A Christmas Carol” is the same. Mean old miser Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future to reflect upon his life and how he can change. There are gorgeously composed songs written by Alan Menken (Disney’s “The Little Mermaid” and “Aladdin”), and there was a movie version with Kelsey Grammer as Scrooge. But, what is it about this story, in our 16th year, that intrigues viewers to come and see it? There’s power in the stories of others. There is something everyone can relate to in this story. You may not be a Scrooge, but you could be a Tiny Tim, or an Emily, or a young Jacob Marley. This holiday season, we are focused on presenting “A Christmas Carol” with the stories that make Scrooge who he is. We want to highlight his community on stage, and in turn, reflect on our community. We can’t have traditions without you, so join us this season as we continue to share our growth and celebrate the holiday spirit.

Siobhan Brumbelow is on staff at Elm Street. She currently holds a BA in Theatre from Brenau University and toured with Missoula Children’s Theatre.

UPCOMING AT ELM STREET

DEC 7-24

FRI/SAT AT 7:30PM | SUN AT 2:30PM DEC 24TH AT 2:30PM

Presenting Partner:

Call or visit us on the web to learn about our

SPRING CLASSES

ELMSTREETARTS.ORG | 678.494.4251 TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Rob’s Rescues I met with Tara Sorenson and Stacey Richolson, who are the founders of Purr Nation Cat Alliance, www.purrnation.org.

What do you do and how did you start Purr Nation? Tara: Purr Nation Cat Alliance is

This month, my column is all about cats, so I am going to do two cats from Cherokee County Animal Shelter this time. Also, because I couldn't choose between which one to do for this article. This cat's name is William. He is 4 years old and is a sweet orange tabby who loves to be petted. He is a stray and was brought to the shelter on Oct. 9. William is curious about toys. Please adopt him as he is a super nice cat.

a nonprofit feline safe haven. We rescue cats from high-kill shelters and other desperate situations, and provide temporary care and safe refuge before they can be adopted into forever homes. We partner with professionals and cat experts in the community to educate the public and promote community awareness and involvement. I met Tara Sorenson and Stacey Richolson with Tic Tac. Stacey in September 2016. I had a confusing medical issue with a cat and was referred to Stacey, who fostered the cat. Tic Tac is the name of the cat who was the foundation of everything and is the mascot of Purr Nation. We realized that our outlooks and visions aligned, and decided to combine our efforts and expertise to form Purr Nation Cat Alliance.

Who was the first cat you rescued? Stacey: I have always rescued cats, since childhood in the neighborhood and

through college when students would often leave their cats behind. I would try and find homes for them. Tara: I adopted my first cat who lived for 10 months with feline leukemia. When she passed, I adopted two cats in her honor. Through this process I was exposed to volunteering with cats, and saw firsthand how many cats were in need. This all evolved into starting our own rescue.

On average how many cats do you save every year?

Last year just over 500. Now that we are a fiscal sponsor of the Grey Project (see Rob's Rescues interview from the October 2017 issue) that number is going to increase substantially.

What is the youngest cat you have every saved?

We took in a mom cat with two kittens that were 1 day old from Cobb County Animal Control.

What is a story that you love to tell? This cat's name is Poe. She is 1 year old and is a sweetheart. She is really soft, fluffy and pretty. She has been here since June 28, but really should have been adopted. She is quite interested in toys. There really isn't any reason why you should not adopt this curious cat.

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Our favorite story is about Tic Tac. Tic Tac encompasses our commitment to a single cat. We didn't take the easy route with him. It was recommended that he be euthanized with the medical issues he had, but we felt he deserved so much more. Peter is another cat we like to talk about. We got him from Calhoun Animal Control and he got very sick after being neutered. He was subsequently adopted by a wonderful family and became the son's best friend. We specialize in injured or ill animals. Stacey has a vet tech background.

I’m Rob Macmillan and I’m on a mission to help shelter dogs and cats. These animals are at the Cherokee County Animal Shelter at 1015 Univeter Road, Canton. Contact me at robsrescues@gmail.com.


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Cherokee Photography Club Congratulations to the winners in the October competition "Graffiti!"

Digital Projection:

1st Martin Longstaff "Chasing Trains"

2nd Russ Miller "Tailgating"

Monochromatic:

1st Rick Sapp "Tunnel Makeover"

3rd Karen Beedle "Here's Your Sign" 86

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2nd Martin Longstaff "Beware"

HM David Ferguson "Krog"


The Cherokee Photography Club meets on the fourth Monday of the month, and for those participating in the monthly contest, that meeting is held on the second Monday of the month. Both meetings are 7-9 p.m. and held at the Cherokee County Arts Center, 94 North St., Canton. For more information, please contact Kim Bates at 770-617-7595 or email him at kbphotoart@comcast.net.

3rd Eillene Kirk "Krog Tunnel"

HM Dean Kelley "Love"

Color Print:

1st Martin Longstaff "Three Wee Men"

3rd Rick Sapp "Designer Washroom"

Above, HM Linda Bauer "Il Papa Roma" Left, 2nd David Ferguson "Yes - Graffiti in Buckhead"

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GREENPRINTS TRAIL SYSTEM

Sources: City of Woodstock, Esri, HERE, DeLorme, TomTom, Intermap, increment P Corp., GEBCO, USGS, FAO, NPS, NRCAN, GeoBase, IGN, Kadaster NL, Ordnance Survey, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), swisstopo, MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

Visit our website for more information on these or other trail projects. www.greenprintsalliance.org

Noonday Creek Trail - This 1.43 mile paved trail begins at Market Street in Downtown Woodstock one block west of Main Street.

It continues downhill toward Noonday Creek where it intersects with Towne Lake Pass Trail and the bridge to Woofstock Park. The trail continues along Noonday Creek to its current end at Highway 92.

Trestle Rock Trail - This 0.40 mile paved trail is located in Olde Rope Mill Park and is an easy flat trail on the banks of Little River. Towne Lake Pass - This approximately 1.2 mile trail connects the Towne Lake community to Downtown along the banks of Noonday Creek. It runs from the intersection of Towne Lake Parkway and Towne Lake Hills South to Woofstock Park.

Rubes Creek Trail - This .5 mile trail runs along Rubes Creek and will ultimately connect into a larger run of trails. 88

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Sharing Struggles to Help Others continued from page 32

our names and our kids' names spoken by these characters, and reliving some of the scenes portrayed in the film. We hope people will ultimately see God's grace on display as he turns our hard hearts back toward him and each other during the story. We also hope people will have a new appreciation for what military and first responder families go through. They have unique challenges in their lives as they run to chaos and the sound of guns.”

Where was the movie filmed? How can our readers see it?

“The production company is based in Memphis, Tennessee, so much of the movie was filmed there. Some of the combat scenes were filmed in a desert area of California. I don't know yet how long 'Indivisible' will be in theaters; hopefully, it will be seen enough to justify a long run. I assume that after it finishes in the theaters, it will be available for purchase in several ways, including online and DVD. PureFlix is the distributor; they have the master plan for current and future use of 'Indivisible.'

What are your post-movie plans? Has the movie, and the response to it, made a difference in your life?

“It's a privilege to be part of ‘Indivisible’ and to share our story of hope with others. As far as future plans go, I'm still an active duty chaplain, serving soldiers and their families, and I will continue to do that as long as I can. The film may bring us speaking opportunities for various groups, like military groups, churches, conferences, etc. If that happens, we will respond accordingly, and hopefully be able to encourage people at some of those events, as long as we can take time off to do that. We have a busy family now, with two teenagers and a pre-teen, so life is certainly filled with activity. If people want to invite either Heather or me, or both, to speak at an event, they can send us a request at www.darrenandheatherturner.com.

Tolerate the Turbulence continued from page 56

This material was prepared by MarketingPro Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note: Investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Citations. 1 - marketwatch.com/story/if-us-stocks-suffer-anothercorrection-start-worrying-2018-10-16 [10/16/18] 2 - multpl.com/s-p-500-historical-prices/table/by-month [10/18/18] 3 - crestmontresearch.com/docs/Stock-Yo-Yo.pdf [10/18/18] 4 - icmarc.org/prebuilt/apps/downloadDoc.asp [2/18] TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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REFERENCE

TOWNE LAKE AREA CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

Ahimsa House helps domestic violence victims 24-hours a day get their pets to safety. 404-452-6248. www.ahimsahouse.org.

Georgia Animal Project, based in Ball Ground, offers high quality, low cost spay/neuter services for dogs and cats. 770-704-PAWS (7297). www.theanimalproject.org.

Pet Buddies Food Pantry provides pet food, supplies, spaying and neutering, and education through community outreach programs to families in need. 678-310-9858. www.petbuddiesfoodpantry.org.

Angel House Girls Home, residential facility to help girls ages 12-18 learn self-sufficiency. 770-479-9555. www.angelhousega.com.

Give a Kid a Chance – Cherokee sponsors a yearly back-to-school bash, giving children in need filled backpacks to free haircuts. www.giveakidachance.org.

Safe Kids Cherokee County offers free child safety seat inspections by appointment. 770-721-7808. www.cherokeesafekidscherokeecounty.org.

Anna Crawford Children’s Center, dedicated to preventing child abuse and neglect through prevention and intervention services. 678-504-6388. www.cherokeechildadvocates.org.

Goshen Valley Boys Ranch offers a home, care and counsel to young men in the DFCS system. 770-796-4618. www.goshenvalley.org

Bend Your Knees, Inc. raises awareness, helps children with pediatric brain tumors. Bob Dixon, 678-922-1560.

Green Shelters America animal rescue group. 770-712-4077. GreenSheltersAmerica@gmail.com. www.GreenSheltersAmerica.com.

CASA for Children has programs to increase safety and improve educational, social and emotional functioning of children impacted by abuse. 770-345-3274. www.casacherokee.org. CCHS Thrift Store accepts donations, sells used household items to raise money for Cherokee County Humane Society. 5900 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth. 770-592-8072. Cherokee Family Violence Center offers emergency shelter and crisis intervention, affordable housing, education, support services. 770-479-1703. Spanish 770-720-7050 or 800-334-2836 option 2. www.cfvc.org. Cherokee Fellowship of Christian Athletes challenges professional, college, high school, junior high and youth level coaches and athletes to use athletics to impact the world for Christ. Bill Queen, 404-441-3508. www.cherokeefca.org. Cherokee County Humane Society (CCHS) 770-928-5115. admin@cchumanesociety.org. www.cchumanesociety.org.

Habitat for Humanity North Central Georgia, 770-587-9697. www.habitat-ncg.org Healing Hands Youth Ranch offers safe, peaceful environment where abused and at-risk children are paired with rescue horses for hope and healing. 770-633-4451. www.hhyr.org. HopeQuest Ministry Group helps people with life dominating issues related to alcohol abuse, substance abuse and/or sexual brokenness. 678-391-5950. www.hqmg.org. HOPE Center offers support for unplanned pregnancy. 770-924-0864. info@hopectr.com. www.hopectr.com. HOPE Center — Seeds Thrift Store offers men, women & children’s clothing, furniture & other home goods. 770-517-4450. www.seedsthriftstore.com.

Cherokee FOCUS works to improve lives of children and families through collaborative programs and initiatives. 770-345-5483. www.cherokeefocus.org.

Life Connection Ministries provides humanitarian relief in the form of wells and greenhouses to impoverished communities. Mission trips offered. 678-234-1798. www.lcm-ga.com.

Cherokee County Senior Services offers educational, social, leisure and recreational activities for senior citizens. 770-345-5312. 770-345-5320. www.cherokeega.com/senior-services.

Matthew E. Russell Foundation establishes literacy and libraries in rural areas worldwide. 678-234-1798. www.mattrussell.org.

Cherokee Young Life for high school students, meets Monday nights at Bradshaw Farm clubhouse, 7853 Hickory Flat Highway, Suite 104, Woodstock 30188. 678 653-5707. www.cherokeecounty.younglife.org. Community Veterinary Care provides professional veterinary care for pets whose owners have limited financial means. 678-640-3512. www.communityveterinarycare.com. Companion Animal Connection 678-493-9847. www.adoptapet.com.

MUST Ministries provides groceries, hot meals, emergency shelter, supportive housing, clothing, employment services, summer lunch and more from five locations in eight counties, including the Canton office at 111 Brown Industrial Pkwy. www.mustministries.org. National Alliance for Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grassroots organization in America working to build better lives for the millions affected by mental illness. www.nami.org.

Everyday Angels offers financial assistance for local families in need. aaeverydayangels@gmail.com.

Never Alone provides food and clothing assistance to Cherokee families in need. www.neveralone.org.

Feed My Lambs, Inc. provides free Christian preschools in the U.S. and around the world. 770-795-9348. office@feedmylambs.net. www.feedmylambs.net.

Next Step Ministries offers a therapeutic day program, Saturday respite, camps and special events for people with special needs. 770-592-1227. www.nextstepministries.net.

Forever Fed is a mobile food ministry that addresses physical hunger and hopelessness by providing meals and sharing the gospel. www.foreverfed.org.

North Georgia Pregnancy Center offers help and care to young girls and women with an unplanned pregnancy or who need counseling. 706-253-6303. www.ngapregnancy.org.

Funds 4 Furry Friends helps those in need with food, spay/neuter and medical attention for their pets. 770-842-8893. www.funds4furryfriends.com.

Papa’s Pantry, a year-round food ministry that includes the Masters Training Center to help individuals and families in crisis get back on their feet. 770-591-4730. www.papaspantry.org.

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SERV International operates the House of Hope orphanage in Africa, sponsors a clean water program in Dominican Republic and meal distributions worldwide. Offers mission trips. 770-516-1108. www.servone.org The Blue Ribbon Foundation fosters a national dialog toward finding the cause, cure and prevention of ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis), CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome), fibromyalgia and Lyme disease. 478-397-5542. www.theblueribbonfoundation.org. Volunteer Aging Council helps raise funds for seniors in Cherokee County. A list of current needs is available. 770-310-3474. www.vac-cherokeega.org.

SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS

AA Meetings Canton: 9:30 a.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Mondays at Canton First United Methodist, 930 Lower Scott Mill Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at Hillside United Methodist, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway. www.aageorgia.org/14c-meetings.html. Abortion Recovery Helping those who have been impacted by abortion. 678-223-3519. Al-Anon and Al-A-Teen Canton: 8 p.m. Thursdays at St. Clements Episcopal Church, 2795 Ridge Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays Al-Anon at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2208, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-516-3502. American Heart Assoc. - Cherokee Div. 678-385-2013. American Red Cross metro chapter 770-428-2695. A-Typical Parkinson’s Education and Support Group Meets 6:00 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at Ball Ground UMC, 3045 Canton Hwy. in Ball Ground. Contact Norma Schmidt at 770-366-9585. Caregivers Alzheimers Spousal Support Group Meets: 12:30 p.m. first Tuesday of every month for lunch at Benton House of Woodstock, 3385 Trickum Road. 678-494-4500. woodstockinfo@bentonhouse.com. Celebrate Recovery, Christ-centered recovery program for all types of habits, hurts and hangups. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at Woodstock Church of the Nazarene. 770-366-7515. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Sixes United Methodist. 770-345-7644. www.sixesumc.org. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Ministry House, 678-459-2347. www.MinistryHouse.org. Meets: 6:15 p.m. Thursdays at 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton. 678-764-8660. www.celebraterecovery.com. Cherokee County Support Group for people with autoimmune conditions. Meets: 6:30 - 8 pm second Thursday at New Light Baptist Church, 1716 New Light Road, Holly Springs. 404-402-0571, 770-337-0294, jhmom88@comcast.net or christystephenson@msn.com. Cherokee County Special Olympics provides yearround sports training and athletic competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. www.cherokeecountyspecialolympics.org. Cherokee Christian Ministerial Association for pastors and ministry leaders. Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Wednesday at Dayspring Church, 6835 Victory Drive, Woodstock. www.cherokeeministers.org.


Diabetes Support Group Meets: 9:30 and 11 a.m. third Tuesday at Emeritus Assisted Living, 756 Neese Road, Woodstock. 770-793-7818. Georgia Canines for Independence. 404-824-4637. gcidogs@aol.com. www.gcidogs.org. Grace Valley Ministries connects pastors through small group meetings, free counseling and a place to retreat. 727-251-7690. info@gracevalleyministries.org. www.gracevalleyministries.org. Grandparents Raising GRANDchildren Meets: 7:15 p.m. second Tuesdays Transfiguration Catholic Church, Marietta (nursery available). 770-919-9275. Hearing Loss Association of America NW Metro Atlanta chapter for people with hearing loss looking for support and resources, holds free and informative quarterly meetings at the Senior Center on Arnold Mill Road. nwmetroatlantahlaa@gmail.com. La Leche League of South Cherokee Meets: 10 a.m. first Tuesday and 7 p.m. third Tuesday at Bascomb United Methodist Church. 678-315-7686. 770-517-0191. MOMS Club of Woodstock-Towne Lake momsclubofwoodstocktl@gmail.com. www.sites.google.com/site/ momscluboftownelakewoodstock. MOPS — Mothers of Preschoolers (birth — K) Meets: 9:30 a.m. second and fourth Mondays at Hillside UMC, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-924-4777. Unlimited Possibilities, support group for stroke and brain injury survivors. Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday of each month at Kennestone Outpatient Rehab Center. 678-677-2589.

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

American Business Women’s Association, Cherokee Eagles Charter Chapter. Meets: 6:30 p.m. on the third Tuesdays at Dynastic Buffet at the intersection of Canton Highway and Piedmont. 678-493-3618. Cherokee Business Network Meets: 7:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Chick-fil-A, 9728 Highway 92, Woodstock. 770-345-8687. Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce Meets: Various times during the year. Schedule at www.cherokeechamber.com. 770-345-0400. Gini@CherokeeChamber.com. Cherokee Toastmasters Club Meets: Noon-1:15 p.m. Wednesdays at the Bank of North Georgia, 200 Parkway 575, Woodstock. www.cherokeetoastmasters.com. The Joy of Connecting Networking for Women Meets: Various times and locations. 678-7896158. www.xperienceconnections.com/spotlight/ woodstock/.

VETERANS SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS American Legion Post 316 Meets: 7 p.m. third Thursdays at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 678-662-2366.

Cherokee County Libertarians Meets: 7:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday at the Cherokee County Board of Realtors Training Center, 1600 River Park Blvd., Suite 104, Woodstock. www.cherokeelp.org.

Cherokee County Homeless Veteran Program Contact Jim Lindenmayer at Jlindenmayer80@gmail. com or 678-983-7590, or Mike Satterly at 404-680-2412.

Cherokee County Republican Party Meets: 9 a.m. third Saturday at American Legion Post 45, 160 McClure Street, Canton. www.cherokeecounty.gop.

Woodstock VFW Post 10683 Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Woodstock Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 404-663-4663.

Cherokee County Republican Women affiliated with The Georgia Federation of Republican Women. Meets: Monthly in Woodstock/Canton. 770-592-7811. jkconkey@gmail.com.

CIVIC, COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS

AARP Woodstock Chapter is for anyone age 50 and older. Meets: 11:30 a.m. second Tuesdays at Tuscany. Lunch is $15. 770-926-1944. Canton-Cherokee TRIAD/S.A.L.T. (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) Meets: 8:30 a.m. first Tuesday at G.Cecil Pruitt YMCA in Canton (Hall of Fame Room). www.saltcherokee.com. Cherokee County Historical Society 770-345-3288. www.rockbarn.org. Citizen Oversight and Education 678-520-2236. citizenoversighteducation@yahoo.com. Jewish Havurah (Friends) A group of Jewish people who meet for Jewish holidays, special Jewish events and Shabbat dinners. 770-345-8687. Kiwanis Club of Greater Cherokee Meets: 8 a.m. first Monday, at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2107, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock. 678-468-9900. www.greatercherokeekiwanis.org Pilot Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. second Mondays at IHOP on Hwy. 20. 770-393-1766. Lynda@edgoodwinassociates.com. www.pilotinternational.com. Rotary Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 770-480-4179. Rotary Club of Towne Lake Meets: Noon Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills E., Woodstock. www.townelakerotary.com. Rotary Club of Woodstock Meets: 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 678-428-6514.

Grassroots Conservatives of Cherokee Meets: 7- 9 a.m. Fridays at Chick-fil-A, 951 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock by the Outlet Mall. 770-294-0922. Republican Women of Cherokee County 678-520-2236. www.rwccga.com.

RECREATION & HOBBIES

Allatoona Gold Panners. Periodic events, outings. rrkelly@bellsouth.net. Cherokee Amateur Radio Society Meets: 10 a.m. on the second Saturday at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. www.cherokeehams.com. Cherokee Community Chorale 678-439-8625. www.cherokeechorale.org. Cherokee County Arts Center 94 North St., Canton. 770-704-6244. www.CherokeeArts.org. Cherokee County Master Gardeners 770-721-7803. www.caes.uga.edu/extension/ cherokee/mastergardeners. Cherokee Photography Club www.cherokeepc.org. Cherokee County Saddle Club hosts monthly meetings and group rides. www.cherokeesaddleclub.com. Cherokee Hockey In Line League (CHILL) roller hockey. www.cherokeehockey.org. Cherokee Music Teachers Association 770-720-1701. www.cherokeemta.org. Cherokee Soccer Association 770-704-0187. www.csaimpact.com.

Service League of Cherokee County 770-704-5991. www.serviceleague.net.

Cherokee Youth Lacrosse Association www.cherokeelacrosse.com.

South Cherokee Optimist Club Meets: 7:30 a.m. every Friday at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-926-3522.

Christian Authors Guild Meets: 7-9 p.m. first and third Monday at Prayer and Praise Christian Fellowship, 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. www.christianauthorsguild.org.

Towne Lake Optimist Club Meets: 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-715-3375. www.townelakeoptimists.com. Woodstock Jaycees Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday and third Thursday at 216 Rope Mill Road. 770-926-8336.

Kingdom Riders, a chapter of the Christian Motorcyclists Association in Canton. Meets: 8 a.m. fourth Saturdays at Family Tradition restaurant in Hickory Flat.

Woodstock Junior Woman’s Club www.woodstockjwc.org.

Les Marmitons, for men interested in culinary arts. www.lesmarmitons.org.

Towne Lake PowerCore Team Meets: 7-8:30 a.m. Fridays at Freight Kitchen & Tap, 251 E. Main St., Woodstock. 404-816-3377. www.powercore.net.

Woodstock Lions Club Meets: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church. 770-906-2958.

Neighbors and Newcomers of Towne Lake (NNTL) is a social club for residents of 30189 area code. 770-855-9623. www.nntlclub.com.

Women of Woodstock Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. first and third Wednesday at Tavern at Towne Lake. info@womenofwoodstock.com. www.womenofwoodstock.com.

Woodstock Preservation Group 770-924-0406. http://preservationwoodstock.com/.

Sons of the American Revolution - Cherokee Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays at the Rock Barn, 638 Marietta Hwy., Canton. www.cherokeechapter.com.

Towne Lake Business Association Meets: 12:30 p.m. third Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 678-389-3887. www.tlba.org.

Woodstock PowerCore Team Meets: 7 a.m. on Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-952-5000 ext. 20.

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS

Cherokee County Democratic Party Meets: 7 p.m. second Thursday at Holly Springs Train Depot, 164 Hickory Road, Holly Springs. 770-345-3489. www.cherokeedemocrats.com.

William G. Long Senior Center offers activities for seniors at 223 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 678-445-6518. TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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COMMUNITY OF FAITH ADVENTIST

Cherokee 101 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-7304 http://cherokee.netadvent.org/ Canton 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton 678-880-0106 www.cantonadventist.org

AME

Allen Temple AME 232 N. Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-6348 www.allentempleame.org St. Paul 390 Crisler St., Canton 770-479-9691 www.stpaulame-canton.org

BAPTIST

Canton Bible Church 94 North St., Canton CantonBibleChurch.org Carmel 2001 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock Cherokee 7770 Hickory Flat Highway, Woodstock 770-720-3399 www.cherokeebaptistchurch.org Cornerstone Community 4206 North Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-439-5108 www.ccchurchonline.org Crossroads Community Church 2317 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-592-7007 Crossroads Primitive 3100 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-710-1068 Faith Community Office: 110 Village Trail, Suite 110, Woodstock Sunday Services: 3075 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-516-1996 www.faithcommunitychurch.org First Baptist of Woodstock 11905 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-4428 www.fbcw.org First Baptist Canton One Mission Point 770-479-5538 www.fbccanton.org First Baptist Holly Springs 2632 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-5349 www.fbchollysprings.com Harvest 3460 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth www.hbcga.org Heritage Fellowship 3615 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-479-9415 www.HeritageCanton.com Hickory Road 2416 Hickory Road, Canton GA 30115 www.hickoryroad.org Hillcrest 6069 Woodstock Road, Acworth 770-917-9100 www.hbcacworth.org Hopewell 78 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-5723 www.hopewellbaptist.com

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Mt. Zion 4096 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-479-3324 www.mtzb.org New Victoria 6659 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-926-8448, www.newvicbaptist.org Rising Hills Church 615 Mountain Road, Woodstock www.gorhc.org River Church 2335 Sixes Road, Canton 770-485-1975 www.riveratlanta.org Shallowford Free Will 1686 Shallowford Road, Marietta 770-926-1163 www.shallowfordchurch.com South Cherokee 7504 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-0422 Sutallee 895 Knox Bridge Highway, White 770-479-0101 www.sutalleebaptistchurch.com Toonigh 4999 Old Highway 5, Lebanon www.toonightbaptistchurch.com

CHURCH OF GOD

Bells Ferry 6718 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-592-2956 www.bellsferry.com Canton Church 110 Bluffs Parkway, Canton 678-285-3288 www.cantonchurch.com New Life Church 154 Lakeside Drive, Canton 770-345-2660 www.newlifecanton.com Sunnyside 2510 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-693-1018 www.sunnysidecog.org Toonigh 4775 Holly Springs Parkway, Canton 770-926-3096 www.toonighcog.org

EPISCOPAL

Christ the Redeemer Charismatic 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton 404-395-5003 www.ctrcec.com

Temple Beth Tikvah 9955 Coleman Road, Roswell 770-642-0434 www.bethtikvah.com Temple Kehillat Chaim 1145 Green St., Roswell 770-641-8630 www.kehillatchaim.org Temple Kol Emeth 1415 Old Canton Road, Marietta 770-973-3533 www.kolemeth.net

MESSIANIC JEWISH CONGREGATIONS Congregation Beth Hallel 950 Pine Grove Road, Roswell 770-641-3000 www.bethhallel.org

LUTHERAN

Celebration of Grace 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-345-8540 www.celebrationofgrace.org Good Shepherd 1208 Rose Creek Drive, Woodstock 770-924-7286 www.gslutheran.org Timothy 556 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-928-2812 www.tlcwoodstock.org

ORTHODOX

St. Elizabeth 2263 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-485-0504 www.stelizabethga.org

PRESBYTERIAN

Cherokee 1498 Johnson Brady Road, Canton 770-704-9564, www.cherokee-pca.org. Covenant South Annex Rec Center 7545 Main St., Bldg. 200, Woodstock www.cc-pca.org Faith 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton www.faithpc.us Grace Church 1160 Butterworth Road, Canton 678-493-9869, www.gracecanton.org Heritage 5323 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-3558 , www.heritagepres.com Trinity 1136 Trinity Church Road, Canton www.trinity-presbyterian-church.org

Episcopal Church-Annunciation 1673 Jamerson Road, Marietta 770-928-7916 www.ecamarietta.org

Woodstock 345 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-0074, www.woodstockpcusa.com

Saint Clement’s 2795 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-6722 www.stclementscanton.org

Our Lady of LaSalette 12941 Sam Nelson Road, Canton 770-479-8923 www.lasalettecanton.com

JEWISH

Chabad Jewish Center 1480 Shiloh Road, NW, Kennesaw 770-400-9255 www.jewishwestcobb.com Congregation Ner Tamid Reform Jewish Congregation 1349 Old 41 Highway NW, Suite 220, Marietta 678-264-8575 www.mynertamid.org Congregation Etz Chaim 1190 Indian Hills, Marietta 770-973-0137 www.etzchaim.net

ROMAN CATHOLIC

St. Michael the Archangel 490 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-516-0009 www.saintmichaelcc.org Transfiguration Catholic Church 1815 Blackwell Road NE., Marietta 770-977-1442 www.transfiguration.com

UNITED METHODIST Ball Ground 3045 Canton Hwy, Ball Ground 770-735-6247 www.ballground.church/


Bascomb 2295 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-926-9755 www.bascombumc.org Big Springs 2066 Sugar Pike Road, Woodstock Canton First 930 Lower Scott Mill Road 770-479-2502 www.cantonfirstumc.org CITY ON A HILL 7745 Main St., Woodstock 678-445-3480 www.coahumc.org Fields Chapel 1331 Fields Chapel Road, Canton 770-479-6030 www.fieldschapel.org Hickory Flat 4056 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-345-5969 www.hickoryflat.org Hillside 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-924-4777 www.hillsideumc.org Holly Springs 2464 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-2883 www.hollyspringsumc.com Liberty Hill 141 Railroad St., Canton 678-493-8920 www.libertyhillumc.org Little River 12455 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-2495 www.littleriverumc.info Mt. Gilead 889 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0837 www.mtgilead-umc.org Sixes 8385 Bells Ferry Road, Canton 770-345-7644 www.sixesumc.org Woodstock 109 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-516-0371

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Emerson 4010 Canton Road, Marietta 770-578-1533 www.emersonuu.org

OTHERS

Action Church 271 Marietta Road, Canton 770-345-3030 www.actionchurch.tv Antioch Christian Church 3595 Sugar Pike Road, Canton 770-475-9628 www.antiochcanton.org Antioch Church 9876 Main St., Suite 250, Woodstock 678-494-2193 www.antiochchurch.life Awakening 180 Parkway 575, Suite 140, Woodstock 770-924-4150 www.awakeningwoodstock.com

Branches of Christ 5946 Jacobs Road, Acworth 770-917-4964 www.branchesofchrist.com BridgePointe 233 Arnold Mill Road, Suite 400, Woodstock 770-517-2977 www.bridgepointechurch.org Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 2205 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-529-9572, www.mormon.org Church of the Messiah 4115 Charles Cox Drive, Canton 770-479-5280 www.churchofthemessiah.net Dayspring 6835 Victory Drive, Acworth 770-516-5733 www.dayspring-online.com Dwelling Place Church 110 Londonderry Court #130, Woodstock www.dwellingplacemovement.org Empowerment Tabernacle 507 Industrial Drive, Woodstock 770-928-7478 www.EmpowermentTabernacle.com The Factory 9872 Main St., Woodstock 770-517-7265 www.thefactoryministries.org Faith Family 5744 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-4560 www.ffcacworth.com Fivestones Church 1358 Sixes Road, Canton 770-720-2227 www.fivestonesga.com Fresh Springs Worship Center 1910 Eagle Drive, Suite 100, Woodstock 678-557-9841 www.freshspringsworship.com Fuente de Vida (Fountain of Life) 205 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-880-3135 www.fdvida.org God’s Rolling Thunder Latimer Hall, 103 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock www.godsrollingthunder.org His Hands 550 Molly Lane, Woodstock 770-405-2500 www.hishandschurch.com Hope Church 6576 Commerce Parkway, Woodstock www.HopeChurchAtl.com Iglesia Mana Para Siempre, Inc. Bilingual church Spanish & English 452 Milton Drive, Canton 678-880-8750 www.iglesiamanaparasiempre.com Life Bible Church 124 P. Rickman Industrial Drive, Canton lifebiblechurch.com Life Church 300 Adam Jenkins Memorial Drive, Suite 108, Canton 770-847-0170 www.lifechurchcanton.com Ministry House 347 Holly St., Canton 678-459-2347 http://MinistryHouse.org Momentum 659 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock

678-384-4919 www.MomentumChurch.tv New Covenant Bible 1095 Scott Road, Canton 770-479-6412 www.newcovenantcanton.org New Life Church 154 Lakeside Drive, Canton 770-345-2660 www.newlifecanton.com North Atlanta Church 6233 Old Alabama Road, Acworth 770-975-3001 www.northatlantachurch.org Oak Leaf 151 East Marietta St., Canton 678-653-4652 www.oakleafcanton.com Prayer & Praise Christian Fellowship 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-928-2795 www.prayerandpraise.org Resurrection Anglican 231 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0040 www.rezwoodstock.org Revolution 125 Union Hill Trail, Canton 770-345-2737 www.therevolution.tv Sojourn Woodstock 8534 Main St., Woodstock 770-769-7495 www.sojournwoodstock.com Sovereign Grace 471 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-494-2100 www.sgcatlanta.org Thrive Chapel 11303 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-835-5795 www.thrivechapel.com Towne Lake Community 132 North Medical Parkway, Woodstock 678-445-8766 www.tlcchurch.com Unity North Atlanta 4255 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 678-819-9100 www.unitynorth.org Victory 4625 Highway 92, Acworth 770-794-7366 www.victoryga.com Woodstock City Church 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock 678-880-9092 www.woodstockcity.org Woodstock Christian 7700 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-8238 www.woodstockchristian.org Woodstock Church of Christ 219 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8838 www.woodstockchurchofchrist.org Woodstock Church of the Nazarene 874 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-366-7515 www.wcnga.com Woodstock Community Church 237 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8990 www.wcchurch.org TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Advertisers

For advertising rates and information Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com

December 2018

ANIMAL/PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES Animal Atlanta 770-591-0007 www.AnimalAtlanta.com

35

Cherokee County Animal Shelter www.cherokeega-animals.org

89

Towne Lake Pet Care 404-907-9778

5

ATTORNEYS/LEGAL SERVICES Debranski & Associates, LLC 770-926-1957, ext 306 www.Debranski.com Imbriale Injury Law 678-445-7423 www.imbrialeinjury.com

9

40

Nelson Elder Care Law, LLC Inside front 678-250-9355 www.NelsonElderCareLaw.com AUTOMOTIVE Aspen Falls Auto Spa 770-591-3630

54

Levitt Orthodontics 770-516-6100 www.levittortho.com

Next Step Ministries 770-592-1227 www.nextstepministries.net

69

Park Pediatric Dentistry of Woodstock 73 770-926-9260 www.PediatricWoodstockDentist.com

Papa’s Pantry 770-591-4730 www.PapasPantry.org

78

Towne Lake Family Dentistry Inside Back 770-591-7929 www.TowneLakeFamilyDentistry.com

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

37

Chloe's Auto Repair 770-575-8800 www.ChloesAutoRepair.com

7

Christian Brothers Automotive 770-926-4500 www.cbac.com

1

Joe's Automotive 770-517-2695

37

Woodstock Quality Paint & Body 770-926-3898

47

Towne Lake Business Association www.TLBA.org CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

CHIROPRACTIC Joint Chiropractic, The 678-214-4449 www.thejoint.com

35

Ribley Chiropractic 770-592-2505 www.ribleychiro.com

18

Towne Lake Family Chiropractic 770-592-1877 www.townelakechiro.com

44

COMPUTERS Cherokee Computer Guys 678-889-5900 www.ccrguys.com

3

39

DENTAL

BEAUTY SALON & SPA

39

1922 Men's Grooming Salon 678-483-8900

15

élon Salon 770-427-8698 www.elonsalon.com

27

Dentistry for Woodstock 770-926-0000 www.dentistryforwoodstock.com

1

9

Main Street Nail Studio 770-928-2662

42

Canton Dental Town 770-622-1515 www.dentaltownsmiles.com

Salon Gloss 770-693-6968 www.salongloss.biz

51

Salon & Spa Venéssa 770-591-2079 www.salonvenessa.com 94 TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Gentle Dental Care and Georgia Dental Implant Center 770-926-2784 www.georgiadic.com Kragor Orthodontics 770-485-8827 www.kragorortho.com

EDUCATION/TRAINING Giving Care Training Center 678-831-0830 www.givingcareathome.com

89

Stem Hangar, The 678-224-6188 www.thestemhangar.com

30

St. Joseph Catholic School 770-428-3328 www.stjosephschool.org

56

Citadel Professional Services, LLC 770-952-6707 www.CitadelWealthCare.com

23

Graham Bailey Edward Jones 678-445-9525 ww.edwardjones.com

5

Hill & Hill Financial, LLC 770-672-0402 www.hillandhillfinancial.com

57

FITNESS

(Cosmetic, Family, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics & Pediatric) Baird & Baird Family Dentistry 770-517-0444 www.BairdFamilyDentistry.com

33

FINANCIAL SERVICES

CREDIT UNION Credit Union of Georgia 678-486-1111 www.CUofGA.org

Williams Orthodontics 770-592-5554 and 770-345-4155 www.DrWilliamsOrthodontics.com

5

Burn Bootcamp 68 706-289-9762 http://woodstock.burnbootcamp.com R2 Total Fitness 678-809-7833 www.r2totalfitness.com

33

FUNERAL SERVICES

13

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Woodstock Funeral Home and Cremations 770-926-3107 www.woodstockfuneralhome.com

9

HEALTH & WELLNESS CBD American Shaman of Woodstock 33 833-OIL-HOPE www.CBDWoodstock.com IVMD Hydration & Wellness www.ivmdsolutions.com

41


Your CBD Store 770-627-3512 www.cbdrx4u.com

45

OPTOMETRIST Eyes on Towne Lake 770-702-5996 www.eyesontownelake.com

HOLIDAY EVENTS

43

Cruise Planners, Kathy Faisal 678-445-5235

35 45

85

Eagle Watch Golf Club 404-960-9225 gary.weller@clubcorp.com

83

79

Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 678-494-4251 www.elmstreetarts.org Etowah Eagles Tip Off Club www.etowaheaglesbasketball.com

73

80

Holiday Lights at Veterans Park

80

Barefoot Fotos www.BarefootFotos.com

73

5

Beth Fornuto Photography 770-846-3848 www.bethfornuto.com KBG Photography www.KBGphotographyblog.com

Bryan Plumbing Services 770-826-5277

PHOTOGRAPHY

Budget Blinds 678-540-1615 www.BudgetBlinds.com/Woodstock

47

Casey's Painting 678-445-9661 www.caseyspainting.com

23

Atlanta North Dermatology & Skin Care 770-516-5199 www.atlantanorthdermatology.com

CFM Electrical Services 678-614-9661

61

78

Governors MedSpa & Concierge Medicine Cover, 48, 49 678-888-5181 www.governorsmedicine.com

7

Northside Cherokee Pediatrics 678-388-5485 northsidecherokeepediatrics.com

ClearView window cleaning & pressure washing 770-926-1960 www.ClearViewAtl.com Coleman Home Services 770-294-9667 www.colemanhomeservices.com

PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL SERVICES

35

Enhance Floors & More 770-565-3808 www.enhancefloors.com

53

Handy Handyman, The 404-316-1490 www.thhmga.com

65

L. Bean Interiors 770-824-8386

40

Mr. Junk 678-Mr-Junk1 www.MrJunk1.com

45

Atlanta Communities, Tara Daigle 404-925-6351

Pike’s Professional Painting 770-516-0045

45

Precision Painting & Remodeling 678-234-9668 www.precisionpaintingatlanta.com

61

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Tomlinson Team, The 770-365-6193 www.thetomlinsonteam.com

Reliable Heating & Air 770-594-9969 www.ReliableAir.com

55

RPM Landscape & Pavers 770-597-5175 www.rpmlandscapeandpavers.com

41

Towne Plumber 770-257-7503 www.towneplumber.com

42

INSURANCE Geico Jerry Sorrels 770-565-9696

61

59

62

Northside Hospital Cherokee 11 www.Northside.com/Cherokee-Sports

Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 770-974-2390 www.DrFixitPHD.com

Plastic Surgery Center of the South 64 770-421-1242 www.plasticsurgerycenterofthesouth.net Rebound Physical Therapy 678-445-9799 www.ReboundPTClinic.com

70

WellStar & Mayo Clinic 770-956-7827 www.wellstar.org/mayo

67

REAL ESTATE & RELATED SERVICES

Broadus Realty Group 404-583-8856 www.broadusrealtygroup.com Harry Norman Realtors, Gina Riggs 404-860-0159 770-422-6005

63

RECREATION & ENTERTAINMENT

Holiday Lights of Hope www.HolidayLightsofHope.com HOME IMPROVEMENT & REPAIR

Windsong Properties, Grace 770-516-3678 www.WindsongLife.com

39

Georgia All-Star Gymnastics 770-516-2654 www.ga-allstars.com

8, 54

Young Life 470-274-7712 cherokeecounty.younglife.org

25

RESTAURANTS/FOOD Copper Coin Coffee Inside front, 37 470-308-6914 www.coppercoinwoodstock.com Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 www.FireStoneRestaurants.com

41

Menchie's Towne Lake 770-924-4016

23

Reformation Brewery www.ReformationBrewery.com

31

Smallcakes — A Cupcakery 678-324-1910 smallcakeswoodstock.myshopify.com Tavern at Towne Lake 770-592-9969 www.tavernattownelake.com

8

35

RETAILERS/ SHOPPING 65

3

25

Neighborhood Nest, The 770-485-5898 www.TheNeighborhoodNestGA.com

7

Queen B’s Boutique 770-380-6794 www.QueenBsWoodstock.com

57

Wild Birds Unlimited 770-928-3014 www.wbu.com/woodstock

25

SENIOR LIVING/ SERVICES

Kurt & Sheila Team, Keller Williams Back Cvr 404-954-2486, 678-494-0644 www.kurtandsheilateam.com

Grey Fox Errands 770-975-2787 www.greyfoxerrands.com

69

Coldwell Banker, Mahria Heller 71 O:770-429-0600, C:404-731-5748 www.homesbymahria.cbintouch.com

Lodge at BridgeMill, The 770-479-4639 www.TheLodgeAtBridgeMill.com

57

Soliel Laurel Canyon 678-500-8099 www.SolielLaurelCanyon.com

Oaks at Towne Lake 770-592-2195 www.oaksseniorliving.com

19

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018

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Since 1996, we have brought relevant, uplifting and reader-driven content to readers. We publish Around Acworth, Around Canton, Around Woodstock and TowneLaker. We look forward to serving you, our readers and advertisers, every month. Thank you for your continued support and participation in making this truly your community magazine.

Front row, from left, Laura Latchford, Christie Deese, Patty Ponder and Jackie Loudin. Back row, Michelle McCulloch, Denise Griffin, Candi Hannigan, Karen Flaig, Katie Beall and Katherine Amick. Photo by Beth Fornuto.

At Aroundabout Local Media, we believe the world functions at the community level: diverse groups of people living in close proximity, sharing commonality of culture, values and local pride, developing safety nets for those in need, and helping each other to live richer lives. It is our heartfelt desire to contribute to the fabric that helps make a community happen. Through our magazines, we aim to provide everyone in the communities we serve with uplifting, interesting information about the community they are proud to call home. We encourage you to send us your photos, ideas, stories or anything else you think the community would like to know about. It’s your community. It’s your magazine. Look on page 6 for our contact information.

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TOWNELAKER | December 2018