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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Contents

48 & 49 On the Cover Williams Orthodontics Photo by Rebekah Gregg

October 2018

16

24

58

In Every Issue

Features

4 Around Towne

16 Teddy the Spaz Man

From rescue dog to social media sensation, this pup is living the life. Fans of 38 Special filled the Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater for the final show in the Woodstock Summer Concert Series.

24 Living with Down Syndrome

Woodstock mom tells how support, resources are essential for new and expectant parents. Early detection, hereditary checks are key to surviving a breast cancer diagnosis.

58 Friends Share a Sweet Hobby

46 Everyday Angels 50 Towne Lake Dining Guide 52 TLBA 62 Downtown Woodstock Dining Guide 70 Library Events 74 Rob’s Rescues

34 Healthy Assessments

10 Community News 28 Chamber Ribbon Cuttings

22 Last Concert of the Season

8 Celebrations

76 Community Calendar 84 School News 88 Recent Home Sales

Two Cherokee County men take up beekeeping and enjoy sharing their love of the complex insects.

90 Clubs & Orgs 92 Church Listings 94 Directory of Advertisers

Advertising Patty Ponder, ALM President 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com www.townelaker.com TowneLakerMagazine

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

@Townelaker

townelakermagazine

Contributors 30 72 81 40 54 59 35 56 80 20 68 26 42 34 60 58 24 26 18 72 32 38 86 16 36 44

Don Akridge Paul Baumgartner Christopher Brazelton Stacy Brown Michael Caldwell Joshua Fuder Dr. James Haley James Imbriale Barbara P. Jacoby Dan Jape Bryce Jones Dr. Ambre and Andy Kragor Kurt & Sheila Johnson Katie Lang Ann Litrel Jackie Loudin Stephanie Meredith Dr. Christa Nelms Deidre Parker Bill Ratliff Susan Schulz Elisabeth Stubbs Hannah Suh Diane Warren Shelley Winter Dr. Amber York


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AROUND TOWNE

The

People, The Places and The Pleasures that make Towne Lake

Letter From the Editor

What’s New

It’s time for some accountability, people. Remember the recycling letter from the editor I wrote in April? Well, let’s see how I’ve been doing. You know tasks are always better when you have to report to someone. It’s easier to exercise with a partner, lose weight in a support group, or have a doctor overseeing your progress toward better health. So, faithful TowneLaker readers, you’re with me on this journey whether you like it or not. As I’ve gotten more interested in recycling, I’ve done a bit of research on the subject. I’d like to be a good steward in every area of my life: Drive the most efficient routes so i don’t waste gas; prepare just enough food for a meal and a leftover day; donate clothing I no longer wear. I don’t want to be wasteful. I’m proud to say I’ve done well. I haven’t made as many trips to the recycling centers as I thought I would, but that’s more a result of being empty nesters with less waste to disperse. Perhaps what makes me the most proud is the quality of our magazines at Aroundabout Local Media. Not only are you holding a beautiful, glossy publication that allows your community photos and ads to shine, but you can have the satisfaction in knowing it’s completely recyclable. Rather than me summing it up for you, read what the Waste Management website (www.wm.com) has to say.

The Hair Bar, which has opened at 2054 Eagle Drive, specializes in hair tied extensions, color, cuts and balayage. Hours are 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays, closed Sundays and Mondays. 678 214-5059. www.thehairbarwoodstock.com. On Facebook as @thehairbarwoodstock.

Magazines are made from paper that's been buffed and coated to achieve a glossy appearance. Next, the paper is covered with a white clay that makes color photographs look more brilliant. The shiny appearance does not contaminate the paper at all. About 45 percent of magazines are being recycled today. Recycled magazines are used to make newspaper, tissues, writing paper and paperboard. Recycling just one ton of paper saves enough energy to power the average American home for six months, so don't be afraid to recycle your old magazines. It's the right thing to do. A Common Misconception Some consumers think glossy paper can't be recycled. That may have been true in the early days of recycling, but no longer. With today's recycling technology, nearly all community recycling programs accept glossy magazines and catalogs for recycling.

I spoke with Jessica Porter, chair of the Going Green committee at the Cherokee Chamber of Commerce, who validates this information. She is a great resource for getting on board the green initiative, either for your company or personal goals. At www.cherokeechamber.com, under the programs tab, click on Going Green for a list of recycling centers and guidelines. It’s clear we all need to recycle more; let’s do what we can to raise that 45 percent to 100 percent. I’m on board, but I do have a problem. I want to hold on to my magazines. And judging from the calls and emails I get from our readers, so do you. Why don’t we call that a form of recycling … I think it falls under the reuse category. Let’s keep those issues on our coffee tables and refer to them again and again. But when it’s time to toss a few of the older issues, don’t hesitate to drop them in the recycling bin and know that you are making a difference. It's the right thing to do.

Candi Hannigan is the executive editor of TowneLaker. She has lived in Cherokee County since 1987. Send your comments or questions to Candi@AroundaboutMagazines.com.

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Northside Hospital has a new

Sports Medicine Network, and

has hired Dr. Vonda Wright as chief of sports medicine. The new network combines the expertise of three practices – Northside Cherokee Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Northside East Cobb Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, and The Orthopedic Sports Medicine Center of Atlanta – to provide comprehensive medical, surgical and concussion care in Atlanta, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Buford, Cumming, East Cobb, Holly Springs, Midtown, Roswell and Woodstock.

What’s Coming At press time, Blue Ridge-based

Canoe, a retail shop that features

bags and jewelry, was set to open Oct. 1 at 450 Chambers St. in Woodstock. Details available at www.canoelook.com.

K Pop Korean BBQ is planned for the space between Johnny’s Pizza and Georgia Floors in the SouthPointe at Towne Lake shopping center. Details on the opening date weren’t available at press time.

On the Horizon? At press time, the Chrysler/ Dodge/Jeep dealership proposed

for Ridgewalk Parkway is waiting for zoning finalization, according to Woodstock City Manager Jeff Moon. The 12-plus acre property is on the south side of Ridgewalk Parkway and to the west of Ridge Trail.


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COMMUNITY BOARD The TowneLaker Community Board consists of well-respected community leaders from different walks of life. Our board members assist us in many ways, including contributing to our magazine and providing valuable feedback.

Kurt Johnson, co-founder of the Kurt and Sheila real estate team, has been involved in real estate most of his adult life. He and his wife have lived in Cherokee County for more than 13 years, their three children have attended county schools since the oldest started first grade at Bascomb Elementary. Kurt and Sheila work hard to promote Cherokee County and all it has to offer. Ann Litrel is an artist and writer whose nationally

published work includes decorative art, paintings for private and corporate collections, and writing and illustration for a range of publications. Ann lives in Towne Lake with her husband and coauthor Dr. Mike Litrel and their two sons. Ann can be reached at Ann@annlitrel.com.

Publisher Aroundabout Local Media, Inc. ALM President Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com Executive Editor Candi Hannigan 770-615-3309 Candi@AroundaboutMagazines.com Managing Editor Jackie Loudin 770-615-3318 Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Art Director Michelle McCulloch 770-615-3307 Michelle@AroundaboutMagazines.com Page Designer Laura Latchford Laura@AroundaboutMagazines.com Controller Denise Griffin 770-615-3315 Denise@AroundaboutMagazines.com Market Support Associate Christie Deese Christie@AroundaboutMagazines.com Copy Editors Bill King, Eliza Somers

Scott Coleman is the owner of Coleman Home

Services, a residential construction firm based in Towne Lake. He and his wife Lisa have three grown children and have lived in Towne Lake for 23 years. Scott and Lisa are supporters of the local special needs community. Scott enjoys the outdoors, cooking and his annual fishing trip to Alaska.

Bettie Sleeth has lived in Towne Lake for more than 12 years, and helped start the Kiwanis Club in Cherokee County. She's been active in service leadership programs in Cherokee County schools, helping bring Key Clubs to Etowah, Sequoyah and Creekview high schools and a Circle K club at Reinhardt University. She's active at her church, Hillside United Methodist, and serves in many community service projects and activities. Lynne Saunders is the founder and executive director of Papa’s Pantry and The Master’s Training Center. Her employment classes are based on a book she wrote, “21st Century Keys to Employment.” Lynne has been married to Bill for 33 years and has three grown daughters and five grandchildren. Anthony Hughes, raised in St. Petersburg, Fla., has been a special education teacher since 2001. He teaches at E.T. Booth Middle School and moved to Woodstock in 2015 with his wife Jessica and sons Jacob and Gavin. They are excited to be a part of the Towne Lake community. Depending on the season, they spend a lot of time at any of the area’s sport fields or enjoying Lake Allatoona. 6

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

TowneLaker, a publication of Aroundabout Local Media, Inc., is a monthly community magazine. The magazine’s goal is to build a sense of community and pride in the Towne Lake and surrounding area by providing its residents with positive stories and timely information. It distributes a total of 16,400 free copies. Approximately 15,600 are direct mailed to homes and businesses and an additional 800 are placed in racks around the community. It also has 2,000+ digital viewers of the magazine online each month. TowneLaker welcomes your comments, stories, and advertisements. Editorial deadline is the 1st and advertising deadline is the 5th of the previous month. Subscriptions are available for $24 per year. Send check or money order to the address below. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the Editor/ Publisher and the Publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. TowneLaker is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the Publisher. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2018. TowneLaker 1025 Rose Creek Drive, PMB 380, Suite 620 Woodstock, GA 30189 For Advertising: Patty Ponder, 770-615-3322 Website: www.townelaker.com Volume 24, Issue 6

America’s Community Magazine


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Celebrations!

Anna Wolfe

Age 12 on Sept. 24 We love you! Mom, Andrew and Amelia

Congratulations!

Happy 30th birthday, Courtney! Many more, love always Ron and Andrea.

Juashua Sudeth and Katrina Morciglio plan to marry Oct. 6. We wish you many happy days and a wonderful adventure to come. Love Mom and Dad.

Happy second birthday, Archer! Sept. 30 Mama and Dada love you!

Happy birthday, Chon Bon! Age 6 on Oct. 11 Love Mom, Dad, Anderson and Penny

Happy 12th Anniversary, Christine!

I have been incredibly blessed by your love for the past 16 years. We will conquer many more mountains! Jason

ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE FREE! E-mail to: Jackie@AroundaboutMagazines.com November deadline is Oct. 10. Please specify TowneLaker. 8

TOWNELAKER | October 2018


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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COMMUNITY

YOUR LOCAL NEWS Cherokee County Grows at Fastest Rate in 10-County Region Cherokee County added 7,100 people in the past year and is growing at the fastest rate — percentagewise — in the 10-county Atlanta region, according to population estimates recently released by the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC). The county now has a population of 254,500. Cherokee has led the region’s counties in percentage growth since 2010. Cherokee’s growth continues a long-term trend in which the Atlanta region’s newer, outer suburbs have grown faster than older, inner suburbs. Cherokee grew by 2.9 percent between April 2017 and April 2018, and by 19 percent between 2010 and 2018 – both tops in the region. During the same time frame, Henry County, on the south side of the region, saw a 15 percent population increase.

Growth Since 2010 by the Numbers

2010

2017

2018

4,107,750

4,480,100

4,555,900

Cherokee

214,346

247,400

254,500

Clayton

259,424

275,300

279,400

Cobb

688,078

750,300

758,300

DeKalb

691,893

733,900

744,530

Douglas

132,403

140,900

142,800

Fayette

106,567

114,000

116,200

Fulton

920,581

1,002,800

1,020,370

Gwinnett

805,321

894,000

910,700

Atlanta Region

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Source: Atlanta Regional Commission

Population across the 10 counties has increased 11 percent since 2010 (compared with Cherokee’s 19 percent). Overall, the Atlanta region added 75,800 people in the past year, the second-largest increase since the Great Recession formally ended in 2010. The region’s growth was down slightly from a year earlier, when Change increased Average Annual population by 78,300. Change The Atlanta region is now home to 2017-2018 4,555,900 people, more than 25 states. 2010-2018 Jobs growth fueled the region’s population boom. The 29-county metropolitan statistical area (MSA), 75,800 56,019 as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, added more than 41,000 jobs between April 2017 and April 7,100 5,019 2018, ranking seventh in the nation (among the top 12 MSAs ranked by number of jobs). “The Atlanta region had strong 4,100 2,497 growth over the last few years as we emerged from the Great Recession,” said Mike Carnathan, manager of 8,000 8,778 ARC’s Research & Analytics Group. “People are moving here because jobs are plentiful, and because metro Atlanta offers a great quality 10,630 6,580of life.” The ARC is the official planning agency for the 10-county Atlanta Region, including Cherokee, Clayton, 1,900 Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas,1,300 Fayette, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry and Rockdale counties, as well as Atlanta and 2,200 73 other cities. The1,204 ARC serves as a catalyst for regional progress by focusing leadership, attention and planning resources on key regional 17,570 issues. For more details12,474 about the ARC’s population estimates, check out its latest Regional Snapshot at www.atlantaregional.org. 16,700 13,172


WHAT ADVANCED HEART CARE LOOKS LIKE.

Northside Hospital Cherokee was built with a team that is recognized for providing a high level of expertise in treating heart attacks, heart failure and stroke. Right here you have board certified cardiologists, nurses and expert staff to help you survive a heart attack and teach you how to live a healthy life. That’s a lifetime of care. For information visit Northside.com/Cherokee-Heart. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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YOUR LOCAL NEWS First Baptist Woodstock Names Hunt’s Replacement First Baptist Church of Woodstock has named Jeremy Morton to co-pastor and work alongside Johnny Hunt as the church's longtime leader prepares to transition into a new role with North American Mission Board (NAMB), according to an announcement at www.fbcw.org. Morton, senior pastor at Cartersville First Baptist Church, will eventually succeed Hunt as senior pastor. Hunt will make the final call on when that transition Jeremy and Carrie Morton with their children will take place. Zeke, Madie and Abe. Morton became the senior pastor of Cartersville First Baptist Church in the fall of 2013. Before that, he was senior pastor at Cross Point Baptist Church in Perry since the church's founding in 2002. Morton, who has been preaching since he was 16 years old, earned his bachelor's degree in Christianity from Brewton Parker College in 2004. He obtained his Master of Divinity in Biblical Studies from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary in 2007, and once he completes his dissertation, will receive his Doctor of Ministry in Expository Preaching from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas. In the beginning of 2019, Hunt will begin his fulltime position as senior vice president of evangelism and leadership at NAMB, where he will focus on equipping the current and next generation of pastors.

Drive-through Flu Shot Clinic to Open Get ready to drive-through and beat the flu at one of six public health drive-through flu shot clinics happening soon in North Georgia. Since 2008, public health departments in Cherokee, Fannin, Gilmer, Murray, Pickens and Whitfield counties have conducted these special flu shot clinics, making it possible for residents to drive up, roll up a sleeve, and get a shot while staying in the car. The clinic is limited to ages 18 and older. The types of flu vaccine that will be offered at the clinics are the fourin-one quadrivalent flu vaccine and the Fluzone high-dose vaccine for people age 65 and older. Quadrivalent flu vaccine protects against four strains of flu, including two influenza A viruses and two influenza B viruses. The Fluzone high-dose flu vaccine is for people 65 years of age and older, because it has four times the amount of protective antigen for immune systems that tend to weaken with age. The quadrivalent flu shot costs $25, while the high-dose shot is $65. Cash, Medicare, Medicaid, Aetna, BlueCross BlueShield Health and United Healthcare Insurance will be accepted, along with other forms of payment and insurance, depending on the county. The shots will be available in Cherokee County, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sept. 25 at Woodstock City Church, 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock. Call 770-928-0133 or 770-345-7371 for more details. For the schedule in the other counties, visit www.nghd.org. To learn more about influenza and flu protection, log onto the CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/flu. 12

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Cherokee DNOW 2018 Set for November Young people from churches throughout Cherokee County are participating in Cherokee DNOW 2018 on Nov. 9-10. DNOW, which stands for Disciple Now, is a gathering of youths from area churches, including First Baptist Canton, New Victoria Baptist, Church of the Messiah, Hopewell Baptist, and Hillside, Hickory Flat and Liberty Hill United Methodist churches. Cost is $40 per person. Register by Oct. 15 by contacting Darin Peppers at 770-289-2491 or darin@fpmetroatlanta.org.

Safer Public Transactions The Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office has set up public transaction locations around the county for people selling and buying items listed in classifieds, or on Craigslist, OfferUp, Letgo, etc. The locations, marked with signs, are well-lit and are video recorded spots, created to help make in-person transactions safer. Addresses are listed below.

• BridgeMill Precinct

9550 Bells Ferry Road, Canton

• Free Home Precinct

9253 Free Home Highway, Canton

• Hickory Flat Precinct

7675 Vaughn Road, Canton

• Oak Grove Precinct

100 Ridge Mill Court, Acworth

• Waleska Precinct

9081 Fincher Road, Waleska

• Traffic Enforcement Precinct 1190 Evenflo Drive, Ball Ground

• South Annex

7545 Main St., Woodstock

Sheriff Frank Reynolds at one of the county’s public transaction locations.


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If you fill your calendar with the activities that we’ve listed here, fall will come and go before you know it. Enjoy!

I n C h e ro k e e Oct. 1-31

Oct. 20

streets with creative scarecrows decorated by area businesses, schools and nonprofit organizations. Vote for your favorites at Dean’s Store at 8588 Main St.

in downtown Canton. Admission is free. Event features games, food, safety demonstrations and entertainment.

Scarecrow Invasion in downtown Woodstock will line the

Oct. 6

Holly Springs Autumn Fest is set for 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at

Barrett Park and will feature local arts and crafts vendors, food trucks, an entertainment stage and a kids zone with inflatables, rock climbing wall and double trampoline bungee. www.hollyspringsga.us.

Oct. 13

The Great Pumpkin Fest & Fun Run begins with the run at 9 a.m. at Veterans Park, 7345 Cumming Parkway, Canton. Checkin begins at 8:30 a.m. $15 to register, open to all ages. Festival begins at 10 a.m. with bounce houses, rope maze, petting zoo, craft show, food trucks, etc. Bring your own pumpkin to launch from a trebuchet. 770-924-7768. www.crpa.net.

Fall festival at Carmel Elementary School, noon-4 p.m., with bounce houses, carnival games, raffles and food. www.carmelpta.org.

Georgia Zombie Fest 5K Walk, Run, Creep or Crawl and

1-Mile Fun Run for all ages begins with registration at 5:30 p.m., 1-miler at 6:30 and 5K at 7 p.m. A virtual 5K is available for those who can’t attend the event. More details at www.georgiazombiefest.com.

Oct. 19

The fourth annual Bobcat BOOgie Fun Run and 5K, 6-8:30 p.m., starts and finishes behind Bascomb Elementary School. Event includes food, costume contests and more. To register, visit Active.com and search Bobcat BOOgie 5K.

Oct. 20

Georgia Zombie Fest will take over downtown Woodstock noon-9 p.m. Last year’s event drew about 8,000 fans to enjoy the live music, contests and zombie face painting. Sponsored by Cherokee FOCUS, a nonprofit that helps children and families in our county. Admission: adults $5, children age 11 and younger free, families up to six people, $20. www.cherokeefocus.org. 14

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Cherokee Family Fun Day and Children’s Health and Safety Expo will take place 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Brown Park

Oct. 26

Light Up the Night Community Fall Festival, 6-9 p.m. at the Cherokee Charter Academy, 2126 Sixes Road, Canton. Free entry, tickets for booths and inflatables, food and entertainment. www.ccaptc.org.

Oct. 27

Trick-Or-Try-It Halloween Open House is 1-3 p.m.

at the Cherokee County Aquatic Center, 1200 Gresham Mill Parkway, Canton. No admission cost. Programs to try include swim lesson evaluations (all ages), swim team tryouts (ages 5-18), PNO/camp craft room for kids, yoga (ages 15 and older), log rolling (ages 5 and older), water aerobics (ages 15 and older) and more. Visit www.crpa.net for more details.

Y Halloween Festival, 1-5 p.m., at the Cherokee Outdoor YMCA, 201 E. Bells Ferry Road. Hayrides, climbing tower, costume contest, trunk-or-treat, games, bounce houses and more. Rain date Oct. 28. No charge. Halloween festival in downtown Canton, in conjunction with the season’s last farmers market, includes a DJ; trick or treating with farmers, market vendors and downtown businesses; and a costume parade and costume contest. Farmers market hours are 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Oct. 31

KidsFest is 3-8 p.m., featuring trick or treat activities for

the younger ghouls and goblins, including moonwalks, DJ Ronnie, Tim the Magician, Adam the Juggler, games, stringed apple and pumpkin bowling games, face painting, costume contest and candy giveaway, all in the safety of The Park at City Center, 101 Arnold Mill Road in Woodstock. Costume contest begins at 6 p.m. Trophies and prizes for the funniest, scariest, cutest and best costumes. Also, vote for your favorite pet costume.


Out s i d e C h e ro k e e Weekends in October

Apple Pickin’ Jubilee, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., at Hillcrest Orchards

in Ellijay, with wagon rides, pig races, cow milking, a petting farm, mini golf, museums, jumping pillow and numerous playgrounds. Live entertainment and food. www. hillcrestorchards.net.

Oct. 6-7

Georgia Marble Festival at Lee Newton Park in Jasper,

open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Live entertainment, parade, children’s area, business expo, quarry tours, bingo and road race. www.georgiamarblefestival.com.

Oct. 13-14, 20-21

Georgia Apple Festival in Ellijay, with more than 300 vendors featuring handmade, hand-crafted items, and on-site demonstrations of how selected types of crafts are made. Antique car show on Oct. 13 at the civic center, parade on Oct. 20 at 10 a.m., downtown Ellijay. www.georgiaapplefestival.org.

Oct. 20-21

Gold Rush Days Festival in Dahlonega celebrates the 1828

discovery of gold in the area. More than 300 art and craft exhibitors and food vendors will gather around the public square and historic district. It’s estimated more than 200,000 people visit this event. www.dahlonegajaycees.com/gold-rush.

Oct. 19-20

The Kennesaw State University Owl-O-Ween Festival, open 6-11 p.m. Friday and 4-11 p.m. Saturday, features balloon glows, trick-or-treating, tethered hot air balloon rides, Oktoberfest beer garden, live music, vendor marketplace, sports bars, artist market, food trucks, roving entertainment, interactive kids area, a main concert stage and more. www. owl-o-ween.com.

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Social Media Dog Brings Smiles to Woodstock BY DIANE WARREN

I didn’t go in search of a social media dog. I simply wanted a sweet companion for our dog Roxie, who recently had lost her hound brother, Buddy. So, imagine my surprise that, three years later, Teddy has more than 65,000 social media followers, is a Hallmark “star,” (He can be be found on a 2018 Hallmark Christmas ornament), has been on TV, featured in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, has his own book, and is recognized by strangers on the street. We adopted Teddy from Big Canoe Animal Rescue in October 2014, after volunteers found him tied up outside their shelter one morning. We specifically wanted another hound, not for hunting (we’ve never hunted a day in our lives), but because hounds are funny, sweet and make excellent family pets. From day one, Teddy made the funniest faces I’d ever seen. And, boy, did he have energy. Watching him tear through the house with those long, gangly legs, with his ridiculously long tongue skimming the floor, he reminded us of a walking, talking cartoon character. He was funny, spunky and he cracked us up, thus earning the affectionate nickname Teddy the Spaz Man. Oh, and he loved the camera!

I immediately began sharing pictures of him on my personal Facebook page. My friends got such a kick out of his funny faces, they encouraged me to create a page for him. I thought, “Why not, he’s making my friends laugh, so this could be fun.” And, because Teddy’s expressions were so humanlike, I naturally gave him a voice by adding captions of what I thought he’d say if he could talk. Pretty soon, Teddy had this whole persona – a sarcastic teenage boy who loves to stir the pot and feud with his nemesis neighbor, Mr. Johnson, but who also has a heart of gold, is an animal advocate, and loves his family more than anything. As Teddy’s personality grew, so did the number of his followers, as well as the number of messages I received thanking Teddy for helping them get through a tough time. Whether it was an illness, a breakup, or just a bad day, Teddy was making a difference in people’s lives, and that felt incredible. One mom wrote that Teddy played a role in helping their family bond, because, each night before dinner, they come together to look at his Facebook page and get a good laugh. Knowing that Teddy makes a difference in people’s lives has been the best, and most surprising, part of all of this.

Teddy’s Dog Bar Helps Dogs Stay Cool Teddy’s all about spreading joy and kindness, and he’s brought that mission to downtown Woodstock the best way he knows how. He’s “opened” Teddy’s Dog Bar, a cooling-off station in front of his house, where dogs can grab a refreshing Barkarita (or you know, water), an organic treat, and even a water hose. This Georgia heat can be brutal on dogs, and after seeing two dogs collapse from heat exhaustion, Teddy thought it’d be a great way to help out his dog friends. So, next time you’re on the Noonday Creek trail, between the trailhead on Market Street and Woofstock, feel free to stop by Teddy’s Dog Bar. Who knows, Teddy and his fur siblings, Yogi and Violet, just might be outside. They’d love to meet you!

@teddythespazman @teddythespazman www.teddythespazman.com TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Four Things to Know About Tire Maintenance BY DEIDRE PARKER

Tire rotation.

Car maintenance goes beyond changing the oil and washing your car. It relies on your ability to tend to the general well being of the car. Keeping the tires in good working condition is important, not just to the car, but to the lives of everyone in the vehicle, and other people on the road.

This involves turning or interchanging the tire wheels to ensure an even wear and balance. An uneven tire wear can be caused by the weight, which is distributed unevenly due to the presence of the engine and other vital components. Most manufacturers recommend that the tires should be rotated every 6,000-8,000 miles.

Tire pressure.

Wheel alignment.

The first point of call should be a check of your tire pressure. Properly inflated tires serve as a protection against damage and reduce the possibility of the car spinning out of control. The recommended tire pressure differs from one tire to another. If you are unable to read the recommended PSI on the tire, check inside the frame of your driver door for recommended pressure.

Tire tread depth.

The importance of the tire tread depth cannot be overemphasized. It keeps the tire in shape by getting rid of water between the tires and the road, keeping the car under total control and reducing the risks of hydroplaning. Factors such as high-speed driving and hard braking can lead the tire to wear down. You easily can check to see if your tires are in need of replacement by inspecting the tread wear indicator bars across the tread.

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

This is the process of properly aligning the wheels of the car and axle to ensure that your car handles at its optimum level to increase the safety of the tires and safeguard them against premature wear and tear. Also, it protects the bearings and suspension. When your car’s wheels are out of balance, they can cause vibrations, especially when driving fast. Your tires’ roadworthiness is important to your safety, and the safety of those around you. Visit your local auto repair to make sure your tires are in good shape. Having a trusted mechanic review them will save you a lot of time, energy and resources.

Deidre Parker, owner-operator of Chloe's Auto Repair, holds an ASE certification and has extensive experience in the area of automotive repair.


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Why You Need a Furnace Tune-up BY DAN JAPE

It is important to have your furnace checked once a year by a professional for a tune-up. However, there are a few simple things you can check yourself to make sure your family is safe and warm this winter.

• Visually inspect the flue system of your furnace and water heater. The flue is the round galvanized pipe that takes

the unburned gas products and the carbon monoxide outside the home. It is located on the top of your furnace, and the water heater usually ties into the furnace flue. Carefully examine the pipe for holes or rust. Squeeze the round pipe and make sure you do not have rust-outs working from the inside out. Make sure the flue is solid and strong. You should not be able to easily crush the pipe with your hand. The flue should be sloping upward at all times and should be attached to both the furnace and water heater.

• Remove the top door to your furnace and, with a flashlight, carefully look for rust build-up inside the burners and the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is the compartment

that contains the burning of gas, and the burners protrude into the heat exchanger cells. Look for any rusty metal and flakes of rusted particles. Carefully examine the condition of the burners, looking for damage. If there is any rust in the heat exchanger, or on the burners, it has to be cleaned out. Check the front panel of the furnace for burned paint or hot spots. The panel should never get hot enough to burn the paint or the finish off the front or the

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

side of the furnace. The cause of burned paint is a heat exchanger that is not containing the heat of combustion, and can be a sign of a furnace that needs service or replacement.

• Have someone turn the furnace on while you observe the burners lighting. They should all light smoothly and evenly

without any whooshing sound or booming. Once the burners light, they should all burn blue, with a slight yellow tip of the flame. Wait until the fan and the blower start up, and watch for movement of the flame and watch for yellow in the flame. This can be a sign of a leaky heat exchanger or a rusted out exchanger. Turn the power switch off and the blower will stop. Watch the flame. If it stops moving and dancing around, this is a problem you should have checked out. Also, observe your pilot light for movement and yellow flame when the blower is running. Turn off your furnace power switch and see if the movement and the yellow flame change. • Change your furnace filter. This is a good time of year to change your air filter, since summer is over and the furnace has run many hours. A clean filter will allow proper airflow and efficiency on your system year-round.

Dan Jape is the owner of Reliable Heating & Air. He can be reached at 770-594-9969.


GYN

Surgical Specialists

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We are a full-service gynecologic practice that offers routine gynecologic care and the most advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures to treat a wide range of gynecologic conditions. Our board-certified physician and skilled robotic surgeon, Dr. Rama Rao, provides a patient-centered approach to women’s health care in a compassionate and trusting environment. We offer advanced diagnostic and treatment options for: • Cervical dysplasia • Endometriosis and pelvic pain • Ovarian masses

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A well traveled guitar.

Legendary Southern Rock Band Comes to Woodstock PHOTOS COURTESY OF ED SELBY

The band 38 Special closed out the 21st annual Woodstock Summer Concert Series on Sept. 8. In anticipation of the show, fans started setting up chairs on the Tuesday prior.

Don Barnes and Danny Chauncey entertain the crowd with their smash hit “Hold on Loosely.”

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018


Mayor Donnie Henriques welcomed the crowd.

The opening band for the evening was Shyanne.

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Living With Down Syndrome An article about Stephanie Meredith appeared in a recent issue of the Brigham Young University magazine, in a feature that recognized the service of one graduate in each of the 50 states. Since October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, we asked Stephanie to share her story. BY STEPHANIE MEREDITH

When my husband and I found out that our son Andy was born with Down syndrome 18 years ago, we were overwhelmed 23-year-olds who were worried about the future ahead of us. We wondered: Would people be kind to Andy? Would he be able to go to college or work or get married someday? We had so many concerns, and we were so fortunate that the day after our son was born, a woman who worked at the hospital showed us a photo of her son with Down syndrome and gave us a book. She helped us see that life could be happy and fun with our new baby. Unfortunately, we found out later that many other parents learning about the same diagnosis were not receiving the same kind of support and information. They often were given outdated or inaccurate information. Since that time, I’ve worked to provide support for new and expectant parents and create accurate, up-todate Down syndrome materials, which can be found at our National Center for Prenatal and Postnatal Resources where I work, at the University of Kentucky (Lettercase. org and downsyndromepregnancy.org). Our program has helped tens of thousands of families over the past decade to see what life with Down syndrome and other conditions looks like. Over a year ago, our son said he wanted to work at Publix, and took off on his bike to go apply for a job while I was cooking dinner. When I realized he’d left, I drove off in a panic to go pick him up. While I was driving, my husband called and cut through my frantic haze saying, “Could you have imagined when he was born that our biggest challenge at 16 would be that he took off on his own to go apply for a job?” Indeed. Publix was so impressed with his initiative that he was hired shortly thereafter, and I’m so proud of my teen son, who has worked for over a year, earned his Eagle Scout from Troop 50 of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, goes to every school and church dance with a wonderful crew of friends, and plans on going to a Kennesaw State University program for students with disabilities after he graduates from Woodstock High School in 2019. Our life truly is fun with all three of our children, and we are dedicated to supporting other families just beginning their journey. 24

TOWNELAKER | October 2018


Local Resources

Stephanie Meredith recommends the following groups for support.

Gigi’s Playhouse in Atlanta, Roswell: https://gigisplayhouse.org/atlanta

Down Syndrome Association of Atlanta: http://www.dsaatl.org Parent to Parent of Georgia: http://p2pga.org

Prom-goers, back row from left: Kate Meredith, Caleb Travis, Julia Cordner, Nels Schultzke, Kaylee Isaksen and Andy Meredith. Front row, Chris Isaksen and Spencer Schweiger.

Top 3 Truths About Down Syndrome

1.

People with Down syndrome are individuals with their own strengths and challenges, like everyone else. Andy is an amazing photographer and bike rider, but reading and math are harder for him. Others of his friends with Down syndrome are reading at grade level but may struggle with speech. One thing they have in common is that opportunities continue to improve for all of them.

2. 3.

Most parents and siblings of children with Down syndrome say their children have a positive impact on their entire family and increase their empathy for others.

There are more than 200,000 people living with Down syndrome in the U.S., and about 5,000 babies are born with Down syndrome each year, according to Meredith, who points to www. downsyndromeinfo.org for more details. “Our national program that supports new and expectant parents learning about a diagnosis of Down syndrome is the National Center for Prenatal and Postnatal Resources at lettercase.org and downsyndromepregnancy.org. “Based on a population of about 247,000 and an occurrence rate of about 1:800, there are probably about 300 people with Down syndrome in Cherokee County, but we don’t have solid numbers on that. The Down Syndrome Association of Atlanta has a community group in Cherokee County; Gigi’s Playhouse has a center in Roswell; and FOCUS (Families of Children Under Stress) has a Woodstock support group for parents (https://focusga.org/how-focus-can-help-you/comfort/ support-groups).”

Below, Andy and Stephanie Meredith in 2000. Photo by Justin Meredith.

People with Down syndrome can have bright futures, including meaningful employment, college and marriage, when given opportunities and supports.

3 Ways to Value People With Down Syndrome

1. 2.

If you know parents who have a baby with Down syndrome, tell them, “Congratulations,” and offer to listen. Never say, “I’m sorry.”

People with Down syndrome want friends and relationships, just like everyone else. So, invite our children over for parties, play dates and library field trips to start friendships that last a lifetime. These relationships can be meaningful and fulfilling on both sides.

3.

Be understanding about challenges, and encourage people with Down syndrome to reach their potential. Take the time to listen, teach and be patient, then sincerely congratulate their achievements and nurture their talents. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

25


Questions to Ask Your Orthodontist BY DRS. ANDY AND AMBRE KRAGOR

Are you an orthodontist?

Believe it or not, you do not have to be a specialist in orthodontics to provide braces or Invisalign. However, an orthodontist is a trained specialist who has an undergraduate college degree, four years of dental school training, and an additional two to three years of training at an accredited advanced specialty program. They only provide orthodontic care in their practice, focusing 100 percent of their time aligning teeth and dentofacial structures.

Are you privately owned or a corporation?

Asking this allows you to get a feel for the orthodontic practice and determine if it is in line with your style. After all, orthodontics is a process that lasts an average of one and a half to two years, so you want to feel comfortable with the practice you choose. Some people like being able to travel to different cities and see the same company for their orthodontic care in various offices. Others like a more family-owned private practice style.

Are you a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO)?

Only orthodontic specialists can become members of the AAO. Most orthodontists will have this displayed in their office

or on their website. This association ensures that its members practice within the highest standards of the profession.

Approximately how long will treatment take?

Orthodontic treatments last on average 18-24 months. If you receive an estimate over or under this timeline, it is important to ask why, and have your orthodontist explain to you the reason(s). Each patient is unique, and has different treatment needs and goals, so a variance in treatment time between patients is normal.

When is the ideal time for orthodontic treatment?

The AAO recommends every child have an orthodontic evaluation at age 7 to ensure no growth discrepancies exist that may require early intervention. However, a majority of patients seen at this age do not require treatment until much later. It is important to determine the best treatment timing for your child or yourself. The only way this can be assessed is to visit your orthodontist for a consultation. It also is never is too late to see an orthodontist.

Dr. Ambre Kragor, and her husband Andy, are orthodontists who practice in the Towne Lake/Woodstock area. 770-485-8827. www.KragorOrtho.com.

Proper Protection Can Save Your Hearing BY DR. CHRISTA NELMS

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the leading causes of permanent hearing loss, but it is 100 percent preventable if you take the correct measures. Ten million of the 40 million individuals who have hearing loss have been diagnosed with noise-induced hearing loss, according to the American Speech and Hearing Association. When an individual is exposed to a noise, as loud as a lawn mower, for more than 8 hours at a time, permanent damage most likely has occurred. The louder the noise, the less exposure time is needed to cause hearing loss. There are two primary types of hazardous noises: occupational noise, meaning factory or mechanical work, and recreational noise, like lawn equipment, loud music, power tools, firearms, motorcycles, etc. Unfortunately, there are unexpected noises that are difficult to predict, such as a loud explosion, or even a child’s toy. Studies have shown some children’s toys can emit sounds up to 120 dBA, which equates to the level of a jackhammer. Once the ear has been exposed to these sounds longer than the recommended exposure time, the tiny hair cells in the inner ear become damaged, and are unable to recover. This has an effect not only on one’s ability to hear sounds, but also on the ability to understand speech. NIHL also may present as a temporary threshold shift (TTS) after exposure to excessive 26

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

levels of noise. A TTS is a hearing loss that will recover over time, after exposure to the noise has ended. Research has shown that repeated TTS eventually leads to a permanent threshold shift. We live in a noisy world that does not seem to be getting any quieter. It is up to you to be aware of the noises around you and protect your ears. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides several strategies to help prevent noise induced hearing loss. • Become educated on the noise levels around you and the effect they can have on your hearing. There are even smartphone apps to help you measure environmental noise levels. • Use hearing protection and limit sound exposure time. You always can increase the distance between yourself and hazardous noise, which reduces the intensity of damaging sound delivered to your ears. • Remember to protect those who are young, and inform family and friends of the dangers. • Have your hearing tested annually by a doctor of audiology.

Christa Nelms, Au.D. is a Doctor of Audiology and provider at North Georgia Audiology in Woodstock. She has been practicing since 2000.


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Colour Express Incomparable to any other colouring or conditioning service known today, Colour Express imparts hair with beautiful colour, sensational shine and incredible condition-—all in 5 minutes. The perfect shades await you to emphasize your amazing hair cut while also allowing your skin tones and eye color to emerge. élon Salon, your hair colour headquarters, will make your seasonal transition beautifully easy. Make an appointment today for the most gorgeous hair imaginable.

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27


Cherokee Chamber of Commerce

3605 Marietta Highway, Canton 770-345-0400 • www.cherokeechamber.com

EVENT CALENDAR Oct. 4, Nov. 1

Good Morning Cherokee Breakfast: 7 a.m.

October sponsor is Cobb EMC. November sponsor is WellStar Health System. Breakfast meetings offer current and future chamber members the opportunity to conduct business and network with more than 200 fellow business leaders. Held at the Cherokee County Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway in Canton. Register by emailing gini@ cherokeechamber.com or online.

1

Oct. 11

Power Hour 10-11 a.m. Networking with fellow business owners.

2

Oct. 17

RIBBON CUTTINGS 1. Marco's Pizza Woodstock 32068 Eagle Drive, Woodstock, 770-516-5220, www.marcos.com 2. Squares on 92 6080 Highway 92, Acworth, 770-928-2654

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

B.L.A.S.T.T. workshop 9-11 a.m. Understanding Your Website Traffic Using Google Tools. Digital Marketing Trends for Small Businesses presented by Drew Tonsmeire, KSU Small Business Development Center.

Oct. 23

Business After Hours 4:30-6:30 p.m. Presented by AT&T at Rocky’s Lake Estate, 2700 Cox Road, Woodstock.


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Tax Changes Around the Home

How the tax cuts and jobs act impacted three popular deductions. DON AKRIDGE, MBA, CFP®, CPA/PFS U.S. MARINE CORPS VETERAN – EMORY UNIVERSITY ALUMNUS

Three recent tax law changes impact homeowners and home-based businesses. They may affect your federal income taxes this year. The SALT deduction now has a $10,000 yearly limit. You now can deduct only up to $10,000 of some combination of (a) state and local property taxes or (b) state and local income taxes or sales taxes, annually. (Taxes paid or accumulated due to trade activity or business activity are exempt from the $10,000 limit.)1, 2 If you have itemized for years and are continuing to itemize this year, this $10,000 cap may be irritating, especially if there is no state income tax or a very high state income tax where you live. In the state of New York, for example, taxpayers who took a SALT deduction in 2015 deducted an average of $22,169.1, 2 Connecticut, New Jersey and New York recently passed laws in reaction to the new $10,000 limit, essentially offering taxpayers a workaround – cities and townships within those states may create municipal charities through which residents may receive property tax credits in exchange for charitable contributions.2 So far, the Internal Revenue Service is not fond of this. IRS Notice 2018-54, released in May, warns that “despite these state efforts to circumvent the new statutory limitation on state and local tax deductions, taxpayers should be mindful that federal law controls the proper characterization of payments for federal income tax purposes.” Both the IRS and the Department of the Treasury are preparing rules to respond to these state legislative moves.2, 3 The interest deduction on home equity loans is not quite gone. The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act seemed to suspend it entirely until 2026, but this winter, the IRS issued guidance noting that

30

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

the deduction still applies if a home equity loan is arranged to help a taxpayer “buy, build or substantially improve” the involved house. So, you may still deduct interest on a home equity loan if your receipts show that the borrowed amount is used for a new 30-year roof, a kitchen remodel, or similar upgrades. Keep in mind that the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act lowered the limit on the total home loan amount eligible for the interest deduction each year – it is now set at $750,000. That cap applies to the combined home loans a taxpayer takes out for both a primary and secondary residence.1, 4, 5 The home office deduction is gone, unless you are self-employed. Before 2018, if you dedicated an area of your home solely to business use and defined it as your principal place of business to the IRS, you could claim a home office deduction on Schedule A. This was considered a miscellaneous itemized deduction. Unfortunately, the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act did away with miscellaneous itemized deductions. If you work for yourself, though, you still can claim the home office deduction using Schedule C, the form used to report income or loss from a business activity or a profession.5 Are you strategizing to maximize your 2018 federal tax savings? Are you looking for ways to legally reduce your federal and state tax obligations? Talk to a financial professional to gain insight and plan for this year and the years ahead. continued on page 87

Don Akridge is president of Citadel Professional Services, LLC, an independent firm, founded in 1994 and conveniently located off Chastain Road between I-575 & I-75 in Kennesaw. 770-952-6707.


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Two Locations

Northside Cherokee Pediatrics provides compassionate, comprehensive medical care for patients from birth to 18 years of age. Our physicians and staff offer the quality one-on-one care you demand to keep your child happy and healthy including, short wait times, same-day appointments and personalized care at a location convenient for your busy lifestyle. Northside Cherokee Pediatrics Offers: • Exceptional Care: Board-certified physicians. Attentive & complete care for children birth - 18. • Timely Access: Same-day appointments available. Shorter wait times. • Efficient Follow-up: Timely feedback and reports. Next day test results available.

NorthsideCherokeePediatrics.com

Holly Springs 684 Sixes Road, Suite 220 Holly Springs, GA 30115

678-388-5485 Towne Lake 900 Towne Lake Pkwy, Suite 306 Woodstock, GA 30189

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HELPING HANDS

Giving Hope to the Most Vulnerable BY SUSAN BROWNING SCHULZ

Mother Teresa said, “Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love.” Walking through the doors of Changed 2 Ministries (C2M), I learned about a whole bunch of small things being done with great love. And not just with big love, but boundless joy. C2M’s founder, Randy Richardson, shared with me a stack of adorable handwritten notes from children who attend C2M’s Friday evening Bible Club for kids. Mirian wrote: “Dear Randy, You are the best person. You are an angel who helps us change our lives. You do many things for us like going to camp and having fun. Thank you.” Richardson started C2M in 2008. One of its main outreaches is called Church on the Street. While driving through Canton, he noticed a group of men standing outside a gas station. He stopped and asked what they were doing. He learned that they were trying to find jobs. He listened to their stories of hardship and daily struggles to provide for their families. Richardson was moved to share food, clothing and the gospel message with these men. There were 150 people at the first outreach. Church on the Street still meets today. Now it is held at its donation center at 2484 Marietta Highway in Canton. C2M’s aim is to give hope to the most vulnerable in our community by serving no-income to low-income families, meeting basic human needs.

Randy Richardson 32

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

C2M's Bible Club for Kids is a populace event.

Richardson understands intimately what hopelessness feels like. An addict for most of his adult life, he was radically changed after hearing the gospel message at age 42 in 1999. He now goes to the most desperate in our community and shares the same life-changing news he heard. God redeemed him out of the depths of a horrendous life of addiction. It is quite obvious Randy is supposed to be here to serve, because after almost dying from liver failure, he made it through a successful transplant in October 2006. Changed forever, he now lives to serve. “Most of the folks we minister to here are Hispanic,” Richardson said. “Along with our generous volunteers and donors, we help many with food, furniture, diapers and beds.” Language doesn’t seem to be a barrier at C2M. Maybe that’s because everyone understands the universal language of love. When asked why he named his nonprofit Changed 2 Ministries he said, “When I first got saved, the Lord changed me, so I knew when I started sharing Jesus with others, he could change them, too. That is why I named the ministry Changed 2 Ministries.” Where there are people in need, C2M will be there lending a hand, a smile and an encouraging word. Everyone is welcome to take part. There are plenty of ways to plug in and help at C2M.

• Every Monday: Church on the Street Canton, 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. at the donation center* (food, clothing, household goods and furniture, and diapers are distributed). • Every Tuesday: Celebrate Recovery, 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church Woodstock. • Every Friday: Kids Bible Clubs, 5 p.m. at the donation center.* • Every Saturday: Worship service, 6-8 p.m. at the donation center* • Ongoing: Prison Visitation Richardson’s wish is to one day purchase the donation center building. “If we can purchase the building, the work being done here will continue on after I am gone,” he said. Donations of food, clothing, diapers, furniture, cars and monetary help are always welcome. To donate, volunteer or find out more, visit www. changed2ministries.com. For larger items such as furniture, please call in advance: 404-732-6735 or email randy.richardson@ changed2ministries.com. *Donation Center is located at 2484 Marietta Highway, Canton, GA 30114 Susan Browning Schulz is a Bible teacher, author, wife, and mom of three grown children. She lives and plays along the Etowah River and loves serving at Woodstock City Church.


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Assessing Your Risk of Cancer BY KATIE LANG, MS, CGC

At-home DNA kits are more popular than ever. You can learn where your ancestors are from and find distant cousins and other long-lost relatives. Much can be learned from creating your family tree, especially if you include a family health history. Ten percent of all diagnosed cancers are inherited. If your family has a history of cancer, you now have the power to learn more about hereditary cancer risks for you and your children. What is hereditary cancer? It’s when there are mutations (changes) in specific genes that are passed down from either parent. These mutations greatly increase a person’s risk of developing certain types of cancer. There have been dozens of genes discovered that can increase a person’s risk to develop cancer. If a mutation in a cancer-causing gene is identified within a family, it has the potential to help the entire family better understand their risks and be proactive. It could also help those individuals in the family who did not inherit the mutation, since these genes are passed down only 50 percent of the time. If you have a strong family history of cancer, genetic testing can help you assess your personal risk and make a decision regarding preventive measures and access earlier or more frequent cancer screenings. Testing can provide information on risks for a wide range of cancers including breast, colon, prostate, ovarian and uterine cancers. And women aren’t the only ones who should consider genetic testing. Men can inherit and pass on these genetic mutations. In fact, 50 percent of all mutation carriers are men even though they are tested at far lower rates than women. It’s important to note that a genetic test does not diagnose cancer. It can only give you risk information – tell you about gene mutations that you have that increase your risk of developing cancer. Genetic counseling is recommended before and after any genetic testing to help you learn the implications for the results you receive and options for next steps. Part of the consultation includes the cost of testing. Many people don’t realize that the cost for testing dropped considerably in recent years, and it may be covered by insurance. Knowledge is power, and genetic testing can be the first step to taking action against your cancer risk.

Katie Lang, MS, CGC, is a certified genetic counselor and coordinator of the Cancer Genetics Program at Northside Hospital Cancer Institute. 404-851-6284. northside.com/cancer-genetics-program.

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

General Cancer Support Group A general cancer support group meets at 12:30-2 p.m. on the third Wednesday each month in the Galleria at Northside Hospital Cherokee, 450 Northside Cherokee Blvd. The hope is to eventually add a breast cancer support group, according to Christy Andrews, executive director of Cancer Support Community Atlanta, a division of Northside Hospital Cancer Institute. For more details, visit www.cscatlanta.org.


Catch It Early

Five types of breast cancer screenings.

REAL. LOCAL. SAVINGS.

BY JAMES HALEY, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

One out of every eight women will have breast cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Early detection is THE key to fighting cancer. If breast cancer is caught in the beginning stages and before it spreads beyond the breast, the five-year survival rate for women is 99 percent. (Data: American Society of Clinical Oncology) The screenings are simple. There are several types, so you want to discuss the best option with your doctor and select the one that is right for your situation. These are the most common choices.

• Mammograms. The most frequently recommended type of breast cancer screening, they require the use of X-rays. Mammograms can show the early stages and late stages of tumors through X-ray imaging. It is recommended that women 40 years old or older have mammograms every one to two years. • Clinical breast exams. This type of screening checks for abnormalities and lumps in the breasts without invasive tools. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network shares that the breasts and underarms are usually part of an annual examination. • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI relies on magnetic fields to generate images. This is considered to be a more invasive procedure and is reserved for high-risk patients who meet strict criteria, such as those with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, when the standard diagnostic testing has failed to give a conclusive answer, etc. • BRCA testing. This test helps determine your genetic risk for breast cancer. This type of screening looks for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations that increase the risk of having breast cancer. This screening is often offered as an option for patients who are at specific high risk for cancer. • Thermography. This procedure uses a camera with heat-sensing technology to create a map of your breasts. Changes in temperature in the tissue can be a sign of tumors. This is another less invasive screening option.

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Breast cancer kills 40,000 women every year, but screenings can help with early diagnosis and increase the rate of survival. An annual exam and screening to check for breast cancer is recommended. You can discuss the best exams and tests with your doctor, to feel confident about your screening choices. Whatever you do, don’t delay your annual exam.

James Haley, M.D. is a double board certified OB/GYN and urogynecologist with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists. www.cherokeewomenshealth.com. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

35


Dignity for Those Living with Dementia BY SHELLEY WINTER

The number of people diagnosed with dementia is rapidly increasing. If you have a loved one living with dementia, you may ask how you can help make their lives as normal as possible. Preserving their dignity and honoring their wishes will bring them a lot of comfort and reassurance. Here are some ways to help maintain a sense of self-worth.

1. 2.

Every person has likes and dislikes. This includes respecting their spiritual beliefs, the foods they prefer to eat, and the things they like to do. Don’t be condescending, patronizing or disrespectful. Speak kindly and compliment them genuinely and generously. Don’t have conversations about them in their presence as if they were not there. It can also involve not using such words as bib, diaper or baby-talk words like potty. Answer questions with patience, no matter how many times you may have to repeat your answer. Your loved one’s cognitive and physical capabilities will change over time. Allow them to do as much as they can, such as bathing or feeding themselves. Let them help with light chores. Give them tasks they can accomplish to help maintain their independence but don’t expect more from them than they are capable of doing. Find the strength in their current capabilities. This may even help delay the progression of the disease.

3.

4. 5.

Carefully plan for successful outings or trips. Consider the distance and time of day of the trip. This will make you and your loved one more comfortable. Prepare family members and friends for any changes that may have happened since they last saw the person with dementia. This is particularly important for family gatherings or holidays, and may also include calling ahead to a restaurant and speaking to the manager or host/hostess about seating arrangements or special diets. Keep it simple. When you're speaking to him or her, provide one piece of information or one instruction at a time and wait before proceeding to the next one. Give the person time to process information or instruction. He or she is still perfectly capable of understanding you; they may just need a little extra time to process what you've said.

6.

Treat those living with dementia with respect, patience and dignity. It might take a little bit more time on your part, but it will be well worth your effort. Remember the Golden Rule: treat others the way you would like others to treat you.

Shelley Winter, community relations director at Oaks at Towne Lake, has worked in assisted living/memory care communities since 2008. 770-592-2195. shelley@oaksseniorliving.com.

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Perimeter North

Medical Associates

Welcoming New Patients! A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Dr. Mian is a board-certified physician in family medicine who is proud to serve the families of Canton and North Georgia with the highest standard of care. Dr. Mian works alongside our experienced nurse practitioner, Leslie Jackson NP-C, serving each patient with the time, attention and personalized care you and your family deserve. We offer early office hours for your busy schedule, same-day appointments for sick visits and a convenient, new location in the BridgeMill Community.

Haroon Mian, M.D.

Services: • Care for patients aged 2 and older • Chronic disease management and acute illness care • Physical exams for school and sports participation • Immunizations for children and adults

NEW Location! 10515 Bells Ferry Road, Suite 200 Canton, GA 30114 Hours: 7:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Call 770-395-1130 to schedule an appointment PNFM.com

Leslie Jackson, NP-C

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

37


Quartz countertops require no sealing.

Countertops That Meet Your Needs and Style BY ELISABETH STUBBS

Is your home in need of new countertops? Currently, the popular choices are granite and quartz.

Granite is a natural material. It is mined and, like any natural rock, there are variations in the appearance of the slabs. It can stain or crack if not properly cared for, and it must be sealed periodically. Quartz countertops are a manufactured product, and therefore have a more consistent appearance than granite. Quartz countertops are made from quartz dust and resin, so they are nonporous, and require no sealing. We are seeing a migration away from granite, as many clients tell us they want something different. While the starting price point for granite (around $3,000 per slab, fabricated and installed) is lower than quartz, there is a much wider price range on granite that is generally based upon availability/scarcity of the stone. Where the stone is quarried also affects the pricing. Granite that comes from deeper beneath the earth’s surface is rarer, and more costly. Marble is another consideration for some people. Marble is much more porous than most granite, and requires more vigilant maintenance and sealing. 38

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

Today’s quartz countertops offer an extremely realistic marblelike visual and are easier to take care of in a heavy-use area like a kitchen, so many homeowners choose quartz. In fact, today’s best-selling product nationwide is calacatta marble quartz designs, available from most major manufacturers. You always want to take the time to visit the stone yard and select your granite or marble slab(s) in person. Remember, you are purchasing a natural stone product that is guaranteed to have variations from the sample. Some stones have far more variation than others. Even a single granite or marble slab will possess a certain amount of color variation from one end to the other.

Design Tip

When choosing countertop colors, consider your kitchen’s lighting. If your kitchen has little or no natural light, select a color that has a significant amount of white, gold or light-colored specks. Dark colors like deep blue, mahogany and black look best in areas that receive substantial light.

Elisabeth Stubbs is one of the owners of Enhance Floors and More, one of Atlanta’s top-rated flooring dealers, located in Marietta.


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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

39


Woodstock Honored at Governor’s Conference BY STACY BROWN

The city of Woodstock’s tourism professionals were recognized at the 2018 Georgia Governor’s Tourism Conference in Atlanta. Hosted by the Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) and the Georgia Association of Convention and Visitors Bureaus (GACVB), the annual industry event brought together more than 400 tourism industry professionals from across the state. The Woodstock Visitors Center was awarded the Al Burruss Award for Creative Expression, recognizing the renovation that took place at the center earlier this year. Georgia Department of Economic Development Deputy Commissioner for Tourism Kevin Langston noted that the renovation project preserved the history of a significant building while creating an innovative space to welcome and inform visitors. “Communities all across Georgia feel the positive impact that the tourism industry has in our state,” said Langston. “As we work to expand our reach in attracting visitors from across the globe, our efforts would not be possible without the contributions of Georgia Tourism teams as well our tourism industry partners.” Tourism Manager Kyle Bennett accepted the award on behalf of the Woodstock Visitors Center, along with Economic Development Director Brian Stockton, historian and center founder Juanita Hughes and myself. Mayor Donnie Henriques, Downtown Development Authority Chair Perry Tanner, State Rep. Michael Caldwell and Program Manager Mitzi Saxon also attended the annual event. The award was presented by Langston, Georgia Association of Convention and Visitors Bureaus President Rashelle Beasley and Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Pat Wilson. 40

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

From left: Rep. Michael Caldwell, Mitzi Saxon, Stacy Brown, Brian Stockton, Kyle Bennett, Juanita Hughes, Donnie Henriques and Perry Tanner.

“Georgia’s tourism industry is a significant contributor to our economic health, generating a record $63.1 billion in economic impact, and employing more than 460,000 Georgians,” said Wilson. “Our tourism industry professionals continue to welcome a record number of visitors to our state each year. I thank them for their dedication to making Georgia a top vacation destination, and for ensuring the tourism industry maintains its success well into the future.” Renovations were completed by local contractor Robert Conner and included the addition of a second restroom and exposing the 113-year-old brick walls. A wall was constructed providing for a gallery area to feature local art and history displays, historical record storage and workspace, and an updated seating area. Custom information

racks and modern retail displays were constructed by local artisan Ben Richter of the Woodstock Wood Stock. Since the reopening of the center, staff has seen an increase in the number of visitors, and an improvement in visitor engagement and satisfaction. The Woodstock Visitors Center welcomes approximately 15,000 visitors a year to the area. It is one of Georgia’s Regional Visitor Information Centers, and the staff includes two Georgia certified travel planners. The center is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m, Mondays through Saturdays.

Stacy Brown is the marketing and tourism coordinator for the city of Woodstock. She can be reached at sbrown@ woodstockga.gov.


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TheLodgeatBridgeMill.com Facebook.com/TheLodgeatBridgeMill TOWNELAKER | October 2018

41


Selling a Rental Home With No Tax Consequences BY KURT & SHEILA JOHNSON

Let us start by saying we are not attorneys or CPAs, and it is always advisable to consult with both when deciding on the best investment strategy for your specific circumstances. With that out of the way, we will share with you one of several strategies for selling investment properties tax free (tax deferment for now at least). This method is referred to as a 1031 exchange. A 1031 exchange can be done with any property that has been held for investment purposes or for productive use in a trade. These 1031 exchanges are administered by a third party in conjunction with the closing attorney when you sell the property you are exchanging. You can sell the exchange property to anyone for any purpose, but the proceeds from that sale must be sent to the third party administering the exchange. You then have 45 days to identify the replacement property. This can be any property from any seller, but the purchase of the replacement property must be completed within 180 days of the sale of the exchange property. The exchange administrator holds the proceeds from the sale of the exchange property and then tenders these on your behalf to complete the purchase of the replacement property. In this way, the IRS permits you to make this tax-free exchange, because you have not had use of these funds for other purposes. You must replace the exchanged property with

42

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

investment real estate of equal or greater value to defer the total amount of taxable profit. Any real estate can be exchanged for other real estate as long as the use of the property being exchanged is the same (“like-kind�) as the property being exchanged for (both for investment purposes or for productive use in a trade). You could exchange a single family home for land, a duplex or a shopping center, etc. Consider if you were approaching retirement age and had 20 rental properties and grew tired of managing multiple properties. You could sell the 20 properties and use the proceeds to buy a beach home. The rules require that the beach home be used for investment purposes for a minimum of 24 months before you could move into it and recharacterize the property as your primary residence and forego paying the

taxes resulting from the sale of the 20 rental properties. This is an amazing way (albeit a little complicated) to earn a living with rental properties for decades and ultimately pay no tax on the sale of these properties. This is a fairly complex method of selling real estate to defer taxes, and we glossed over many caveats and small print (in the interest of keeping this article brief and informative). Before considering this strategy, speak to a CPA, attorney and 1031 exchange administrator. If your investments include real estate, you should seriously consider this method. Kurt and Sheila are a topproducing real estate team that lives in Towne Lake and has served Cherokee County for more than 15 years. www.KurtandSheilaTeam.com


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

43


Stay Pain-Free During Your Daily Commute BY AMBER YORK, DC

Most of us have been subjected to the stress and tension that comes with driving around town, whether it’s a commute into Atlanta, shuffling your kids back and forth from school, or driving to the corner market. If you have ever experienced low back pain after driving for any period of time, you are not alone. Between 30 percent and 60 percent of people have reported pain that was caused or made worse by periods of driving. While many factors can play a role in an uneasy commute - traffic, vehicle type, forceful acceleration/ deceleration, the placement of your foot pedals, driver’s seat - there are a handful of ways to reduce the stress and keep the back pain at bay. Start by adjusting your seat. Make sure you are in a comfortable position before you pull out of the driveway. Can you check all of your mirrors without straining the neck? Is your lumbar support actually giving you support? Make sure to empty your pockets; no cellphones or wallets, especially in your back pocket, since this can lead to misalignment of the spine. Be sure to sit up straight with your knees slightly higher than your hips and avoid overreaching for the steering wheel, a position that can lead to increased stress in the low back, neck, shoulders and wrist.

If you have a long commute or are taking a road trip, take the time to stop and stretch. You are not designed to sit in one position for long periods of time. When we do, the muscles and joints tend to stiffen. Plan ahead and make an extra pit stop or two, about every two hours, to keep your body in motion. For the daily commuters, try utilizing your heated seat option. Turn your seat warmers on for 10-15 minutes at a time to help loosen tight and stiff muscles and increase blood circulation. Be sure to move a little in your seat. Any motion is better than sitting still, even if it’s just adjusting your seat, changing positions or pumping your ankles to keep the blood flowing. As always, if you are experiencing prolonged or severe periods of pain, consult with your trusted healthcare provider for a thorough evaluation. Pain can be a sign of a more serious health condition.

Dr. Amber York is a Life University graduate specializing in low force adjusting at Towne Lake Family Chiropractic.

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JOIN US AS A MEMBER FOR A DAY: CHRIS CONNOLLY | chris.connolly@clubcorp.com | 404.960.9225 *Offer expires 10/31/18 and may not be combined with any other promotion or discount. Membership is contingent on successful completion of Club’s enrollment process. Membership offer may vary depending on category and classification of membership selected and may require a loyalty agreement. The O.N.E. program and corresponding benefits are subject to certain restrictions and exclusions. Alcohol, service charges and applicable taxes are excluded. Participating clubs subject to change. Benefits are subject to the benefit terms and conditions, which may be found on clubcorpnetwork.com. All offers are subject to availability. Other restrictions and exclusions may apply. Call for details. © ClubCorp USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 42313 0918 EA

44

TOWNELAKER | October 2018


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

45


EVERYDAY

Identifying people in need in our community.

Everyday Angels is honored to share the story of Towne Lake’s beloved Donley family, who, for the past 25 years, have blessed everyone they meet. Trent and Michelle Donley moved to Towne Lake in 1992 to begin their family. During the birth of their second child, Savannah, they learned she had severe challenges. At the time, there were no quick DNA tests to analyze her case. It took several days before Savannah was diagnosed with Trisomy 9, a rare chromosomal disorder in which the entire ninth chromosome appears three times (rather than twice) in some cells of the body during development. “There were less than 100 children diagnosed with this condition, so doctors didn’t give us much hope. When she was finally able to go home from the hospital, the staff literally gave us instructions on what to do when we found her unresponsive,” Trent said. “Aside from some challenges with seizures and pneumonia around her first birthday, Savannah began to thrive. While limited and slow in her physical and mental development, she was becoming very social. Determined to defy her odds, Michelle and I pursued nutritional support, advanced speech, physical and occupational therapies all over the Southeast to help our daughter advance and communicate beyond her capabilities.” The Donleys always wanted a big family despite potential risks. “We felt strongly that we wanted more children, and knew God would give us what he wanted us to have. I wouldn’t trade our decision for anything,” Michelle said. When their oldest daughter, Payton, was 4 ½ and Savannah was 3, Michelle gave birth to Sam, a healthy boy who is a junior at University of Alabama. In October 2001, they welcomed their fourth child, Jacob, who also was born with Trisomy 9. Jacob faced more challenges in his first year than did Savannah. “He has been hospitalized a few other times Savannah Donley. throughout his 16 years, but generally has been an active and happy child. Jacob has been greatly blessed by the trail that Savannah has blazed for him, and so many of his challenges seemed less daunting at the time, due to our experience with this disorder,” Trent said. Throughout the past 20 years, Savannah and Jacob and the entire Donley family have become well known within Cherokee County special needs programs with teachers, aides and transportation staffs. 46

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

Trent and Michelle with Savannah, Sam, Payton and Jacob.

On Mother’s Day, the Donleys faced their greatest challenge and fear, as Savannah became lethargic and was rushed to the emergency room, experiencing a crash of her lungs, heart, liver and kidney functions. She was given a less than 50 percent chance of survival. “Each day at St. Joseph's began with a doctors huddle that felt a lot like being in an episode of ‘House,’ with each specialty bouncing different ideas on what might have caused the initial incident, and what would likely happen in the future. Savannah spent 27 days in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), where she received a tracheotomy and feeding tube, and then transferred to DeKalb Hospital Long Term Care (LTAC) hospital in attempt to wean her off the ventilator that kept her breathing,” Trent said. For 78 days, Trent and Michelle commuted to be with Savannah as they took turns caring for Jacob at home. Trent and Michelle had to take a leave of absence from their jobs for 13 weeks. On July 31, Savannah came home, where she is happy and has made improvements. She is still dependent on constant heart and oxygen monitoring, with one family member “on call” each night. Despite her improvements, she has a long way to go with breathing, eating, and overall strength and mobility. “Thankfully, Savannah has already had extensive experience defying those who have counted her out, and we are hoping to work to a full recovery and get her off this ventilator. We've been incredibly blessed with help from family, friends, and our church at Hillside UMC, throughout this crisis. Our oldest daughter, Payton, has commuted home from graduate school nearly every week since May, and assumed nearly full-time duties helping with her little


Hey Towne Lake,

You Can Join!

LIVE WORK WORSHIP PLAY

sister. Michelle and I would likely have already dropped without her consistent and strong support,” Trent said. The Donley family is unique and exceptional. To witness their grace, unconditional love, patience and strength is awe-inspiring. You will never see anyone in this family sweating the small stuff. Everyday Angels would like to rally our compassionate community to provide relief for this precious family. Savannah's medical bills now total more than $750,000; out-of-pocket expenses for co-pays, caregivers and therapies total more than $5,000 monthly. If you have not made that charitable tax-deductible contribution this year, why not give and know where 100 percent of it is going? We also ask you to cover Savannah, Michelle, Trent, Payton, Sam and Jacob in prayer as they navigate this journey of Savannah's healing. "Savannah is a child of God, and labels and boundaries cannot change who he created her to be. She was put on this earth for a purpose, and she is not finished. She has work to do, smiles to share, joy to spread, and love to promote. Please pray that she continues to move forward," Michelle said. "But I will restore you to health and heal your wounds,’ declares the Lord ..." Jeremiah 30:17 You may donate through Everyday Angels (501c3) or a gofundme site created by friends: www.gofundme.com/f9dhs-savannah-smiles. Everyday Angels is a 501(c)3 nonprofit serving Cherokee County since 2000. If you would like to make a tax deductible donation, please visit www.everydayangels.info to donate via Paypal or send your donations to: Everyday Angels, PMB 380, 1025 Rose Creek Drive, Suite 620, Woodstock GA, 30189. One hundred percent of your funds will go to the family you specify. Also, if you know of a special need within your community that you would like to share, please send an e-mail to aaeverydayangels@ gmail.com for consideration and qualification.

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#DoYouCU TOWNELAKER | October 2018

47


20

Celebrating YEARS

of Fun and Smiles

48

Sponsored Content TOWNELAKER | October 2018

I

t has been 20 years since Michael Williams, with fresh degrees in hand and a successful residency under his belt, came to metro Atlanta looking for the perfect spot to start his career as an orthodontist. He and his wife Ginger heard Woodstock was the place to be and, after a few visits, they decided to put down roots in Towne Lake. In 2018, Dr. Williams has two practices in Cherokee County (Woodstock and Canton), each a destination where patients can expect excellent treatment, the latest technology and a fun experience. The waiting rooms offer TVs, video games and a coffee bar. There is always music playing and a fun contest underway. The connection Dr. Williams makes with his patients is a big reason families choose Williams Orthodontics. Kids love his positive and upbeat attitude, which is evident from the time they first meet him to the day they finish their treatments. A recent testimonial from a happy mom says it well: “Having two boys in braces at the same time can be stressful. However, everyone is so flexible and makes everything so easy and carefree, and your eagerness to please really takes the stress away.” “I’ve always tried to be cutting-edge, but the office also has to be a fun place to go, so that patients look forward to their appointments,” Dr. Williams said. “Nowadays, the kids have as much say-so as the parents when choosing an orthodontist. I love helping kids, and adults, have straighter teeth and more confident smiles.”


PHOTOS BY REBEKAH GREGG WILLIAMS ORTHODONTICS PATIENTS

Dr. Williams must be doing something right. It’s evident in the Aroundabout Local Media Readers’ Choice polls that he is a community favorite. Williams Orthodontics was chosen the top orthodontist in the TowneLaker, Around Woodstock and Around Canton competition for the past three years, and has been the top choice of TowneLaker readers since the contest began almost 20 years ago. The orthodontist’s passion for creating beautiful smiles just keeps growing, and he’s constantly equipping his office with the most efficient tools to make correcting teeth as simple as possible. “We are totally computerized,” Dr. Williams said. “3-D X-rays, digital scanners, digital printers, and computerized charting and imaging streamline the orthodontic process.” The Latest and Greatest Good Impressions: Gone are the days of impressions made with goop that spills out over the sides and threatens to slide down the throat. With his i-Tero digital scanner and printer, Dr. Williams takes

video images that are stitched together to make a 3-D image, or model, of the teeth. He uses those models to create clear retainers. 3-D X-rays: The I-CAT 3-D scanner uses low radiation to capture a 3-D radiographic image of the patient’s skull, showing the teeth, bone and airways. “We can see more detail than on a traditional 2-D X-ray, using lower radiation,” Dr. Williams said. “The I-CAT and i-Tero are the latest technologies in the industry. They aren’t just cool. They help us provide the most accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment.” Quality Treatment Dr. Williams leads a patient-centered office that strives for exceptional results and excellent customer service. He sees his craft as being as much an art as it is a science. “You have to have a vision in your mind, and the knowledge and experience to get the intended results.” To make sure he’s at the top of his game, Dr. Williams has gone through multiple testing processes and applications to earn certifications that will assure current and

FOLLOW THE FUN!

future patients get the best treatment possible. In addition to his educational accomplishments (see list of credentials), Dr. Williams is nationally certified by the American Board of Orthodontics. This certification is achieved by less than 30 percent of orthodontists. Membership in the Edward H. Angle Society, a prestigious, honorary orthodontic study group that trains and tests orthodontists, is another accomplishment that makes Dr. Williams proud. Dr. Williams also is a former president of the Georgia Association of Orthodontists. “Our goal is to develop a smile that is not only beautiful and natural-looking, but one that establishes proper health and function,” he said. “We maintain the highest level of care for our patients by being perpetual students and always striving to provide our patients with latest technologies and advancements in orthodontics.” To schedule a complimentary consultation, call 770-592-5554.

DrWilliamsOrthodontics.com

Dr. Michael Williams Education • Bachelor of Science degree from Ole Miss. • Doctor of Dental Medicine degree from the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry. • Hospital Dental Residency at the University of Alabama (UAB), where he received a certificate in Hospital/General Practice Dentistry. • Specialty degree in orthodontics from UAB. • Master of Science in Orthodontics from the UAB School of Dentistry.

Offices WOODSTOCK

770-592-5554 145 Towne Lake Pkwy, Suite 201 Woodstock, GA 30188

CANTON

770-345-4155 205 Waleska Rd, Suite 1A Canton, GA 30114 TOWNELAKER | October 2018

49


TOWNE LAKE AREA DINING CUISINE

BKFST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAYS SPIRITS RESERV.

Cancun Mexican Grill, 4430 Towne Lake Parkway 770-693-4680

Mexican

no

$

$

open

full bar

no

Cheeseburger Bobby’s, 2295 Towne Lake Parkway 678-494-3200, cheeseburgerbobbys.com

American

no

$

$

open

no

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Soup/Salad/ Sandwiches

$

$

$

open

no

no

American Irish

no

$

$$

open

full bar

6+

Mexican

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Family Tradition, 4379 Towne Lake Parkway 770-852-2885, familytradition.net

Homestyle Cooking

$$

$$

$$

closed

no

no

GameDay Fresh Grill, 2990 Eagle Drive 770-693-6754, gamedayfresh.com

American/Burgers

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Thai/Sushi/ Chinese

no

$

$$

open

full bar

no

JD’s Barbeque, 6557 Bells Ferry Road 678-445-7730, jdsbbq.com

Barbeque

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Jersey’s Sports Bar, 6426 Bells Ferry Road 770-790-5740

American

no

$

$$

open

full bar

yes

Johnny’s Pizza, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-9494, johnnyspizza.com

Pizza/Pasta/ Salad

no

$

$-$$

open

full bar

no

Kani House, 2455 Towne Lake Parkway 770-592-5264, kanihouse.com

Japanese Steak/Sushi

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

yes

Sunday $$ $$-$$$ open full bar Brunch

no

China Fun, 1075 Buckhead Crossing 770-926-2671, chinafun88.com Corner Bistro, 2360 Towne Lake Parkway 770-924-1202, cornerbistrotl.com Donovan’s Irish Cobbler, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-693-8763, donovansirishcobbler.com El Ranchero, 1025 Rose Creek Drive 770-516-6616

Izumi Asian Bistro, 2035 Towne Lake Parkway 678-238-1899, iloveizumi.com

Keegan’s Public House, 1085 Buckhead Crossing #140 Irish/Pub 770-627-4393, keegansirishpub.net La Parrilla, 1065 Buckhead Crossing 770-928-3606, laparrilla.com

Mexican

no

$

$$

open

full bar

LongHorn, 1420 Towne Lake Parkway Steakhouse no $ $$ open full bar 770-924-5494, longhornsteakhouse.com Maple Street Biscuit Co., 2295 Towne Lake Pkwy #160 678-903-2161, maplestreetbiscuits.com

no call ahead seating

Southern

$

$

no

closed

no

no

Mellow Mushroom, 2370 Towne Lake Parkway 770-591-3331, mellowmushroom.com

Pizza/Pasta

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

NY Style Deli & Pizza, 2340 Towne Lake Parkway 678-426-7004

Pizza/Subs/ Bakery

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

no

no

Bakery/Soups/ Sandwiches

$

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Chinese/Japanese

no

$

$-$$

open

beer/wine

no

Chinese

no

$

$-$$

open

no

no

Panera Bread, 2625 Towne Lake Parkway 678-813-4809, panerabread.com Peking & Tokyo, 200 Parkbrooke Drive 770-591-8858, pekingandtokyo.com Song’s Garden, 4451 Towne Lake Parkway 770-928-8387, songsgarden.com

Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills Drive American 770-592-9969 see ad on pg 57 The Place, 1105 Parkside Lane 770-928-8901, theplacebargrill.com

Sunday $ $$ open full bar Brunch

no

Bar/Grill

no

$-$$

$$

open

full bar

no

Tuscany, 250 Cinema View Drive 678-453-0888, mytuscanyrestaurant.com

Italian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

10+

Volcano Steak & Sushi, 2990 Eagle Drive 678-498-7888, volcanowoodstock.com

Asian

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

full bar

no

full bar

yes

WOW Pho & Grill, 6422 Bells Ferry Rd Vietnamese no $-$$ $-$$ open 678-383-6099, wowpho.com see ad on pg 3

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

coming soon

$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

RESTAURANT

Casual and Upscale Restaurants


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

51


Towne Lake Business Association While the temperatures may be cooling, our enthusiasm for your business is not! As we begin the final quarter of this year, we have new goals to set, and others to complete, as do you. The Towne Lake Business Association is committed to bringing you informational and inspirational speakers to assist you in achieving your goals. Come join us to network with business leaders and be a part of the positive growth in our community. Guests always are welcome at the monthly lunch-n-learn events. Membership is $75 for a year. Visit www.tlba.org for details and a list of benefits. WHEN:

October’s Lunch-n-Learn Tuesday, Oct. 16, 12:15-2 p.m.

WHERE: The Tavern at Towne Lake Hills E. COST:

$14 (includes lunch)

SPEAKER: Jimmy W. Mercer, president of JWM & Associates, is a former chief of police and graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, VA. with 43 years of experience in the public and private sector. TOPIC:

Safety for Small Business and Corporate Security Thank you for supporting our community by “Keeping Towne Lake Dollars in Cherokee.” www.tlba.org

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

TLBA SPOTLIGHT Michelle Quay is the owner and independent financial adviser of Quay Financial Group, Inc. Quay has been licensed for 21 years, practices integrated financial planning by focusing on holistic approaches for individuals, small business owners and families. As an independent adviser, she strictly works for her clients and cares for their welfare. Quay creates tailored strategies to help clients pursue personal wealth now and through retirement. Services include retirement and life event planning, saving for college and advising on tax reduction strategies. Quay Financial Group, Inc. helps create an individual approach to financial planning in order to help clients stay on track with personal financial goals. Quay lives in Canton with her husband Chris and their two dogs, Avalanche and Joe. She is actively involved in her community in various networking and philanthropic groups. Michelle Quay is an investment adviser representative of, and, offers securities and investment advisory services through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc. (WFS), member FINRA/SIPC. WFS is separately owned and other entities and/or marketing names, products or services referenced here are independent of WFS.


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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A Republic, If You Can Keep It The word republic spawns from two latin root words: “res” meaning thing and “publica” meaning public, or more literally “the We live in the conservative stronghold of Cherokee County, which public thing.” The governing model of a republic is that of a people means at one point or another you have probably said the word who hold sovereign governing power and lend that power to a group “democracy,” and had a friend interject to remind you that we live in of elected officers to execute governance on their behalf. The idea is a “republic,” not a “democracy.” Although this interjection is rarely that the government is a “public thing” belonging to all the people. necessary for the conversation, your friend is absolutely correct. When studying Roman Republican artifacts, you’ll often see the The United States was crafted purposefully by our founders as letters SPQR imprinted on them. This stood for Senatus Populusque a republic, and not a democracy, but what does that mean, and Romanus, or By the Senate and People of Rome. Here in the why do people seem to care so much? The etymology of the word United States, we often see “We the People.” The most important democracy breaks into two greek words: “demos” difference in our American republic, though, meaning people and “cracy” meaning rule. At The United States comes in defining our “public thing.” first glance, the concept feels perfectly American. The res publica in America isn’t our was crafted People controlling our own destiny with a direct government, but our Constitution. Our major voice in every matter facing the state. difference, and why it matters that we correctly purposefully by True democracy is defined as a system that our children what form of government they our founders as a teach is governed by popular majority of all eligible have inherited, is the document that safeguards members or electors. However, our founders republic, and not each of our rights from our government itself. recognized the inherent risks associated with Rather than a government structure that allows a democracy ... democracy. 51 percent to take away the rights of 49 percent, An easy way to realize the dangers associated we have entrusted our individual sovereignty to with this raw form of governance is to think of democracy as a “public thing,” a Constitution, that governs even our government. two wolves and a sheep deciding what is for dinner. As you can The Constitution and our republic ensure that the rights of a voting imagine, a majority vote works out very poorly for the sheep. That minority are protected, no matter the outcome of a majority vote. is danger No. 1 in a true democracy: The rights of a minority are Our elected officials cannot simply vote to override the not protected and always are subject to the will of the majority. protections in the Constitution. Amending the document is a The second danger in a raw democracy is the tendency of process that requires an act of Congress and ratification by threemembers to vote for their own benefit, whether or not that quarters of the states, which means any 13 of the 99 state houses individual benefit is actually viable for the system at large. and state senates could deny an amendment, and the document As John Adams stated about this form of government, “It soon continued on page 87 wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.” Michael Caldwell is the state representative for District As social welfare programs and state spending are continually 20, which includes Towne Lake and Woodstock. He can enhanced to benefit a simple majority by the will of a simple be reached at 678-523-8570 or email him at Michael. Caldwell@house.ga.gov. majority, the inherent pyramid scheme that results from raw democracy inevitably comes crashing down. BY STATE REP. MICHAEL CALDWELL

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Expert Surgical Care for the Cherokee Community

Northside Cherokee Surgical Associates is a full-service practice specializing in general surgery. Our board-certified physician, Dr. Grant Wolfe, uses the latest minimally invasive robotic and laparoscopic techniques to treat the full spectrum of abdominal, thyroid, and soft tissue disorders. Grant Wolfe, M.D.

Treatments offered for: • Hernias

• Skin and soft tissue lesions

• Gallstones and gallbladder problems

• Thyroid and parathyroid disease

• Breast masses and cancer

• Diverticulitis and colon cancer

• Gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernias

• Stomach, adrenal gland, pancreas and spleen disorders

(770) 924-9656 • ncsurgicalassociates.com 900 Towne Lake Parkway, Suite 412, Woodstock, GA 30189 TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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The Facts About Georgia’s Move Over Law BY JAMES IMBRIALE ESQ.

Georgia’s Move Over Law states that motorists traveling in the lane next to the shoulder must move over one lane when emergency and utility vehicles are stopped on the side of the highway and operating in an official capacity. Vehicles included in the law include all first responders (law enforcement, fire, EMS), utility vehicles, DOT vehicles, HERO units and wreckers tending to an accident. The law is meant to keep officers and traffic violators safe from crashes with passing cars. The Move Over Law was passed in the aftermath of growing numbers of police, emergency technicians and DOT workers being killed during routine traffic stops, crash responses and highway construction projects around the nation. Right now, more than 30 states have such laws on the books, with fines that range as high as a thousand dollars or more in some states. The fine in Georgia can be up to $500. Failure to obey the Move Over Law can lead to consequences far more serious than fines. According to FBI statistics, traffic crashes claim the lives of more police personnel than any other cause of death in the line of duty, including shootings. Reports show emergency vehicles of all types have been struck while parked beside Georgia highways, even while their emergency lights were flashing. This law was meant to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities to police officers, paramedics, firefighters, tow truck operators and highway maintenance workers. The Georgia Move Over Law requires drivers to move over one lane when possible if an emergency vehicle with flashing lights is parked on the shoulder of the highway. And, if traffic is too heavy to move over safely, the law requires drivers to slow down below the posted speed limit instead, and to be prepared to stop.

Move Over Law: Georgia Code, Title 40-6-16. A. The operator of a motor vehicle approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle that is displaying flashing yellow,

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amber, white, red or blue lights shall approach the authorized emergency vehicle with due caution and shall, absent any other direction by a peace officer, proceed as follows: 1. Make a lane change into a lane not adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle if possible in the existing safety and traffic conditions; or 2. If a lane change under paragraph (1) of this subsection would be impossible, prohibited by law, or unsafe, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle to a reasonable and proper speed for the existing road and traffic conditions, which speed shall be less than the posted speed limit, and be prepared to stop. B. The operator of a motor vehicle approaching a stationary towing or recovery vehicle or a stationary highway maintenance vehicle that is displaying flashing yellow, amber, or red lights shall approach the vehicle with due caution and shall, absent any other direction by a peace officer, proceed as follows: 1. Make a lane change into a lane not adjacent to the towing, recovery, or highway maintenance vehicle if possible in the existing safety and traffic conditions; or 2. If a lane change under paragraph (1) of this subsection would be impossible, prohibited by law, or unsafe, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle to a reasonable and proper speed for the existing road and traffic conditions, which speed shall be less than the speed posted limit, and be prepared to stop. C. Violation of subsection (a) or (b) of this Code section shall be punished by a fine of not more than $500.00.

James Imbriale is a personal injury attorney at HartmanImbriale LLP. He has strictly practiced personal injury law for 27 years, and he works and lives in Towne Lake. 678-445-7423.


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Nothin’ Sweeter Than Local Honey BY JACKIE LOUDIN

Did you know that bears don’t raid beehives for the honey? I didn’t either. It turns out, bears are looking to consume the bees’ larvae, which are good sources of protein. The honey is merely a sweet byproduct of their foraging. That’s what I get for basing my knowledge of bees and bears on Winnie the Pooh. On the other hand, Bobby Thanepohn and Ryan McDonald (aka Mac) of Cherokee County have a wealth of knowledge when it comes to honeybees. They are apiarists, a fancy word for beekeepers. Both are University of Georgia certified beekeepers, and members of the Georgia Beekeepers Association and the Cherokee and Forsyth Beekeepers Club. The two have been friends since 2003, and enjoy hunting and riding motorcycles together. While sitting around a campfire on a hunting trip, the conversation revealed that each had started keeping bees. Since neither one likes to do anything halfway, they went all in, and soon realized they were about to have a whole lot of honey. “Our primary reasons for getting into beekeeping were the cool, sciency, animal-husbandry, entomology, gardening aspect of it,” Bobby said. "Then, the beehives grew. They grew organically, and the natural byproduct was honey.” Once they had given gifts of honey to all their friends and family members, the two

decided to sell the surplus honey at the Canton Farmers Market. That’s where you can find Bobee MacBee's most Saturdays, sharing their love and knowledge of all things related to honey and honeybees, with anyone who will listen. There’s one thing they want to stress: “Get into it for the bees, not the honey.” During my visit to their hives, Bobby and Mac made sure I learned a few things about keeping bees. I now feel smarter than even the most average of bears.

Fun Bee Facts

• Honeybees will fly up to 3 miles from the hive, or a 28-square-mile radius, in search of good nectar sources: dandelions, blackberries, clover. The bees will focus on a favorite source until it’s exhausted, often flying past something closer to the hive. • In the winter, bees disconnect their muscles from their wings. This renders them unable to fly, but still able to vibrate their wings, in order to generate heat for the hive. • Bees prefer a small window of temperatures in the hive - from the midto high 90s - and they will fan their wings and cluster to keep the temperature constant, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, no matter if it is 100 or -10 degrees outside. • Once the queen lays an egg, it takes three days for it to hatch into a larva. On day 21, a working bee emerges, and its first job is to clean its own cell.

Below, Inspecting the frames is an important part of keeping a hive healthy.

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The owners of Bobbee MacBee's showed Jackie how to safely hold bees in the palm of her hand.

• The lifespan of a bee in the springtime is only a few weeks. • Bees use stored honey for food to sustain them through the winter. • There are three kinds of apiarists: hobbyist (own less than 100 hives), sideliner (100-300 hives) and commercial beekeeper (300+ hives). Bobby and Mac are hobbyists. • The answer to every beekeeping question is: “It depends.” Many factors affect a hive’s ability to thrive. Eating local honey often is acknowledged by health advocates as a good way to tackle seasonal allergies. It’s important to find a local beekeeper as a source for honey, since most grocery store honey is not local, and has been heated and filtered, removing valuable enzymes and nutrients. If you can’t be a beekeeper, there are ways you can assist the honeybee population: plant flowering trees and shrubs in your yard, avoid pesticides, don’t mow as often, allow clover and dandelions to grow. While some of these suggestions may not be popular with your homeowners association, you can plant a small section of wildflowers or try container gardening as an alternative. Visit bobbemacbees.com for more information or search Facebook or Instagram


The Biology of the Honeybee BY JOSHUA FUDER

A mosaic of colors is created from the various pollens the honey bees gather. Photo courtesy of Bobbee MacBee's.

Bobby Thanepohn (left) and Mac McDonald are UGA certified beekeepers.

In May, I attended the Young Harris College-University of Georgia Beekeeping Institute. While I am not a beekeeper, I also am not a novice to beekeeping. In my role as a UGA Cooperative Extension county agent, I have a number of friends in various bee clubs. I even have two hives that a friend keeps at my house. In my two days at the institute, I learned that there is much more to these amazing creatures than most people realize, and I wanted to share my newfound bee knowledge. Bees have three body segments: head, thorax and abdomen. The head has five eyes; there are two on the side and three small eyes that look like dots on the top of the head. These three eyes are more like light sensors so the bee knows which way is up. These light-sensing eyes can get bees into trouble in snowy areas. They sometimes exit the hive when snow is on the ground, and if the reflected light from the ground is brighter than the sky, the bees will fly upside down before crashing into the snow. The thorax, the bee’s power center, is the location of the bee’s four wings and six legs. There are many bee look-alikes in the insect world. One way to distinguish a bee from a fly is the bee’s four wings. Flies only have two wings. The abdomen houses the internal organs, and the stinger is located at the base of the abdomen. The abdomen has seven segments and contains eight waxproducing glands. Wax is secreted in liquid form through segments four through seven until it cools and hardens. After it hardens, the hive workers collect it and form the hive’s cells. These wax scales are 3 millimeters across and 1 millimeter thick. It takes about 1,100 scales to make 1 gram of wax. Bees, like butterflies and moths, go through a complete metamorphosis, which includes egg, larva, pupa and adult life stages. With honeybees, what interested me was the time it takes them to progress from egg to adult. A queen completes this in as little as 16 days, whereas a worker, the female sister, takes 21 days. A drone, the male brother of the queen, takes 24 days. The difference is based on survival. When a colony needs to replace a queen, they must replace her fast so egg-laying can continue. It takes only three days for an egg to develop into a larva. A bee larva looks like a small grub or maggot. It is white in color, nestled into a cell and has no legs or eyes. During this stage, it increases 900 times in weight. But how can it grow this fast, molting its skin six times, if it is blind and immobile? The worker bees feed these voracious little eaters, making approximately 1,300 visits each day to feed them and clean their cells. After bees become adults, they have various roles in the hive. While we may think they leave the cells and start flying to flowers, only the oldest adults at the end of their lives are seen in gardens. The bees begin their adulthood as homebodies, working on important jobs like cleaning and capping cells, basically acting as the hive’s sanitation department. After they graduate from these tasks, they move to brood tending, comb building, grooming and food handling. It is not until around day 15-20 of their adult life that they begin outdoor tasks, like ventilating and guarding the entrance to the hive. An adult bee’s first foraging flight usually is not until about day 20. In the summer, most bees live only 35 days. Foraging flights are dangerous business given all the hazards: lawnmowers, windshields, birds, spiders and other predators. It makes sense that this is a task for the older, disposable bees.

Joshua Fuder is the agriculture and natural resources agent with UGA ExtensionCherokee County. Joshua lives on two acres in Canton, where he keeps a large vegetable garden, composts, maintains two beehives and cares for 30 fruit trees. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Road Trip to Paradise BY ANN LITREL

My old minivan barrels along the empty country road. We’re deep in northwest Georgia, where skeletal gray barns mark the passing fields. My niece Julia, headed to college soon, sits beside me. Seated in the back is her friend, Kim, a young artist I came to know when I mentored her senior project, a series of paintings. We’re headed for Summerville, Ga., to a place called Paradise Garden. Paradise Garden is the creation of Howard Finster, a self-taught artist, preacher, and sometime bicycle repairman. At age 59, Rev. Finster received what he called, “a command from God, to paint sacred art.” Finster put down his tools, cemented them into a walkway in his garden, and went on to create an astounding 46,991 pieces of art before his death at in 2001. His 2½-acre garden reputedly is packed with exuberantly colored paintings and fantastical folk art sculptures. The garden is famous, but I’m a bit nervous. Folk art can appear crude, and I’m not sure how Julia and Kim will like it. I issue my disclaimer: “I don’t know if this place will be fabulous or just a giant junkyard … we’ll find out.” I had been looking for a creative end-of-summer adventure with my niece. She’s a talented young woman, reserved and a bit intimidating in her cloak of private thoughts. From a young age she appeared to me a born writer; the summer she was 14 she produced a book of 80,000 words. Kim is an immensely talented young artist – she, too, quiet. But I had often seen her face alight with enthusiasm when we worked together, as she explained her vision for a painting. Our van glides through Summerville and pulls into the tiny parking strip for Paradise Garden. Towering in the background we behold a spire rising from a circular building, five stories stacked in layers like a giant pink birthday cake. This is the Folk Art Chapel, we see on the site map. Built by Finster – with no blueprints. We enter the garden gates. Inside is an unearthly feast for the eyes – a jungle of towering sculptures, hub caps and Coke bottles, arbors draped with flowering vines. Kaleidoscope mosaic paths flow

Decorated Garden Wall. 60

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under our feet. Small channels of water bubble and jump with tiny frogs and fish. A wondrous wall of imbedded stone faces evokes the ancient remains of a Hindu temple. Rising on stilts is a small playhouse glittering in the sun, shards of mirror plastering its every surface. We mount the stairs beneath to look inside and behold tiny reflections of ourselves, broken into a million prisms. A final video at the visitors center tells Rev. Finster’s story – he saw himself as a sacred artist, recording visionary prophecies and glimpses of a celestial outer space world revealed to him by God. His vision was to show the world the glories of God’s Paradise - "all the wonderful things of God's Creation, kinda like the Garden of Eden.” Over the years, as Finster’s garden grew, he became world famous, doing record covers for musical groups REM and Talking Heads, shows with New York galleries, and one unforgettable appearance on “The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson”- whose studio audience he hilariously referred to as Johnny’s “congregation.” But his visionary journeys were more real for Finster than the fame. His art was his life ministry. We head back home, quiet, our senses overflowing, perhaps, with visions. A question percolates through my mind, finally surfacing: “So, was Finster ‘visionary’ or ‘crazy’?” I ask. Julia and Kim don’t answer right away. It seems as though every visionary artist, inventor or thinker who ever lived has slammed hard up against “common sense,” “what everybody knows.” And people have called them crazy. There was nothing logical about Finster’s Paradise, no earthly reason for him to create it. People thought he was crazy when he started. Yet eventually his vision of heaven was recognized as the utterly astounding work of beauty it is, inspiring truly thousands of people all over the world.


Above, Kim and Julia at the Visitor Center entrance. Top, World Folk Art Church.

“So, is Finster being ‘visionary’ and ‘crazy’ the same thing?” I ask again. My niece Julia smiles and shrugs in her enigmatic way. For myself, I’ve concluded that perhaps we in this world are always doomed to be blind – to see the “visionary” in the “crazy” only long after it is offered to us.

Our glossy paper is recyclable!

Ann Litrel is an artist and writer who works in her studio Ann Litrel Art in Towne Lake. She lives with her husband Dr. Michael Litrel. Email at ann@annlitrel.com.

Source: www.wm.com/thinkgreen/what-can-i-recycle.jsp TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Casual and Upscale Restaurants

RESTAURANT CUISINE BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER SUNDAY Canyons American no $ $ open 335 Chambers St. 678-494-8868 canyonsresh.com

SPIRITS RESERV. Beer/Wine no

Century House Tavern Modern 125 E Main St. 770-693-4552 American centuryhousetavern.com Copper Coin Coffee American 400 Chambers St. 470-308-6914 coppercoinoodstock.com see ad on Inside front, 20

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

8 persons +

$

$

$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Fire Stone Wood-fired 120 Chambers St. Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 see ad on pg 37 firestonerestaurants.com Freight Kitchen & Tap Southern 251 E. Main St. 770-924-0144 freightkitchen.com

no

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 10:30-3

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

no

Habanero’s Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. 9550 Main St. Brunch 678-498-8243 11-1:30 Ice Martini & Sushi Bar Tapas/Sushi no 380 Chambers St. 770-672-6334 icemartinibar.com Ipps Pastaria & Bar Italian no 8496 Main St. 770-517-7305 ippspastaria.com

$

$-$$

open

Full bar

yes

Fri./Sat. only

$$

open

Full bar

yes

$$

$$

open

Full bar

no

J Christopher’s Diner $-$$ $-$$ no open no 315 Chambers St., 770-592-5990 jchristophers.com J Miller’s Smokehouse BBQ & no $-$$ $-$$ open Beer 150 Towne Lake Parkway Southern 770-592-8295 Sandwiches jmillerssmokehouse.com Mad Life Studios Southern no $-$$ $$-$$$$ open Full bar 8722 Main St. madlifestageandstudios.com Partners II Pizza 8600 Main St. 678-224-6907 partnerspizza.com/woodstock-ga

no

$$-$$$

open

Beer/Wine

no

Pure Taqueria Mexican Sat./Sun. 405 Chambers St. 770-952-7873 Brunch puretaqueria.com/woodstock 11-3

$$

$$

open

Full bar

6 persons+

Reel Seafood Seafood 8670 Main St. 770-627-3006 reel-seafood.com

Sunday Brunch 10:30-3:30

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

no

$-$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Sat./Sun. Brunch 11-3

$$

$$-$$$

open

Full bar

no

Wine bar Tapas

Salt Factory Pub Gastropub 8690 Main St. 678-903-6225

no

no

no

Rootstock and Vine 8558 Main St. 770 -544-9009 www.rootstockandvine.com

Pizza

Weekends only

Semper Fi Bar and Grille 9770 Main St. 770-672-0026 Tea Leaves & Thyme 8990 Main St. 770-516-2609 tealeavesandthyme.com

American

no

$

$

open

Full bar

no

English Tea room

no

$$

no

closed

no

yes

Truck & Tap 8640 Main St. 770-702-1670 truckandtap.com

Variety of Food trucks

no

$-$$

$-$$

open

Craft Beer

no

Sunday Brunch 10-2

$$

$$$

open

Full bar

yes

Vingenzo’s Italian 105 E. Main St. 770-924-9133 vingenzos.com 62

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$ = most entrees under $10 • $$ = most entrees $10 - $15 • $$$ = most entrees $15 - $20 • $$$$ = most entrees over $20

DOWNTOWN WOODSTOCK DINING


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Silver Roamers

Cherokee Recreation and Parks 7545 Main St., Woodstock 770-924-7768 • www.crpa.net For a $24 yearly fee, the Silver Roamers can attend monthly gatherings and discuss upcoming events. Members get discounts on trips and events and win prizes through the Roamers Mileage Club. Non-members can take part in day and overnight excursions, but the cost is a little more. Most trips are handicap accessible. Monthly meetings are held at 11 a.m. on the first Mondays at the recreation center community room. Contact Frankie Sanders with questions.

Oct. 8, Nov. 13

Adult Coloring. Also meeting Dec. 3, Jan. 7, Feb. 4. Noon in the recreation center community room. $5 members/$10 nonmembers. Cost includes coloring books, colored pencils and lunch. Bring your own if you want.

Oct. 11

Decatur Square Tour with Jim Howe, Sweet Melissa.

Leaves 8:30 a.m. from the boys and girls club, 9 a.m. recreation center. $40 members/$50 non-members.

Oct. 31

Riverview Cemetery Tour, Local on North. Meet at Local on North in Canton at 11:30 a.m. $40 members, $50 non-members.

Nov. 15

Holocaust Museum, Tin Lizzy’s. Leaving 9 a.m. from boys and girls club, 9:30 a.m. recreation center. $30 members/$40 non-members.

Nov. 29

Delta Flight Museum, lunch on Main Street. Leaves 8

a.m. from boys and girls club, 8:30 a.m. recreation center. $40 members, $50 non-members.

Dec. 12

Bees Knees Cooking Class includes cost of the food. At 10:30 a.m. at the recreation center community room/kitchen. $25 members, $35 nonmembers.

Dec. 18

The Cottage on Main/Payne Corley House Tour. Leaving

8 a.m. from the recreation center, 8:30 a.m. from the boys and girls club. $45 members, $55 nonmembers.

Dec. 20

Mercedes Benz/Mollie B’s includes admission, guided tour and food. Leaving 8 a.m. from the boys and girls club, 9:30 a.m. recreation center. $60 members, $70 nonmembers.

Wednesdays through Dec. 26

Never Roam Alone Water Club meets 2-3 p.m. at the Cherokee County Aquatic Center. A time to stay active and healthy, socialize and have fun. Free for members only. 64

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Don’t Forget Your Behind Pink reminds us to screen for breast cancer. But screening for colon cancer is important, too! It’s the third leading cause of cancer-related death in women – following lung and breast cancers. At age 50, everyone should get a screening colonoscopy – earlier if you have a family history or other risk factors.* Cover all your assets. Talk to your doctor about getting screened.

Canton 678.593.1295

Woodstock 770.926.5459

www.atlantagastro.com *U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

AGA, LLC and its affiliates are participating providers for Medicare, Medicaid and most healthcare plans offered in Georgia.

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Visits with Santa!

Free Admission

Friday, November 9th

Presented by:

Northside Hospital Cherokee Conference Center Cherokee County Administration Building 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton Take Exit 20 on I-575 & follow signs.

Vendor space is available now! Santa’s Sweet Shop Sponsor Santa Sponsor

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Shopping Bag Sponsor


WELLSTAR & MAYO CLINIC

WORKING TOGETHER. WORKING FOR YOU. When you get a serious diagnosis from your doctor such as cancer or heart disease, you may want to explore all of your options, including a second opinion. That’s why WellStar Health System is a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. As a WellStar patient, your doctor has access to Mayo Clinic’s knowledge, expertise and resources.

ASK YOUR WELLSTAR PHYSICIAN ABOUT THE MAYO CLINIC CARE NETWORK. WellStar is the first health system in Georgia to become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network.

wellstar.org/mayo 770-956-STAR (7827) TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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An Extraordinary Summer My Walk on the Camino de Santiago night. We would walk around the town, getting tapas to eat or sometimes a second dessert. We toured 1,000-year-old buildings and cathedrals. We met locals and saw what most tourists never would get to see. Eventually, we would call it a night and head off to bed and fall asleep (unless there was a particularly loud snoring pilgrim in a bed near me). Then we would wake up again BY BRYCE JONES the next morning and head out for the long walk to our next dinner party! Every day on the Camino was unique Every day on the Camino was a new and filled with new adventures, but the adventure, and every day I had the chance average day would go something like this: to learn something new. I learned I liked I would start my day by waking up before a lot of different foods, like sunrise in my albergue, which mussels, paella, squid, and is a special place to stay just for a lot of foods whose names pilgrims, and quickly get ready I cannot pronounce. I also for the day's walk. My dad and learned that people have a lot I would either eat breakfast to share about themselves. I at our albergue or we would never ran out of topics to talk walk a couple of kilometers to about. The people I met always build up an appetite, and eat had something unique and at a local cafe in a small village interesting to share with me. along the Camino. I learned about beekeeping, After breakfast, we would gardening, cooking, histories start walking again. We would of other countries, ideas for usually walk 5 to 7 kilometers new books to read, language before stopping to rest. And, lessons, guitar lessons, and when we did stop, it was like I even learned how to find a paradise. We would get drinks, Bryce with fellow pilgrims around a campfire at the San Anton Monastery plant along the side of the road eat a snack like a Spanish ruins near Castrojeriz, Spain. called the stinging nettle, that omelette, and chit-chat with we carefully picked, cleaned and cooked vineyards almost daily), water and bread. new friends we had met that day (usually for dinner (my dad got stung!). We would get to pick our three courses pilgrims from some far away land like I walked and talked with amazing people from the pilgrim's menu, which is a fixed South Korea, Finland, Argentina, Holland, from around the world, including doctors, price menu just for pilgrims. We would South Africa or Lithuania). After we got our scientists, college students, retirees, talk and laugh with all the people we sat second wind, we would continue walking. college coaches, and even an ocean with, and it was usually the best time of We would continue this pattern, of walking biologist. I learned so much, because the day. My dad described it like this: “Each 7 to 10 kilometers before stopping, until people shared some moments in their lives day we got up to walk a long way to meet we got to our final destination for that day. with me. I experienced that you don't need new friends on the way to our next dinner Sometimes, when we were walking electronics or television to enjoy the world. party,� and that's a great way to put it. through towns we hadn't planned to stop Listening and communicating with other I loved taking selfies and photos with all in, we would see some friends we had people is a great way to learn and pass my new friends at dinner (and all over the recently met on the Camino resting, so we time. Experiencing history when it's right Camino!). Once dinner was over, we would would stop to say hello and take a break so in front of you is amazing. It was incredible then usually have two to three hours we could walk with them. While we were to imagine all the people throughout time before we would have to go to bed (most walking, which was usually for six to 10 that had stood in the same spots, inside albergues have a curfew), so we would hours each day, we would talk with other the same beautiful buildings, sharing get together with a bunch of our new pilgrims to pass the time. We would talk meals and stories with the pilgrims that Camino friends and go out and explore about all sorts of things. That's how I got to they had met on their Camino. the village or city where we were for that know people so well.

This is the second of a three-part series written by a student from Woodstock Middle School, who spent his summer hiking through France and Spain.

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Once we got to a village we wanted to stop in for the night, we would find an albergue with two available beds, check in, unpack our backpacks, and then get a nice refreshing shower. Before dinner, we would talk with our new friends, sit outside in the shade, or play cards or other games. We also would walk around the town, which was usually small and old, and explore its history and beauty. When dinner time arrived, we would sit down at a big table and eat a savory three-course meal that always would come with wine (we were walking in wine country through


Above, Bryce walking across a concrete pillar bridge along the Camino. Top, Bryce and his dad in front of the famous Cathedral of Saint Mary of Burgos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site built in the 13th century. Right, Bryce entering the town of Santo Domingo de la Calzada in Spain.

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@ the Library

Sequoyah Regional Library System 116 Brown Industrial Parkway • Canton, GA 30114 770-479-3090 • www.SequoyahRegionalLibrary.org

Oct. 15

ROSE CREEK

Toddler STEAM: DIY Sensory Bags 10:30 a.m. Sensory

4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, 770-591-1491

Oct. 16

North Georgia Ghost Towns Uncovered 6:30 p.m. Hundreds lost their homes. Many towns were lost forever. Join local author professor Lisa Russell as she discusses the history hidden beneath North Georgia’s lakes.

Oct. 25

Lego Robotics Club 6 p.m. Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to join the fun by taking apart and rebuilding Lego Mindstorms.

Oct. 27

Children’s Writers Critique Group 3 p.m. Inklings Creative

Expressions presents its Children’s Writers Critique Group. If you enjoy writing stories for children, this is the place for you.

WOODSTOCK 7735 Main St., Woodstock, 770-926-5859

Oct. 6

Super Sphero Saturday 11 a.m. The Sphero SPRK+ robots

are back. Sphero are spherical robots that can be coded with tablets provided by the library. Learn how Spheroes are coded, then interact with them during free play. For all ages.

bags are a mess-free way for children to explore and learn. Make several types of sensory bags to take home. Children must be accompanied by a participating adult.

Oct. 16

Book Discussion Group at noon. Enjoy coffee,

conversation and a book discussion with new friends. This month’s selection is “Manhattan Beach” by Jennifer Egan. All ages welcome; new members encouraged.

Oct. 23

The Walking Dead Zombie Walk at 6 p.m. Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to participate in a Zombie Walk competition. Come dressed like a zombie and grab your makeup supplies. Show off your creative zombie looks on the catwalk, or Zombie Walk, for a prize. Spooky refreshments and zombie makeup supplies provided. This program is sponsored by the Cherokee County Teen Advisory Board.

Oct. 25

Halloween at Hogwarts 6 p.m. All ages are welcome to celebrate Halloween, Harry Potter style! Participants can choose a wand, make a potion, get sorted into their Hogwarts’ house, make crafts and play games. For all ages.

2018

2018

Football Schedule

Football Schedule 10/6

vs. Presbyterian

10/13

@ Gardner-Webb

2 pm 1:30 pm

10/20 bye

vs. Point Univ.

6 pm

10/13

@ Bluefield College

6 pm

10/27

@ Charleston Southern

6 pm

10/20 bye

11/3

vs Campbell

2 pm

10/27

vs. Univ. of Pikeville

1:30 pm

11/10

@ Monmouth noon

11/3

vs. St. Andrews Univ.

1:30 pm

11/17

vs Jacksonville State

11/10

@ Union College

at Suntrust Park

ksuowls.com 70

10/6

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

TBA

6 pm

reinhardteagles.com


TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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The Puzzle Pieces of Life BY REV. DR. PAUL W. BAUMGARTNER

I have always enjoyed building jigsaw puzzles. When I am working on a puzzle, quiet hours slip by quickly, freeing my mind of the usual busyness that occupies my thoughts. When I was growing up, I received a puzzle every Christmas and spent the holidays putting it together. My wife continued that tradition in my adult life. She seems to take particular glee in finding the most difficult puzzles ever created. Some pieces Recently, I have found it of life are so particularly fun and convenient to build jigsaw puzzles using an beautiful that app on my iPad. When using I am fascinated my iPad, I don't typically look at a picture of the completed by them. puzzle before I put the pieces together. It makes it more interesting. Sometimes, I discover I have the whole thing upside down. Sometimes a piece isn't what I think it is at all. For instance, what I presume is a piece of blue sky, turns out to be a piece of blue water. I struggle with some pieces because they are so dark I can't really tell what they are. I am fascinated by some pieces because the shapes and colors are so beautiful. The more pieces I put in place, the more

exciting it becomes. I love the revelation of the picture when a puzzle is finally completed. Life is like that, I think. Sometimes I discover I have gotten everything turned upside down. Sometimes things are not what I think they might be at all. Some pieces of life are so dark that it is hard to understand them. Some pieces of life are so beautiful that I am fascinated by them. I can realistically assume that more than half of the pieces of my life's puzzle are in place now, and it is exciting to look at how they are fitting together. I know when it is finished, the puzzle of my life will reveal a picture that has always been as much (or more) about God as it has been about me. God turns the upside-down in my life rightside-up. God helps me to see beyond my assumptions, to truth. God shines light into the dark pieces of my life and makes the beautiful pieces shine more brightly. I am confident that the final picture of my life will be breathtaking — because God has been present in every piece of it.

The Rev. Dr. Paul Baumgartner has served as senior pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church since January 2004. He can be reached at pastorpaul@gslutheran.org.

Marriage Moments

Fulfilling Your Heart’s Desire BY BILL RATLIFF

I recently saw the movie “Beautifully Broken” and was inspired by the true story of a couple’s escape from the genocide in Rwanda. This led me to think about a couple that I know in our community. Oris and Elizabeth had a marriage “made in heaven” in Haiti. They were married in a church in Cap Haitien in August 2000. They had a strong sense of God’s plan for them. In December of that same year, Oris received the opportunity to go to the United States through the green card process and pursue U.S. citizenship. Elizabeth was brokenhearted as Oris boarded the plane and flew to a foreign land. They had to live separately for more than six years. Oris began a ministry called Haiti Cheri with two friends, Dan and Paul, who reside in Cherokee County. The purpose of the ministry was to give back to his homeland by taking people on mission trips to Haiti every year. While in Haiti, conducting medical clinics, building a school and helping churches, he was able to visit his wife. Both Oris and Elizabeth worked hard during those six years. She got her nursing degree and he earned several degrees, including a Phd. Oris received his citizenship in 2006, and in 2007 Elizabeth and their 5-year-old son Chris moved to the United States, and in 2009 she received her citizenship as well. 72

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

Their story is inspirational to me and all who know them. Their second son Brad was born in the United States and they reside in Woodstock. Oris is currently a professor at Shorter University and continues to lead mission trips through Haiti Cheri. Oris and Elizabeth’s journey is a testament to the truth found in Psalm 37:4: “Delight yourself in the Lord and He will fulfill the desires of your heart.”

Date Your Mate Take your mate on a road trip. Stay off the interstate and take the back roads to no particular destination. Do it without a schedule or agenda. Turn off the radio, put away your devices and enjoy the feel of simpler living. If you see something that sparks your interest, stop to investigate it. It’s not about the road trip but about being in the moment.

Bill Ratliff is a pastoral counselor and certified life coach. Contact him at billratliffcatalyst@gmail.com or www.billratliffcatalyst.com.


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Rob’s Rescues I interviewed Samantha Altfest, who is the Community Services Advocate for Ahimsa House.

How did Ahimsa House start?

At Cherokee County Animal Shelter at the moment, there are 13 kittens that are about 3 months old. Please adopt them while they are here. The cat room is really cool and kids should know that it is a really fun place to hang out with the kittens and cats. When you adopt a cat from Cherokee County Shelter they are always spayed or neutered and up to date on vaccines. This dog's name is Blaze. She is 7 years old and is an owner surrender. This dog has a super long tongue and no tail and is a reddish color. She is calm, doesn't jump on you, and knows how to sit. Blaze would be a great family dog and gets along with other dogs.

Emily Christie was a victim of domestic violence. She escaped her situation but could not take her cat with her, and left her with someone but never saw her cat again. In 2004, she opened up a shelter to take care of the pets of women who were forced to seek protection in domestic violence shelters. Now it is a decentralized system of foster care and the whereabouts of the animals are kept strictly confidential.

What does Ahimsa House do?

Ahimsa House does many things. Primarily it addresses the link between animal cruelty and domestic abuse. It provides services to people escaping Rob, Devyn Wittmeyer, Samantha Altfest and domestic abuse situations. A lot of the time Diego the Ahimsa House mascot. women won't leave the abusive situation they are in because they fear for the well being of their pets if they leave. Ahimsa House has a 24 hour crisis line: 404-452-6248. People can call if they are thinking of leaving or have left domestic violence. Ahimsa House makes arrangements for their pets and provides 60 days of temporary care in an appropriate place. The animal is free to go back to its owner whenever they are ready. Ahimsa House also provides vet care and training for behavioral issues. Ahimsa House volunteers keep the animals safe and the organization works on many levels to reunite owner and pet, including helping to pay pet deposits if needed when the owner is able to start a new life.

What animals do you mostly help with?

Mostly dogs and cats but we take any kind of animals including snakes, birds and rabbits. We have also helped with horses.

What is the weirdest animal that you have taken in?

We took in a rat and snake that were best friends. The snake refused to eat the rat! We also had a call for a zebra - but ultimately we didn't have to take it in.

How many animals do you help every year?

Every year we help more than the previous year. Last year we helped about 300.

Is Ahimsa House only in Georgia, or everywhere?

We serve the whole state of Georgia. We don't work outside the state but there are some similar organizations in other states. There is a list on our website.

What advice do you have for me?

Model healthy and happy relationships with friends. Be kind to people.

What is a favorite story you like to tell?

I started as an intern and one of the first things I did was reunify a pet and owner after they spent two months apart. That was very special.

continued on page 87

Follow Rob! @robsrescues 74

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

I’m Rob Macmillan and I’m on a mission to help shelter dogs and cats. These animals are at the Cherokee County Animal Shelter at 1015 Univeter Road, Canton. Contact me at robsrescues@gmail.com.


TASTE OF

e t o wa h Friday • October 19, 2018 • 6 - 8:30 tickets $20

tickets may be purchased at the door or from Etowah Tennis or Softball players/parents

Supporting Etowah Eagle

tennis & softball

silent auction* *silent auction final bids close at 8:00 pm

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Around & About OCTOBER Through Oct. 20

S.A.L.T (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) is holding

its annual Boston Pork Butt Fundraiser. Order a fully cooked 4.5 pound (approximately) Boston Butt that you can pick up in downtown Woodstock between noon and 2 p.m. Oct. 20. To order, visit www.saltcherokee.com.

1-31

Vote for your favorite display in the annual Scarecrow Invasion in downtown Woodstock. Cast your votes at Dean’s Store at 8588 Main St.

for a Purpose at 7 p.m. 4 Painting at 1180 BridgeMill Ave., Canton

30114. A fundraiser for the BridgeMillSixes Service League, the artistic evening with friends costs $35 per person. Wear paint-friendly clothing. No experience necessary. BYOB or snack and a friend. Proceeds support the North Georgia Angel House. For reservations, contact Mary Wiechert at 404-431-3777 or mnwiechert@gmail. com, or Susan Silverman at 770-617-5659 or lildealer2@yahoo.com.

Night Live: Roaring ’20s 5 Friday Night downtown Woodstock 6-9

p.m. Enjoy live music as you stroll through the downtown streets and visit the many shops and restaurants Woodstock has to offer.

Friday in Canton, sponsored 5 First by Canton Main Street, is held 6-9

p.m. and features live music, a car show, food and family activities. The October

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018

theme is Jeep Night, with music by Skipper Grace.

Roll 5K fundraiser 6 forRun,NextWalkSteporMinistries will

take place at First Baptist Church Woodstock. Proceeds from last year’s event helped the ministry purchase a new bus to transport more clients into the community. 770-592-1227. www.nextstepministries.net.

Third annual Smile Run 5K, Fun Run and Tot Trot hosted by the

Christian Egner Foundation, 5:30 p.m. at Etowah River Park, 600 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton. Christian passed away in the fall 2015 from asthma-related complications. He was an energetic little boy who loved to dance and sing, and his smile was contagious. Proceeds from the race go directly to organizations that benefit children, particularly those with special needs. www.thesmilerun.com.

Touch-a-Truck. Cherokee Recreation & Parks Agency hosts an annual Toucha-Truck event, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at the Cherokee County Fire and Training Facility in Holly Springs, 3985 Holly Springs Parkway. The FREE event gives kids a chance to climb aboard and get behind the wheel of their favorite vehicles, learn from the operators, and meet some of their hometown heroes. For information, contact Lindsey Collett, lcollett@cherokeega.com. Community Health and Fitness Fair, 10 a.m.-4 p.m, 12186 Highway

92, Woodstock, GA 30188 (Walmart parking lot). Meet with local health and fitness businesses for a day focused on health and wellness. Activities will include games, a bouncy house, food, raffles and demos. A portion of all proceeds benefits the Special Olympics. Email dsims133@ gmail.com or call 678-494-8889 for more information.

Church Pork and 6 River Torque Car Show and BBQ is set

for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at River Church, 2335 Sixes Road, Canton. Cost is $5

to show (no compete) or $15 to compete, multiple classes more than 25 trophies awarded. The show is open to any car, truck or motorcycle. Event also features barbecue, hot dogs, sides, sweets and drinks available for purchase at familyfriendly prices. All proceeds will go to purchase Christmas presents for foster kids in Act Together Ministries. For information, contact Zach at 770-265-6601 or zachnix74@gmail.com. A gardeners seminar, at 10 a.m. at the senior services center, 1001 Univeter Road in Canton, presented by the Master Gardener Extension Volunteers of Cherokee County will focus on concrete planters. Planters can be pricey, but with a little know-how and a few ingredients, you can create your own beautiful work of art to contain your garden plants. You will learn the secrets of hypertufa containers and go home with your own masterpiece. $10 materials fee. Class size limited. To register call 770-721-7803 or email uge1057@uga.edu

Cherokee Arts 6-27 The Center is featuring the

Georgia Clay Council exhibit, with a reception set for 6-8 p.m. Oct. 5. The center is in Canton at 94 North St. www.cherokeearts.org.

We All On 12-21 “Are Board?” by Steve

Miller and presented by Broadway Bound Productions at the Canton Historic Theatre, 171 E. Main St. The show is a cruise ship comedy and world premier. For tickets and information go to www. broadwayboundproductionsinc.com or call 770-720-2698. Tickets are $15 for seniors and students, $18 for adults. www.cantontheatre.com.


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Around & About

continued from page 76

12,26 at the pool at the Cherokee County Aquatics Center, 1200 Parents Night Out. Parents can drop off kids ages 5-13

Wellstar Way, Canton. Drop-off starts at 5:30 p.m. and pick-up ends at 10 p.m. Kids will play in the pool, enjoy a pizza dinner, participate in crafts, play games and end the night with a movie. Ratio of kids to counselors is 10:1. Please send the kids with pajamas to change into after the pool. While this is not a special-needs program, every effort is made to accommodate all children, however, advance notice is needed if you want to register your special-needs child. Call 678-880-4760 for registration or questions.

house at fire station 14, 225 Arnold Mill Road, 13 Open Woodstock. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free lunch, inflatables, music, games

for the children, an extrication demonstration and other activities. Parking available across the street at Allen Temple AME Church.

COED @ THE CIRCUIT

11 Innovation Way, Woodstock. 770-345-0600, www.cherokeega.org

1 Million Cups Cherokee (1MC CHK): First and third

Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m. First Wednesdays are held at The Circuit, third Wednesdays are held in different Cherokee County cities. The free, biweekly coffee gathering helps build startup communities on a grassroots level. Perfect for entrepreneurs looking to practice their pitch skills, gain valuable feedback, or belong to a community.

The Lunch Circuit: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. on the second Wednesdays. A monthly exclusive lunch gathering of aspiring and current entrepreneurs to eat, build community and learn the stories behind successful Cherokee entrepreneurs.

13-14 United Methodist Church, 4494 Towne Lake Parkway. 7

Woodstock WordPress Meet-Up: First and third

17

Entrepreneurship 101 Book Club: Every other Wednesday, 6:30-7:30 p.m. This new meetup is a partnership with Creative Muscle Studios.

Hillside Presents: Broadway Revue musical at Hillside

p.m. Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday. Featuring Broadway tunes from the 1920s to the present. Admission is free; a love offering will be taken to benefit the church’s music and worship ministries.

A Novel Idea meets 7-9 p.m. at East Main Café (inside Audio

Intersection) at 210 E. Main St. October is the perfect month for a few scary stories. Listen to tales of being attacked by rabid dogs, encountering a terrifying killer with treacherous cyber skills, or when the dead just won’t shut up. No admission charge. Door prizes. BYOB.

Night, a fundraiser for the BridgeMill-Sixes Service League, 19 Bingo begins at 7 p.m. at the Terrace in BridgeMill. For ages 15 and older.

$20 per person. Sign up at bssl.org or contact Ruth Clark at 678-493-8943.

Bend Your Knees golf tournament begins with a shotgun start at 9

a.m. at the Fairways of Canton. The event is a fundraiser for the Collins Foundation, Bend Your Knees Inc., which helps families of children with brain tumors. www.bendyourknees.org/golf-tournament.

19-20, 26-27 & 31

Haunted Horse Hill at Mariposa Farms 7-10 p.m.

at 75 Red Gate Trail, Canton, GA 30115. Cost for haunted house is $10. The kid zone is $5 and includes trick-or-treating with the horses, painting pumpkins, faces painting, games and bounce house. All proceeds benefit BEATS, Inc. www.beats-inc.org.

20 in downtown Woodstock. Food, music, costume contests, cold

Georgia ZombieFest and Halloween Extravaganza 3-9 p.m.

beer, zombie makeup and much more. Bring the kids to the Little Zombie Zone, children 5 and younger are free. All proceeds benefit Cherokee FOCUS and its initiatives.

Cherokee Family Fun Day and Children’s Health and Safety Expo will take place at Brown Park in downtown Canton 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission is free. Event features games, food, safety demonstrations and entertainment.

The Cherokee Music Teachers Association will meet at 11 a.m. at

the Cherokee Arts Center. The meeting includes a program by David Rowe, specialist on the Orff educational philosophy, who will talk about incorporating Orff ideas into lessons. For more information or directions, please contact Linda Lokey at linda@lokey.net or 678-358-6546. 78

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Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Local WordPress developers, designers and publishers get together to share knowledge and experience, and to meet other WordPress users in the area.

Creative Problem Solvers Meet-Up: First and

third Tuesdays, 7-8:30 a.m. Join an innovative, diverse community of creative problem-solvers, entrepreneurs, “want-repreneurs” and innovators dedicated to helping one another work through business challenges.

OTP and Greater Cherokee Tech Pros: Every third Thursday, 7:30-8:45 a.m. A gathering of local technology professionals. Women Entrepreneurs Meetup: Every third Friday,

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. For aspiring and current female entrepreneurs who want to take action and hold each other accountable for stated goals. NOT a lead exchange or referral networking program.

NOVEMBER

“Catfish Moon” presented by Cherokee 2-11 Theatre Company at the Canton Historic

Theatre, 171 E. Main St. The show is a Southern comedy about the friendship of three old friends. Tickets $15 for seniors and students, $18 for adults. www.cantontheatre.com.

Jingle Bell Shop will be held 11 a.m.-8 p.m. at the 9 Northside Hospital Cherokee County Conference Center, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. Vendor booths available for the annual Christmas event that offers free admission, free visit with Santa, holiday shopping, Santa’s workshop with children’s crafts, Santa’s sweet shop and a restaurant raffle. Contact gini@ cherokeechamber.com for more information.


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SafeSchools Alert a Chance to Report Concerns BY BARBARA P. JACOBY

While October is National Bullying Prevention Month, the Cherokee County School District is focused on this mission every day. In addition to working continuously to improve how we teach students to prevent bullying, identify bullying and respond to bullying, we’ve also made it easier to report bullying. With the start of this school year, the district launched a new expanded system for reporting safety concerns: SafeSchools Alert. Expanding the options for reporting tips is one of the many important recommendations to come from the Superintendent’s Safety and Security Ad Hoc Committee following the Parkland school shooting tragedy. The SafeSchools Alert system allows students, parents, school staff and anyone in the community to report safety concerns by text, email, online message or phone call. You can make a tip about bullying, a rumored threat, a friend in trouble, harassment, drugs, alcohol, vaping, vandalism and any other school safety concern. The system also allows you to make a tip anonymously. Through SafeSchools Alert, you can submit safety concerns in four ways. 1. By phone: 1-855-4ALERT1, ext. 1695 2. By text: Text #1695 + your tip to ALERT1 or 253781 3. By email: 1695@alert1.us 4. By online message: http://1695.alert1.us The school district police and school operations administrators are notified of every tip, so they can investigate and take appropriate

action. The SafeSchools Alert system is closely monitored, making it more effective than sending a message to school social media accounts or a school email address. SafeSchools Alert does not replace 911; students and parents should continue to call 911 in emergencies. Posters promoting SafeSchools Alert are displayed in all schools, and stickers are displayed inside all school buses. Every student began the school year by watching a video in class that reviewed school safety practices, including the importance of “See Something, Say Something” and SafeSchools Alert. These videos are posted on the school district’s YouTube channel, and we encourage parents to review them with their children, and reinforce the messages about school safety, bullying and other disciplinary issues. We’ve also created a brief public service announcement for SafeSchools Alert that was written with students in mind; you can watch it at http://bit.ly/CCSDsafeschools. Special thanks to Cherokee High School Drama Club members for portraying students in the video. SafeSchools Alert only will work if we all use it, so please remember if you “See Something, Say Something” to help keep our students, teachers, staff and volunteers safe. #SafeCherokee

Barbara P. Jacoby serves as chief communications officer for the Cherokee County School District, and is a CCSD parent with four children.

The Downtown Buzz is held at the Chambers at City Center (8534 Main Street) on the last Friday of the month and begins at 8 a.m. unless otherwise noted.

Meeting: Oct. 26 Topic: Networking

For more information on the Downtown Buzz program or to suggest a topic for consideration, please contact Mitzi at 770-592-6056 mainstreetwoodstock.org/connect/#buzz Business, individual and non-profit memberships are available

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Elm Street

Embracing the Challenge of Creativity BY CHRISTOPHER BRAZELTON

Every month or so our staff members read a book. The topics vary, but the goal is for each staff member to continue to learn, find key insights, and bring them back to a half-day retreat to tell the rest of the staff how they are going to apply it to themselves personally or at Elm Street. I highly recommend this simple practice for any business staff. This past month we read “Creativity, Inc.” by Ed Catmull, the founder of Pixar and now president of Disney Animation. The book is filled with fantastic stories of how the Pixar organization became what it is today, and how some of our favorite characters came to life. The struggles behind creating some of the Pixar favorites were remarkable (“Inside Out” was a completely different concept when first pitched). During our discussion after we finished the book, we took a moment to look at the practices Pixar used for creating its movies from start to finish, and to imagine how we could apply those practices at Elm Street to further grow the creative efforts of our volunteers and staff. When examining our production process, one staff member said something to the effect of, “It’s hard to reimagine/re-evaluate our current process when we almost get it wrong (ie: don’t follow it) every time now.” It clicked with all of us almost immediately: Every single one of Pixar’s movies had issues where the process didn’t work. In fact, Catmull attests that the first time (and only time) that the process of creating one of their magical movies was completed correctly was “Toy Story 3.” Fifteen years of working on the process and the giant, multi-million dollar company got it right once, only to fail at it for the movies following this. His point in sharing this in the book (and my point for this article) is that, yes, the process is needed, but overrated - which is really hard for me to say. But, almost always, it is more important to trust the people. In a way, we’ve done this at Elm Street, trying to give ownership to our volunteers, trusting the brilliant people we have working on a show with a mediocre script or limited resources. It’s worked so far and we will continue to do that (and even more intentionally now). Maybe you could join us? Volunteer and see the creativity yourself. You'll be surprised at the creativity you have. If you are not sure, join us and see a creative story come to life on the stage and think about it. You can check out the amazing “The Drowsy Chaperone” − a musical filled with hilarity running this October.

UPCOMING AT ELM STREET

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

Oct 12-28

FRI/SAT AT 7:30PM | SUN AT 2:30PM

THE LANDSCAPE OF GUITAR an animated painting concert experience

“guitars of the Gipsy Kings, harmonies of Simon & Garfunkel and the colors of Van Gogh”

Oct 6th, 2018 at 7:30pm

Lantern Series Presenting Partner: Christopher Brazelton, a Florida State University graduate, is the executive director of Elm Street Cultural Arts Village.

ELMSTREETARTS.ORG | 678.494.4251 TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Cherokee Photography Club Congratulations to the winners in the August competition, "Weather."

Monochromatic:

1st Martin Longstaff "Soup Kitchen Line-up"

2nd Becky Sapp "Fog in the Valley"

Digital Projection:

1st Karen Beedle "Morning Fog"

3rd Dean Kelley "Southlight" 82

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2nd Rick Sapp "Morning Fog in Pleasant Valley"

HM Becky Sapp "Rear View"


The Cherokee Photography Club meets on the fourth Monday of the month, and for those participating in the monthly contest, that meeting is held on the second Monday of the month. Both meetings are from 7-9 p.m. and held at the Cherokee County Arts Center, 94 North St., Canton. For more information, please contact Kim Bates at 770-617-7595 or email him at kbphotoart@comcast.net.

3rd Eillene Kirk "Snowscape"

Color Print:

1st Martin Longstaff "Magnum Double Scoop"

3rd Vicki Sellers "Weather at Denali"

HM Becky Sapp "Parched Clay"

2nd Ken Bertoli "Beach Beware" TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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YOUR SCHOOL NEWS Learning About Bus Safety Boston Elementary School first-graders in Macy Landry’s class learned about bus safety during presentations led by bus drivers and transportation staff.

Hat Day Makes School Fun Kindergarten teacher Dawn Hultstrom and student Brooke Naturile, from Cherokee Christian Schools, celebrated the school’s recent Hat Day.

Cobb EMC Leadership Program Cobb EMC is accepting applications for the Cobb EMC Youth Leadership Program, which offers current high school juniors the opportunity to develop leadership and networking skills, to earn scholarships, and to learn about the electric cooperative. Program participants will interview for one of four spots on the Washington Youth Tour, an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington in June 2019, where they will join student leaders from across the nation, meet with elected representatives, and learn about U.S. history, government and careers in public service. Cobb EMC’s top four winners also will receive either a $1,500, $1,000 or one of two $500 scholarships, and will interview for one paid summer internship with the company. Applicants must live in a primary residence served by Cobb EMC. The application deadline is Oct. 11. To learn more, visit cobbemc.com/ youthtour. 84

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Local Team Is First Runner-Up The 14U East Cobb Braves baseball team finished first runner-up in the Grand Slam World Series in Panama City Beach, Fla., in July. The team finished 5-2 in the World Series, with an overall season record of 21-7-1.

Front row, from left: Cameron Peavy, Connor Walsh, Nick Walker, Sebastian Lopez, Gavin Tillison, Jaedon Roderick and Ryan Pensinger; back row: head coach Stephen Fricks, William May, Jason Seagraves, Jordan Fricks, coach Ryan Gobie, James Snipes, Maddox McDaniel and coach Randall Roderick.


Teachers of the Year Chosen Congratulations to the Cherokee County School District’s School Teachers of the Year winners. At the start of every school year, each school is asked to select its own Teacher of the Year. The school-level winners become eligible for Cherokee County School District 2019 Teacher of the Year. The districtwide competition will be judged by a panel of retired educators and community partners, based on applications submitted by the school-level winners. The county winner will be surprised in his or her classroom by the superintendent of schools this fall and will be honored, along with each school’s winner, at the 2018 Legacy Makers: CCSD Teachers of the Year Celebration in November. The district winner will be entered into the Georgia Teacher of the Year competition. The 2018-2019 Cherokee County School District Teachers of the Year are: ACE Academy: Pete Godfrey Arnold Mill Elementary School: Brooke McMullen Avery Elementary School: Bonnie Smith Ball Ground ES STEM Academy: Lisa Nations Bascomb Elementary School: Leslie Kreiger Boston Elementary School: Lori Moore Carmel Elementary School: Melanie Phillips CCSD Preschool Centers: Lauren Garcia Cherokee High School: Ben Sosebee Clark Creek ES STEM Academy: Jama McCartney Clayton Elementary School: Jane Jarrett Creekland Middle School: Laura Brown Creekview High School: Liana Howard Dean Rusk Middle School: Bonnie Jackson E.T. Booth Middle School: Kara Reeder Etowah High School: Tabatha Box Free Home Elementary School: Keith Furstenberg Freedom Middle School: Kate Morris Hasty ES Fine Arts Academy: Sarah Munroe

Teacher of the Year for Little River Elementary is certified teacher Karen Reynolds (left) and the classified worker of the year is Suzanne Newman.

Hickory Flat Elementary School: Corinne Ingram Holly Springs ES STEM Academy: Sonja Chapman Indian Knoll Elementary School: Patti Nations Johnston Elementary School: Brittany Stalling Knox ES STEM Academy: Nicole Waldrep Liberty Elementary School: Angie Nalls Little River Elementary School: Karen Reynolds Macedonia Elementary School: Leah Parrott Mill Creek Middle School: Dana Townsend Mountain Road Elementary School: Amy Kerwood Oak Grove ES Fine Arts Academy: Amy McCravy R.M. Moore ES STEM Academy: Alison Hughes River Ridge High School: Katie Freeman Sequoyah High School: Paul Peacock Sixes Elementary School: LaTonya McGruder Teasley Middle School: Nicholas Garcia Tippens Education Center: April Popham Woodstock Elementary School: Katie Grooms Woodstock High School: Derek Engram Woodstock Middle School: Heidi Switzer

Career Cafe Kicks Off New Year

Students met with admissions representatives during the college fair.

Woodstock High School’s Career Cafe, a media center-hosted program held during lunch periods that features events and speakers to inspire students and teach them about career, higher education and scholarship opportunities, held its first event of the new school year. The first program was a college fair featuring more than 20 colleges and universities. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Serving the Community, One Meal at a Time BY HANNAH SUH WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM STUDENT

Everyday, we wake up knowing we are going to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner. Occasionally, we even know what we are going to have for these meals. It is a natural routine we have and do without thinking much about it. We forget there are people in communities everywhere who are not as fortunate. Many people struggle to find meals that will last their family through the weekend or even through the day. In light of this, Woodstock High School has put together a food pantry to serve its community. Assistant Principal Nancy Henson started the food pantry in hopes of serving her community and to give others the opportunity to do so, as well. She wanted to highlight the importance of giving to those around us, for “we should care about our community and those within it.” “It was brought up to me by the school’s social worker, Dr. Tara QuinnSchuldt, last spring,” Henson said. “They currently have the food pantry at Etowah High School, and she reached out to me and [Mark] Smith [WHS principal] to see if we would be interested in starting one here. Together, we talked about it, and we decided that we would absolutely love to do it!”

The official food pantry logo was designed by project partner Heritage Presbyterian Church. 86

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One of many donation boxes located around the school. Photo courtesy of journalism student Emily Hailstone.

WHS is working with Heritage Presbyterian Church to provide food to students with a weekend bags system. The bags will be given discreetly, to “bridge the weekend gap when they do not have free and reduced breakfast and lunch programs offered at school,” Henson said. With the help of the Atlanta Food Bank, these bags will be put together for $1 per bag. Students who currently are enrolled in the Cherokee County School District’s free and reduced lunch program will be able to pick these bags up every Thursday during the last 10 minutes of seventh period. Donations from students are encouraged and accepted in many locations, including the front office, athletic office and counseling office. “We are soliciting donations from kids and teachers in the community, anyone who wants to drop food off at any time

can. We ask for nonperishables, no glass, and nothing extremely heavy, because it will go home in backpacks. We want food that is easy to make. Microwavable, individually packaged or sometimes single serving portions; things that can sustain a family through the weekend is the goal,” Henson said. Within the first few weeks of this new program, Atlanta Food Bank generously has donated a couple of tons of food to the pantry. Volunteers have sorted the donations, organizing and putting them on shelves. WHS students with disabilities have been able to work on organizing the foods, helping them improve their job-related skills. These amazing students, and many others involved from the student body, have been doing a phenomenal job lending a helping hand.


Tax Changes Around the Home continued from page 30

Securities offered through registered representatives of Cambridge Investment Research Inc., a broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors Inc., a registered investment adviser. Cambridge is not affiliated with and does not endorse the opinions or services of Peter Montoya Inc. or MarketingPro Inc. This material was prepared by MarketingPro Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note: Investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. Citations. 1 - investopedia.com/taxes/how-gop-tax-bill-affects-you/ [1/3/18] 2 - cnbc.com/2018/05/23/irs-treasury-have-set-their-sights-on-bluestates-tax-workarounds.html [5/23/18] 3 - irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/n-18-54.pdf [5/23/18] 4 - nytimes.com/2018/03/09/your-money/home-equity-loans-deductible. html [3/9/18] 5 - fool.com/taxes/2018/05/20/say-goodbye-to-the-home-officededuction-unless-yo.aspx [5/20/18]

A Republic, If You Can Keep It continued from page 54

would remain unchanged. This American res publica stands in the gap and protects our people from our government and, occasionally, each other. Why is it important that we recognize our roots as a republic rather than a democracy? It’s more than just a need for literal accuracy. We owe it to the next generation to ensure they understand what sets America apart and what has maintained the freedoms and basic human rights our nation pioneered in the world. The continuance of this special form of government relies on each of us understanding it and renewing it with every generation. As the story goes, when Ben Franklin exited the constitutional convention, a group of citizens approached him and asked what form of government the delegates had crafted. “A republic,” he said, “if you can keep it.”

Rob’s Rescues continued from page 74

What could I do to help you?

Volunteer opportunities are listed on the website and include foster care, donations for vet care, crisis line volunteers who answer the 24-hour crisis line, and outreach volunteers. Getting the word out is critical.

What do you most need from the community?

Volunteers and donations of money, supplies and services. We get a lot of help from vets. We want to try and make sure that everyone who may need us learns about us. Our website is: www.ahimsahouse.org.

VARSITY FOOTBALL Etowah Eagles Games start at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 31 L 36-14 Sept. 7 W 17-14 Sept. 14 L 35-3 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26 Nov. 2

@ South Forsyth @ Pebblebrook vs Hillgrove Bye vs Cherokee @ Woodstock @ Walton Bye @ Lassiter vs Roswell

Scores from MaxPreps

Woodstock Wolverines Games start at 7:30 p.m.

Aug. 31 W 37-17 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 L 24-12 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26 Nov. 2

Cambridge Bye vs North Paulding vs North Forsyth Bye vs Etowah @ Cherokee @ Lassiter @ Roswell vs Walton

Scores from MaxPreps TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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TOWNE LAKE AREA HOMES SOLD IN AUGUST

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REFERENCE

TOWNE LAKE AREA CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

Ahimsa House helps domestic violence victims 24-hours a day get their pets to safety. 404-452-6248. www.ahimsahouse.org.

Georgia Animal Project, based in Ball Ground, offers high quality, low cost spay/neuter services for dogs and cats. 770-704-PAWS (7297). www.theanimalproject.org.

Pet Buddies Food Pantry provides pet food, supplies, spaying and neutering, and education through community outreach programs to families in need. 678-310-9858. www.petbuddiesfoodpantry.org.

Angel House Girls Home, residential facility to help girls ages 12-18 learn self-sufficiency. 770-479-9555. www.angelhousega.com.

Give a Kid a Chance – Cherokee sponsors a yearly back-to-school bash, giving children in need filled backpacks to free haircuts. www.giveakidachance.org.

Safe Kids Cherokee County offers free child safety seat inspections by appointment. 770-721-7808. www.cherokeesafekidscherokeecounty.org.

Anna Crawford Children’s Center, dedicated to preventing child abuse and neglect through prevention and intervention services. 678-504-6388. www.cherokeechildadvocates.org.

Goshen Valley Boys Ranch offers a home, care and counsel to young men in the DFCS system. 770-796-4618. www.goshenvalley.org

Bend Your Knees, Inc. raises awareness, helps children with pediatric brain tumors. Bob Dixon, 678-922-1560.

Green Shelters America animal rescue group. 770-712-4077. GreenSheltersAmerica@gmail.com. www.GreenSheltersAmerica.com.

CASA for Children has programs to increase safety and improve educational, social and emotional functioning of children impacted by abuse. 770-345-3274. www.casacherokee.org. CCHS Thrift Store accepts donations, sells used household items to raise money for Cherokee County Humane Society. 5900 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth. 770-592-8072. Cherokee Family Violence Center offers emergency shelter and crisis intervention, affordable housing, education, support services. 770-479-1703. Spanish 770-720-7050 or 800-334-2836 option 2. www.cfvc.org. Cherokee Fellowship of Christian Athletes challenges professional, college, high school, junior high and youth level coaches and athletes to use athletics to impact the world for Christ. Bill Queen, 404-441-3508. www.cherokeefca.org. Cherokee County Humane Society (CCHS) 770-928-5115. admin@cchumanesociety.org. www.cchumanesociety.org.

Habitat for Humanity North Central Georgia, 770-587-9697. www.habitat-ncg.org Healing Hands Youth Ranch offers safe, peaceful environment where abused and at-risk children are paired with rescue horses for hope and healing. 770-633-4451. www.hhyr.org. HopeQuest Ministry Group helps people with life dominating issues related to alcohol abuse, substance abuse and/or sexual brokenness. 678-391-5950. www.hqmg.org. HOPE Center offers support for unplanned pregnancy. 770-924-0864. info@hopectr.com. www.hopectr.com. HOPE Center — Seeds Thrift Store offers men, women & children’s clothing, furniture & other home goods. 770-517-4450. www.seedsthriftstore.com.

Cherokee FOCUS works to improve lives of children and families through collaborative programs and initiatives. 770-345-5483. www.cherokeefocus.org.

Life Connection Ministries provides humanitarian relief in the form of wells and greenhouses to impoverished communities. Mission trips offered. 678-234-1798. www.lcm-ga.com.

Cherokee County Senior Services offers educational, social, leisure and recreational activities for senior citizens. 770-345-5312. 770-345-5320. www.cherokeega.com/senior-services.

Matthew E. Russell Foundation establishes literacy and libraries in rural areas worldwide. 678-234-1798. www.mattrussell.org.

Cherokee Young Life for high school students, meets Monday nights at Bradshaw Farm clubhouse, 7853 Hickory Flat Highway, Suite 104, Woodstock 30188. 678 653-5707. www.cherokeecounty.younglife.org. Community Veterinary Care provides professional veterinary care for pets whose owners have limited financial means. 678-640-3512. www.communityveterinarycare.com. Companion Animal Connection 678-493-9847. www.adoptapet.com.

MUST Ministries provides groceries, hot meals, emergency shelter, supportive housing, clothing, employment services, summer lunch and more from five locations in eight counties, including the Canton office at 111 Brown Industrial Pkwy. www.mustministries.org. National Alliance for Mental Illness, the nation’s largest grassroots organization in America working to build better lives for the millions affected by mental illness. www.nami.org.

Everyday Angels offers financial assistance for local families in need. aaeverydayangels@gmail.com.

Never Alone provides food and clothing assistance to Cherokee families in need. www.neveralone.org.

Feed My Lambs, Inc. provides free Christian preschools in the U.S. and around the world. 770-795-9348. office@feedmylambs.net. www.feedmylambs.net.

Next Step Ministries offers a therapeutic day program, Saturday respite, camps and special events for people with special needs. 770-592-1227. www.nextstepministries.net.

Forever Fed is a mobile food ministry that addresses physical hunger and hopelessness by providing meals and sharing the gospel. www.foreverfed.org.

North Georgia Pregnancy Center offers help and care to young girls and women with an unplanned pregnancy or who need counseling. 706-253-6303. www.ngapregnancy.org.

Funds 4 Furry Friends helps those in need with food, spay/neuter and medical attention for their pets. 770-842-8893. www.funds4furryfriends.com.

Papa’s Pantry, a year-round food ministry that includes the Masters Training Center to help individuals and families in crisis get back on their feet. 770-591-4730. www.papaspantry.org.

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SERV International operates the House of Hope orphanage in Africa, sponsors a clean water program in Dominican Republic and meal distributions worldwide. Offers mission trips. 770-516-1108. www.servone.org The Blue Ribbon Foundation fosters a national dialog toward finding the cause, cure and prevention of ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis), CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome), fibromyalgia and Lyme disease. 478-397-5542. www.theblueribbonfoundation.org. Volunteer Aging Council helps raise funds for seniors in Cherokee County. A list of current needs is available. 770-310-3474. www.vac-cherokeega.org.

SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS

AA Meetings Canton: 9:30 a.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Mondays at Canton First United Methodist, 930 Lower Scott Mill Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at Hillside United Methodist, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway. www.aageorgia.org/14c-meetings.html. Abortion Recovery Helping those who have been impacted by abortion. 678-223-3519. Al-Anon and Al-A-Teen Canton: 8 p.m. Thursdays at St. Clements Episcopal Church, 2795 Ridge Road. Woodstock: 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays Al-Anon at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2208, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-516-3502. American Heart Assoc. - Cherokee Div. 678-385-2013. American Red Cross metro chapter 770-428-2695. A-Typical Parkinson’s Education and Support Group Meets 6:00 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at Ball Ground UMC, 3045 Canton Hwy. in Ball Ground. Contact Norma Schmidt at 770-366-9585. Caregivers Alzheimers Spousal Support Group Meets: 12:30 p.m. first Tuesday of every month for lunch at Benton House of Woodstock, 3385 Trickum Road. 678-494-4500. woodstockinfo@bentonhouse.com. Celebrate Recovery, Christ-centered recovery program for all types of habits, hurts and hangups. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at Woodstock Church of the Nazarene. 770-366-7515. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Sixes United Methodist. 770-345-7644. www.sixesumc.org. Meets: 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Ministry House, 678-459-2347. www.MinistryHouse.org. Meets: 6:15 p.m. Thursdays at 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton. 678-764-8660. www.celebraterecovery.com. Cherokee County Support Group for people with autoimmune conditions. Meets: 6:30 - 8 pm second Thursday at New Light Baptist Church, 1716 New Light Road, Holly Springs. 404-402-0571, 770-337-0294, jhmom88@comcast.net or christystephenson@msn.com. Cherokee County Special Olympics provides yearround sports training and athletic competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. www.cherokeecountyspecialolympics.org. Cherokee Christian Ministerial Association for pastors and ministry leaders. Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Wednesday at Dayspring Church, 6835 Victory Drive, Woodstock. www.cherokeeministers.org.


Diabetes Support Group Meets: 9:30 and 11 a.m. third Tuesday at Emeritus Assisted Living, 756 Neese Road, Woodstock. 770-793-7818. Georgia Canines for Independence. 404-824-4637. gcidogs@aol.com. www.gcidogs.org. Grace Valley Ministries connects pastors through small group meetings, free counseling and a place to retreat. 727-251-7690. info@gracevalleyministries.org. www.gracevalleyministries.org. Grandparents Raising GRANDchildren Meets: 7:15 p.m. second Tuesdays Transfiguration Catholic Church, Marietta (nursery available). 770-919-9275. Hearing Loss Association of America NW Metro Atlanta chapter for people with hearing loss looking for support and resources, holds free and informative quarterly meetings at the Senior Center on Arnold Mill Road. nwmetroatlantahlaa@gmail.com. La Leche League of South Cherokee Meets: 10 a.m. first Tuesday and 7 p.m. third Tuesday at Bascomb United Methodist Church. 678-315-7686. 770-517-0191. MOMS Club of Woodstock-Towne Lake momsclubofwoodstocktl@gmail.com. www.sites.google.com/site/ momscluboftownelakewoodstock. MOPS — Mothers of Preschoolers (birth — K) Meets: 9:30 a.m. second and fourth Mondays at Hillside UMC, 4474 Towne Lake Pkwy. 770-924-4777. Unlimited Possibilities, support group for stroke and brain injury survivors. Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday of each month at Kennestone Outpatient Rehab Center. 678-677-2589.

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

American Business Women’s Association, Cherokee Eagles Charter Chapter. Meets: 6:30 p.m. on the third Tuesdays at Dynastic Buffet at the intersection of Canton Highway and Piedmont. 678-493-3618. Cherokee Business Network Meets: 7:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Chick-fil-A, 9728 Highway 92, Woodstock. 770-345-8687. Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce Meets: Various times during the year. Schedule at www.cherokeechamber.com. 770-345-0400. Gini@CherokeeChamber.com. Cherokee Toastmasters Club Meets: Noon-1:15 p.m. Wednesdays at the Bank of North Georgia, 200 Parkway 575, Woodstock. www.cherokeetoastmasters.com. The Joy of Connecting Networking for Women Meets: Various times and locations. 678-7896158. www.xperienceconnections.com/spotlight/ woodstock/.

VETERANS SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS American Legion Post 316 Meets: 7 p.m. third Thursdays at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 678-662-2366.

Cherokee County Libertarians Meets: 7:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday at the Cherokee County Board of Realtors Training Center, 1600 River Park Blvd., Suite 104, Woodstock. www.cherokeelp.org.

Cherokee County Homeless Veteran Program Contact Jim Lindenmayer at Jlindenmayer80@gmail. com or 678-983-7590, or Mike Satterly at 404-680-2412.

Cherokee County Republican Party Meets: 9 a.m. third Saturday at American Legion Post 45, 160 McClure Street, Canton. www.cherokeecounty.gop.

Woodstock VFW Post 10683 Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesday at Woodstock Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. 404-663-4663.

Cherokee County Republican Women affiliated with The Georgia Federation of Republican Women. Meets: Monthly in Woodstock/Canton. 770-592-7811. jkconkey@gmail.com.

CIVIC, COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS

AARP Woodstock Chapter is for anyone age 50 and older. Meets: 11:30 a.m. second Tuesdays at Tuscany. Lunch is $15. 770-926-1944. Canton-Cherokee TRIAD/S.A.L.T. (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) Meets: 8:30 a.m. first Tuesday at G.Cecil Pruitt YMCA in Canton (Hall of Fame Room). www.saltcherokee.com. Cherokee County Historical Society 770-345-3288.  www.rockbarn.org. Citizen Oversight and Education 678-520-2236. citizenoversighteducation@yahoo.com. Jewish Havurah (Friends) A group of Jewish people who meet for Jewish holidays, special Jewish events and Shabbat dinners. 770-345-8687. Kiwanis Club of Greater Cherokee Meets: 8 a.m. first Monday, at Hillside United Methodist Church, Room 2107, 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock. 678-468-9900. www.greatercherokeekiwanis.org Pilot Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. second Mondays at IHOP on Hwy. 20. 770-393-1766. Lynda@edgoodwinassociates.com. www.pilotinternational.com. Rotary Club of Cherokee County Meets: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 770-480-4179. Rotary Club of Towne Lake Meets: Noon Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake, 1003 Towne Lake Hills E., Woodstock. www.townelakerotary.com. Rotary Club of Woodstock Meets: 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays at IHOP on Highway 92. 678-428-6514.

Grassroots Conservatives of Cherokee Meets: 7- 9 a.m. Fridays at Chick-fil-A, 951 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock by the Outlet Mall. 770-294-0922. Republican Women of Cherokee County 678-520-2236. www.rwccga.com.

RECREATION & HOBBIES

Allatoona Gold Panners. Periodic events, outings. rrkelly@bellsouth.net. Cherokee Amateur Radio Society Meets: 10 a.m. on the second Saturday at William G. Long Senior Center, 223 Arnold Mill Road. www.cherokeehams.com. Cherokee Community Chorale 678-439-8625. www.cherokeechorale.org. Cherokee County Arts Center 94 North St., Canton. 770-704-6244. www.CherokeeArts.org. Cherokee County Master Gardeners 770-721-7803. www.caes.uga.edu/extension/ cherokee/mastergardeners. Cherokee Photography Club www.cherokeepc.org. Cherokee County Saddle Club hosts monthly meetings and group rides. www.cherokeesaddleclub.com. Cherokee Hockey In Line League (CHILL) roller hockey. www.cherokeehockey.org. Cherokee Music Teachers Association 770-720-1701. www.cherokeemta.org. Cherokee Soccer Association 770-704-0187. www.csaimpact.com.

Service League of Cherokee County 770-704-5991. www.serviceleague.net.

Cherokee Youth Lacrosse Association www.cherokeelacrosse.com.

South Cherokee Optimist Club Meets: 7:30 a.m. every Friday at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-926-3522.

Christian Authors Guild Meets: 7-9 p.m. first and third Monday at Prayer and Praise Christian Fellowship, 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock. www.christianauthorsguild.org.

Towne Lake Optimist Club Meets: 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-715-3375. www.townelakeoptimists.com. Woodstock Jaycees Meets: 7 p.m. first Tuesday and third Thursday at 216 Rope Mill Road. 770-926-8336.

Kingdom Riders, a chapter of the Christian Motorcyclists Association in Canton. Meets: 8 a.m. fourth Saturdays at Family Tradition restaurant in Hickory Flat.

Woodstock Junior Woman’s Club www.woodstockjwc.org.

Les Marmitons, for men interested in culinary arts. www.lesmarmitons.org.

Towne Lake PowerCore Team Meets: 7-8:30 a.m. Fridays at Freight Kitchen & Tap, 251 E. Main St., Woodstock. 404-816-3377. www.powercore.net.

Woodstock Lions Club Meets: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church. 770-906-2958.

Neighbors and Newcomers of Towne Lake (NNTL) is a social club for residents of 30189 area code. 770-855-9623. www.nntlclub.com.

Women of Woodstock Meets: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. first and third Wednesday at Tavern at Towne Lake. info@womenofwoodstock.com. www.womenofwoodstock.com.

Woodstock Preservation Group 770-924-0406. http://preservationwoodstock.com/.

Sons of the American Revolution - Cherokee Meets: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays at the Rock Barn, 638 Marietta Hwy., Canton. www.cherokeechapter.com.

Towne Lake Business Association Meets: 12:30 p.m. third Tuesdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 678-389-3887. www.tlba.org.

Woodstock PowerCore Team Meets: 7 a.m. on Thursdays at Tavern at Towne Lake. 770-952-5000 ext. 20.

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS

Cherokee County Democratic Party Meets: 7 p.m. second Thursday at Holly Springs Train Depot, 164 Hickory Road, Holly Springs. 770-345-3489. www.cherokeedemocrats.com.

William G. Long Senior Center offers activities for seniors at 223 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. 678-445-6518. TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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COMMUNITY OF FAITH ADVENTIST

Cherokee 101 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-7304 http://cherokee.netadvent.org/ Canton 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton 678-880-0106 www.cantonadventist.org

AME

Allen Temple AME 232 N. Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-6348 www.allentempleame.org St. Paul 390 Crisler St., Canton 770-479-9691 www.stpaulame-canton.org

BAPTIST

Canton Bible Church 94 North St., Canton CantonBibleChurch.org Carmel 2001 Bascomb Carmel Road, Woodstock Cherokee 7770 Hickory Flat Highway, Woodstock 770-720-3399 www.cherokeebaptistchurch.org Cornerstone Community 4206 North Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-439-5108 www.ccchurchonline.org Crossroads Community Church 2317 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-592-7007 Crossroads Primitive 3100 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-710-1068 Faith Community Office: 110 Village Trail, Suite 110, Woodstock Sunday Services: 3075 Trickum Road, Woodstock 770-516-1996 www.faithcommunitychurch.org First Baptist of Woodstock 11905 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-4428 www.fbcw.org First Baptist Canton One Mission Point 770-479-5538 www.fbccanton.org First Baptist Holly Springs 2632 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-5349 www.fbchollysprings.com Harvest 3460 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth www.hbcga.org Heritage Fellowship 3615 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-479-9415 www.HeritageCanton.com Hickory Road 2416 Hickory Road, Canton GA 30115 www.hickoryroad.org Hillcrest 6069 Woodstock Road, Acworth 770-917-9100 www.hbcacworth.org Hopewell 78 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-5723 www.hopewellbaptist.com

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Mt. Zion 4096 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-479-3324 www.mtzb.org New Victoria 6659 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-926-8448, www.newvicbaptist.org Rising Hills Church 615 Mountain Road, Woodstock www.gorhc.org River Church 2335 Sixes Road, Canton 770-485-1975 www.riveratlanta.org Shallowford Free Will 1686 Shallowford Road, Marietta 770-926-1163 www.shallowfordchurch.com South Cherokee 7504 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-0422 Sutallee 895 Knox Bridge Highway, White 770-479-0101 www.sutalleebaptistchurch.com Toonigh 4999 Old Highway 5, Lebanon www.toonightbaptistchurch.com

CHURCH OF GOD

Bells Ferry 6718 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-592-2956 www.bellsferry.com Canton Church 110 Bluffs Parkway, Canton 678-285-3288 www.cantonchurch.com New Life Church 154 Lakeside Drive, Canton 770-345-2660 www.newlifecanton.com Sunnyside 2510 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-693-1018 www.sunnysidecog.org Toonigh 4775 Holly Springs Parkway, Canton 770-926-3096 www.toonighcog.org

EPISCOPAL

Christ the Redeemer Charismatic 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton 404-395-5003 www.ctrcec.com

Temple Beth Tikvah 9955 Coleman Road, Roswell 770-642-0434 www.bethtikvah.com Temple Kehillat Chaim 1145 Green St., Roswell 770-641-8630 www.kehillatchaim.org Temple Kol Emeth 1415 Old Canton Road, Marietta 770-973-3533 www.kolemeth.net

MESSIANIC JEWISH CONGREGATIONS Congregation Beth Hallel 950 Pine Grove Road, Roswell 770-641-3000 www.bethhallel.org

LUTHERAN

Celebration of Grace 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton 770-345-8540 www.celebrationofgrace.org Good Shepherd 1208 Rose Creek Drive, Woodstock 770-924-7286 www.gslutheran.org Timothy 556 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-928-2812 www.tlcwoodstock.org

ORTHODOX

St. Elizabeth 2263 East Cherokee Drive, Woodstock 770-485-0504 www.stelizabethga.org

PRESBYTERIAN

Cherokee 1498 Johnson Brady Road, Canton 770-704-9564, www.cherokee-pca.org. Covenant South Annex Rec Center 7545 Main St., Bldg. 200, Woodstock www.cc-pca.org Faith 3655 Reinhardt College Parkway, Canton www.faithpc.us Grace Church 1160 Butterworth Road, Canton 678-493-9869, www.gracecanton.org Heritage 5323 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-3558 , www.heritagepres.com Trinity 1136 Trinity Church Road, Canton www.trinity-presbyterian-church.org

Episcopal Church-Annunciation 1673 Jamerson Road, Marietta 770-928-7916 www.ecamarietta.org

Woodstock 345 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-0074, www.woodstockpcusa.com

Saint Clement’s 2795 Ridge Road, Canton 770-345-6722 www.stclementscanton.org

Our Lady of LaSalette 12941 Sam Nelson Road, Canton 770-479-8923 www.lasalettecanton.com

JEWISH

Chabad Jewish Center 1480 Shiloh Road, NW, Kennesaw 770-400-9255 www.jewishwestcobb.com Congregation Ner Tamid Reform Jewish Congregation 1349 Old 41 Highway NW, Suite 220, Marietta 678-264-8575 www.mynertamid.org Congregation Etz Chaim 1190 Indian Hills, Marietta 770-973-0137 www.etzchaim.net

ROMAN CATHOLIC

St. Michael the Archangel 490 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-516-0009 www.saintmichaelcc.org Transfiguration Catholic Church 1815 Blackwell Road NE., Marietta 770-977-1442 www.transfiguration.com

UNITED METHODIST Ball Ground 3045 Canton Hwy, Ball Ground 770-735-6247 www.ballground.church/


Bascomb 2295 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-926-9755 www.bascombumc.org Big Springs 2066 Sugar Pike Road, Woodstock Canton First 930 Lower Scott Mill Road 770-479-2502 www.cantonfirstumc.org CITY ON A HILL 7745 Main St., Woodstock 678-445-3480 www.coahumc.org Fields Chapel 1331 Fields Chapel Road, Canton 770-479-6030 www.fieldschapel.org Hickory Flat 4056 East Cherokee Drive, Canton 770-345-5969 www.hickoryflat.org Hillside 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-924-4777 www.hillsideumc.org Holly Springs 2464 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-2883 www.hollyspringsumc.com Liberty Hill 141 Railroad St., Canton 678-493-8920 www.libertyhillumc.org Little River 12455 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-2495 www.littleriverumc.info Mt. Gilead 889 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0837 www.mtgilead-umc.org Sixes 8385 Bells Ferry Road, Canton 770-345-7644 www.sixesumc.org Woodstock 109 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock 770-516-0371

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Emerson 4010 Canton Road, Marietta 770-578-1533 www.emersonuu.org

OTHERS

Action Church 271 Marietta Road, Canton 770-345-3030 www.actionchurch.tv Antioch Christian Church 3595 Sugar Pike Road, Canton 770-475-9628 www.antiochcanton.org Antioch Church 9876 Main St., Suite 250, Woodstock 678-494-2193 www.antiochchurch.life Awakening 180 Parkway 575, Suite 140, Woodstock 770-924-4150 www.awakeningwoodstock.com

Branches of Christ 5946 Jacobs Road, Acworth 770-917-4964 www.branchesofchrist.com BridgePointe 233 Arnold Mill Road, Suite 400, Woodstock 770-517-2977 www.bridgepointechurch.org Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 2205 Bascomb-Carmel Road, Woodstock 770-529-9572, www.mormon.org Church of the Messiah 4115 Charles Cox Drive, Canton 770-479-5280 www.churchofthemessiah.net Dayspring 6835 Victory Drive, Acworth 770-516-5733 www.dayspring-online.com Dwelling Place Church 110 Londonderry Court #130, Woodstock www.dwellingplacemovement.org Empowerment Tabernacle 507 Industrial Drive, Woodstock 770-928-7478 www.EmpowermentTabernacle.com The Factory 9872 Main St., Woodstock 770-517-7265 www.thefactoryministries.org Faith Family 5744 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth 770-926-4560 www.ffcacworth.com Fivestones Church 1358 Sixes Road, Canton 770-720-2227 www.fivestonesga.com Fresh Springs Worship Center 1910 Eagle Drive, Suite 100, Woodstock 678-557-9841 www.freshspringsworship.com Fuente de Vida (Fountain of Life) 205 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-880-3135 www.fdvida.org God’s Rolling Thunder Latimer Hall, 103 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock www.godsrollingthunder.org His Hands 550 Molly Lane, Woodstock 770-405-2500 www.hishandschurch.com Hope Church 6576 Commerce Parkway, Woodstock www.HopeChurchAtl.com Iglesia Mana Para Siempre, Inc. Bilingual church Spanish & English 452 Milton Drive, Canton 678-880-8750 www.iglesiamanaparasiempre.com Life Bible Church 124 P. Rickman Industrial Drive, Canton lifebiblechurch.com Life Church 300 Adam Jenkins Memorial Drive, Suite 108, Canton 770-847-0170 www.lifechurchcanton.com Ministry House 347 Holly St., Canton 678-459-2347 http://MinistryHouse.org Momentum 659 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock

678-384-4919 www.MomentumChurch.tv New Covenant Bible 1095 Scott Road, Canton 770-479-6412 www.newcovenantcanton.org New Life Church 154 Lakeside Drive, Canton 770-345-2660 www.newlifecanton.com North Atlanta Church 6233 Old Alabama Road, Acworth 770-975-3001 www.northatlantachurch.org Oak Leaf 151 East Marietta St., Canton 678-653-4652 www.oakleafcanton.com Prayer & Praise Christian Fellowship 6409 Bells Ferry Road, Woodstock 770-928-2795 www.prayerandpraise.org Resurrection Anglican 231 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-591-0040 www.rezwoodstock.org Revolution 125 Union Hill Trail, Canton 770-345-2737 www.therevolution.tv Sojourn Woodstock 8534 Main St., Woodstock 770-769-7495 www.sojournwoodstock.com Sovereign Grace 471 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 678-494-2100 www.sgcatlanta.org Thrive Chapel 11303 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-835-5795 www.thrivechapel.com Towne Lake Community 132 North Medical Parkway, Woodstock 678-445-8766 www.tlcchurch.com Unity North Atlanta 4255 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 678-819-9100 www.unitynorth.org Victory 4625 Highway 92, Acworth 770-794-7366 www.victoryga.com Woodstock City Church 150 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock 678-880-9092 www.woodstockcity.org Woodstock Christian 7700 Highway 92, Woodstock 770-926-8238 www.woodstockchristian.org Woodstock Church of Christ 219 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8838 www.woodstockchurchofchrist.org Woodstock Church of the Nazarene 874 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770-366-7515 www.wcnga.com Woodstock Community Church 237 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 770-926-8990 www.wcchurch.org TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Advertisers

For advertising rates and information Patty Ponder 770-615-3322 Patty@AroundaboutMagazines.com

October 2018

ANIMAL/PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES Animal Atlanta 770-591-0007 www.AnimalAtlanta.com

24

Cherokee County Animal Shelter www.cherokeega-animals.org

75

Merry Mac Dog Training 770-579-3865 www.MerryMacDogTraining.com

41

Towne Lake Pet Care 404-907-9778

5

ATTORNEYS/LEGAL SERVICES Debranski & Associates, LLC 770-926-1957, ext 306 www.Debranski.com Imbriale Injury Law 678-445-7423 www.imbrialeinjury.com

9

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AUTOMOTIVE Aspen Falls Auto Spa 770-591-3630

75

Chloe's Auto Repair 770-575-8800 www.ChloesAutoRepair.com

33

1

Joe's Automotive 770-517-2695

20

Woodstock Quality Paint & Body 770-926-3898

73

BEAUTY SALON & SPA 1922 Men's Grooming Salon 678-483-8900

15

élon Salon 770-427-8698 www.elonsalon.com

27

Main Street Nail Studio 770-928-2662

80

Salon Gloss 770-693-6968 www.salongloss.biz

51

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS Downtown Buzz 80 770-592-6056 www.mainstreetwoodstock.org/connect/#buzz 94

TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Towne Lake Family Dentistry Inside Back 770-591-7929 www.TowneLakeFamilyDentistry.com

71

Williams Orthodontics Cover, 48, 49, 73 770-592-5554 and 770-345-4155 www.DrWilliamsOrthodontics.com

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Papa’s Pantry 770-591-4730 www.PapasPantry.org CHIROPRACTIC

EDUCATION

Joint Chiropractic, The 678-214-4449 www.thejoint.com

41

Ribley Chiropractic 770-592-2505 www.ribleychiro.com

54

Towne Lake Family Chiropractic 770-592-1877 www.townelakechiro.com

63

COMPUTERS

Nelson Elder Care Law, LLC Inside front 678-250-9355 www.NelsonElderCareLaw.com

Christian Brothers Automotive 770-926-4500 www.cbac.com

Towne Lake Business Association www.TLBA.org

Cherokee Computer Guys 678-889-5900 www.ccrguys.com

3

CREDIT UNION Credit Union of Georgia 678-486-1111 www.CUofGA.org

47

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FINANCIAL SERVICES Citadel Professional Services, LLC 770-952-6707 www.CitadelWealthCare.com Graham Bailey Edward Jones 678-445-9525 ww.edwardjones.com

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FUNERAL SERVICES Woodstock Funeral Home and Cremations 770-926-3107 www.woodstockfuneralhome.com

9

HEALTH & FITNESS

DENTAL

R2 Total Fitness 678-809-7833 www.r2totalfitness.com

(Cosmetic, Family, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics & Pediatric) Baird & Baird Family Dentistry 770-517-0444 www.BairdFamilyDentistry.com

Stem Hangar, The 678-224-6188 www.thestemhangar.com

21

Canton Dental Town 770-622-1515 www.dentaltownsmiles.com

9

Dentistry for Woodstock 770-926-0000 www.dentistryforwoodstock.com

1

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HOME IMPROVEMENT & REPAIR Bryan Plumbing Services 770-826-5277

5

Budget Blinds 678-540-1615 www.BudgetBlinds.com/Woodstock

64

Casey's Painting 678-445-9661 www.caseyspainting.com

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CFM Electrical Services 678-614-9661

43

Kragor Orthodontics 770-485-8827 www.kragorortho.com

57

ClearView window cleaning & pressure washing 770-926-1960 www.ClearViewAtl.com

Levitt Orthodontics 770-516-6100 www.levittortho.com

5

Gentle Dental Care and Georgia Dental Implant Center 770-926-2784 www.georgiadic.com

Park Pediatric Dentistry of Woodstock 24 770-926-9260 www.PediatricWoodstockDentist.com

Coleman Home Services 770-294-9667 www.colemanhomeservices.com Dr. Fixit, Ph.D. 770-974-2390 www.DrFixitPHD.com

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Enhance Floors & More 770-565-3808 www.enhancefloors.com

53

Governors MedSpa & Concierge Medicine 39 678-888-5181 www.governorsmedicine.com

Handy Handyman, The 404-316-1490 www.thhmga.com

35

GYN Surgical Specialists 404-303-3157 www.GYNSurgicalSpecialists.com

21

L. Bean Interiors 770-824-8386

71

Mr. Junk 678-Mr-Junk1 www.MrJunk1.com

64

Northside Cherokee Surgical Assoc. 770-926-9229 www.ncsurgicalassociates.com

Pike’s Professional Painting 770-516-0045

63

Northside Cherokee Pediatrics 678-388-5485 northsidecherokeepediatrics.com

Precision Painting & Remodeling 678-234-9668 www.precisionpaintingatlanta.com

43

Reliable Heating & Air 770-594-9969 www.ReliableAir.com

29

Towne Plumber 770-257-7503 www.towneplumber.com

55

INSURANCE Geico Jerry Sorrels 770-565-9696

35

LANDSCAPING & PEST CONTROL

87

FCA Field of Faith ww.fieldsoffaith.com

73

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Georgia All-Star Gymnastics 770-516-2654 www.ga-allstars.com

37

Plastic Surgery Center of the South 30 770-421-1242 www.plasticsurgerycenterofthesouth.net

18

PHOTOGRAPHY 65

Rebekah Gregg Photography 52 678-637-7518 www.rebekahgreggphotography.com PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL SERVICES Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates Canton: 678-593-1295 Woodstock: 770-926-5459 www.atlantagastro.com

65

Atlanta North Dermatology & Skin Care 770-516-5199 www.atlantanorthdermatology.com

45

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Jingle Bell Shop 770-345-0400 www.CherokeeChamber.com

66

Kennesaw State Owls Football

70 43

WellStar & Mayo Clinic 770-956-7827 www.wellstar.org/mayo

67

Santa Boggs 404-680-5989 www.SantaBoggs.com Taste of Etowah

75

Woodstock Wolverines Football

87

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Tomlinson Team, The 770-365-6193 www.thetomlinsonteam.com

OPTOMETRIST

Holiday Tour of Homes www.WoodstockJWC.org

70

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Reinhardt University Eagles Football

Landscape Matters 770-403-5813 www.LandscapeMattersInc.com

7

Georgia Zombiefest www.GeorgiaZombieFest.com

42

REAL ESTATE & RELATED SERVICES

Mclellan Excavation & Landscaping 404-520-0710 www.excavationandlandscaping.com

8

Rebound Physical Therapy 678-445-9799 www.ReboundPTClinic.com

Atlanta Communities, Tara Daigle 404-925-6351

Ed Selby 678-860-1546 www.edselbyphoto.com

Etowah Eagles Football

Perimeter North Family Medicine 770-395-1130 www.pnfm.com

55

Eyes on Towne Lake 770-702-5996 www.eyesontownelake.com

81

Northside Hospital Cherokee 11 www.Northside.com/Cherokee-Heart

Calvary Landscaping & Irrigation 770-720-1727 or 770-827-0346

RPM Landscape & Pavers 770-597-5175 www.rpmlandscapeandpavers.com

Elm Street Cultural Arts Village 678-494-4251 www.elmstreetarts.org

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Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Wahl Team, The 57 O: 770-517-2150 Cell: 404-428-4262 www.wahlteam.com Broadus Realty 404-583-8856 www.broadusrealtygroup.com

28

Harry Norman Realtors, Gina Riggs 404-860-0159 770-422-6005

33

Kurt & Sheila Team, Keller Williams Back Cvr 404-954-2486, 678-494-0644 www.kurtandsheilateam.com Soliel Laurel Canyon 678-500-8099 www.SolielLaurelCanyon.com

31

Windsong Properties, Grace 770-516-3678 www.WindsongLife.com

36

RESTAURANTS/FOOD Copper Coin Coffee Inside front, 20 470-308-6914 www.coppercoinwoodstock.com Fire Stone Wood Fired Pizza & Grill 770-926-6778 www.FireStoneRestaurants.com Smallcakes — A Cupcakery 678-324-1910 smallcakeswoodstock.myshopify.com Tavern at Towne Lake 770-592-9969 www.tavernattownelake.com WOW Pho & Grill 678-383-6099 www.wowpho.com

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RETAILERS/ SHOPPING Queen B’s Boutique 770-380-6794 www.QueenBsWoodstock.com

21

SENIOR LIVING/ SERVICES

RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT Cruise Planners, Kathy Faisal 678-445-5235

63

Eagle Watch Golf Club 404-960-9225 gary.weller@clubcorp.com

44

Lodge at BridgeMill, The 770-479-4639 www.TheLodgeAtBridgeMill.com Oaks at Towne Lake 770-592-2195 www.oaksseniorliving.com TOWNELAKER | October 2018

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Since 1996, we have brought relevant, uplifting and reader-driven content to readers. We publish Around Acworth, Around Canton, Around Woodstock and TowneLaker. We look forward to serving you, our readers and advertisers, every month. Thank you for your continued support and participation in making this truly your community magazine.

Front row, from left, Laura Latchford, Christie Deese, Patty Ponder and Jackie Loudin. Back row, Carla Caldwell, Michelle McCulloch, Denise Griffin, Candi Hannigan, Karen Flaig and Katherine Amick. Photo by Beth Fornuto.

At Aroundabout Local Media, we believe the world functions at the community level: diverse groups of people living in close proximity, sharing commonality of culture, values and local pride, developing safety nets for those in need, and helping each other to live richer lives. It is our heartfelt desire to contribute to the fabric that helps make a community happen. Through our magazines, we aim to provide everyone in the communities we serve with uplifting, interesting information about the community they are proud to call home. We encourage you to send us your photos, ideas, stories or anything else you think the community would like to know about. It’s your community. It’s your magazine. Look on page 6 for our contact information.

TowneLaker Distribution Map Circulation: 16,400

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TOWNELAKER | October 2018


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