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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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April 2011 Volume 16, Issue 12

68 Featured Articles

50 & 51

On the Cover Little Caesars, voted best value in America three years in a row! Photo by Kim Bates. AroundAbout — TowneLaker is printed using soy-based inks and paper stocks that are at least 25% recycled. Our printer also recycles all paper and ink waste.

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Readers’ Choice Awards

Your favorite businesses celebrated their win.

36

Teacher of the Year

Meet Cherokee’s best teachers!

48

Dreams Do Come True

Kristin Ribley shares her great adventure.

58

Summer Camps

Helpful guide to plan for summer break.

72

Lake Allatoona History

Don Martin lets us in on some rich history.

Keep up-to-date with our community! www.townelaker.com Patty Ponder is the General Sales Manager for AroundAbout — TowneLaker. She can be reached at (770) 615-3322 or patty@townelaker.com. 2

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april 2011


Community

34 If Momma’s Not Happy, Nobody’s Happy

— Shelley Herod

18 Save $$ on Kids Clothing at Seasonal Consignment Sales — Lisa Huffman

38 Historical Society

19 Leaving a Legacy Plan

39 The First Apartment

61

— Kara Kiefer

— Don Akridge

20 Saving the HOPE Scholarship — Chip Rogers 21 A Dignified Solution to a Financial Crisis — Sheila & Kurt Johnson

40 Gruner Veltliner, the Groovy Wine

Schools & Sports

— David Hecklemoser

62 You Can Make a Difference 42 Mosquito Prevention

— Rick Coughlin

— E.T. Booth Students

63 Tennis Nutrition

22 Bill Lundeen – Possessing a Service Heart — Susan Cannizzaro

— Jason Fleeman

Faith

27 Moms and Kids

— Colin Morris

74 “Poor Baby!”

Lifestyle

48

28 The Boyfriend-ectomy

— Dr. Steven Weiskopf

33 What to Expect from a Sleep Study

76 Marriage Moments

— Donna Ratliff

— Dr. Mike Litrel

In Every Issue

30 Enjoy Pregnancy Without Foot Pain

— Doug Thrasher

— Cynthia Blount

46 Musings from Towne

— Robyn Hohensee

Wanted Basement Bulldozer

— Laurie Wischner

Around Towne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Community News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Birthdays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Community Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . 26 Everyday Angels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

52 Twelve Months of Giving

— Dan Jape

TLBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 School Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

57 Stressed Out Mom

Church Listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Recent Product Recalls . . . . . . . . . 80

— Dee Locklin

56 When Maintaining a Lawn, Timing is Everything

— Paul Pugliese

Local Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Community Numbers . . . . . . . . . . 84 Elected Officials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Real Deals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

22 april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Community Coupons. . . . . . . . . . . 93 Advertisers Directory. . . . . . . . . . . 94

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Community Kara is the Editor of AroundAbout — Townelaker magazine. She lives in Towne Lake with her husband Mike and their two sons Brandon and Garrett. Feel free to send your comments or questions to editor@townelaker.com.

Around Towne The People, The Places and The Pleasures that make Towne Lake by Kara Kiefer As this magazine went to press, I was on an airplane to Colorado to surprise my mom for her 70th birthday. And there is one thing I knew for sure — I would come back to Woodstock with a lot more stuff in my suitcase. Why? Because my mom is “reorganizing” and “downsizing.” Her “downsizing” includes giving back old framed photographs, gifts I gave her from traveling abroad, childhood trophies and more than likely, my old letter jacket. Her downsizing is quickly becoming my upsizing because if I don’t take them, they will be donated or thrown away. But I don’t know what to do with them either! More than likely, they will end up in the storage room in the basement, waiting to be passed on to the next generation!

custom portraits and fine art. For more information, please e-mail her at 81artist@comcast.net or become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/krystyna81.

What’s New?

What’s Closed?

After some mysterious construction activity at the former Curves location on Towne Lake Parkway, the new tenant finally has revealed itself. TwoSome — Organic Herb Tea and Bakery will be opening soon at 2485 Towne Lake Parkway, adjacent to Repair.Com shoe repair.

Max Cleaners, located in the shopping center behind Longhorn Steakhouse, recently closed.

Yoguri, a new frozen yogurt shop, recently opened at 440 Chambers Street in downtown Woodstock. All yogurt treats are priced by weight. Blue Frog has opened at 8608 Main Street, stocking eclectic merchandise and art. Blue Frog can be reached at (770) 592-0122.

What’s Moved? Around About Local Media, which includes the corporate offices for AroundAbout — TowneLaker and AroundAbout — East Cobb, recently relocated from Rose Creek Drive to 2449 Towne Lake Parkway in the former Allstate building.

What Will be Moving? American Heritage Academy will move into the vacant building originally planned for a Food Lion on Bells Ferry Road. American Heritage Development Director Parviz Nikkhoo said the school will move to its new location over the summer and begin renovations. Classes are scheduled to resume in August or early September.

Woodstock Coffee House, also located in that center, has closed and will reopen in downtown Woodstock with a new name, Woodstock’s Best Coffee House. The shop will be located on Chambers Street, next to Roomscapes and Heartworks Gallery. An opening date was not available by press time.

A Big Thank You! The “Live On” Connor Merritt Memorial Bass Tournament was a huge hit! Proceeds netted approximately $7,000 for the Yellow Ribbon suicide prevention program of Cherokee County. Connor’s mom, Judy, thanks everyone who participated, donated funds or auction prizes.

Sign up today for money-saving group coupon offers in your email inbox featuring only local businesses!

Towne Lake Nails has moved from the Southpoint shopping center (behind McDonald’s) to the Kroger shopping center, 2295 Towne Lake Parkway, next to Subway. Dr. Peri Fletcher, chiropractor/clinical nutritionist and owner of HealthCoach Nutritional Healing Center, has relocated her practice along with Emily Mattocks, licensed massage therapist. They are now practicing at 2453 Towne Lake Parkway inside Ribley Chiropractic. For more information, please call (770) 592-2505. Studio 81 LLC — Portrait and Fine Art by Kristina Laurendi Havens moved her studio to Ann Litrel Art, 8594 Main Street. Kristina offers a variety of classes as well as 4

www.thedailyvalue.com

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

See page 66 for more details. april 2011


april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

www.townelaker.com Keeping You Plugged in to the Latest Happenings Online by James Ball, Digital Marketing Director, AroundAbout Local Media Have you noticed the changes to the TowneLaker. com website? Why the change? It’s actually more than just a simple case of Spring Fever, though the timing does feel right! Our visitors have helped us determine what we need to do more of and what we need to abandon. You see, it really is your site, and we absolutely want it to be all it should be for you! We certainly put our best foot forward when we launched the original site, but until it had some time and use from you, it was merely guesswork on our part. All of us here are very pleased with the new site. We hope that you find it as attractive, intuitive and easy to navigate as we do! We realize that our website is often the “front door” to many who may not receive our magazines. As such, it is a very important and integral part of who we are. It’s important that it represents us in a very real and transparent way, and that it functions as it should for our readers and site visitors. As a community magazine, we feel that it is absolutely necessary to evolve along with the digital realm and all that it has to offer. Communicating and connecting with others has never been easier or faster. We think that this is a benefit within a community that simply cannot be overlooked. We value the Internet for what it offers us as a company, and this is because it helps us to better serve our clients and our readership. We really do consider it a privilege that so many of you have chosen to connect with us online!

Publisher AroundAbout Local Media, Inc. Sales Manager Patty Ponder

patty@townelaker.com, (770) 615-3322

Executive Editor Kara Kiefer

editor@townelaker.com, (770) 615-3309

Advertising Director Leslie Proctor

admanager@townelaker.com, (770) 615-3304

Art Director Michelle McCulloch

art@townelaker.com, (770) 615-3307

Digital Marketing Director James Ball

james@aroundaboutmagazines.com, (770) 615-3310

Video Correspondent Brandon Schultze Community Board Sen. Chip Rogers, Colin Morris, Debi Radcliff, Bill Ratliff, Doug Thrasher AroundAbout — TowneLaker, a publication of AroundAbout Local Media, Inc., is a monthly community magazine. The magazine’s goal is to build a sense of community and pride in the Towne Lake area by providing its residents with positive stories and timely information. It is distributed free to approximately 12,500 homes by mail to all Towne Lakers. An additional 1,900 are placed in racks around the community. AroundAbout — TowneLaker welcomes your comments, stories, and advertisements. The deadline is the 10th of the previous month. Subscriptions are available for $24 per year. Send check or money order to the address below. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists and submissions are not necessarily those of the Editor/Publisher and the Publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. AroundAbout — TowneLaker is not responsible for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the Publisher. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011.

If you have any questions about your own website, search engine optimization (SEO), social media marketing, or anything else digital in nature, please contact me at (770) 615-3310 or e-mail me at james@ aroundaboutmagazines.com. We do offer products and services designed to fit the digital and online needs of small businesses, and I’d be happy to speak with you further about them.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker 2449 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, GA 30189 Website: www.townelaker.com Franchise Opportunities Available: www.AroundAboutMagazines.com

Volume 16, Issue 12 6

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

Local News Yard Sale to Benefit Animal Rescue Groups Mostly Mutts will sponsor its third annual indoor yard sale at the Climatized Self Storage April 1 – 3, 8 – 10 and 15 – 17. Gently used and new items will be sold by several area animal rescue organizations. Profits will benefit the various rescues. Sales times are 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 11 a.m. – 4 .m. Sundays. Climatized Self Storage is located at 42 Sycamore Lane. For more information on Mostly Mutts, please visit www. mostlymutts.org or call (770) 325-7387.

Lemonade Stand Benefits Fundraiser Three young Arbors residents recently held a lemonade stand fundraiser benefitting children with Leukemia. Ryan Shillcutt, MJ Smith and Jake Smith gave the proceeds from their drink stand to the Pennies for Patients fundraiser sponsored by Chapman Intermediate School. At 50 cents a glass, the boys raised a total of $45.

horses or walk alongside special needs children in hippotherapy. Horse experience preferred, but training is available. School approved community service hours available. Very rewarding and fun! Flexible week-day shifts, 12 months per year, with a covered arena with air conditioned and heated lounge. For more information, e-mail greenacresonline@bellsouth.net or call (770) 517-5154.

Local Scout Troop Completes Service Project Boy Scout Troop 639, chartered by Woodstock Christian Church, recently installed a handrail to assist an elderly resident navigate steep terrain so she can board the Cherokee Area Transportation System (CATS) bus.

Left to right: Ryan Shillcut, MJ Smith, Jake Smith and dog Kirby raise funds for Pennies for Patients.

Sheriff Department Wins Registration Race The Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency recently held its annual Guns & Hoses charity 5K. The Cherokee County Sheriff’s office competed with the Cherokee County Fire — Left to right: Vick West, Chief Emergency Services to register Deputy of the Cherokee County the most runners. $5 from each Sheriff’s Office and Eddie registration fee was donated to Robinson, Training Chief of Cherokee County Fire and each agency’s chosen charity. Emergency Services. The Sheriff’s department registered 277 participants and $1,385 was donated to Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), and the fire department registered 205 and donated $1,025 to the Hope and Light Foundation.

Therapeutic Horse Volunteers Needed Horse Talk, a North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) Center in Woodstock, needs adult and teen (14 and up) volunteers to lead the trained therapeutic 8

Left to right: Hunter Williams, Ryan Childree, Jimmy Wilson, Noah Hedrick, Ethan Knox, Finn Kitchen, Matthew Moyers, Andrew Kelly, Roger Moyers, CJ Marthaler and Tyler Graham.

Boston Students Participate in Career Day Cobb EMC recently hosted its annual Career Day for local elementary schools, including Boston Elementary School. Participating students were “hired” for the day and paired with Cobb EMC employees. The students learned about the job responsibilities and were allowed to assist with certain projects. Students were selected based on their applications for specific jobs at Cobb EMC. Keeley Thayer (left) and Barbara Thomas take a break from their work for a picture with their Cobb EMC colleague for the day, Padmaja Posa.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

SafeTeen Georgia Driving Academy Join Safe Teen Georgia for a day-long event on May 7, featuring driver safety exhibits and hands-on learning. The event will be held at the Atlanta Motor Speedway and will feature 25 exhibitors. Interactive exhibits include a simulated distracted driver course, driving under the influence, seatbelt safety and more. Tickets are free and can be found by visiting www. drivers.safeamerica.org.

Camping for a Cause If you’ve traveled on Towne Lake Parkway at night, you probably noticed a campfire and tent pitched at Towne Lake Community Church. David Youssi, founder of Irrigation Without Borders, is camping for Camp H.A.I.T.I.(Haitian Agricultural Irrigation Technology Initiative). David will camp every night until enough funds have been raised to support at least one proposed village irrigation project. David chose to camp because it represents solidarity to those who live like that every day. To help David in his cause or learn more, please visit www.irrigationwithoutborders.org.

April Activities for Seniors William G. Long Senior Center 223 Arnold Mill Road (next to the fire station) (678) 445-6518 Hours: 9 a.m. — 3 p.m., Monday — Friday

Remembering Dylan Kent Etowah High School freshman Dylan Kent recently passed away after his eight-month battle with Burkitt’s Lymphoma. Before entering high school, Dylan had played football with the Cherokee Youth Football Association and had hoped to play for the Etowah Eagles, but he was diagnosed in July, 2010 before the season began. Dylan was the only child of his parents, Robyn and James. The Dylan Kent fund has been set up through Sun Trust bank to assist the family with outstanding financial needs as a result of Dylan’s illness.

Contest Corner Congratulations to Emmy Young for being the first to find our hidden picture on page 42 of the March issue. Congratulations also to Lura Gilmer (right) for being the first to spot the phrase “are you ready for Spring break?” located on page 69. Laura won a gift certificate to the Corner Bistro and Emmy won a gift certificate to Bar-B-Cutie. 10

Free Tax Preparation Date: Every Monday through April 18 Time: 9 a.m. Information: Bring your necessary documents. Senior Olympics Opening Ceremony Dates: Saturday, April 2 Time: 9:30 a.m. Information: Senior Olympics will run during the month of April. There will be a wide variety of sporting events such as Golf, Pool, Pickle ball, Bocce ball and many more. For more information and registration please contact the Center. Movie and Ice Cream Date: Monday, April 18 Time: 2 p.m. Showing: It’s Complicated Birthday Party and LOTTO Drawing Date: Wednesday, April 13 Time: 12 noon

Be the first to find the April Fool’s Joke!

Find the hidden picture: If you know the answer to the contest question or find the hidden picture, be the first to call (770) 615-3325 or e-mail editor@townelaker.com. Contest rules: A player is eligible to win once every 12 months.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

Happy Birthday! Wedding, Birthday and Anniversary Announcements are Free! E-mail to: editor@townelaker.com • May deadline is April 10.

Dalton Peters

Lauren Peters

Ryan Peters

Age 13 on March 20 Son of Lori & Chris Peters

Age 13 on March 20 Daughter of Lori & Chris Peters

Age 19 on March 19. Son of Lori & Chris Peters

Claire Elizabeth Rowe Age 2 on April 2 Daughter of Steve & Shari Rowe Sister of Kevin & Christopher

Ellie Kearney Age 13 on March 6 We love you, Mom, Dad, Grace & Sarah

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Colton Kuleszynski

Colby Kuleszynski

Age 1 on March 13 Son of Amy & Chris Kuleszynski Brother of Colby

Age 2 on March 26 Son of Amy & Chris Kuleszynski Brother of Colton

Allie Zschoche

Felipe Duque

Carolina Duque

Matthew Duque

Age 11 on April 27 Love wishes from Mom, Gabbie, Ed, Greg & Cassie

Age 9 on April 2 Son of Adriana & Jaime Duque Brother of Carolina We love you!

Age 6 on March 19 Happy Birthday Son of Adriana & Jaime Duque Sister of Felipe We love you!

Age 6 on March 19 Son of Beatriz & Jorge Duque Brother of Sara We love you!

Keagan Simons Age 3 on March 14 Son of Trina & Cortland Simons Grandson of Renee Gann, Joanne & Rick Simons

Cameron Mullins Age 14 on April 9 Son of Shannon & Clay Truesdale Brother of Jesse and Billy

Connor Marshall Jones

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Age 11 on April 29 Son of Tonya Jones Happy Birthday CJ Love Mom and Trey!

Hunter Nicole Pearson Age 12 on April 10th Daughter of Cyndee & Tracy Pearson Sister of Jenna

april 2011


Stork Watch

Zoey Lynn Ratliff

Ava Claire Lawley

Born on February 13, 2011 6 lbs., 3 oz., 19 inches Parents: Ashley & Scott Ratliff Proud Grandparents: Donna & Bill Ratliff

Born on March 7, 2011 6 lbs., 12 oz., 19.5 inches Parents: Christine & Matt Lawley Proud Grandparents: Donna & Bill Ratliff and Lorna & Herbi Lawley

Celebrating Moms! At AroundAbout-TowneLaker, we feel that each and every mom is her family’s “Mother of the Year.” For this reason, we would like to honor as many of our moms as possible for our May issue with a special pictorial celebrating all mothers!

Steve Greeson

Alliya Dunning

Cody Blair Smith

celebrating the BIG 50 on April 5 We Love You, Karyn, Drew, Elizabeth

celebrating on March 19 Daughter of Kira Dunning

Happy 1st Birthday on April 23 Son of Dawn & Brad Smith Brother of Sean & Zack

We are looking for photos of our Towne Lake area moms with their children. The photos can be from babyhood through present day. If you don’t have children, we also would love to share your photos of you and your mom, even if it was in the 70s! Here are the guidelines: 1. Please ensure all submitted photographs have identifications listed for each person in the photo. 2. Please submit the photos via email to editor@townelaker.com or by mail to: AroundAbout-Townelaker, 2449 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock GA 30189.(Please include a selfaddressed stamped envelope for photo return)

Rob Ley celebrating on April 7

Kristen Ley celebrating on April 5

Shelby Petrus Age 8 on April 21 with her Daddy, Steven Petrus Age 37, on April 19. Shelby is the daughter of Stacy & Steven Petrus, sister of Spencer

3. The deadline for submissions is April 10.

april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Feature

Readers’ Choice Awards The 15th Annual Readers’ Choice award ceremony recently was held at Bar-B-Cutie. More than 50 winning businesses attended and received framed certificates and vinyl stickers to display in their storefronts. Congratulations to all our winners! Photos by Kim Bates. Mandy Seiz from Rebound Physical Therapy and Patty Ponder Sales Director for Around About Local Media.

Bar-B-Cutie Staff

Pet Groomer Stephanie Caldwell from Animal Hospital of Towne Lake.

Danny Branom from Christian Brothers.

Nick and Billy from Esquire Cleaners.

Matt Godfrey from Steve Canon’s State Farm Insurance.

Tim Courtwright owner of World of Kids Athletic Campus. 14

Oscar Velez from 3 Brothers Painting.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Towne Lake Eye Associates’ Dr. Steve Keith.

Frank and Kathy Pucci owners of Unique Hair Salon. april 2011


Bonnie and Melanie Salas from First Class Travel.

Dr. Marvetta Scott.

Left to right: Katie McMahon, Eagle Watch HOA; Karen Flaig owner of AroundAbout Local Media; Bob Flipse, Eagle Watch HOA; and Andrew Cartwright, Eagle Watch Golf Club.

Karen Flaig with Chick-fil-A representatives Aileen Langford and Maggie Besin.

Towne Lake’s Carwash and Detail owners Tim and Peggy Smith.

Genevieve Whitworth and Tabitha Wharton from The Pointe at Towne Lake Apartments.

Rod Noble of Noble Services.

Todd Darby from Taco Mac.

Dancin’ Grits owner Patty Johnson.

Christine Cartwright from Hillside UMC Preschool.

april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Photographer Derek Shane with wife Crystal and son. 15


Feature

“Thank You Readers!”

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AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

Save $$ on Kids Clothing at Seasonal Consignment Sales by Lisa Huffman Seasonal consignment shopping is a fast growing trend, especially for baby and children’s items. The economy and unemployment rates have made this increasingly more a necessity for some. Kids grow so fast, and items like clothes, strollers, car seats, cribs and toys many times seem barely used. Seasonal consignment sales offer a unique venue for both sellers and shoppers. Unlike a thrift store that is open every day, these sales set up shop for a weekend or a few days in the spring and fall. Some also offer a holiday sale around December that specializes in toys and holiday clothes. I have participated in a seasonal consignment sale for years now and have found it to be instrumental in helping me tackle the clothing budget for the kids. I receive 70 percent of the selling price, minus a $5 registration fee, with the remaining 30 percent going to the charity involved. As an added bonus, sellers are granted early access to the sale. It’s more important “I recommend these days to get there early, participating as a so you won’t miss the good stuff! shopper at a seasonal

sale to get your feet

I recommend participating as wet.” a shopper at a seasonal sale to get your feet wet. Most accept only cash or check. You should bring a laundry basket for your loot. It is exciting to stumble on a really nice outfit for a fraction of the cost. My kids get excited because they know Mom is coming home with loads of “new” clothes. Next, you should find a sale you like and become a seller. At each sale, I usually make $150 – 200 and spend $100 – $125. Participating as a seller does take time, but it’s worth it because I am taking what doesn’t fit anymore and getting new clothes that do fit with some extra money for the clothing budget. I certainly appreciate other folks doing the same or there would be nothing to buy at such great prices.

Tips for potential sellers:

1. Place a storage tub in each child’s closet and toss clothes in year-round for review closer to sale time. 2. Register early for your preferred sale and learn the rules and guidelines for a seller. 3. Pick a convenient location in your home for consignment sale set-up. A well-lit flat area works best. 4. Invest in an inexpensive clothes-hanging rack. continued on page 88 18

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

april 2011


Leaving a Legacy Plan We will all leave this world sometime. Why leave unanswered questions with those we love? by Don Akridge, MBA, CPA, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ U.S. Marine Corps Veteran – Emory University Alumnus

We all want to live a significant, successful life. Yet how many of us realize that our important, positive contributions can last long after we are gone? Two things are certain: death and taxes. Some of us grasp that reality early, so we create wills, living trusts and estate plans. Others deny this reality and leave their heirs with perplexing questions, added stress and even anger when they pass away. The truly farsighted among us opt for a full-fledged legacy plan. How does a legacy plan differ from an estate plan? An estate plan determines a destiny for your assets. A legacy plan does that and more. It communicates your values, wishes and memories as well as financial directions. If you ask someone about the “why” of estate planning – that is, why should you have an estate plan in the first place – the instant response is, “to avoid estate tax.” That is certainly a good reason to create an estate plan, but it may not be the best one. A legacy plan can convey your values and wishes when it comes to the following matters:

A legacy plan communicates more than financial details; it expresses your values, your final wishes and the life lessons you want to pass along. It conveys knowledge that may make things smoother for your heirs and your company at a time of grief and crisis. It imparts wisdom that your successor may use to guide inherited assets in the future, so that these assets might endure for more than a generation. In other words, it gives your heirs your business and some answers to the questions “what do we do now” and “what would he/she have wanted us to do.” Legacy plans are built taking many factors into account. The first factor is you. What are your goals, financial and otherwise? A legacy plan should first respect your wishes and intentions.

“A legacy plan communicates more than financial details; it expresses your values, your final wishes and the life lessons you want to pass along. ”

The distribution of the estate – selecting a steward, showing that person how these assets are to be managed according to your values and outlook.

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The future of a family business – you can share the knowledge only the owner and founder has, you can establish who will own it after you, who will manage it and who will benefit financially from it.

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Protecting your business (and your estate) from “predators and creditors” – taking steps to insulate the business (and your heirs) against lawsuits, outstanding debts, and intrusions of relatives or past associates.

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What do conventional estate plans risk ignoring? While basic estate plans establish where assets go, they don’t often communicate the personal and practical details that can aid heirs in the case of an unexpected loss.

The second factor is family. People define “family” in all kinds of different ways. A good legacy plan respects your definition, and is created with an understanding of it and your particular “family” dynamics. Only after this should the tax and financial strategies of the plan be determined.

Many estate plans are too boilerplate, and/or they aren’t designed to hand down the experiential wealth and wisdom that should accompany the assets. A good legacy plan transmits values, instructions and guidance to ease a family’s burden when it comes to settling financial and business issues at a time of grief. Don Akridge is President of Citadel CPA, Financial Planning & Investment Services founded in 1994 and conveniently located off Chastain Road between I-575 & I-75 in Kennesaw. Phone 770-9526707. Securities offered through 1st Global Capital Corp. Member FINRA, SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through 1st Global Advisors, Inc. Created by 1st Global or Peter Montoya, Inc. for use by our financial advisors.

april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community by State Senator Chip Rogers

Saving the HOPE Scholarship Saving the HOPE scholarship is the top legislative priority for Governor Deal and most legislators. No single state government program is as popular and few have been as successful. The HOPE scholarship has been called the “3rd rail” of Georgia politics. In other words, it’s too dangerous to touch. Enormous credit should go to Georgia’s new Governor, who not only “touched” this 3rd rail but made the saving of HOPE his signature issue. After eight weeks of work, the measure to save HOPE is on the Governor’s desk for approval. The bill is not perfect, but it does rescue the program from bankruptcy. While no longer paying full tuition for all students, Georgia’s HOPE scholarship, HOPE grant, and four-year old pre-K programs remain the most generous and set the “After eight weeks of standard for lottery funded work, the measure to education programs in save HOPE is on the America.

Governor’s desk for

The process for saving these approval.” programs meant everyone – students, schools, lottery officials, pre-K professionals, retailers – had to share in the sacrifice. The changes are many, but are balanced: Maintains the current merit-based HOPE Scholarship for students with a GPA of 3.0.

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The HOPE Scholarship award, the private HOPE award and the HOPE grant will be adjusted annually based on lottery revenue.

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Creates the Zell Miller Scholarship program for those students who graduate from high school with a GPA of 3.7 and have received a score of at least 1200 on combined Critical Reading Score and Math Score on the SAT or have received a score of at least 26 on the ACT. These students will receive full tuition at Georgia’s public institutions and the full private HOPE award at our private institutions.

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Requires recipients of the HOPE Grant to earn a 3.0 GPA.

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Provides that students who already possess a postsecondary degree are ineligible to receive the HOPE Grant.

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Maintains Pre-Kindergarten as a universal program serving

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four-year olds throughout Georgia. Maintains Pre-K program at a full day, 6.5 hours.

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Adds 2,000 slots to address the Pre-K waiting list in the state.

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Adds $4.2M to increase quality in the Georgia Pre-K program.

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Adds $4.5M for extended day slots for at-risk children.

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No individual employee at the Lottery Corporation may receive a bonus greater than 25 percent of that employee’s base compensation. In total, bonuses shall not exceed 1 percent of the net increase over the prior year’s deposit into the Lottery for Education Account.

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No bonuses may be awarded in years in which there is not a net increase over the prior year’s deposit into the Lottery for Education Account.

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Provides that commissions to lottery retailers shall not exceed six percent of gross sales.

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HOPE Scholarship funds will be paid in full without taking Pell eligibility into account.

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Pell-eligible students will then be able to use these federal funds to cover the costs of college-going expenses beyond tuition costs.

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$20M will be appropriated to the one percent loan program and Georgia Student Finance Commission will work to raise private matching funds for $10M of this investment.

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These student loans can also be forgiven altogether if loan recipients become certified and teach in a public K-12 school in the STEM fìeld. Each year of service in the classroom will forgive one year of the student loan.

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Georgia’s lottery has been more successful than anyone could have imagined when it was created by the voters in 1992. Now almost two decades later, the program is at a cross-roads. With no changes, it would go broke. With the passage of Governor Deal’s plan, we can look forward to another 20 years of HOPE and pre-K. The choice is simple. Chip Rogers is the State Senator for District 21. You can call him at (404) 463-1378 or fax him at (404) 657-9887. You also can e-mail Chip at Chip@SenatorChipRogers.com. Chip also serves on the AroundAbout — Townelaker Community Board.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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A Dignified Solution to a Financial Crisis by Sheila & Kurt Johnson For homeowners facing the prospects of a foreclosure, there can still be a dignified solution that will save them, their neighbors and their bank significant money and grief. In 2010, 36 percent of all homes sold in Metro Atlanta were either foreclosures or short sales. Of that number, 41 percent were short sales, up from 35 percent in 2009. Why the increase in short sales over foreclosures? Why aren’t the banks just foreclosing on these homes? The reason is simple: money. Homes that are sold as a short sale sell for an average of 22 percent more than homes that are foreclosed. Homes that are foreclosed on are expensive for the banks to maintain, secure and sell. The impact on our neighborhoods is devastating as well. A property becomes vacant when it is foreclosed. Despite the bank’s best efforts to maintain it, the appearance of a foreclosed home will decline, which keeps other homes from selling for their full price potential. The benefits to the borrower can be significant as well. In many cases, the lender will forgive the unpaid debt as a result of a short sale. At a minimum, the short sale will greatly reduce the resulting deficiency. Additionally, the borrower can remain in the property until the terms of a sale are negotiated with the lender and the property sells. This additional time gives the homeowner an opportunity to prepare finances for the move. When feasible, a short sale can redeem a homeowner’s credibility. The borrower’s effort to sell the home before the bank forecloses shows their bank, family, neighbors and future creditors that they did the best they could, under their circumstances, to honor their obligations and mitigate losses. Kurt and Sheila Johnson have bought, renovated, rented and sold more than 130 homes for their own investment since 2000. www. KurtandSheila.com. (404) 954-2486. april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

Bill Lundeen — Possessing a Service Heart by Susan Cannizzaro If you are in the know about the Etowah High School baseball program, you know the program would be at a loss without one man in particular. Bill Lundeen has dedicated his heart and soul, plus numerous hours, to make sure the field is perfect and the team has everything it needs. Bill has been a very active volunteer for the past four years, since his son Alex started playing baseball for the team. “I have a passion for the smell of leather, cut grass, the crack of the bat and for all of challenges that baseball brings,” Bill said. As President of the Etowah Dugout Club, he has been inspirational in getting others to volunteer their time to help out as well. Last spring, 56 volunteers showed up to get the facility back in shape from the winter. “We put 35 tons of dirt on the field, painted rails, rebuilt the mounds, and added more lockers. If we had to contract this work out, it would cost tens of thousands of dollars,” Bill said. Coach Greg Robinson, who came to Etowah in 2007 from Milton High School, works very closely with Bill and calls him the “cog” that makes everything happen. “Bill

does everything so well, from taking care of the field, to all of the announcing for the varsity games, to rallying the troops, and even fixing maintenance vehicles when they break down. He has taken a tremendous burden off the county and saved us a lot of financial resources. I have been lost many times and Bill’s been my GPS and a blessing to everyone who knows and meets him. He does everything I used to do and much better, which allows me to do my coaching better,” said Greg. Bill’s degrees in speech, theatre and electronics, plus his varied careers such as professional landscaper to biomedical engineer to VP of Operations, have come in handy with all he does for Etowah. He also has more than 30 years of experience in helping with youth sports. “Knowing a little about everything makes me dangerous,” he said. When Coach Robinson was hired in 2007, Bill met him and told him that he would like to help out. “We share a lot of the same thoughts on how a field should be taken care of and together we have improved a very aged facility with a great group of volunteers,” said Bill. Brian Gilbert, who works closely with Bill, said, “This program and field would not be 22

where they are today without Bill. He is very detailed oriented and sets up spreadsheets for the volunteers, as well as organizes numerous fundraising events. He is as genuine as they come.” It may sound like Bill is retired with all the time he spends helping out, but he is currently on medical disability for Parkinson’s disease. Bill does not see it in a negative light, because it has given him time to give back and “have a service heart.” He is currently participating in a clinical genetic study through Emory, where he underwent brain surgery in December. For this doubleblind study, some subjects were injected with an experimental drug and others were not. “I will not find out until August 2012 if I received the drug or not. If the drug is working on slowing the progression of Parkinson’s, then I will undergo the surgery again if I did not receive it the first go round. I feel very fortunate to be able to participate in such a program,” he said. None of his work at Etowah could happen without the continuous support and love from his wife and son, according to Bill. “My wife Irinda and I have been married 22 years, and she and my son sacrificed a lot and supported me spending so much time away from them while at the field.” According to Etowah parent Christi Fabian, Bill has been the master communicator for a long time, keeping them informed and being the liaison between coach and the baseball parents. “He has an uncanny ability to see and then seek out the goodness in every person he encounters. We are all better people for having known Bill,” Christi said. Lene Ormstrup, whose son plays junior varsity baseball, added: “If you see a man on a tractor, that will be Bill. All the kids just love him and whatever Bill says, it’s the law.” He does care deeply for the kids he is around. “I do believe we can influence how a child grows up. I carry comments that people made during my youth and I will encourage these kids when they are down and let them know they are doing a great job and not to give up.” said Bill. “The best part of my job is the interaction with the players and being able to be part of baseball.” Bill has not only inspired a baseball team, but a whole community, through his thoughtful efforts and dedication.

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Take Back Your Yard! by Kara Kiefer When I was young, I distinctly remember my mother saying, “It’s nice outside. Go outside and play.” We weren’t allowed to spend hours in front of the television; instead we spent our summer days playing kick the can, going to the park or playing on our swing set. Mosquito control was a truck that spewed a fog throughout the neighborhood, and if you remember that truck, you probably remember running through that fog. Spending so much time outdoors as a child instilled in me the love of being outdoors, either reading, gardening, dining or entertaining. But there is one thing that ruins it every timemosquitoes. Maureen and Rick Coughlin The mosquito fog trucks have become a thing of the past, which left me with over the counter options, and I tried everything: bug spray, yard foggers, citronella candles and even a dryer sheet stuck in my pocket. The only effective remedy was bug spray, but I was never crazy about putting pesticide on my skin. Not to mention, I couldn’t use Deet on our dog or small children. If I wanted to do anything outside, I had to do it during the heat of the day, when the mosquitoes weren’t as bad. I wanted to take back my yard! And I wanted my children to be able to play outside for hours without getting covered in mosquito bites.

home, hitting all the vegetation. It was odorless, and the effect was immediate- no mosquitoes! We were able to eat dinner outside without one single swat or bite. I could tend to my garden after dinner or read a book without applying smelly and greasy bug spray. What a relief to finally be able to enjoy being outdoors at any time of the day! The treatment is effective for three weeks, and remains so even after it rains. Customers can do a one-time treatment or sign up for recurring service, which comes with a 21-day guarantee. I also discovered that The Mosquito Authority believes in giving back in the form of fundraising for organizations such as PTAs, touchdown clubs, booster clubs etc. For every member of the participating organization who utilizes The Mosquito Authority’s recurring service, the company will donate $25 per customer to the organization. No mosquitoes AND the opportunity to help a cause close to you — win-win! Contact The Mosquito Authority if you are interested in learning more about this program. If you’re like me and tired of being held hostage by mosquitoes, give Mosquito Authority a call, and take back your yard!

The Mosquito Authority (678) 294-7597 www.themosquitoauthority.com

After doing some research, I came across The Mosquito Authority, which is owned and operated by local Towne Lake residents Maureen and Rick Coughlin. They purchased the franchise after they saw what it did for their mosquito problem. The Mosquito Authority treats the perimeter of your home with a mild pesticide (same ingredient as found in lice shampoo) to eradicate pesky mosquitoes. My house backs up to woods so the mosquito problem is prevalent. I was anxious to see if this finally was the fix. The first thing my service provider did was seek out and treat all standing water. From there, he sprayed the perimeter of my

Andrew, Kara, Peaches (dog) & Kelsey

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Community

Community Calendar: April Fridays through April 15 (except Good Friday)

April 15 – 16

Time: 5 – 7 p.m. Location: St. Clement’s Episcopal Church, 2795 Ridge Road, Canton Information: Dine in or take out. Cost is $6 for adults, $3 for children under 10. Proceeds will benefit the church’s community outreach ministry.

Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Woodstock High School auditorium, 2010 Towne Lake Hills South Drive Information: Presented by school’s drama department. Tickets are $7.

Lenten Fish Fry

April 2

Car, Truck, Motorcycle Show Time: 9 a.m. Location: NW corner of Highway 92 and Highway 5 Information: Free admission for spectators; $25 entry fee. Proceeds benefit seven-month old Gabriel Sierra who is suffering from a rare, extremely aggressive tumor (www.helpgabriel. org). Call Mark Reeves at (770) 5924411 or (404) 642-1729 or e-mail thenandnowauto@bellsouth.net.

April 12

Free Skin Cancer Screening Time: 6 – 8 p.m. (appointment required) Location: Northside Hospital Cherokee, 211 Hospital Road, Canton Information: Physicians and licensed medical staff will provide full or partial body assessments, conducted in a private setting. Call (404) 845-5555 and press “0” to register.

April 14 – 15

Cherokee County School District (CCSD) Registration Times: Thursday 3:30 – 6 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Location: All CCSD Elementary schools Information: Registration for the 201112 school year for Kindergarten and first grade students who are entering school for the first time. Visit www.cherokee. k12.ga.us

Our Town

April 16

Easter Eggstravaganza Time: 1 – 3 p.m. Location: Northside Hospital Cherokee, 201 Hospital Road, Canton Information: Free event with egg hunts for every age group. Photos available with the Easter Bunny for $5.

April 16

Yard Sale Time: Location:

8 a.m. Cherokee Christian High School, 3075 Trickum Road

Spring Fling Time: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Location: Deer Run West Clubhouse, 7032 Hunters Ridge Information: More than eight businesses will be there to take spring orders. Contact Vera Fossali at fossai@att.net.

April 22 – 23 & 29 – 30

Secret Garden

Times: 7:30 p.m., April 22 – 29 11 a.m. & 3 p.m., April 23 & 30 Location: Woodstock City Center Auditorium, 8534 Main Street Information: All seats $9. Call (678) 4944251 or visit www.elmstreetarts.org

April 23

Easter Festival Time: Location:

11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Bascomb United Methodist Church, 2295 Bascomb

Carmel Road Information: Egg hunts, crafts for all ages, games, petting zoo and bounce house and the Easter Bunny. Open to the community.

April 27

McDonald’s Kids’ Night Celebration Time: 5:30 – 7 p.m. Location: 2105 Towne Lake Parkway Information: Young author James Snipes will read from his new book “Super J Meets the Fire Guy.” Young guests will receive a toy, and the author will sign books.

April 29

Junior Service League Golf Tournament Time: 8 a.m. registration; 9 a.m. start Location: Towne Lake Hills Golf Club Information: Benefits the Ferst Foundation for Childhood Literacy and Cherokee County charities. For more information including sponsorship, visit www.jslwoodstock.org or e-mail questions to jslwoodstock@yahoo.com.

April 29-30

Eagle Watch Garage Sale Time:

8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

April 30

Yard Sale, Rabies and Microchipping Clinic Time: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Location: Cherokee County Animal Shelter, 1015 Univeter Road, Canton Information: Rabies vaccines will be $10 and microchipping will be $20. To sell items, e-mail shelterfriends@gmail.com.

Send Us Your Community Calendar Events • editor@townelaker.com• May deadline is April 10. 26

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Moms and Kids Dylan is a five-year-old boy who lights up a room. A year ago, Dylan began complaining of a sore ankle. His mom initially felt it was a result of playing soccer, which is his first organized sport. However, after a long year later of numerous doctor visits, casts, tests and MRIs, Dylan was diagnosed with Synovial Sarcoma, a rare form of soft tissue cancer. After the second MRI revealed a small tumor and surgery was scheduled, his mom felt some relief that this problem might soon be behind them. Unfortunately, an hour into the routine surgery, she received the words that dropped her to her knees. The tumor was cancerous and could not be removed because it was tangled in the soft tissues, nerves and arteries. Dylan grew up in south Florida with his 34-year-old single mother, who has played the role of mother, father and provider all of his life. As a waitress, she provided well for them until the medical bills began accumulating. She found herself having to work 10-hour days just to stay ahead. Her sister lives in our community and shared Dylan’s story with her friends. Luckily, one of her friends had a connection with a specialist who agreed to care for Dylan if she would move to Atlanta. Hopeful, Dylan’s mom did just that. She packed up her life and drove 780 miles to live with her sister, in hopes of saving her son. In just four days, her sister’s family (with three children of their own) prepared a small bedroom area and a half-bath for them, with help from the most wonderful friends and neighbors. Dylan is scheduled to undergo an aggressive chemo treatment in hopes that it will rid him of cancer, since his tumor is inoperable. However, a less-than-ideal scenario is also looming — amputation. His chemo begins with 3 – 4 days in the hospital and 3 days at home. The new family of seven is emotionally prepared for the unknown journey ahead of them. Dylan’s mom is unable to work while caring for him and will not only need to keep her transportation and insurance, but will also need to pay for gas to get them back and forth to the hospital. This past week, we shared Dylan’s story with a local builder, RJK homes, and they graciously offered to add a spacious shower for Dylan. This will allow Dylan and his mom the comfort and convenience of caring for him throughout his chemo sessions in their new home. This month, we simply ask that you consider picking up a small gas card or gift card next time you are in the grocery store line. Any additional assistance is always appreciated. Please pray for strength and healing for Dylan as he begins his battle. Everyday Angels has a new web page that will allow you to donate online through Paypal. Please visit www.everydayangels.info or send your donations to our new address: Everyday Angels, 2449 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock GA, 30189. One hundred percent of your funds will go to the family you specify. Also, if you know of a special need within your community that you would like to share, please send an e-mail to aaeverydayangels@gmail.com for consideration and qualification.

by Colin Morris April 15 is an important date. Everyone else in Georgia may be frantically doing financial paperwork, but my kids and I are planting our garden. My mother-inlaw has a green thumb. Many years ago, she Colin Morris with her children (left to counseled me to never right) Patrick, Micaela and Gabriel. plant anything in the yard before April 15. Of course, I didn’t listen to her advice since I was a young bride, and the weather outside was gorgeous and warm. I went to the garden store, bought a buggy full of happy little plants and spent the first week of April moving them into my yard. You don’t need a crystal ball to guess what happened. A cold snap killed all my little happy plants. Now, I hold fast to the April 15 rule. I don’t claim to be an expert gardener. I learn something new about planting a garden every year that we do it. Last year we tried growing veggies from seed. We were operating on a tight budget, and buying seedling plants was many times more expensive than buying seeds. I discovered that the kids really enjoy planting the seeds inside and watching them sprout. I bought a little mini-greenhouse and we planted cucumbers, beans, tomatoes and some herbs. Within a week some of the plants were peeking up through the dirt. The lesson I learned was to start earlier. We did not start growing our veggies until early April. By the time they got big enough to move outside, I felt like my garden was woefully behind. The plants did grow and produce a sizable harvest, but our tomatoes were some of the last to turn red. Planting a garden with my kids gives them a sense of ownership and responsibility. My youngest son planted a bean plant in his classroom last year. When he brought it home, we planted it in our garden. From then on, it was Patrick’s bean plant. The plant grew like Jack and the Beanstalk until the caterpillars found it. Unfortunately, Patrick had to learn a hard lesson about “farming” and crop failure! It was eventually a positive experience because we captured as many caterpillars as we could and enjoyed watching them in our bug jar. I hope you don’t get an inflated mental picture of our garden. It is truly very humble. Up against our house, we have a small plot of maybe two feet by 15 feet where we plant several different types of tomatoes, some herbs and maybe a green veggie or two. However small it may be, it brings our family much benefit and enjoyment. Even if you only have the room or the budget for a small pot of herbs, plant something with your kids — just not before April 15!

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Lifestyle by Mike Litrel, M.D.

The Boyfriend-ectomy Early in my medical practice, I stumbled upon a unique malady that hadn’t been described in my training. A young woman was sent to me from the emergency room. Only 30 years old, she had undergone multiple operations over the preceding three years Ann and Mike Litrel and their sons, to have diseased organs Tyler and Joseph. extracted from her body. Every few months she arrived at the E.R. in debilitating pain. Sometimes the surgeon on call would dutifully remove a suspect organ or cyst. Yet still, she suffered.

her to feign medical problems. After each of the dozens of emergency room visits and five surgeries, he had taken all of her pain medication – even when she was recovering from surgical incisions.

Her complaints of pain were so insistent it seemed possible the underlying problem hadn’t been diagnosed. I settled on exploratory laparoscopy as the next logical step: extensive and painful scar tissue could be removed to give her relief. Yet once the camera was inside, it revealed only pristine internal anatomy. Troubled, I sent her home from the procedure with a mild pain medication that afternoon.

And yes, he’s a good vampire because he struggles with his natural proclivity to suck human blood, taking it out on animals instead.

A couple of weeks later she reappeared in my office. She needed more pain relief. Her body was writhing. “Look,” I stopped her, “you’re perfectly healthy inside.” I pulled out the surgical photos so she could see. She insisted the pictures were wrong. Her face was contracted in agony. I am not a good poker player, but I knew by now she was bluffing. The knee-jerk answer was a drug addiction. But something about her didn’t fit the pattern. It was as though something else was going on. I stated the obvious, kindly but firmly: “I know you’re lying. If you want help, you need to tell me the truth.” Complete silence descended on the exam room. Conflicting emotions flitted across her face – she was struggling, holding something off in some inner battle. The minutes passed. Finally she began to speak. And when she did, it was like a dam breaking. “My boyfriend makes me go to the emergency room and pretend I’m in pain so I can get the pain medication he likes,” she blurted out. She covered her face with her hands and sobbed uncontrollably. Her breath came in gasps as she tried to suppress her crying and tell the rest of her story. There had been a divorce five years before when she discovered her husband’s infidelity. She met the boyfriend later, and it was nice to have someone pay attention to her again. He moved in three years ago and soon began coercing

A terribly diseased organ indeed was affecting her life, and radical surgery was required immediately. Medically speaking, it was time for a “boyfriend-ectomy” — slice this loser from her life. The best strategy of course is to avoid this type of guy in the first place. The problem is that kind and vulnerable women often make such lousy choices. Witness the estrogen-laden frenzy over Edward the Vampire in the Twilight series. Yes, he is very good looking. Yes, he is deeply in love.

But newsflash here, ladies — he’s still a vampire! The usual physical stuff isn’t enough for this guy — he wants to suck your blood, too? Vampires exist in real life, both men and women. But when it comes to vampire victims, I think women are especially vulnerable, because they are biologically engineered to sacrifice themselves: in marriage, in pregnancy, in motherhood. If these tasks fell on the average man — myself included — the human species would long since have gone extinct. A man’s biology encourages him to take more than he gives, and it’s only his maturity and love that enables him to overcome the natural male tendencies to selfishness. And this is why I caution my young patients against early sexual activity. There is an easy way to tell if a suitor loves a woman for herself, or if he’s just a vampire looking for a warm body to satisfy his physical needs. Say no, and if he proposes, he loves you. If he leaves, it was just your body. Perhaps you have to kiss a lot of frogs to find your true prince. The wise woman keeps it to just kissing. Dr. Mike Litrel practices with his fellow OB/GYNs Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Canton and Woodstock. Dr. Litrel lives in Woodstock with his wife Ann and their two sons, Tyler and Joseph. E-mail Dr. Litrel at www.cherokeewomenshealth.com

Copyright © 2011

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Lifestyle

Enjoy Pregnancy Without Foot Pain by Dr. Steven Weiskopf “Oh my aching feet” is a statement often heard from pregnant women. Yet sore feet are not a symptom that mothers-to-be should have to deal with during pregnancy. There are many remedies to help alleviate foot pain. Women often experience foot pain because of increased weight, foot instability and swelling. In the last five years, I’ve seen an increase in pregnant women with foot pain because more are active — even running marathons — during their pregnancies. This level of activity can be healthy, but it also may increase the incidence of foot and ankle problems. It is not uncommon for women to experience a change in their foot size during pregnancy. A permanent growth, up to half a shoe size, can occur from the release of the same hormone, relaxin, that allows the pelvis to open to deliver the baby. Relaxin makes ligaments in the feet more flexible, causing feet to spread wider and longer. To avoid foot problems, I recommend these guidelines for all pregnant women.

Painful, Swollen Feet — Throbbing, swollen feet can be due

to excess fluid buildup (edema). To reduce swelling, put your feet up whenever possible, stretch your legs frequently, and wear wide comfortable shoes. Don’t cross your legs when sitting.

Arch Pain — Pain in the arch can be due to both fatigue and over pronation (flattening of the arch). Over pronation stresses the ligament (the plantar fascia) that holds up the arch. The best prevention is to stretch your feet in the morning, and before and after exercise. Wear supportive low-heeled shoes, and don’t go barefoot. Ingrown Toenails — Stress from tightly-fitting shoes may cause painful ingrown toenails. Wear wider shoes during the last trimester of pregnancy. If you experience an ingrown toenail, avoid “bathroom surgery.” Repeated cutting of the nail can cause the condition to worsen. It is best to seek treatment with a podiatrist. Pregnancy and pending motherhood should be a joy. If foot pain persists, see a foot and ankle specialist. Relief can usually be provided with conservative treatments such as foot orthotics, supportive shoes, minor toenail procedures, or physical therapy. Dr. Steven Weiskopf is a board certified podiatrist specializing in treatment and surgery for the foot, ankle and lower leg. His office is located at 1190 Buckhead Crossing in Towne Lake For more information, call (770) 928-9263 or visit www.villagepodiatrycenters.com. 30

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Towne Lake Business Association Member Spotlight: FIVE PILLARS of HOPE Gloria Snyder, Independent Nikken Wellness Home Consultant Gloria Snyder’s business has a tagline: With Healthy Options, Possibilities Emerge. She offers hope to those who want to live healthier, more balanced lives. She believes that with a few measures of preventative care, most health challenges can be avoided or improved upon. It is what she teaches and lives. For the past 12 years, she and her husband Richard have incorporated Nikken technologies into their home to create a healthier environment for themselves, their children, grandchildren and pets. The technologies produce beneficial negative ion air, clean, re-energized PiMag water for drinking and showering and magnetic sleep systems for deep restorative sleep. She invites others to experience how she lives by taking a tour of her Nikken certified wellness home. Gloria continues to study the principle of energy wellness by attending seminars and continuing education programs taught by some of the world’s most renowned specialists. Magnetism, far-infrared, negative ions and nutrition are energies found everywhere and are a precondition for all forms of life, according to Nikken scientists. Nikken products are designed to help integrate these healthy influences into every aspect of your day. Gloria educates on the benefits of these energies to assist with your daily performance and recovery. If Gloria looks familiar to some Towne Lake families, you may remember her from Discovery Point, where she taught three year olds. She continues to work at keeping children safe and happy by showing their parents how to create their own wellness home. Gloria’s vision for her business is to create a network of Wellness Homes in our community, causing a ripple effect of positive influence to others. Gloria is the VP of the GA Wellness Association and VP of Membership for the Towne Lake Business Association. You can contact Gloria at (678) 431-2691 or gloriasnyder@ mynikken.net. Her website is www.nikken.com/ gloriasnyder.

The April 11 application deadline for the Towne Lake Business Association’s (TLBA) 9th Annual Entrepreneurial Scholarships is just a few days away, and there is still time to submit your applications. Two graduating college or technical school-bound high school seniors, one each at Etowah and Woodstock High Schools, will be awarded a cash scholarship of $1,000 and be featured in the Ju ne issue of AroundAbout — TowneLaker. If you are or someone you know is a senior who attends either school and would like to apply, please contact your school counselors today and ask for an application. You also can request an application directly by calling (770) 615-3350 or emailing donaldekyle@gmail.com. The 11th Annual TLBA Golf Tournament will be held on Wednesday, September 14, at the Towne Lake Hills Golf Club, and State Senator Chip Rogers already has signed up as our very first hole sponsor. The proceeds from the tournament fund our annual TLBA Entrepreneurial Scholarships. To sign up today as a player, sponsor or volunteer, please contact Don Kyle at donaldekyle@gmail.com. The topic of our March Lunch ‘N’ Workshop was “The Top 5 Human Resources Mistakes Small Business Make.” We want to thank Michael D. Haberman of Omega HR Solutions, Inc. for leading this workshop.

LUNCH ‘N’ LEARN WORKSHOPS Tuesday, April 19, 12:30 — 2 p.m. 30 Minute Business Plan, presented by Drew Tonsmeire, Area Director, Kennesaw State University Small Business Development Center. Drew will discuss the key steps required to develop your very own business plan. Tuesday, May 17, 12:30 — 2 p.m. Getting What You Want Through Persuasive Communications, presented by Mike Stewart of Mike Stewart Sales Dynamics. All Workshops are held at Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills. Please RSVP to all events at (770) 615-3350.

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS: LTCi Business First Image, Inc. Hardwood Services, Inc. Skyline Properties Group, Inc.

Diana Renton Raymond Jackson David Lindsay D.D. Lee

As always, we thank you for supporting our community and our local businesses, and thus “Keeping Towne Lake Dollars in Cherokee.”

Visit us at www.tlba.org. 32

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What to Expect from A Sleep Study by Cynthia Blount, RN, BSN, CPHQ Director, Northside Hospital Sleep Disorders Centers According to the National Sleep Foundation, approximately 7 out of 10 Americans are affected by a sleep problem, yet few seek help. If you fall into this category, you might benefit from an overnight sleep study. Unfortunately, most people are reluctant because they expect sleep studies to be uncomfortable experiences or they don’t know what to expect at all. Why do I need a sleep study? Untreated sleep disorders have been linked to a number of chronic diseases including hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, depression and stroke. If you have regular difficulty getting to sleep, or staying asleep, if you snore or stop breathing for short periods of time during the night, or if you have persistent daytime sleepiness and fatigue for weeks at a time, an evaluation by a sleep specialist and an overnight sleep study can save your life. Your problem may be the result of bad sleep habits. In order to fully understand your problem, you need to be observed while you sleep, by someone who is specially trained in sleep medicine. What is a sleep study? A sleep study, or polysomnogram, records your brain wave activity, muscle twitches, eye movements, heart rate and breathing while you sleep. Sensors are placed on your scalp, face, chest, limbs and a finger, while elastic belts go around your chest and abdomen. As the information is collected, it is transmitted to a computer in the next room, where a registered polysomnographic/sleep technologist monitors you at all times. After the study, a board-certified sleep physician reviews and interprets the information to help you and your personal physician understand your specific sleep patterns and problems. Treatment recommendations are made if evidence of a sleep disorder is found. Sleep studies are completely safe and painless. How am I supposed to sleep like that? It is very important for patients to feel comfortable with their

For more information, call the Northside Hospital Sleep Disorders Center. Atlanta – (404) 851-8135 Forsyth – (770) 887-3293 Cherokee – (770) 345-2568 www.northside.com continued on page 88 april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Lifestyle

If Momma’s Not Happy, Nobody’s Happy by Shelley Herod For years men have fled to their “man cave” to watch sports, shoot pool or play video games without the distraction of their wife, girlfriend or children. The cave has evolved from a recliner and television to an entire room filled with sports memorabilia, beer fridge, and an assortment of audio-visual features. It is an awesome idea, but moms need a place to escape as well. A “mom cave” is a space where the woman who looks after everyone can have time to nurture herself. Remember the saying “If momma’s not happy, nobody’s happy.” Real Simple Magazine Senior Editor Nicole Sforza states, “‘Mom Caves’ allow her to break away from the world, even if just for a few moments, to check in and relax, destress, and just plain chill.” It only takes four easy steps to turn a small space into a Zen heaven. Many women have begun to assemble their kid and husband free zones in their homes. For some moms it is a place to work in peace while others it is a place to do anything except work.

area. Painting, refinishing furniture, or sweating away a few pounds might be the perfect haven that you crave.

Step 3: Distinguish your Space: The main objectives of a

mom cave are privacy and a feeling of coziness. An oversized closet is easy to distinguish its space. Simply shutting the door closes off the outside world, but what if you are lacking a door? A room divider or screen, fabric panels or curtains, or a two-way book shelf as a room divider can be used to differentiate the space. However, do not forget the most important accessory: a “do not disturb sign”.

4. Select your Tools: The furniture, style, textures, and color

are key tools to making your “mom cave” the bliss that you seek.

Furniture: Only one chair is necessary since this is your special

“ ‘Mom Caves’ allow her to break away from the world, even if just for a few moments. . .”

Step 1: Pick your Purpose: What do you

Texture: Soft fabrics and plush textures are a must. Incorporate them in your pillows, window treatments, throws, and slipcovers. Chenille and cashmere have a soft hand and scream relaxation.

want to focus on? Do you prefer music, crafts, reading, office space, sewing, studying, or just relaxing while watching your favorite television show? Surround yourself with things you love; however, do not clutter up your space. Clutter is a source of stress. This is a stress free zone!

Step 2: Pick your Spot: A “mom cave” does not have to occupy an entire room. It can be as simple as a corner of a room, an unused living room, a bathroom area, the guest bedroom, an oversized closet, a porch or balcony, or even an area in the garage. A good mom cave has a place to sit, a place to store things, a place to work and a place to relax. Even though a confined space such as a closet or a corner might sound claustrophobic, it can be that special space that you have been searching for. A window or a mirror to reflect the light can be a simple solution to create the illusion of a larger space. A living room or guest room can easily be transformed into multiple areas. Add a desk or an armoire in the corner to create a work space. A chaise lounge is a simple addition to form a reading nook. The living room is the perfect area to design a music room. A garage you ask? What a great place for a workout or craft 34

refuge. Although, it must be chosen wisely for it is your “mom throne.” A daybed, chaise lounge, or wing back chair are cozy pieces of furniture to generate relaxation. If you do not have a chaise, an ottoman is a good consideration for kicking your feet up. Also, a side table is necessary to hold a book or a drink. If you cannot purchase new furniture immediately, slip covers are an easy and less expensive option.

Style: If you live in a house of males like I do, mom’s cave is the perfect place to add your feminine and personal touches. This is your “space” to express your personality. Colors: If the space allows for a choice in color scheme stay

consistent with the selected furnishings. Selecting the right shade all depends on the goal that you are trying to achieve. Try to keep the color pallet relaxing, soothing, warm, and comforting. Greens, blues, aquas, and neutrals promote relaxation. Warmer hues encourage coziness. This can also be the right place to use feminine tones such as pink, yellow, and lavenders. If you do seek motivation and creativity, that would be the exception to using a relaxing pallet. Reds, brighter greens, and sunshine yellow are known to spark these motivating characteristics. Today’s women need a retreat more than ever; lives are becoming more chaotic than the past. Women deserve to escape to their caves just like men do. Both men and women need to have their own time and space; this might even be the prescription to longer and happier marriages.

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Feature

Teachers of the Year Since our children spend so much time in school, it’s important to fill those hours with quality, caring educators. And lucky for us, our school system is filled with excellent instructors! Each year, one teacher from each Cherokee County school is named Teacher of the Year. It’s a prestigious honor, especially considering the nomination and voting comes from his/her peers! We are proud of the winners and honored to feature each of them below.

Merry Willis — Carmel Elementary School. Merry has been teaching for seven years, all at Carmel. Currently, she teaches 5th grade math and science. She also has taught 3rd and 4th grades. Merry said her students inspire her. “Their enthusiasm and excitement for learning, their A-HA moments when they learn something new, or master a topic for the first time, all inspire me every day. Watching them develop a sense of who they are going to be, and watching them interact with the world around them as scientists and explorers, also make every day an adventure that I am excited to be a part of!”

Robyn Dailey — Boston Elementary School.

Robyn has been teaching for six years, three of those at Boston. Currently, she teaches 2nd grade. When asked what inspires her, Robyn said: “Watching my students grow and succeed in the classroom. Receiving smiles of accomplishment from my students is priceless.” Teaching can present its challenges, but according to Robyn, “You have to display a positive attitude and be on your toes so you are ready for whatever comes your way.

MaLissa Hogan — E.T. Booth Middle School.

MaLissa, who teaches 7th grade language arts, has been at Booth for five of her nine years as a teacher.MaLissa is inspired when “a student embraces writing and finds his/her voice. Then, I feel like I have done my job.”

Shirley Davis — Chapman Intermediate School. Shirley, the Media Specialist, has been teaching at Chapman for the past 10 years and has been a teacher for a total of 19. “Interacting with students in the classroom or the media center is one of the best things that inspire me as a teacher. Working daily with students to help them find resources for an assignment or solutions to a problem is very rewarding.” She enjoys her students so much that she finds the two years they are there is not enough time. “I love getting to know them and make connections.” 36

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Gayle Eakin — Bascomb Elementary School.

Gayle has been a teacher for more than 25 years, seven at Bascomb as a 4th grade teacher. Elementary-aged children truly provide inspiration to Gayle. “I love their laughter. I enjoy nothing more than when children laugh with me about a character in a story, a silly song we sing, catching a mistake I made with a big OOPS! or telling me about their antics at home.” Gayle noted that as a teacher, it’s important for her to get to know each student so she can provide differentiated instruction to meet each student’s needs. “I have to find the time to reflect each day about the successes in the classroom as well as reflecting upon which child may need a bit more of my time the next day.”

Denise Lewis — Woodstock Middle School. Denise is an 8th grade language arts teacher, and has been at Woodstock Middle for 10 years. Denise enjoys the daily interactions with her students. “The students inspire me; I love their smiling faces, their light bulb moments, and their ability to brighten my day with interesting comments and ideas.

Robert Putnam — Etowah High School. Robert, a 27-year veteran, has been teaching visual arts at Etowah for the past six years. Robert said that all the students he encounters on a daily basis inspire him. “Their kindness, humor, and goodness cause me to always be willing and prepared to share what I have learned in life, as an artist and a person, with them each and every day. They never fail to lift me up and fill my spirit with hope for the future. They cause me to be the best that I can be.” Of teaching, Robert said, “A good teacher must always show the student how the skills that they learn can be used beyond the classroom. I feel that it is equally important that the students learn to think for themselves and find their own solutions to the problems that a teacher or life presents to them.”

Krista Webb — Woodstock High School. Krista has been an AP U.S. History, AP World History and U.S. History instructor for 13 years at Woodstock. She has been teaching for 18 years. Krista thoroughly enjoys teaching teens and said, “It inspires me to see the energy and excitement teenagers bring to the classroom; I love to see young people begin to understand the complexities of history, the intricate relationships that exist between countries, and the multiple concerns of decision-making at the national and international level.

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The First Apartment by Kara Kiefer My son is about to complete his first year in college, and already, he’s thinking about where he is going to live next year. Along with most freshmen, he is a dorm dweller. His experience in the dorms has been quite different than mine. To me, it’s not a dorm unless you have a room with two beds, two desks attached to the wall, two little dressers and two little closets and live with someone you don’t like. You don’t have your own bathroom; you pack your stuff into a bucket and walk down the hall to the communal bathroom. If you’re lucky, a shower is available. The laundry room is at the end of the dorm wing, and if you don’t remove your clothes from the dryer in a timely manner, they will be removed for you and left on the floor. That’s dorm living. Oh, how things have changed. His “dorm” is luxurious by my standards. He has his own room, his own bathroom, a full kitchen, a living room and a washer and dryer. I know what you’re thinking, and you’re right, he’s spoiled. While he has had it pretty good for his freshman year, he has decided to move off campus with a buddy into an apartment. And so the search began. If it were me, I would have researched several places and narrowed down several to visit. That would be logical. However, he and his buddy decided to do the “drive around aimlessly” approach. They managed to tour the opposite ends of the spectrum from the totally nasty to the ridiculously expensive. They did find something they both liked. All they needed was parental approval. By explaining how nice his living situation was in the dorm, makes the following a bit more understandable. The apartment they found was in a gated community. The apartments touted crown molding, garden tubs, walk-in closets and valet trash service — for a college student. “Are you kidding me?” was my only comment to my husband. Of course, the price was much more appropriate for the young professional, not the poor, young college student. So we did the only logical thing. We went back to his dorm to do some research. And low and behold, we found the middle ground between dumpy and lavish. Now, we begin the search to furnish his first apartment. And at least he now has the right idea. Thrift store! Kara Kiefer is the Editor of AroundAbout — TowneLaker. She lives in Towne Lake with her husband Mike and sons Brandon and Garrett.

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Lifestyle

Gruner Veltliner, the Groovy Wine by David Heckelmoser This month’s article is on a grape with an interesting name: Gruner Veltliner. Pronounced GREW-nuhr Felt-LEENher, you might also hear folks refer to it simply as Gruner, GV, or even as GruVe (kind of like “groovy”). Most wines made from Gruner Veltliner are from Austria, where it’s the most planted grape variety. Almost all of it is grown in the northeast part of the country along the Danube to the west of Vienna. GV is Austria’s most famous white wine. Gruner means “green” in German, not because the grape is green, but because it’s used to create fresh wines that are best consumed while they are young. The finest GVs come from the Wachau area, and are deep and powerful due to the warmer region and the influence of the Danube River. The most elegant examples of GV come from the Kremstal and Kamptal regions. GVs are generally more pleasant, easier to drink, and better with food than most inexpensive Chardonnays. Chardonnays tend to have an oak influence, while GV does not. GV is generally fermented in stainless steel, and aged either in tanks or very old, large casks. What does a glass of Gruner Veltliner taste like? It tends to be a crisp, light-to-medium bodied dry white wine with an edge of spice. It can also be made in a richer, more full-bodied style. It can have mineral, herbal, floral, and even fresh pea or lentil notes. GVs typically have a perfumed nose, with hints of peach and other citrus and, most notably, hints of white pepper — white pepper is usually what distinguishes GV the best. GV is high in acid and extremely versatile with food. It pairs well with shellfish, as well as lighter meats like pork and veal. Its peppery and green character makes it a great pairing for green veggies from peas and lentils to quinoa and salads. Try this with hard-to-match foods like asparagus and artichokes. If you like Sauvignon Blanc, give GV a try! Typically you can find a bottle of GV in the $15 – 40 range. Until next time, cheers! David Heckelmoser is a professional member of the Society of Wine Educators, Certified Specialist of Wine CSW, Atlanta Chapter Sommelier Les Marmition. 40

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Lifestyle

Mosquito Prevention by Rick Coughlin With warn weather approaching, it is time to start thinking about mosquito prevention. Mosquitoes cause more human suffering than any other organism – more than one million people die from mosquito-borne diseases every year and another 700 million become sick from mosquito bites, according to the American Mosquito Control Association. Mosquitoes carry diseases and parasites that also afflict dogs and horses, including heartworm in dogs, West Nile virus (WNV) and Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). In Georgia, mosquito-borne viruses are most active late spring through early fall. August and September have the highest number of documented cases. Mosquitoes thrive in wet warm areas. West Nile virus is transmitted to humans through mosquito bites. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on birds with high levels of WNV in their blood. Infected mosquitoes can then transmit WNV when they feed on humans or animals. Georgia had its earliest reported case of WNV last year, roughly two months earlier than usual. In mid-April, the Georgia Department of Community Health/Division of Public Health Acute Disease Epidemiology Section reported that a Clayton County man had been infected. Here are some things you can do to keep mosquitoes out of your yard. Dispose of any tires, which can breed thousands of mosquitoes n Clear gutters of debris n Clean pet water dishes regularly n Check and empty standing water in toys, recycling containers, pots, etc. n Change water in bird baths at least once a week. n Repair leaky outdoor faucets n Avoid water collecting on pool covers, tarps, etc. n Plug tree holes n Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing for several days. n

Even the smallest containers can collect enough water to breed hundreds to thousands of mosquitoes. They do not need much water to lay their eggs. When outside, wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Some of the 176 mosquito species are attracted to dark clothing and some can bite through tight-fitting clothes. When practical wear long sleeves and pants. Mosquito repellants that contain Deet are very effective at controlling mosquitoes. They are sprayed directly on your body and keep mosquitoes away for a period of time depending on the strength. Make sure you do not exceed the recommended usage. continued on page 88 42

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Event Planning 101 by Kara Kiefer

with Food and Beverage Director, Donna Spriggs, I knew I had made the right choice. She was extremely flexible and the price was right. Donna made the whole process easy and stress free. I was going to come out a hero!

M

y experience in event planning has been limited to the occasional birthday party. Recently, one of the groups I belong to asked me (encouraging me heavily) to volunteer to arrange the year-end meeting. Obviously, no one had seen my event planning resumé. I agreed, happily (or so they thought). I was charged with finding a venue, choosing the menu AND staying within budget. After I had a mild panic attack, I went to work. I made a list of the local places I knew could handle such an event, and then I remembered Chesterfield’s. I had been to a breakfast meeting there several years ago and had been blown away. The venue is located in the Lodge at BridgeMill, across the street from Freedom Middle School on Bells Ferry Road. What created a lasting impression on me was not only the warm and comfortable meeting room, but the food, prepared by Chef Craig Regan, was amazing!

My food choices for the event were either an extensive selection of hors d’oeuvres, including hot, cold and carving stations or a seated dinner. I chose the seated meal, and I was so glad I did because it was elegantly prepared, and everyone was thoroughly impressed. Our group got to choose from the herb roasted pork loin with cinnamon/apple chutney, grilled bistro filet medallions with a red wine reduction or Boursin stuffed chicken breast with a Chardonnay sauce. The dinners came with salad, starch and seasonal vegetables. One of the biggest hits was Chef Craig’s fivecheese baked macaroni and cheese. The meeting was a HUGE hit. In fact, I think I got permanently volunteered for every year end meeting! Being in charge of a meeting, however simple or fancy, can be daunting. But what I learned is that Chesterfield’s is ideal for almost any situation including corporate, civic or

It was settled. I wanted the event to be held at Chesterfield’s, and after I met 44

personal events. And what I also learned is that it is fast becoming a popular venue for rehearsal dinners. A full bar is available if your event warrants adult beverages, and the staff goes out of its way to ensure you and your guests’ satisfaction.

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If you get “volunteered” to organize an event or you have one of your own requiring space and exceptional food, I highly recommend Chesterfield’s. To arrange your own event, call Donna at (678) 880-8261. april 2011


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Lifestyle

Musings from Towne Wait Your Turn, Buster by Robyn Hohensee Waiting in a line at least once a day is as inevitable as paying taxes and death. Unless you are the Pope, the Queen of England or Charlie Sheen, you will be standing in a line somewhere. This fact became very clear to me as my husband and I were on our annual cruise. From the time we boarded the majestic Carnival Liberty to the time we disembarked, we spent about 85 percent of our time in line waiting our turn with hundreds of other vacationers. It was like we were cattle being herded from one place to the next. I imagined a collective moo coming from the mouths of my fellow cruisers and so managed to stay amused most of the time. A sense of the absurd will keep a smile on your face during otherwise frustrating circumstances. The most ridiculously long lines were always on the lido deck at the 24/7 buffet. Of course, that is where I spent a lot of my time too, watering at the mouth like I hadn’t eaten a good meal my entire life. The line would start at least 100 feet away from the buffet and would come to a standstill for 10 minutes and then move for again for one minute. Such malarkey! I declared to myself. What is the hold-up, people? Move it! I screamed inside. Curious as to what the hold-up actually was, I kept my foot in line and leaned my head way out so I could see what these slow pokes were doing. Most were taking their sweet time piling up their plates with massive amounts of artery-clogging food. One lady was actually taking one French fry at a time, like they were the most precious things she had ever seen. Good Lord lady, just grab a bunch of ‘em and move on! I almost cried out, but didn’t. Instead I sighed and rolled my eyes. When my turn came, I knew what I wanted, without hesitation. I piled the fries on my plate with one gigantic grab of the tongs and that was that. This is how it is done folks, I smugly thought to myself. The lines continued as Miss Liberty sailed on. It took me 20 minutes to get a deck chair, 15 minutes to order a diet coke from the bartender, and an eternity (so it seemed) to get an elevator to take me to the lineless refuge of my cabin. The finale came at the end of the cruise when all 3,000 of us clamored to disembark the ship. The halls and stairwells were stuffed with anxious people needing to get to their early flights. A brawl almost broke out when a man and his wife were trying to get ahead of the line. Thank goodness that was averted by a calm staff member. On our way home, we got stuck in a massive traffic jam. Such malarkey! Robyn Hohensee is a fiction writer and poet who is a member of the Georgia writers Association. She has lived in Eagle Watch for the past 16 years with her husband Todd and two sons. You can contact her at Robyn561@Yahoo.com. 46

Wanted: Basement Bulldozer by Lauri Wischner I ventured downstairs to my basement the other day, looked around and chuckled. My basement looks as if it could use a thorough cleaning by a bulldozer. No matter how vigilant I am about trying to curtail clutter, it constantly creeps back in and stays awhile. The last time we organized the basement, I tried a de-cluttering technique I discovered in a simple-living book. The author advocated only keeping two more of any item than the number of people you have living in your house. If you had a family of four, for example, you would only own six towels, six plates, etc. She found this minimized clutter and established guidelines for what to keep and what to toss. This sounded about as extreme as the time I heard Oprah say we should change our sheets every three days, but I did grasp the author’s point. I applied a version of the book’s suggestion during that last basement-cleaning session. Among ragged boxes filled with college text “The last time we books and Duran Duran organized the basement, cassettes, I discovered a big I tried a de-cluttering box of beach towels. My technique I discovered in immediate instinct was to hang onto all of them. “The a simple-living book.” ones we don’t use for the pool we can use for painting projects,” I reasoned. But because I yearned to be a virtuous student of simplicity, I stopped myself and saved only three, one for each person in the house. I repeated the process numerous times that day and was surprised when I never missed the tossed-out towels or anything else I threw out that day. A second concept, “bring one in, take one out,” did wonders for my shoe situation. I’ve vowed to only own the quantity of shoes that fit comfortably into my closet’s shoe organizer. Before I purchase a new pair, I force myself to discard or donate an old pair. At times, I’ve faltered, but I have substantially reduced the number of shoes I own. Now, I often refrain from shoe shopping simply because I can’t bear to part with a current pair. I felt so liberated the day I cleaned the basement, but that area of my house has deteriorated again to the point where it closely resembles the aftermath of a tornado. One thing I’ve learned about simplifying is that I take two steps forward and one step back. I’ve come to accept and be comfortable with those small setbacks. I simply pick myself up and forge ahead again. Now, please excuse me while I go tidy my basement before I find myself needing to research bulldozer rentals. Lauri Wischner left her sales career behind to be a stay-at-home wife and mother.

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Lifestyle

Dreams Do Come True!

Celebrity Chef Curtis Stone and Oprah

As far as fans go, Kristin Ribley is one of Oprah’s biggest. For more than 10 years, she faithfully watched her talk show, and when she couldn’t, she would record it. After a show that discussed Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose, Kristin created a vision board of the things she wanted to do or have in her life. One of her goals was to meet Oprah. One day, an e-mail appeared in Kristin’s inbox, asking: “Are you an ultimate Oprah viewer?” “Yes!” thought Kristin. In order to win tickets for a taping, Kristin had to answer several questions. But after several attempts at answering the questions, she talked herself out of sending the e-mail. “I figured so many people would be trying for these tickets, and I felt my answers weren’t perfect enough to even be considered,” she said.

Karen and Kri

stin at a U2 co

ncert

barefoot on the beach, and had dinner. This was definitely my favorite part of the trip,” recalled Kristin. When Kristin and Karen were at the airport, Oprah gave each guest a personal “goodbye.” “I learned a lot from this experience,” said Kristin. “First, I learned to go for what you want, always, like sending that e-mail. Now, I wouldn’t hesitate. The thoughts and intentions we put forth into the world will come back to us. Count on that which is greater than yourself to make your life bigger than you could ever imagine.” Kristin lives in Towne Lake with her husband Dan and children Palmer, Zoe, Athan and Olivia.

Several weeks later, Kristin’s best friend, Karen Ferguson called her. Karen actually entered the contest, and received a call from representatives of the Oprah show, inviting her and a guest to a taping in Chicago. Karen chose Kristin to accompany her. Because it was Oprah’s final season, she wanted to do something big. The “something big” came in the form of this statement from Oprah: “I’m going to take all of you with me to the other side of the world! We are going to Australia!” Kristin and Karen flew to Sydney, where they stayed at the posh Intercontinental Hotel. They were greeted with a red carpet, live music, food and media. The winners were divided into groups, and Kristin’s group went to Queensland, Hamilton Island. Kristin went scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef, held a koala bear, enjoyed a U2 concert, sailed on a private sailboat and surfed on Bondi Beach. One of the most memorable events was a private beach party with celebrity chef Curtis Stone. “While we were having cocktails, two helicopters arrived with Oprah and her best friend Gayle. We hung out with Oprah, 48

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uggling Kristin sn

ala Bear

with a Ko

april 2011


Home Utility Guardians is a locally owned and operated company which specializes in residential solutions to control the thermal flow of energy into and out of your house.

We offer a wide range of Radiant Thermal Barrier products to meet every application for your home; including attics, crawl spaces, garage ceilings and basement ceilings. A Radiant Thermal Barrier is a product that Reflects Energy and is rated on an Emissivity scale instead of R-Value. The emissivity scale ranges from 0 to 100 with 100 having the greatest ability to reflect / block the Thermal Flow of Energy. Radiant Thermal Barriers are not Insulation. The R-Value rating system for insulation stands for Resistance to Thermal Flow, which means Insulation only “SLOWS DOWN” the loss of energy. Our Radiant Thermal Barriers have an Emissivity rating of 97% which STOPS (or Blocks) 97% of the flow of Energy escaping from your home. When our affordable products are coupled with your existing insulation the Heat Gain / Loss is reduced, thereby reducing your overall utility costs and optimizing the comfort inside your home. SAVE YOUR UTILITY DOLLARS WITH AN AFFORDABLE RADIANT THERMAL BARRIER from HOME UTILITY GUARDIANS.

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Lifestyle

Twelve Months of Giving by Dan Jape For most of us, heating and air conditioning is not a luxury, but a necessity. Anyone who has spent a few days with a broken down air conditioner during a blazing, humid Georgia summer can attest to that. We are so accustomed to our “creature comforts” that many of us take our indoor comfort for granted. Since the economic downturn, we are seeing more and more people who simply cannot afford to repair their broken air conditioning or heating systems, let alone replace them. We talk to people every day who have been without air conditioning or heat for two or three years because of the cost associated with fixing them. Many of these folks are families with small children who have to make tough budgeting choices every day and elderly men and women on a fixed income. We have often wondered at the fact that during the holidays, everyone seems to be in a giving mood. Toy and food drives abound, and charitable contributions peak during November and December. But are people less cold, hungry or poor the remaining months of the year?

“We talk to people every day who have been without air conditioning or heat for two or three years because of the cost associated with fixing them.”

It is for these reasons that Reliable Heating & Air and WSB radio have partnered to bring you the “12 Months of Giving,” in which one family per month will be given a free replacement heating and cooling system. All you have to do is submit the story of a friend, family member or co-worker in need. E-mail your nomination to info@reliableair.com and at the end of each month, a winner will be chosen and announced on WSB AM 750 and 95.5FM. Please include contact information for yourself and your nominee. Thank you for your participation! Dan Jape is the owner of Reliable Heating & Air. You may contact him at (770) 594-9096.

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Lifestyle

When Maintaining Lawns, Timing is Everything by Paul J. Pugliese Every year, local county Extension offices receive hundreds of phone calls from homeowners with questions about when to do this or that to their lawns. When do I fertilize? When do I plant grass seed? When do I core aerate? When do I apply pre-emergent herbicides? These are just a few examples of the many questions that we get, and more often than not, one good question leads to another. To assist homeowners and landscape professionals, the University of Georgia Turf Team has created a one-stop website (www.georgiaturf.org) with current, research-based information on lawn care in Georgia. One of the most important tools that consumers can use in lawn maintenance is a lawn calendar. This website has a lawn calendar for each turf grass species that can be grown in Georgia: Bermuda, Centipede, Tall Fescue, Zoysia, and St. Augustine. Every homeowner should get a copy of the lawn calendar for their lawn type and post it on a wall inside the garden shed, garage or workbench. If you don’t have internet access, stop by your local county Extension office and get a free lawn calendar or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1. Many lawn problems begin when homeowners don’t know what type of grass they have. As an example, there are many herbicides that are only labeled for certain lawn types. If you spray an herbicide that doesn’t have your lawn grass listed on the label, then there is a good chance that you will kill your lawn. Never assume that just because it is labeled for one lawn grass

that it can be used on all lawns. If your lawn isn’t on the label, then don’t use it! Our lawn calendars are specific to growing lawns in Georgia. Unfortunately, there is a lot of confusing information on the internet and on various lawn products about the best time to do anything to your lawn. The timing for Ohio residents “Many lawn is not the same for Georgia residents because lawns grow problems begin when on a completely different homeowners don’t schedule depending on know what type of temperature, climate zones, grass they have.” and rainfall patterns. It becomes even more confusing when you consider that every lawn type has a unique maintenance schedule. For example, cool-season grasses like Fescue should only be fertilized in the spring and fall. On the other hand, warm-season grasses that go dormant, such as Bermuda, should only be fertilized after spring green-up and throughout the summer. Bermuda should never be fertilized in the winter since the fertilizer will not be taken up by the dormant roots. You basically are feeding your winter weeds! Our lawn calendars answer the common questions about when, how much, and how often to fertilize water, aerate, seed, mow, and treat weeds for your particular lawn type. Most insects, diseases, and weeds that affect lawns can be minimized or avoided with the proper maintenance at the right time. A thick, healthy turf grass can out-compete most weed problems and can better tolerate insects, diseases, and drought continued on page 88

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Stressed Out Mom by Dee Locklin If you see a slightly disheveled woman muttering to herself on the way to her next errand or appointment, know that it is only me. I will have a deerin-the-headlights look and will no doubt be fumbling for my keys or cell phone. Do not be afraid to say hello or wave from afar, but be aware that my response might be unintelligible. Recent sightings of me stand in sharp contrast to the organized, confident, and composed person I was 20 years ago. Indeed, family and friends recall me as some kind of bionic woman who could accomplish anything and did so with both efficiency and flair. I have a vague recollection of those days, but am forever thankful to those who never fail to remind me that I am a mere shadow of my former self. So what happened? What caused me to morph into a semi-rabid shell of a woman? The answer is simple: I’m a mother with an additional career! For the past 18 years, my days have involved juggling multiple priorities, racing against looming deadlines, fighting fires, “The steady increase solving problems, mediating, of women in the organizing, multi-tasking, workforce has certainly planning, and nurturing. Both at home and at work. Let’s face created chalenges for it; I’m tired. working women and

their families.” I do recognize that stay-at-home moms are similarly challenged. And working fathers face multiple demands as well. But I cannot speak to their experiences. I only know my own journey, and I am here to tell you that I am a stressed-out working mom who can no longer hide her battle scars. Don’t get me wrong. I love being a mother. When our son was born, my life took on new meaning and I have treasured every single moment of parenthood. My career offers additional fulfillment and I know that my work over three decades made a difference to countless individuals and groups. Given the chance, I would not alter my path or my family’s experience in any way. But sometimes I feel overwhelmed. So, as I prop up my swollen feet, allow me to reflect on a few things. Citing data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and other research findings, the Pew Research Center has some interesting things to report about working women. Overall, women make up 47 percent of the workforce. Furthermore, 59 percent of

women work or are actively pursuing employment. And 66 percent of women with children the age of 17 and under work either full time or part-time. The steady increase of women in the workforce has certainly created challenges for working women and their families. For example, the center’s research showed that working women feel rushed. And working mothers feel more stress than working fathers. Indeed, women report experiencing more stress than men, and mothers have higher stress levels than fathers. Women spend less time on housework than in previous decades, but women still bear more responsibility for housework and childcare than fathers do. The Internet is full of advice for stressed moms like me. The tips make great sense, though they are often a bit simplistic (make a daily list of priorities, take time for yourself, do yoga). Other websites suggest family-friendly worksite accommodations and advocate policies that support working parents. This important dialogue needs to continue on local and national levels. Being a wife and mother has been, and will continue to be, my most important jobs. My family comes first. The career certainly benefited my family in many ways, not just financially, but I regret that I was not always Super Mom along the way. Nevertheless, my family is still intact and everyone seems to have fared well. So when you see me muttering in the Kroger parking lot, don’t worry. I’ll eventually find my keys, head home to soak my tired feet, and bask in the love of my wonderful family. Interacting with my husband and son will quickly remind me of what is most important. I’ll take some deep breaths, comb my hair, and remember that I am needed. After all, I am a mom. Dee Locklin is Director of the Public Performance and Management Group at Georgia State University. She lives with husband Lewis and son Taylor in a cluttered home filled with love and lots of dust bunnies. Contact Dee at dlocklin89@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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Summer Camps Guide Sports Camps

Nuno Piteira Soccer Experience Dates/Ages: Weekly overnight camps: June 12 – 16, ages 9 – 14 June 19 – 23. ages 12 – 17 June 26 – 30, ages 10 – 17 Location: Reinhardt University, Waleska Information: Call (770) 640-1588, email nuno@soccerexperience.net or visit www. nunosoccerexperience.com

Gold Swim Lessons Located at 1038 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock. Registering now for spring and summer programs. Specific schedules online at www.goldswim.com or call (770) 591-1998 for more information.

Eagle Watch Tennis Dates: June 6 – 9; June 27 – 30 Days/Time: Monday – Thursday, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Ages: 9 – 14 years old Cost: $100/week Tennis will be an hour each day and other hour will be sports like golf, basketball, ultimate frisbee, soccer and volleyball.

6U and 8U Camp Dates: May 31 – June 2; June 20 – 22; July 18 – 20 Days/Time: Monday – Wednesday 9 – 10 a.m. Ages: 5–6&7–8 Cost: $45 week Any child who pre-registers before May 1 for all three weeks will receive a free junior tennis racquet. 10 & Under Camp Dates: June 13-15; July 11-13; July 25 – 27 Days/Time: Monday – Wednesday 9 – 10 a.m. Age: 8 – 10 Cost: $45 week Any child who pre-registers before May 1 for all three weeks will receive a free junior tennis racquet. 12 & Under Camp Dates: May 31 – June 2; June 20 – 22, July 18-20 Days/Time: Monday – Wednesday, 10 – 11:30 a.m. Ages: 10 – 12 Cost: $65 per week The first six children who register before May 1 for each week will receive three free over-wraps.

14 & Under Camp Dates: June 13 – 15; July 11 – 13; July 25 – 27 Days/Time: Monday – Wednesday, 10 – 11:30 a.m. Ages: 12 – 14 Cost: $65 per week The first six children who register before May 1 for each week will receive three free over-wraps. Contact for all camps: Amanda Hall, amandahall724@gmail.com or (770) 9268508.

Green Acres Equestrian Center’s Summer Camp

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Dates: Weekly (Monday – Friday) May 30-July 29 Times: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.; preschool 2:30 – 5 p.m. Preschool, Tuesdays and Thursdays AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Ages: 6 and older; preschool 3-5 Location: 345 Bluebird Acres Road Cost: $300 week/ $275 siblings if registered by May 1. Preschool Camp: $75/week. Register at www.greenacresonline.com or call (770) 517-5154.

Woodstock Wolverine Basketball Camps Grades 6 – 12 Shooting Academy Dates: May 30 – 31 Time: 4 – 6 p.m. Cost: $55 Grades 6 – 12 Skills Camp Dates: June 6 – 9 Time: 1 – 4 p.m. Cost: $90 For both camps, the cost is $125 if registered by May 20 Grades 1 – 5 Skills Camp Dates: June 6 – 9 Time: 9 – 11:30 a.m. Cost: $80 All camps are limited to the first 60 paid applicants.

The Summit at All-Tournament Players Park Basketball Camps Shooting and Dribbling Date: June 13 – 17 Time: 9 a.m. – noon Ages: 1st – 8th grade boys and girls Fundamentals Date: June 27 – July 1 Time: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Ages: 1st – 8th grade boys and girls Shooting and Dribbling II Dates: July 18 – 22 Time: 9 a.m. – noon Ages: 1st – 8th grade boys and girls Camps will be held at 3910 Canton Road, Marietta. Visit www.summit-atpp.com or call (678) 384-6500.

Woodstock High School Volleyball Camp Dates: May 31 – June 2 Ages/Times: Rising 3rd – 5th graders 9 a.m. – noon april 2011


Rising 6th-9th graders 1 – 4 p.m. The cost is $95 and includes a t-shirt and volleyball. Contact anita.dodd@cherokee. k12.ga.us for more information.

Day Camps

Camp Cherokee Dates: May 31 – July 29 Ages: 5 – 15 years Location: Cherokee Outdoor Family YMCA on Lake Allatoona, 201 E. Bells Ferry Road Cost: Starting at $130 per week; financial assistance available New camps this year! Lacrosse, Snag Golf, Hip Hop Dance and Circus. Classic favorites, too! Water Sports, Horseback, Outdoor Adventures and much more. Call (770) 345-9622 or visit www. cherokeeymcaregistration.com.

Club Scientific Dates: Weeks of June 20 and July 11 Ages: 4 – 14 Location: Bascomb United Methodist Church, 2295 Bascomb Carmel Road Cost: $235 per week. Visit www.clubscientific.com or call (678) 880-6460.

Adventures Express Summer Day Camp Dates: May 31 – July 29 Time: 7 – 9 a.m. drop off; 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. camp activities; 4 – 6 p.m. pick up Ages: 6 – 12 Location: Cherokee Parks and Recreation Agency (CRPA), 7545 Main Street Cost: $25 registration fee; $120/ week. Siblings $110/week. Registration day will be April 16, 9 a.m. – noon at the CRPA.

Towne Lake Community Church Summer Day Camp Dates: May 31-July 29 Times/Cost: Half day, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., $75/week Full day, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., $115/week Ages: 4 – 11 Location: 132 N Medical Parkway There is a $20 registration fee. Call Shelly Kemp at (678) 445-8766 ext. 203 or email her at skemp@tlcchurch.com.

Park View Montessori Camp Dates: May 31 – July 29 Time: Open 6:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Ages: 3–8 Location: 6689 Bells Ferry Road Call (770) 926-0044 or visit www. parkviewmontessorischool.com

Ages: 8 – 14 Location: Ponier Music Woodstock, 5101 Old Highway 5, Suite 2, Canton Cost: $400/session. $375 if registered by April 1. Call (770) 928-8807

Safety Town

Arts Camps

Dates: Weekly June 6 - 27 Time: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Ages: Kindergarten by fall 2011 Information: $50 per child. Visit at www. cherokeecountysafetytown.org or e-mail Debi Radcliff and Meredith Hale at cherokeesafetytown@att.net.

Dance Imagination Princess Camps Dates: June 6 – 22 Time: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Ages: 2 and older Cost: $35/day Cheer and Hip Hop camps Dates: June 6 – July 22 Time: 2 – 4 p.m. Ages: 4 and older Cost: $30/day

Purple Cow Art Camp Dates: June 13 – 16 & 20 – 23 July 5 – 7 & 11 – 14 Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Cost: $20/day; choose your day (s) Information: Call Liz Carter at (678) 3155756 or visit www.thepurplecowonline. com

Residential Camps

The PaceSetter Youth Group, Inc. Dear Diva Dates: Weekly (Monday – Friday), May 31 – July 22 Ages: 5th – 8th grade (girls only) Location: 5465 Windward Parkway, Alpharetta Information: Visit www.deardiva. thepacesettergroup.org/flyer or email deardiva@thepacesettergroup.org.

Location for both: 2485 Towne Lake Parkway. Information: Call (678) 445-2731 or visit www.danceimagination.com

Special Needs Camps

Next Step Ministries, Summer Day Camp Dates: May 31-July 29 Time: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.; additional care time available between 8- 9 a.m. and 3 – 5 p.m. Ages: Middle and high school, and recently transitioned with special needs Location: 3353 Trickum Road, Suite 100 Cost: $200-$250 per week For more information visit www. nextstepministries.net, or call Lori Baker at (770) 592-1227.

Music Camps

Rock Music Camp Dates: Time:

June 13 – 17 July 11 – 15 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

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Schools & Sports

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Etowah Hits the Links Etowah High School (EHS) golf team recently started its season with several wins already accumulated. EHS defeated Marietta High School with a score of 165 to 181. The top four scores were from Jason Hammaker (39), Adam Cross (40), Jake Forbes (42) and Nick Mueller (44). EHS then defeated Cherokee High School; top four scores were Adam Cross (38), Jason Hammaker (39), Philip Strickland (42) and Troy Kumpand (43). EHS continued its winning streak against Sequoyah with top four performers Jake Forbes (40), Jason Hammaker (41), Nick Mueller (45) and Kyle Smith (45). Front row (left to right): Kyle Smith, David Sullivan and Nick Mueller. Back row: Josh Colley, Jason Hammaker, Jake Forbes, Philip Strickland, Trenton Sanders, Troy Kumpand, Adam Cross and Coach Bob Westbrook.

Send Us Your Prom Photos! email: editor@townelaker.com Please identify people in the photos from left to right. Deadlines: Etowah, April 10; Woodstock, June 10

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Schools & Sports

You Can Make a Difference Lifting Someone up with a Happy Thought Joe Lemmo’s 7th grade Language Arts students at E.T. Booth share their thoughts with the community. Bailey Burks I have happy thoughts all of the time! I will always remember the many happy memories I’ve had with my dad. When I was little, my father and I would sit on the couch and watch TV. I would always randomly ask, “Can I please mess with your hair?” To my surprise the answer was always.” Yes!” I would get all of my hair ties and combs, gel, and clippies. I used to make Mohawks, tiny ponytails, spike his hair, and it just made me laugh and smile! Now that I’m older, my dad and I talk and make jokes that I will never forget. When we watch TV, we always laugh and joke about commercials, and repeat them over and over again! We also laugh when we listen to music. We make nicknames for each other and we laugh every time we talk about it. What can I say? My dad makes me laugh even when he’s serious. Truth is, I’m a daddy’s girl! And he’s the one that makes me smile! I hope there is someone who does the same for you!

Elizabeth Hale For the most part, I laugh and smile at everything – from doing what I love, to being with friends. I love to laugh, but to me it’s the things that make me laugh that are so special. One of the main things that make me laugh are my friends. No matter what, every single one of them can make me laugh! Some make me laugh more than others, but it’s true; I doubt there is even one day out of the entire year when one of them didn’t make me laugh. The laughter happens mostly at lunch. I sit with a group of girls, and we laugh constantly. As a matter of fact, we probably laugh more than we eat! It just takes a couple of words and we will suddenly be… laughing. Another thing that makes me smile is seeing family for the first time in awhile. Most of my family lives in Ohio so I don’t get to see them very often. When I do see them though, we always laugh and smile, whether it’s seeing my younger cousins grow up, or watching older ones make stupid mistakes! Everyone should laugh more often. It creates good memories and happy thoughts!

Devin Kinney The thing that makes me smile is my little dog. Every morning, he comes in my room and wakes me up. I laugh because he manages to push my door open and get in. After I wake up, eat breakfast, and get ready for school, he starts barking at me like he is trying to tell me to have a good day. When I walk out the door, I pass the window, I look up, and there is my dog, standing there watching me. I can’t help but laugh and smile! When I get home, my mom usually has the front door open. I cut across the yard to get to the door. There is my dog, standing at the door, jumping up, tail wagging, barking happily. I run to the door smiling and I walk in and flounce on the couch. He jumps up and licks my face. I smile and laugh. These are the moments I will treasure forever.

Jake Stuart When it comes to things I laugh about, it doesn’t take much for me to break down. When I do, it’s hard to stop. But if something especially funny happens, I can’t even breathe! Of things like this, one time comes to my mind. To start, I was with my parents, ordering fast food. We normally don’t, but we had things to do, and no time to have a meal at home. Someone behind us had ordered a large drink and a meal. They stopped in the parking zone as we headed out, apparently to make a phone call, and they set their drink on the roof of their car. When they finished, they sped out on their way, but the drink was still on the roof! Off it flew, and crashed onto another car. We drove away too fast to see how it all played out, but the first driver never noticed their drink was gone. As for the person behind them…well…that’s another story! 62

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Tennis Nutrition by Jason Fleeman Finally: A Tennis Diet!! Sorry, not even close. My degree is in psychology, not nutrition. I simply wanted to write this month’s article on another one of my favorite subjects: FOOD. Disclaimer: I am not a nutrition expert. I’m just someone who has learned a lot about the food I put into my body. Here’s something to consider. Would you drink a glass of milk that has been sitting outside in the 90+ degree heat for more than an hour? Yogurt? Cheese? Ranch Dressing? If you think about it, that sounds disgusting. Yet these are items you sometimes put into your body before taking a lesson or playing in a match. If you do not give your body time to digest foods like these, they will reach 98.6 degrees once they enter your body and turn your stomach inside out. In an effort to put this in perspective, let me tell you a story. One summer, I was doing tennis training for juniors, preparing them for a Southern Championship. The juniors were quite respectful regarding my expertise on strokes, strategy and conditioning. Each day, they would break for lunch and I told them what they could and couldn’t eat. Yes to subs with no cheese, mayonnaise or sauces. Absolutely NO ice cream or other dairy “If you do not give your products. The days were blistering hot, and we all body time to digest wanted something to cool foods like these, they down, but I did not want will reach 98.6 degrees anyone to get sick. One once they enter your student, Joey, would do body and turn your almost anything I asked of stomach inside out.” him. However, there was one area we argued about constantly: his nutrition. So what did Joey do during the first day of training? He decided to get a large chocolate shake to prove my degree in psychology and tennis had no bearing on my knowledge about nutrition. Anyone want to guess what happened about 30 minutes into our return to training in 90+ degree heat?? Now that you know dairy products are out during training or competition, what are some good foods that will benefit you? During a match or lesson, I typically try to eat foods that I would feel safe leaving out for a couple of hours: pretzels, nuts, crackers, fruits like bananas or raisins, or energy bars. Of course, I also drink three parts water to one part Gatorade. Another professional once told me to add a salt pack to my sports drink for additional sodium. Before training or competition, I eat peanut butter toast, banana and sometimes waffles (with very little syrup and NO butter). continued on page 88 april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Schools & Sports

Carmel Students Advance to State Tournament

Woodstock High DECA Students Compete at State

Carmel Elementary School students Preston Alsup, Garrett Bass, Katie Basford and Dylan Mason recently participated in the Georgia Educational Technology Fair in Macon. The students won their individual events at a previous regional tournament, giving them all the opportunity to compete at the state level. At state, Katie placed first in the 5th/6th Case Modification Category, and also placed second in the 5th/6th Tech Literacy Challenge. Dylan Mason placed third in 5th/6th Animated Graphic Design.

Ten DECA (Distributive Education Club of America) students from Woodstock High School recently participated in the organization’s state competition, going against more than 2,000 fellow students from across the state. Ana Bravo, Rani Tilva and the team of Emerald Alexis and Macy Mills placed in the top six of their respective events and will compete in the International Career Development Conference. The team consisted of Ana Bravo, Emerald Alexis, Macy Miles, Dulcinea Clifford, Will Davis, Justin Sloan, Maalik Simmons, Rani Tilva, Meagan Anstett and Zack Pippin.

Left to right: Dylan Mason, Coach Merry Willis and Katie Basford.

Carmel Places Third in Academic Bowl Carmel Elementary School recently placed third in County Academic Bowl. The competition is a highly structured question-and-answer event, for which the students have been preparing since fall. The team was coached by teacher Merry Willis.

Front row (left to right): Justin Sloan, Dulcinea Clifford, Ana Bravo and Meagan Anstett. Back row: Rani Tilva, Emerald Alexis, Macy Miles, Zack Pippin, Will Davis and Maalik Simmons.

Etowah Band Members Chosen for Honor Band

Front row (left to right): Brett Dougherty, Katie Basford and Veronica Sanders. Back row: Rebecca Smith, Greg Carroll, Dylan Mason, Trevor Casey, Jonathan Shea, Nina Niblack, Rachel Bacchus and Abbie Parkes.

Etowah Band Sponsors Huge Yard Sale The Etowah High School band will hold a multi-family yard sale 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, April 16 in the school parking lot at 6565 Putnam Ford Road. Items for sale will include clothing, books, toys, baby items, furniture and more. Proceeds will be used to buy new band uniforms and other expenses not covered by the school. The event will be held rain or shine. 64

Seven Etowah High School band students chosen for the District 9 Honor Band spent a recent weekend practicing at Fannin High School for a Saturday afternoon performance. District 9 covers 18 counties, and the students were selected from hundreds of band students throughout North Georgia. Freshmen David Morrison (clarinet) and Emma Vivlamore (flute/piccolo) and sophomore Abby Deane (clarinet) earned a spot in the 9th and 10th grade honor band. Seniors Brianna Futch (flute), Hunter McFeron (clarinet), Jenny Oglesby (flute/piccolo), and Nicole Perona (clarinet) were selected for the 11th and 12th grade band. Front row (left to right): Nicole Perona, Brianna Futch and Emma Vivlamore. Back row: Band Director Michael Foxworth, David Morrison, Abby Deane, Hunter McFeron and Jenny Oglesby.

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Schools & Sports

Eagles Start Youth Lacrosse Team The Cherokee Youth Lacrosse Association recently established the first Etowah Eagles Youth Lacrosse 11U boys team. The team currently is comprised of mostly 4th and 5th grade boys from Bascomb Elementary and Chapman Intermediate schools. The photos are from the team’s first game against Forsyth.

Kneeling (left to right): Jackson Muoio, Brian Orr, David Ballantyne, Donovan Harike and Mason Armistead. Second row: Justin Sherrer, Drew Zazzara, Nate Sasapan, Peyton Brenneman, Cayden Rechsteiner, Duncan Gandolfo and Zach Bope. Third row: Connor O’Neill, Charlie Voytek, Zack Charitat, Spencer Hayes, Lincoln Beaham, Ian Ballantyne, Jake Smith, Max Moloney and Jackson Lambert. Back row: Coaches Ibes Sasapan, Scott Harike and Robert Beaham.

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Schools & Sports

Booth Falcons Finish Undefeated The E.T. Booth Falcons 7th grade boys basketball team ended its season undefeated. The team finished second at its conference tournament. Congratulations!

Front row (left to right): Patrick Oliver, Gage Hires, Myles Broadie, Jason Ogbomoh, Ryan Grigsby, Aaron Smith, Scott McKenzie, Bryce O’Brien, Sean Smart, Daniel Hogue, Jaggar Laird and Alex Smith. Back row: Coach Daniel Barkes and Manager Taylor King.

Woodstock Swim Meet Results in Records Woodstock High School swimmers recently set school records at a state meet. Rebecca Lombard took fourth place overall in the 100-yard breaststroke, and Erika Staskevicius, claimed two individual records with a 6th place finish in the 50-yard freestyle and placed 13th in the 100-yard freestyle. Rebecca and Erika then teamed with Madison Tank and Ashley Brennan to set records in the 200-yard medley relay and 200-yard freestyle relay. Alex Broome turned in an 11th and 15th place performance in the 50-yard and 100-yard freestyle competitions. Alex joined Chase Johnson, Gabriel Downey and Tyler Gattis to break records in the 200-yard freestyle relay and 400-yard freestyle relay. Gabriel came in 15th overall in the 200-yard freestyle race. Congratulations to the Woodstock High swim team!

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Schools & Sports

School Information Public Schools Bascomb Elementary School 1335 Wyngate Parkway Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 592-1091 Principal: Ruth Flowers www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ bascomb-es Carmel Elementary School 2275 Bascomb-Carmel Road Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 926-1237 Principal: Keith Bryant www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ carmel-es Chapman Intermediate School 6500 Putnam Ford Road Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 926-6424 Principal: Dr. Pam Colvin www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ chapman-es E. T. Booth Middle School 6550 Putnam Ford Road Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 926-5707 Principal: Dawn Weinbaum www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ etbooth-ms Etowah High School 6565 Putnam Ford Road Woodstock, GA 30189, (770) 926-4411 Principal: Keith Ball www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ etowah-hs Kleven Boston Elementary School 105 Othello Drive Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 924-6260 Principal: Les Conley www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/boston-es Polaris Evening School 2010 Towne Lake Hills South Drive Woodstock, GA. 30189, (770) 926-1662 Administrator: Bob Hahn www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/polaris 70

Woodstock High School 2010 Towne Lake Hills South Drive Woodstock, GA 30189 (770) 592-3500 Principal: William Sebring www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ woodstock-hs Woodstock Middle School 2000 Towne Lake Hills South Drive Woodstock, GA 30189, (770) 592-3516 Principal: Mark Smith www.cherokee.k12.ga.us/Schools/ woodstock-ms

Private Schools American Heritage Academy 2126 Sixes Road Canton, GA 30114 (770) 926-7779, www.ahacademy.com Principals: Maryann Radnovich (PreK & K) Sharon Day (1 — 12 grade) PTO President: Fran Chandler Cherokee Christian Academy and Cherokee Christian High School 3075 Trickum Road Woodstock, GA 30188 (678) 494-5464, www.cherokeechristian. org Principal: Hal Scripka Furtah Preparatory School 5496 Highway 92 Acworth, GA 30102 (678) 574-6488, www.furtahprep.org Headmaster: Fred Furtah

Harvest Baptist School 3460 Kellogg Creek Road Acworth, GA 30102 (770) 974-9091, www.harvestbaptist.org Principal: David Goings Lyndon Academy 485 Toonigh Rd. Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 926-0166 www.lyndonacademy.org Headmaster: Linda Murdock North Cobb Christian School 4500 Lakeview Drive Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 975-0252 www.ncchristian.org Headmaster: Todd Clingman Omega Learning Center 5330 Brookstone Drive, NW, Suite 320 Acworth, GA (770) 792-7431 Shiloh Hills Christian School 260 Hawkins Store Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 926-7729 www.shilohhills.com Administrator: John D. Ward St. Joseph Catholic School 81 Lacy Street Marietta, GA 30060 (770) 428-3328 www.stjosephschool.org Principal: Pat Allen

Cherokee County School District 2010 – 2011 Calendar at a Glance

April 4 – 8

Spring Break

May 27

Last Day of School

Etowah Graduation

Sat. May 28, 9 a.m. First Baptist Church of Woodstock

Woodstock Graduation

Sat. May 28, 5 p.m. First Baptist Church of Woodstock

Cafeteria account information: www.mealpayplus.com Aspen: https://sis.cherokee.k12.ga.us/aspen/home.do School District Website: www.cherokee.k12.ga.us

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Feature

Up Around the Bend by Don Martin It’s just 45 minutes north of Atlanta, which is why it is the most popular lake managed by the Corps of Engineers. Every year, more than six million visitors swim and boat in its mountain waters, fish its channels and camp on its banks. And yet, how many ever realize the amazing history that surrounds them, and lies below them, in the beautiful blue waters of Lake Allatoona? Lake Allatoona was created in 1941 by

an act of Congress; construction began in 1949 and was completed in 1950. Several little towns were lost in the creation of the lake. One town, Allatoona, GA — neither big nor prosperous — was the site of one of the most important battles fought in the Civil War. The Battle of Allatoona Pass is when Confederate General Samuel French attempted to destroy Union emplacements at the Pass under the command of John Corse. The Battle of Allatoona Pass took place on October 5, 1864; more than 1,500 lives were lost on that one day of fighting. Sherman called it the costliest and bloodiest battle of the war. Allatoona Pass was a narrow passage at the foot of the Allatoona Range of mountains. A train track for the Western and Atlantic Railroad ran through the pass, and was used by the Union army on its move south as a major supply line. As the armies approached one another at the Pass, French wrote a note to Corse, calling for Union surrender: Commanding Officer U.S. Forces, Allatoona, Georgia

Allatoona Pass today – the Clayton House on the left, the train bed on the right, leading up to the pass.

Sir: I have the forces under my command in such positions that you are now surrounded, and, to avoid a needless effusion of blood, I call upon you to surrender your forces at once, and unconditionally. Five minutes will be allowed you to decide. Should you accede to this, you will be treated in the most honorable manner as prisoners of war. Samuel G. French, Major General, C.S.A.

The same scene, Allatoona Pass and Allatoona, GA, circa 1865. The Pass is more clearly visible in this picture.

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Corse believed General Sherman would send reinforcements from Kennesaw, but none were ever dispatched. As the fighting wore on, and more troops on both sides were slaughtered, it became evident that a stalemate was occurring. French,

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

fearing Union reinforcement and having lost more than 700 men, withdrew and continued northward. The battle was truly a needless effusion of blood. Nothing was accomplished but death and destruction. An interesting side note: Sherman signaled Corse during the battle to “hold the fort, for we are coming.” It was a ruse, designed to trick the Confederate army into believing that reinforcements were on the way. However, the words of that signal became the inspiration for a popular gospel song, “Hold the Fort,” written by popular hymnist Phillip Bliss in 1870. Today, beautiful Lake Allatoona covers the area surrounding the battle ground; Red Top Mountain State Park sits just north of the old town of Allatoona. Many of the civil war sites in the area are still accessible. The Clayton House, which sits next to the Pass and was used as a hospital during the war, is visible in old photographs from the days of the battle and is still standing. Bullet holes and blood stains can be seen, giving testament to the ferocity of the battle that raged around the old homestead. The Western and Atlantic rail bed is still visible, and provides a walking tour of the battle. You can visit the site of the Battle of Allatoona Pass by taking I-75 North from Hwy. 92/Acworth to Exit 283. Go east on Allatoona Road for 1.5 miles, cross railroad tracks, and go another mile. You will descend into the Pass (or what’s left of it). The historical site and markers are on the left, and the Clayton House is on the right. It’s another amazing slice of your history, and it’s just up around the bend. Don Martin is a long-time resident of Cherokee County and Towne Lake. He is the President of The Institute of Convergent Spirituality. He is a nonprofit consultant and campaign director, having worked for Habitat for Humanity since 2005. He can be reached at (770) 355-0197

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Faith

“Poor Baby!” by Dr. Doug Thrasher I imagine that most everybody has heard the phrase, “Poor Baby.” In our house, that phrase has taken on a life of its own. Whenever anyone is sick or has had an accident or is tired or has simply had a bad day, a Poor Baby is warranted. “Poor Baby” means that a person recognizes the pain and discomfort of someone else and is sympathetic and wants to ease his or her pain. Recently, I have had my share of Poor Baby moments. First, I had a “romantic injury,” as my wife Debbie is fond of calling it, when I fell in my backyard and hurt my ribs on Valentine’s Day gathering firewood for our fireplace before cooking her dinner. That qualified for a really big Poor Baby. (For full effect, you need to say these words out loud, sort of drawing out each word with emphasis.) Then, I had a tooth start acting up and halfway through a root canal discovering it was cracked so badly that it would have to be removed. Through pain killer haze, I got Poor Baby on two different occasions while learning that there are a number of specialties in dentistry. I think I have hit my quota now for the next few months. You have to understand that Poor Baby has to be shared evenly to really mean anything. Debbie knows this. And I Poor Baby her whenever she’s sick, dealing with allergies, when she has to spend long hours on the road traveling to help take care of her Mom or even misses a two foot putt. (By the way, she laughs when I miss those putts.) I know some folks, however, who never get enough Poor Baby’s. They want someone to acknowledge that just about everything they do is on the extreme of human endurance. And watch out if someone else tries to be Poor Babied in his/her presence. It does not produce anything good; let me tell you. On the other hand, there are some folks who never want to be Poor Babied. These folks are the hardy ones, who, I must admit, miss out on letting someone else share in their pain and misfortune. Not the wisest choice, in my opinion, especially when the Bible says, “If one part (of the Body of Christ) suffers, every part suffers with it (Poor Baby); if one part is honored, every part rejoices with it.” (1 Corinthians 12:26) So, the next time you see someone you love who is hurting, reach out to them with the words, “Poor Baby!” You will be amazed at the result. A mother’s kiss might be the most healing thing in the world, but Poor Baby ranks a close second. Dr. Doug Thrasher is the Senior Pastor at Hillside United Methodist Church. He is also a member of the AroundAbout — TowneLaker’s Community Board. You may contact him at dthrasher@hillsideumc.org. 74

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Faith

Marriage Moments by Donna Ratliff This month my husband and I experienced several spectacular “marriage moments.” We had the privilege to welcome two new baby girls into our family. Our son and his wife delivered Zoey Lynn to our family on February 13. Three weeks later, our daughter and her husband birthed their second child, Ava Claire on March 7. We were thrilled beyond words to be a part of the excitement of our children having children. We watched proudly as each couple worked as a team during the pain and pressure of the labor and delivery process. We witnessed the joy of each couple as they welcomed their new babies coming into the world. We got to watch the nursing team take care of the babies from the moment of birth and deliver them back to their parents. The chorus of a song I heard at Christmas was running through my mind: “a baby changes everything.” These babies, as well as our three-yearold granddaughter, will have the opportunity to change their world as we love, encourage “We witnessed the and support them. Psalm 111 joy of each couple as says, “Great are the works of they welcomed their the Lord. They are studied by all who delight in them. new babies coming Splendid and majestic is his into the world.” work.” I wholeheartedly agree.

Date Your Mate: (Preparation for this date is to sign up for Netflix if you don’t have it) Take your spouse to Kani House. Enjoy a sushi or hibachi meal together. Go home and pull up the Netflix on your computer. Attempt to choose a movie that you both want to watch. This decision may take up to an hour. The choices are innumerable and the decision to agree could be challenging. The great thing about this date is that by the time you’ve made the decision on the movie you’ll most likely be very tired. You or your spouse may even fall asleep. If that happens, don’t sweat it. Just enjoy the moments you’ve had for the evening.

Have a

Joyous Easter Season! 76

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Towne Lake Area Religious Services Baptist

Jewish

Crossroads Community Church 2317 Bascomb-Carmel Road, (770) 592-7007 Sunday Services: 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Sunday Morning Bible Study: 9:30 a.m. Pastor: Bob Goodner

Chabad Jewish Center 1635 Old Hwy 41 NW, Suite 112-265, Kennesaw (770) 771-9952, info@JewishwestCobb.com Introductory Service: 1st Shabbat of each month at 11 a.m. Traditional Service: 3rd Shabbat of each month at 10:30 a.m. Rabbi: Zalman Charytan www.JewishWestCobb.com

First Baptist Church of Woodstock 11905 Highway 92, (770) 926-4428 Sunday Services: 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Pastor: Dr. Johnny M. Hunt www.fbcw.org Hillcrest Baptist Church 6069 Woodstock Road, Acworth, (770) 917-9100 Sunday Services: 9 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 10 a.m. Wednesday Services: Youth 6:30 p.m., Adults 7 p.m. Pastor: Paul Vance New Victoria Baptist Church 6659 Bells Ferry Road, (770) 926-8448 Sunday Services: 10:50 a.m Sunday Bible Study: 9:45 a.m. Wednesday Awana/Youth: 6:30 – 8 p.m. Pastor: Monty Guice www.newvictoriabaptistchurch.org South Cherokee Baptist Church 7504 Highway 92, (770) 926-0422 Sunday Services: 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Pastor: Steven Lambert

Episcopal Christ Episcopal Church 1210 Wooten Lake Road, Kennesaw, (770) 422-9114 Sunday Services: 8 & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School: 9:15 a.m. Wednesday: 6:30 p.m. praise music, 7 p.m. Eucharist Rector: Doris Graf Smith Christ the Redeemer Charismatic Episcopal Church 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton, (770) 479-1778 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Morning Prayer: Sunday at 8:30 a.m. Rector: Kurt Wheeler Christ the Redeemer Charismatic Episcopal Church 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton, (404) 395-5003 Saturday Service: 5:30 p.m. Priest: Stephen Hunter Episcopal Church of the Annunciation 1673 Jamerson Road, Marietta, (770) 928-7916 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Rector: Rev. Paul McCabe www.annunciationepiscopal.org Saint Clement’s Episcopal Church 2795 Ridge Road, Canton, (770) 345-6722 Sunday Eucharist Services: 8, 9 & 11 a.m. Christian Education: 10 a.m. Wednesday Eucharist Service: 6:30 p.m. Rector: James B. Stutler

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Tikvah l’ Chaim “Hope for Life” Messianic Jewish Fellowship 132 North Medical Parkway, Woodstock (678) 936-4125 or (678) 445-8766 Shabbat Services — Saturday’s 10 a.m. Rabbi Gary Maxted www.tlchaim.com (partnering with TLC Church, Woodstock, GA)

Lutheran Celebration of Grace Lutheran Church 411 Scott Mill Road, Canton (770) 503-5050 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Nursery available Sunday School: 9 a.m., Faith Formation: 9 a.m. Pastor: Virginia Krekling www.CelebrationofGrace.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 1208 Rose Creek Drive (770) 924-7286, sheeptalk-gslc@comcast.net Sunday Services: 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:30 & 11 a.m. Thursday Youth Activities: 6:30 p.m. Pastors: Paul Baumgartner & Justin Ask www.goodshepherdwoodstock.org Timothy Lutheran Church (LC-MS) 556 Arnold Mill Road, (770) 928-2812 Sunday Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Pastor: Stephen Constien

Orthodox St. Elizabeth Orthodox Church Service at the Woodstock Funeral Home Chapel, 8855 Main Street, Woodstock (770) 485-0504 Sunday Divine Liturgy: 10 a.m. Priest Frederick Watson www.stelizabethga.org

Presbyterian Cherokee Presbyterian Church, PCA 1160 Butterworth Road, Canton, (770) 704-9594 Sunday Services: 9 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Sunday School: 11 a.m. Pastor: Alan Lutz www.cherokee-pca.org Heritage Presbyterian Church 5323 Bells Ferry Road, (770) 926-3558 Sunday Services: 9 & 11:10 a.m. Sunday School: 10 a.m.

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Pastor: Dr. Sid Gunter www.heritagepres.com Sixes Presbyterian Church Meeting at our Fellowship Hall at 2335 Sixes Road, Canton, (770) 485-1975 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor: Dr. Lucas Pina www.sixeschurch.org Woodstock Presbyterian Church 345 Arnold Mill Road, (770) 926-0074 Adult Sunday School: 10 a.m. Traditional Worship Service: 11 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Dr. Jake Marshall

Roman Catholic St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church 490 Arnold Mill Road, (770) 516-0009 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 7:30, 9 & 11 a.m. & 12:45 & 5:30 p.m. Sunday Spanish Mass: 2:30 p.m. Pastor: Larry Niese www.stmichaelthearchangelwoodstock.catholicweb.com Transfiguration Catholic Church 1815 Blackwell Rd. NE., Marietta, (770) 977-1442 Saturday Vigil Mass: 5 p.m. Sunday Masses: 8 & 10 a.m. & 12 noon Sunday Spanish Mass: 2 p.m. Pastor: Monsignor Patrick Bishop www.transfiguration.com

United Methodist Bascomb United Methodist Church 2295 Bascomb-Carmel Road, (770) 926-9755 Contemporary Service: 9 a.m. Traditional Service: 11 a.m. Sunday School: 10 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Millie Kim www.bascombumc.org CITY ON A HILL United Methodist Church Worship Experiences at Johnston Elementary School 2031 East Cherokee Drive, (404) 862-7850 Sunday Service: 9 & 10:45 a.m. Nursery available at both times Pastor: Chris Bryant www.COAHUMC.org First United Methodist Church of Woodstock 109 Towne Lake Parkway, (770) 926-6440 Sunday School: 10 a.m. Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. Over 50s meet 1st Saturday each month at 11:30 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Claude Herbert Hillside United Methodist Church 4474 Towne Lake Parkway, (770) 924-4777 Traditional Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m. Contemporary Services: 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:30 & 11 a.m Pastor: Dr. Doug Thrasher www.hillsideumc.org

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Liberty Hill Church at the Mill 141 Railroad Street (678) 493-8920 Sunday Service: 11 a.m. Nursery available Pastor: Jamey Prickett www.libertyhillumc.org Sixes United Methodist Church 8385 Bells Ferry Road, Canton (770) 345-7644 Sunday Services: 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday School: 10 a.m. Pastor: Jim Buckman www.sixesumc.org

Other Churches Allen Temple, AME Church 232 N. Arnold Mill Road, (770) 926-6348 Prayer Time: Friday, 7:14 — 8:14 p.m. Sunday Services: 8 & 11 a.m. Sunday Church School: 9:45 a.m. Pastor: Carl A. Moore, Sr. www.allentempleame.org Bells Ferry Church of God 6718 Bells Ferry Road, (770) 592-2956 Sunday School: 10 a.m. Sunday Service: 11 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Pastor: Ted Wooldridge www.bellsferry.com Branches of Christ 5946 Jacobs Road, Acworth, (770) 917-4964 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Pastor: Steve Pettit www.branchesofchrist.com BridgePointe Church Meeting at Woodstock Middle/High School (770) 517-2977 Sunday Services: 9 & 11 a.m. Pastor: Mat Garcia www.bridgepointechurch.org Celebration Church 340 Towne Lake Parkway, (678) 461-9626 Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Cherokee Seventh Day Adventist 101 Rope Mill Road (770) 591-7304 Saturday Worship: 11 a.m. Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7:30 p.m. Pastor: Jonathan Williamson Christ the King Church of Greater Atlanta 6464 Highway 92 (770) 924-9161 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor: Larry Tomczak www.ctkatlanta.com Christian Praise Center 1358 Sixes Road, (770) 924-7532 www.christianpraisecenter.com Church at North Gate 9876 Main Street, Suite 250 (behind NAPA) (678) 494-2193 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Program: 7:30 p.m. Pastor: Marc Lawson www.ngca.org

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Allatoona Ward, 2205 Bascomb Carmel Road Sunday School & Auxiliary Meetings: 12:30 p.m. Sacrament Meeting: 2:15 p.m. Bishop Phil Karski Canton Ward, 3459 E. Cherokee Drive, Canton Sunday School & Auxiliary Meetings: 10:20 a.m. Sacrament Meeting: 9 a.m. Bishop Scott Harman Church of the Messiah (Non-denominational) 415 Charles Cox Drive, Canton (770) 479-5280 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Pastor: Fred L. Goodwin Cornerstone Community Church 503 Hickory Ridge Trail Suite 160 (678) 439-5108, dlkight@comcast.net Sunday Service: 11 a.m. Pastor David Kight www.ccchurchonline.org Covenant Christian Center 330 Adam Jenkins Memorial Blvd, Canton (770) 345-0307 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Pastor: Apostle Kito J. Johnson www.CityOfCovenant.org Dayspring Church 6835 Victory Drive, Woodstock (770) 516-5733 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor: Tony Crawford www.dayspring-online.com Faith Family Church 5744 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth (770) 926-4560 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Pastor: Tommy White Freedom Church Meeting at North Cobb High School 3400 Old Highway 41 NW, Kennesaw (770) 529-6006 Sunday Services: 9:30 & 11 a.m. www.freedomchurch.tv Pastor: J.R. Lee Jubilee Church (Newfrontiers) Meets at Kell High School 4770 Lee Waters Road, Marietta (678) 471-1930 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. www.jubileechurch.us Love Community Church 5598 Bells Ferry Rd., Acworth (Cherokee Corners) (404) 663-1828 Sunday School: 9 a.m. Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Donna T. Lucas

The Pointe Church Hasty Elementary, 205 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton, (404) 557-9640 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor: Brian Jones www.myfriendschurch.com Prayer & Praise Christian Fellowship Church 6409 Bells Ferry Road, (770) 928-2795 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Christian Living Class: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Youth Meeting: 6:30 p.m. Pastor: Larry H. Baker http://www.prayerandpraise.org Resurrection Anglican Church 231 Arnold Mill Road (770) 591-0040 Holy Communion: Sunday 10 a.m. Christian Education (all ages): Sunday 9 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Greg Goebel www.resurrectionwoodstock.org Towne Lake Community Church (TLC Church) 132 North Medical Parkway (678) 445-8766 Contemporary Family Style Worship: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Messianic Jewish Fellowship (Tikvah l’Chaim): Saturday 10 a.m. The Walk — Adult Singles Worship: Saturday 6 p.m. Celebrate Recovery: Friday 6 p.m. Sr. Pastor William S. Ratliff www.tlcchurch.com Unity Christ Church 2871 Cherokee St., Kennesaw (770) 422-9552 Sunday Service: 11 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Terrence Padgett www.unitycc.com Woodstock Christian Church 7700 Highway 92 (770) 926-8238 Sunday School: 9 a.m. Sunday Worship Service: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Small Groups: 6 p.m. Wednesday Meal: 6 p.m.; Worship: 6:40 p.m.; Program: 7 p.m. Pastor: Lynn Eynon www.woodstockchristian.org Woodstock Church of Christ 219 Rope Mill Road (770) 926-8838 Sunday Services: 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Servico En Espanol Domingo: 10:30 a.m. Aprenda Ingles Gratis (Free ESL): Lunes 7 — 9 p.m. Ministro: Rafael Uzcategui, (770) 926-8271 Pastor: Bryan Collins www.woodstockchurchofchrist.org

Momentum Church 110 Londonderry Court Suite 130, Woodstock, on Hwy 92 — ½ mile east of Hwy 5 (678) 384-4919 Sunday Service Times: 9:30 & 11:15 a.m. Pastor: Ross Wiseman www.MomentumChurch.tv

Woodstock Church of the Nazarene 874 Arnold Mill Road, (770) 924-4499 Sunday Services: 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Program: 7 p.m. Pastor: Greg Brown www.wcnga.com

Northern Hills Church of Christ 4563 Hickory Flat Highway, Canton, (404) 579-0885 Sunday Service: 10 a.m. Pastor: Ronny West www.northernhillsfamily.org

Woodstock Community Church 8534 Main Street (770) 926-8990 Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor: Greg Michael

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Recent Consumer Product Recalls AroundAbout — TowneLaker wants to help keep you and your family safe. The following items have been recalled by their manufacturers in cooperation with the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC). Golden Tea Lights. Pier 1 Imports® of Fort Worth, Texas, is voluntarily recalling approximately 370,000 (in the United States) and 30,000 (in Canada) Golden tea lights sold with ornament tea light holders. The flame from the tea lights can burn with a high flame, posing a fire hazard. Jogging Strollers. B.O.B. Trailers, Inc. of Boise, ID is voluntarily recalling approximately 337,000 (in the United States) and 20,000 (in Canada) B.O.B.® single and double strollers. A drawstring on the stroller can get wrapped around a child’s neck, posing a strangulation hazard. Glass Lids. Le Creuset of America, Inc. of Early Branch, SC is voluntarily recalling approximately 1,800 Le Creuset glass lids. The glass lids can crack or break during use, posing a laceration hazard to consumers. Resistance Stretch Tubing. EB Brands, of Yonkers, NY is voluntarily recalling approximately 29,700 resistance stretch tubing units. The handle on the tubing, also called bands, can break or detach while in use, causing the tubing or handle to strike the user and posing an injury hazard. Also, Perfect Fitness of Mill Valley, CA is voluntarily recalling approximately 7,000 Perfect Pullups. The plastic handle on the recalled product can crack posing a fall injury hazard for the user. Children’s Watches. Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, of Lake Buena Vista, FL is voluntarily recalling approximately 1,200 Children’s Lightup Watches. Watch battery current interacting with nickel in the watch’s stainless steel back can cause skin irritation and/or burning sensations to children who are allergic to nickel. IKEA Cribs. IKEA Home Furnishings, of Conshohocken, PA is voluntarily recalling approximately 20,000 (in the United States) and 6,000 (in Canada) SNIGLAR cribs. The four

bolts provided with some SNIGLAR cribs to secure the mattress support are not long enough. This can cause the mattress support to detach and collapse, creating a risk of entrapment and suffocation to a child in the crib. Child Chairs. Kristi G Company, of Atlanta, and SwimWays Corp. of Virginia Beach, VA are voluntarily recalling approximately 5,200 Kristi G Go & Grow chairs. The chair can tip over, posing a fall hazard. Heaters Sold Exclusively at Dollar General. Atico International USA, Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, FL is voluntarily recalling approximately 92,000 TrueLiving Heater Fans and Portable Quartz Radiant Heaters. These heaters have caught fire, posing a fire hazard to consumers. Bassinets. Burlington Basket Company, of Burlington, Iowa, is voluntarily recalling approximately 500,000 Bassinets. If the cross-bracing rails are not fully locked into position, the bassinets can collapse causing the infant to fall to the floor or fall within the bassinet and suffer injuries. Rechargeable Batteries in Video Baby Monitors, Sold Exclusively at Babies R Us. Summer Infant, of Woonsocket, RI is voluntarily recalling approximately 58,000 Rechargeable batteries sold with certain Slim and Secure™ Video Monitors. The battery in the handheld video monitor can overheat and rupture, posing a burn hazard to consumers. Canister Vacuum. Hoover Inc., of Glenwillow, Ohio, is voluntarily recalling approximately 142,000 Hoover® WindTunnel Canister vacuums. The power cord between the power nozzle and the wand connector can short-circuit posing fire and shock hazards to consumers. This condition can occur even if the vacuum has been turned off but left plugged in. Night Lights. American Tack & Hardware Co., Inc. (AmerTac), of Saddle River, NJ, is voluntarily recalling approximately 261,000 LED night lights. An electrical short circuit in the night light can cause it to overheat and smolder or melt, which can burn consumers or result in fire.

For more information on these and many other warnings issued by the Consumer Products Safety Commission, visit www.cpsc.gov or call 1-800-638-2772. 80

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Reference

Towne Lake Area Clubs and Organizations Business Organizations American Business Women’s Association, Cherokee Eagles Charter Chapter Meeting: Third Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Jacqueline Miller Van Hook, (678) 493-3618 Cherokee Area Business Connection Meeting: Every Wednesday at 7:15 a.m. Contact: Marci Zied, (770) 345-8687 Cherokee Financial Women International Contact: Mitzi Saxon, (770) 479-3400 Cherokee Toastmasters Meeting: Every Wednesday from 12 noon Location: Keller Williams Realty, 220 Heritage Pkwy Contact: Steve Monahan, (770) 712-4077 Website: www.CherokeeToastmasters.com No Fee Referral Network Woodstock Meeting: Every Thursday morning at 7:30am Location: Corner Bistro off Towne Lake Pkwy Contact: Stephanie Natarus, (770) 928-2700 stephanie@livinginsured.com Website: http://www.meetup.com/No-Fee Referral-Network-Woodstock/ North Georgia Referral Network Meeting: Every Tuesday morning at 7:30 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Steve Green, (770) 427-2799 Together We Rise Meeting: Second & Fourth Tuesdays at 11:30 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Pat Snipes, (404) 569-5280 Towne Lake Business Association Meeting: April 19, 12:30 p.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: (770) 615-3350 Website: www.tlba.org Towne Lake PowerCore Team Meeting: Every Friday at 7:15 — 8:45 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Marc Replogle, (770) 952-5000, X20 (404) 816-3377 Website: www.powercore.net Woodstock Business Networking Group Meeting: Thursdays at 7:45 a.m. Location: Atlanta Bread Company on Highway 92 Contact: Lee West, (770) 591-7101 Woodstock Community Business Association Meeting: Second Monday at 12 noon Location: Latimer Hall Contact: info@woodstockcba.com Women of Woodstock Meeting: First & third Wednesday. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Stephanie Natarus, (770) 928-2700 stephanie@livinginsured.com Website: www.womenofwoodstock.com

Charitable Organizations Ahimsa House help for victims of domestic violence who need help getting their pets to safety. Contact: 24-hour, (404) 452-6248, Info (404) 496-4038 Website: www.ahimsahouse.org Chance Afrika Contact: Eric Mwangi, Exec. Dir., ericm@chanceafrika. org, (770) 256 2280, www.chanceafrika.org Cherokee County Animal Shelter Auxiliary Contact: (770) 704-PAWS or ccasa4paws@yahoo.com Website: www.ccasauxiliary.org Cherokee County Humane Society (CCHS)

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Contact: (770) 928-5115, admin@cchumanesociety.org Website: www.cchumanesociety.org CCHS Thrift Store located at 5900 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth, (770) 592-8072, accepts donations and sells used household items to raise money for CCHS. Cherokee County Special Olympics Meeting: First Monday at 7 p.m. Location: CrossRoads Middle/High School Contact: Colleen Konwick, (770) 517-7101 Cherokee Child Advocacy Council, Inc. Anna Crawford Children’s Center and Parents HELP 319 Lamar Haley Pkwy., Canton, (770) 345-8100 Contact: Amy Economopolous, (770) 592-9779 www.cherokeechildadvocates.org Companion Animal Connection Contact: (678) 493-9847 Website: www.cacadopt.petfinder.com Feed My Lambs, Inc. Contact: Candice Knight, (770) 795-9349 Website: www.feedmylambs.net Genesis Adoptions Contact: Lindsay Kirk, (770) 517-0043, Website: www.genesis-adoptions.org Habitat for Humanity North Central Georgia. Contact: (770) 345-1879 Website: www.habitatncg.org Hope Center offers support for unplanned pregnancy. Contact: (770) 924-0864, info@TheHopeCtr.com Website: www.hopectr.com Hospice Advantage needs volunteers. Contact: Shari Koch, (770) 218-1997 Website: www.hospiceadvantage.com iCOR helping orphans, seeks volunteers. Contact: Lily Colgate, (404) 992-8155 Website: www.iCORorphans.com Pet Buddies Food Pantry has pet food collection bin at AroundAbout — TowneLaker offices. Website: www.petbuddiesfoodpantry.org MUST Ministries Contact: Kim Loesing, (770) 479-5397 Papa’s Pantry is a year-round local food ministry. Contact: Lynne Saunders, (770) 591-4730 Website: www.papaspantry.org Safe Kids Cherokee County — Call for an appointment for free child safety seat inspections. Contact: Chad Arp, (678) 493-4343 Website: www.cherokeesafekids.org

Civic Organizations AARP Woodstock Chapter is for anyone 50 and older. Meeting: Second Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Rich, (770) 926-1944

Kiwanis Club of Woodstock Meeting: Every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: (678) 494-4841 Website: www.kiwanisofwoodstock.org Rotary Club of Woodstock Meeting: Every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. Location: IHOP on Highway 92 Contact: Gary Floyd, (404) 506-6878, glfloyd@ southernco.com Rotary Club of Towne Lake Meeting: Every Thursday at 12 noon (lunch) Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Ivan Garcia (770) 926-0105 Sewrifics of Cherokee Meeting: Third Tuesday at 7 p.m. Location: Sixes United Methodist Church, Canton Contact: Sheri Torch, (770) 591-8335 Sons of the American Legion Meeting: Third Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Location: Woodstock Community Church Contact: Charles Tucker, (678) 643-0794 South Cherokee Optimist Club Meeting: Every Friday at 7:30 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: (770) 926-3522 Towne Lake Optimist Club Meeting: Every Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. Location: Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills Contact: Terry Morrison, (770) 715-3375 Woodstock Jaycees Meeting: First Tuesday & third Thursday at 7 p.m. Location: 216 Rope Mill Road Contact: (770) 926-8336 Woodstock Lions Club Meeting: Second & fourth Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Location: New Victoria Baptist Church Contact: (770) 906-2958 Woodstock Masons Lodge #246 F. & A.M., Inc. Meeting: Second & fourth Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. Location: Corner of Air Acres Way & Arnold Mill Rd. Contact: (770) 993-3145 or (770) 926-0627 Woodstock Midday Optimist Club Meeting: Every Wednesday at 12 noon Location: Folks Contact: Johnny Young, (770) 345-6158 Woodstock VFW Post 10683 Meeting: Second Tuesday at 7 p.m. Location: Woodstock Senior Center Contact: Andrew Yrabedra, (404) 663-4663

Political Organizations

American Legion & Auxiliary Meeting: Third Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Location: Woodstock Community Church Contact: Charles Tucker, (678) 643-0794

Cherokee County Democrat Party Meeting: Third Monday at 7 p.m. Location: The Holly Springs Train Depot Contact: Judy Hamilton, (770) 380-7071, jkmailbox@yahoo.com Website: www.cherokeedems.com

Beta Sigma, Kappa Chi Chapter Meeting: Third Thursday at 7 p.m. Contact: Maria Kuhn, vccibaker@aol.com or April Bolle, (678) 327-7233

Cherokee County Republican Party Meeting: First Saturday at 9 a.m. Breakfast served Location: Lodge at BridgeMill, 10451 Bells Ferry Rd. Contact: (678) 809-1411

Hickory Flat Optimist Club Meeting: First & third Tuesdays 12 noon Location: Family Tradition, Highway 140 Contact: Alan Flint, (770) 720- 9056

Cherokee County Republican Women Meeting: Third Wednesday, Dinner at 6 p.m., Speaker at 7 p.m. Location: Featherstone’s at BridgeMill Contact: (678) 520-2236 for reservations Website: www.ccrwcga.com

Junior Service League of Woodstock 24 hour information line: (770) 592-3535

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

april 2011


Cherokee Tea Party Patriots Meeting: Second Sunday at 4 p.m. Location: Woodstock Library, Main St. Contact: Conrad Quagliaroli (770)592-6545 Website: cherokeeteapartypatriots.org

Recreation & Hobbies Airstream Caravan Club Website: http://home.windstream.net/topofga/ Contact: Rob Kelly, (770) 516-7044 Allatoona Gold Panners Location: Creeks around Lake Allatoona Contact: Rob Kelly, (770) 516-7044 rrkelly@bellsouth.net Arts Alliance of Georgia, Inc. Meeting: Second Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Location: Woodstock Art Center 205 Arnold Mill Rd. Contacts: Madeline Hall, (678) 754-8482 woodstockartcenter@comcast.net Blue Skies Laughter Club Meeting: Every Wednesday 7 — 8 p.m. Location: Northside-Cherokee Medical Offices 100 Stoneforest Dr., 1st floor conf. room Contact: Craig Whitley (404) 520-0221 Website: www.addlaughter.com Cherokee Amateur Radio Society Meeting First Saturday at 10 a.m. Location: BridgeMill Community Center Contact: Jim Millsap, PIO, (770) 928-8590 Website: www.cherokee-ares.org/ccars Cherokee County Arts Center Meeting Fourth Friday at 10 a.m. Location: 94 North Street, Canton Contact: (770) 704-6244 Website: www.CherokeeArts.org Cherokee County Saddle Club Meeting Third Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Location: Family Tradition, Hickory Flat Contact: Tamma Trump, (770) 655-0819 Website: www.cherokeesaddleclub.com Cherokee Fencing Club Meeting: Beginners, Wednesdays at 5 p.m.; Club, Wednesdays at 6 p.m. Location: Recreation Center, Main Street Contact: Andy McCann, (678) 494-9750 Website: www.cherokeefencingclub.com Cherokee Youth Lacrosse Association Contact: Dan Baldwin, 770-846-4843 Website: www.cherokeelacrosse.com Cherokee Music Teachers Association Contact: Melanie Williams, (770) 345-2983 Website: www.cherokeemta.org Crossfit WOD Club Meeting: Daily for the “Work Out of the Day” Contact: www.crossfitgarage.com Les Marmitons is for men interested in culinary arts. Meeting: Third Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Location: Chattahoochee Tech Contact: Larry Lodisio, (770) 516-5197 Neighbors & Newcomers of Towne Lake Meeting: Third Tuesday Contact: Carolyn White, (770) 926-6756 Singles of Towne Lake 35+ holds monthly mixers. Contacts: Lisa, (770) 597-3430 LisaR789@bellsouth.net Wildlife Action, Inc. is a conservation organization. Meeting: Third Sunday at 1 p.m. Location: Wildlife Action, 2075 Kellogg Creek Contact: WLA Office, (800) 753-2264

Support Organizations Adoption/Infertility Support Group Meeting: First Wednesday at 7 p.m. Location: First Baptist Church of Woodstock Contact: Cindy Braddock, (678) 445-3131 Alzheimer/Dementia Support Group Meeting: First Thursday at 7 p.m. Location: Atria, 1000 Professional Way Contact: Atria Woodstock, (770) 926-0119 Autism Parent Support Group Meeting: Second Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Location: Cherokee County Community Service Center, BridgeMill Fire Station, Canton Contact: Sharon Jones, (770) 345-6551 Breast Cancer Support Group Meeting: First Thursday of each month Time: 10 a.m. — 12 noon Location: Northside Hospital — Cherokee, Diabetes Classroom, Educational Center Contact: (404) 843-1880 Canadian Women’s Club Contact: Lesley Frappier, cwcatlanta@yahoo.com CASA for Children Inc. provides child advocacy to abused and neglected children through trained community volunteers. Contact: Deidre Hollands, (770) 345-3274 Website: www.casaforchildren.org Cherokee Autism Spectrum Support Group A support group for families with children on the autism spectrum. Contact: Heidi at hcf67@comcast.net or Renee at mrjperrelli@yahoo.com Cherokee County Family Child Care Association Contact: Brenda Bowen, (770) 926-8055 Cherokee County Foster & Adoptive Parents Assoc. Contact: Marie Blackwell, (770) 378-0759, mblackwell@fosteroradopt.org Website: www.fosteroradopt.org C.H.O.O.S.E. of Woodstock Meeting: First Monday at 7 p.m. 24-hour information line: (770) 517-3043 Depression and Bipolar Support Group Meeting: Second Tuesday at 7 p.m. Location: 8534 Main Street, Woodstock Contact: (770) 560-7112, healthymoods@aol.com Website: www.Myspace.Com/healthymoods Emotions Anonymous Meeting: Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Location: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Contacts: Cindy, (770) 928-6554; Sherry, (770) 926-1889 Fellowship of Companies for Christ International Meeting: Second & fourth Thursdays at 7 a.m. Location: Woodstock Family Restaurant Contact: Randall Hill, (770) 516-5887 Georgia Canines for Independence Meeting: First Monday at 6:30 p.m. Location: 6683 Bells Ferry Road, Suite H Contact: Ramona Nichols, (404) 735-3647 Grandparents Raising GRANDchildren Meeting: 2nd & 4th Tuesday at 7 p.m. (nursery available) Location: Transfiguration Catholic Church, Marietta Contact: Jeannie, (770) 919-9275 Hearing Loss Resource Group Contacts: Cathy, (678) 483-9135 WoodstockSHHH-info@phydeaux.org

april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

JDRF Cherokee Pickens Family Support Group for families of children with Juvenile (type 1) diabetes. Meeting: Second Saturday Location: River Green Subdivision Facilities Contact: Tom, (770) 345-4864, Tom@brushwithart.com Jewish Havurah Contact: Marcia, (770) 345-8687 La Leche League of South Cherokee Meeting: First Tuesday at 10 a.m. Location: Bascomb United Methodist Church Contacts: Marguerite, (770) 926-2791 Megan, (770) 517-0191 Miracle Mothers is for women trying to conceive or adopt. Contact: Melissa, (770) 516-1078 Website: www.miraclemothers.org MOMS Club Towne Lake — 30189 Contacts: www.momsclubtownelake.com momscluboftownelake@gmail.com MOMS Club Woodstock — 30188 Contacts: momsclubwoodstockn@yahoo.com MOPS — Mothers of Preschoolers (birth — K) Meeting: Second & Fourth Tues. a.m. or Wed. p.m. Location: First Baptist Church of Woodstock Contact: (770) 926-4428, www.fbcw.org Mothers & More Meeting: First & third Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Location: Kroger at Towne Lake Contact: Michelle Wise, (770) 720-8834 Website: www.woodstockmm.com National Alliance for Mental Illness Family Support Group Meeting: Second & fourth Tuesdays, 7 — 8:30 p.m. Location: Hillside United Methodist Church Contact: Jill, (404) 394-1229 or Patrick, (678) 654-2091 Website: www.nami.org National Psoriasis Foundation Support Group Meeting: First Tuesday at 7 p.m. (call for directions) Contact: Scott Bell, (404) 218-6626 Website: http://support.psoriasis.org/woodstock NWAtlantaMommies.com Play dates, mom’s night out, and online support Meeting: Weekly Contact: Stephanie Peterson, (678) 653-1418 admin@nwatlantamommies.com Website: http://www.nwatlantamommies.com Overeaters Anonymous Meeting: Every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Location: H.O.W. Place, behind fire station on Bells Ferry Road at Old Bascomb Court Contact: Lois, (770) 592-6421 Spirit of Success Career Clothing Connection Provides professional business attire at no cost. Contact: (770) 956-0711. S.N.A.P. offers resources for children with special needs. Meeting: Second Monday from 10 — 11:30 a.m. Location: 100 Hickory Circle, Holly Springs Contact: (770) 720-4068 Tender Hearts Caregivers Support Group Meeting: Second & fourth Wednesday at 10 a.m. Location: Hillside United Methodist Church Contact: Robin Galloway, (770) 517-5899

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Reference

Community Information Numbers & Websites Emergency — 911 • AroundAbout — TowneLaker • (770) 615-3322 Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce

(770) 345-0400

Cherokee County Government:

Animal Shelter Business Licenses Clean & Beautiful Commission Commissioners Courthouse Engineering Office (Traffic Signals) Extension Office Jury Phone Justice Center (Courts, Judges, etc.) Planning & Zoning Senior Services Tax Assessors/Evaluation

(770) 345-7270 (770) 721-7810 (770) 517-7650 (678) 493-6000 (770) 479-1953 (678) 493-6077 (770) 479-0418 (770) 479-9011 (770) 479-1953 (678) 493-6101 (770) 345-5312 (678) 493-6120

Taxes: License Plates/Tags, Property Tax Woodstock Office Voter Registration

(678) 493-6400 (770) 924-4099 (770) 479-0407

Children/Family:

Anna Crawford Children’s Center Cherokee County Boys & Girls Club Cherokee Family Violence Center Cherokee Focus Child Support Enforcement Department of Family & Children Services The Hope Center MUST Cherokee Ministries Papa’s Pantry

(770) 345-8100 (770) 720-7712 (770) 479-1804 (770) 345-5483 (770) 720-3581 (770) 720-3610 (770) 924-0864 (770) 479-5397 (770) 591-4730

Driver’s Licenses (Tues — Sat)

(678) 413-8400

Fire Department (District 1, Station 20)

(770) 926-7155

Georgia State Patrol

(770) 205-5400

Health Department

(770) 345-7371

Hospitals: Kennestone Hospital North Fulton Hospital Northside Hospital — Cherokee

(770) 793-5000 (770) 751-2500 (770) 720-5100

Hotlines — 24 Hour Help Lines:

Battered Women Hotline Drug Tip Line (Cherokee Co. Sheriff) Poison Control Center — Atlanta Outside Metro Atlanta Probate Court Information Line Rite-Call (Child Medical Problems) Sexual Assault & Family Violence Center

84

(770) 479-1703 (770) 345-7920 (404) 616-9000 (800) 222-1222 (770) 704-2610 (404) 250-KIDS (770) 428-2666

Libraries: www.sequoyahregionallibrary.org Rose Creek (770) 591-1491 R.T. Jones (770) 479-3090 Woodstock (770) 926-5859 Non-Emergency 911 (770) 479-3117 Parks and Recreation: BridgeMill Athletic Club (770) 345-5500 Cherokee County Outdoor YMCA (770) 591-5820 Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency (770) 924-7768 www.crpa.net Cherokee Soccer Association (770) 704-0187 www.cherokeesoccer.com Eagle Watch Golf Club (770) 591-1000 Hobgood Park (770) 924-7865 North Atlanta Soccer Assoc. www.nasa-ga.org (770) 926-4175 SCRA Park (770) 926-5672 Towne Lake Hills Golf Club (770) 592-9969 Wildlife Action, Inc. (800) 753-2264

Pets: Animal Control (678) 493-6200 CatSnip (low cost spay & neuter) www.atlantaanimalalliance.com Cherokee County Animal Shelter — Adoptions (770) 345-7270 Cherokee County Humane Society (770) 928-5115 www.cchumanesociety.org Emergency Veterinary Clinic (770) 924-3720 Lost Pet Hotline (770) 615-3333 Pet Buddies Food Pantry www.petbuddiesfoodpantry.org SPARE (Sterilizing Pets And Reducing Euthanasia) (770) 928-5120 Second Chance Dog Rescue www.secondchancedogs.org

Post Office (Woodstock) www.usps.com

(800) 275-8777

Recycling Center

(770) 516-4195

Schools: see www.townelaker.com for complete listing Board of Education www.cherokee.k12.ga.us (770) 479-1871 Sheriff’s Department www.cherokeega-sheriff.org (678) 493-4200 Georgia Sex Offender Registry www.cherokeega-sheriff.org/offender/offender.htm

Utilities:

Atlanta Gas Light Co. www.aglc.com AT&T www.bellsouth.com Cherokee Water & Sewerage Authority Comcast Cobb EMC www.cobbemc.com Georgia Power

(770) 907-4231 (404) 780-2355 (770) 479-1813 (770) 926-0334 (770) 429-2100 (888) 660-5890

Urgent Care Facility Wellstar Urgent Care

Woodstock, City of:

(678) 494-2500

(in Towne Lake, only applies to Avonlea, Deer Run,

ParkView, Paces and certain annexed commercial parcels) www.ci.woodstock.ga.us City Hall (770) 926-8852 Fire Department (770) 926-2302 Police Information (770) 592-6025

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Reference

Elected & Appointed Officials United States Government:

President Barack Obama (D)

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20500 Website: www.whitehouse.gov e-mail: president@whitehouse.gov

Senator Saxby Chambliss (R)

Senate Russell Courtyard-2 Washington, D.C. 20510 Website: http://chambliss.senate.gov e-mail: use contact form on website

Senator Johnny Isakson (R)

1 Overton Park, Suite 970 3625 Cumberland Blvd, Atlanta, GA 30339 Website: http://isakson.senate.gov

Rep. Tom Price (R), District 6

P.O. Box 425 Roswell, GA 30077 Website: http://tom.house.gov e-mail: use contact form on website

(202) 456-1414 fax: (202) 456-2461

(202) 224-3521 fax: (202) 224-0103

(202) 224-3643 GA: (770) 661-0999 fax: (770) 661-0768 (202) 225-4501 GA: (770) 565-4990 fax: (770) 565-7570

(404) 652-7003 fax: (404) 652-7123

Senator Chip Rogers (R), District 21

(404) 463-1378 fax: (404) 657-9887

Senator Jack Murphy (R), District 27

(770) 887-1960 fax: (770) 205-0602

Rep. Charlice Byrd (R), District 20

(404) 656-0126 fax: (404) 463-2793

e-mail: jack.murphy@senate.ga.gov e-mail: charlice.byrd@house.ga.gov

Rep. Sean Jerguson (R), District 22

e-mail: sean.jerguson@house.ga.gov

(404) 656-0287

(678) 493-6270 (678) 493-6260 (678) 493-6240 (678) 493-6480 (678) 493-6490

Magistrate Court: Judge James E. Drane III (R)

(678) 493-6431 (678) 493-6160 (678) 493-6250

Cherokee County Coroner Earl W. Darby

(404) 362-1600

90 North Street, Suite 310 Canton, GA 30114 Website: www.cherokeega.com

86

Superintendent, Dr. Frank Petruzielo P.O. Box 769, 110 Academy St., Canton, GA 30114 Website: www.cherokee.k12.ga.us e-mail: drp@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office Sheriff Roger Garrison (R) 498 Chattin Drive Canton, GA 30115 Website: www.cherokeega-sheriff.org e-mail: rdgarrison@cherokeega.com

Cherokee County Tax Commissioner Sonya Little

100 North St., Canton, GA 30114 e-mail: slittle@cherokeega.com Woodstock Annex 8681 Highway 92, Woodstock, GA 30189

Board of Education: Robert Wofford (R), Post 1

(770) 479-1871 fax: (770) 479-1236

(678) 493-4200 fax: (678) 493-4228

(678) 493-6400 fax: (678) 493-6420 (770) 924-4099 fax: (770) 924-9567

(770) 704-4398, x4374

Mike Chapman (R), Post 2

(770) 704-4398, x4372

e-mail: mike.chapman@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Michael Geist (R), Post 3

(770) 928-3315

Janet Read (R), Post 4

(770) 516-1444

e-mail: janet.read@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Rick Steiner (R), Post 5 (Chair)

(770) 704-4398, x4370

Rob Usher (R), Post 6

(770) 592-7864

Kim Cochran (R), Post 7 (Vice-Chair) e-mail: kimgcochran@gmail.com

(678) 493-6511

Cherokee County Board of Commissioners

Cherokee County School System

e-mail: rob.usher@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Clerk of Courts: Patty Baker

90 North Street, Suite 310Canton, GA 30114

Jason Nelms (R) Post 4

e-mail: rick.steiner@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Juvenile Court: Judge John B. Sumner

e-mail: kbosch@cherokeega.com

e-mail: michael.geist@cherokee.k12.ga.us

State Court: Chief Judge Clyde J. Gober, Jr. Judge W. Alan Jordan

Probate Court: Judge Keith Wood (R)

Karen Bosch (R), Post 3

e-mail: robert.wofford@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Cherokee County Courts:

Superior Court: Chief Judge Frank C. Mills, III Judge Jackson Harris Judge Ellen McElyea

Jim Hubbard (R), Post 2

e-mail: cnelms2@gmail.com

Governor Nathan Deal (R)

e-mail: chip@SenatorChipRogers.com

e-mail: hjohnston@cherokeega.com

e-mail: jhubbard@cherokeega.com

Website: www.woodall.house.gov

State Capitol, Room 111 Atlanta, GA 30334 Website: www.gov.state.ga.us

(678) 493-6001

e-mail: lbahrens@cherokeega.com

Harry Johnston (R), Post 1

Rep. Rob Woodall (R), District 7

State Government:

Commissioners: Buzz Ahrens (R), Chairperson

City of Woodstock Mayor Donnie Henriques

(770) 592-6017

e-mail: dhenriques@progressiveaudiology.com

Towne Lake Residential and Commercial Owners’ Association (678) 493-6000 fax: (678) 493-6013

(Covenant enforcement issues — all Towne Lake common areas)

Douglas Properties

(770) 926-3086

117 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock, GA 30188

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Mosquito Prevention

Tennis Nutrition

continued from page 42

continued from page 63

Do not spray on pets or children under two years old. Always wash repellant-treated skin after coming indoors and never use repellants on wounds or irritated skin.

These are good energy foods. After a day of competition, “recovery foods” are very important especially if you are training or competing for a couple of days. Grilled chicken, rice, pasta (very little cream sauce and still NO butter), tuna, stir-fried veggies, and even pancakes again. If you are training all day or playing multiple matches in a day, do your very best to stay away from red meat, chips, any type of fried chicken (especially nuggets), creamy pastas, hot dogs, or any sandwich meat that has been sitting out more than 30 minutes.

Some pesticide sprays can protect the entire yard, eliminating the need to spray individuals, and making the area safer for babies and pets. The most common sprays are half as toxic as Deet and come with a guarantee. Mosquito-borne diseases affect millions of people worldwide each year. The bite of a mosquito can result in anything from a skin irritation to contracting malaria. Rick Coughlin is the owner of The Mosquito Authority. Email him at rick@themosquitoauthority.com.

Sleep Study continued from page 36

physician, sleep tech and sleeping environment. You would be assigned to a private bedroom in a sleep center or hospital. The room may look like an upscale hotel room, with all of the amenities you would expect – private bathroom, TV, soft bedding, breakfast and more. You’re also encouraged to bring items from home (a favorite pillow or pajamas) to help. Although you will be hooked up to equipment that may look uncomfortable, most people fall asleep with little difficulty. The wires are very thin and flexible and are bundled together so they don’t restrict movement, disrupt your sleep or cause other discomfort. You can easily call the tech during the night if you have any problems. You also can watch videos and learn more about how to get a better night’s sleep at Northside Healthcasts, www.northside. com/healthcast.

Lawn Maintenance continued from page 56

stress. If you properly manage your grass, you won’t need to use as many pesticides because you will have fewer pest issues. Managing your grass properly begins with sticking to a lawn calendar made for Georgia and not watching what your neighbors are doing. More than likely, your neighbors are transplants from another state and are doing a lot of things wrong anyway. If you really want to help the environment, be a good neighbor and print off a lawn calendar for your friends and neighbors so they can keep a copy in their garden sheds. Paul Pugliese is the Agriculture & Natural Resources Extension Agent for Cherokee County Cooperative Extension, a partnership of The University of Georgia, The U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Cherokee County. (770) 479-0418. For more information and free publications, visit our local website at www.ugaextension.com/cherokee 88

A good rule of thumb is stay away from foods and drinks that you would not touch after they sit out in the sun for an hour or more. Also, be smart about what and how much you drink. Caffeine and especially carbonated drinks are not good before or during competition and training. Many children will grab a Gatorade instead of water, so make sure they stick with water for the majority of their fluids. One last thing: Since many foods affect a person’s mood, be mindful of the ones that give you energy and help you focus. There is a good chance that these are foods that will also help you in competition. Jason is a USPTR professional, a USTA Georgia Tennis Professional of the Year and director of junior tennis programs at a local club. Jason can be reached at jasonfleeman@gmail.com.

Consignment Sales continued from page 18

5. Save safety pins and wire hangers year round. Many sales are happening right now, and again in the fall. To find the consignment sales in your area, check out the events section of magazines like AroundAbout and websites like The Bargain Watcher (www.thebargainwatcher.com). I bet there are PLENTY around you! Lisa Huffman, wife of a Marine and mother of two, has enjoyed bargain hunting, couponing, and teaching others how to do the same for years. She has been interviewed by the Wall Street Journal and the American Association of Administrative Professionals.

Do You Love Great LOCAL Deals?

Sign up today at www.thedailyvalue.com Local deals delivered to your inbox!

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

See page 66 for more details

april 2011


april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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Reference

Classifieds Childcare/Babysitting

GARAGE SALES

Home Services

Any Age Children, Any Time, Any Day. 30 years experience, very affordable. Tutoring available. (678) 494-6904.

Eagle Watch Community Garage Sale. Friday and Saturday, April 29 and 30, 8 a.m.to 3 p.m.

EP Pressure Wash. Reasonable rates, free estimates, insured. (770) 380-2325.

help wanted

Victory Pressure Wash. Lowest rates, deck sealing, homes, $99. (678) 852-3525.

Primerica Part-time or Full-time Career. Flexible schedule. Call Donald at (706) 659-4069

instruction/tutoring

Home Services

CPR Class. Medical, corporate and personal. Small or large groups. (404) 369-6285. Ask for Sherri.

Penny Clean "One Woman Show." Residential, commercial, moving and deep cleans. Reasonable rates, 25 years experience. Licensed, bonded and insured. Free estimates. (678) 494-3602.

Private Tutoring by Certified Teacher. Math, test prep, reading. Contact Durema Bacchus, (678) 230-1768.

FOR RENT Basement Apartment for Rent, $500. Utilities included. Two minute walk to lake. Quiet, private. (770) 516-2563 or (770) 337-2170.

Free to Good Home

(these ADS ARE FREE)

FREE TO GOOD HOME Three Beautiful Cats that I must give free to a good home. They are indoor cats and have been well cared for. Please call Karen. (404) 431-6900.

Custom Home Decor Sewing. Window treatments, pillows, bedding, etc. Call Caron, (404) 372-1706, www.caroncreates.com.

Pet sitting/Services Fetch "n" Groom. Dog and cat grooming and boarding. (678) 642-1686.

Dance Curtain Designs. It's all about the details. Custom window treatments and more! Call Lisa, (404) 556-7481. Local High School Student Available for lawn care and pet sitting. References available. Responsible, dependable and reasonably priced. Call Garrett Kiefer at (404) 862-1756.

Services All-natural, Fresh and Hand-crafted Skincare, www.dirtybeauty.com. Local, Natural Food Co-op, www.woodstock. locallygrown.net.

Have Something to Sell? Need Help in the Office? Have a Service You need to Advertise? Return the Form Below for the Next Issue! $

1/Word

(10 WORD MINIMUM)

CLASSIFIED FORM

PLEASE PRINT Month(s):  Jan  Feb  Mar

PLEASE CHECK ALL THAT APPLY

 July

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$

Mail this Form with your Payment to: AroundAbout Local Media, Inc. 1025 Rose Creek Drive, Suite 340 Woodstock, GA 30189 • Fax: (770) 516-4809

1/Word

(10 WORD MINIMUM)

(All Fields Must Be Completed)

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¨ ADD A PICTURE (2.375" X 1.50") FOR ONLY $39 (Per Month).

Category: Word Count:

, $1/word, per month (10 Word Minimum)

Box numbers, phone numbers, zip codes and abbreviations are counted as one word each.

Email picture to admanager@townelaker.com.

Ad Wording (please include contact info):

Please make checks payable to AroundAbout Local Media, Inc. Form of payment: ¨ Cash or Check ¨ Visa ¨ Master Card ¨ American Express CC Account #

Exp:

¨ Discover Sec. Code (CVC):

Credit Card Authorization Signature: Name: Street Address: City, State, Zip: Daytime Phone: AroundAbout TowneLaker Classifieds is a monthly feature. All ads are accepted and placed under categories at the discretion of the publisher. Rates are only $1 per word, per month, with a 10-word minimum. “Pet Lost and Found,” “Ride Share” and “Free to Good Home” pet placement ads are FREE.

NEXT CLASSIFIED DEADLINE IS THE 10 th FOR THE FOLLOWING MONTH'S ISSUE! 90

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

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april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

91


Animal Atlanta

75

Azure Salon & Spa

21

Bam Fence

73

Libery Roofing

Bar-B-Cutie

71

Little Caesar’s

Bon Vivant Salon

9

Monti’s Food Express

68

Calvary Landscaping & Irrigation

17

Mr. Junk

49

Carpet Dry Tech

35

My Mechanic Joe

74

Casey’s Painting

45

Quiznos

31

Cherokee Chrysler Dodge Jeep

69

Reliable Heating & Air

81

Christian Brothers Automotive

81

Skin Essentials by Marilyn

85

Cotton Mill Deli

29

The Lawn Squad

42

Dr. Jerry Smith Orthodontics

52

The Plumbing Doctor

35

Endless Fitness Center

89

The Sundance Center

40

Georgia Hardwood

63

Tile Masters

17

Hammock’s Heating & Air

89

Towne Lake Nails

9

JD’s Bar-B-Que

63

Towne Lake’s Car Wash & Detail

17

Justina’s Accessories Boutique

5

Town Lake Diner

41

La Chic Boutique

75

Tuscany 77

Landscape Matters

33

Zest & Zing

5 50, 51

18

Visit our Community Clipper page for more coupons from our advertisers.

Connect with friends and keep up to date on what’s happening right here in Towne Lake!

3 ways to get connected 92

Visit our new and improved website

www.townelaker.com Join the TowneLaker fan page www.facebook.com/ aroundabouttownelaker

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

Follow us on www.twitter.com/townelaker april 2011


Affordable Coupon Advertising that gets customers in your door! AroundAbout TowneLaker Advertisers who can benefit from coupons:

• Auto services

• Carpet cleaning

• Restaurants

• Hair salons

• HVAC

• Jewelers

• Clothing store

• Nail salons

• Pet sitting

• Retail

• Spa services

• Medical/Dental All advertisements in the Community Clipper must be a coupon offer(s) only. This page cannot be used for regular advertising.

Total Distribution: 15,500 Over 12,500 direct mailed to homes and businesses in the Towne Lake area. To reserve your spot, call (770) 615-3322 or email patty@townelaker.com today! april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

93


Attorneys/Legal Services Merino & Associates, LLC (770) 874-4600

42, Back Cover

Replogle Firm, The (770) 592-5000

71

Robertson Law (678) 313 -0122

76

First Baptist Church of Woodstock (770) 926-4428 www.easteratwoodstock.com

71

Hillside UMC (770) 924-4777

73

Cherokee Chrysler Dodge Jeep (678) 493-1000

69

Christian Brothers Automotive (770) 926-4500

81

My Mechanic Joe (770) 591-6640

74

Towne Lake’s Car Wash & Detail (770) 592-8102

17

Canton Marketplace Dentistry (678) 880-0087

91

First Cherokee State Bank www.2gochecking.com Towne Lake Mortgage (770-591-8277

23

Back Cover

Carpet Dry-Tech (678) 368-5991

35

Chiropractors 1st Choice Chiropractic (770) 924-6757 1000 Woodstock Parkway

85

Discover Chiropractic & Rehabilitation (770) 516-9900 www.discoverrehab.com

77

Wellpath Center (770) 218-1166

9

Dr. Jerry Smith, Orthodontist (678) 905-0300

52

Fountain View Dentistry (770) 926-0000 www.fountainviewsmiles.com 1816 Eagle Drive, Woodstock

43

Big Apple Nail & Spa (770) 516-9996

Park Pediatric Denistry of Woodstock, LLC (770) 926-9260

31

S. Bruce O’Neal, DDS (770) 924-8848

73

Thad Baird & Tyler Baird, DMD (770) 517-0444 4595 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock

89

Churches Bridgepointe Church www.bridgepointechurch.org

94

Towne Lake Family Dentistry Inside Front (770) 591-3345 www.raymorganmd.com 120 No. Medical Pkwy., Woodstock

74

77

Education/Instruction/Counseling Access Education Towne Lake Driving School (678) 494-2200

47

American Heritage Academy (770) 926-7779 www.ahacademy.com

47

Bits, Bytes & Bots (770) 826-0449

59

Cherokee Christian School (678) 494-5464 www.cherokeechristian.org 3075 Trickum Rd., Woodstock Educational Therapy (770) 579-1743

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

49, 58

87

Health & Beauty Azure Salon & Spa (770) 345-8280

Williams Orthodontics (770) 592-5554

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaners

40

53

Banking/Financial Services Citadel Professional Services, LLC (770) 952-6707 225 Town Park Drive, Kennesaw

Park View Montessori School (770) 926-0044 Polyglot Ventures (678) 310-3303

Dentists/Orthodontists

Automotive

Goddard School, The (770) 516-0880

54, 55

29

21 47

Bon Vivant Salon (770) 516-9100 www.bonvivantsalon.com

9

Salon & Spa Venessa (770) 591-2079

52

Skin Essentials by Marilyn

85

Sundance Massage Center, The (678) 591-5066

40

Towne Lake Nails (678) 445-3051

9

Home Improvement/Repair & Service Advanced Stucco Repair Inc. (770) 592-1597

67

Bam Fence (678) 525-1125

73

Bryan Plumbing Services (770) 826-5277

21

Casey’s Painting

45

Castle Painting (678) 978-4378 www.castlepaintingga.com

Inside Back

Chris’ Painting & Home Repair (770) 826-7034

87

Dr. Fixit, Ph.D.

25

Georgia Hardwood (770) 374-5555

63

Hammocks Heating & Air (770) 794-0428

89 april 2011


Handy Handyman, The (404) 316-1490

18

Home Utility Guardians (770) 842-6655 www.homeutilityguardians.com

49

JDH Electric, LLC (770) 607-6900

61

Liberty Roofing (678) 797-5325

5

Mosquito Authority, The (678) 294-7597 www.themosquitoauthority.com

23

Mr. Junk

49

Nelson Painting & Home Improvements (678) 283-8171

41

Plumbing Doctor, The (770) 516-9000

35

Precision Painting (678) 234-9668

Pro Wash Solutions (404) 551-3053 Reliable Heating & Air (770) 594-9969 www.reliableair.com

60

Junior Service League of Woodstock (770) 592-3535 www.jslwoodstock.org

65

South Cherokee Veterinary Hospital (770) 924-6746

Steps Dance Center (770) 516-1363

33

76

Universal Pet Care

Woodstock Wolverines www.woodstockwolverinesfootball.com

87

87

Restaurants/Food Services

Physicians and Medical Services

Bar-B-Cutie (770) 924-9491

71

Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC 29 (770) 720-7733, (770) 516-0552 www.cherokeewomenshealth.com

Chesterfields (678) 880-8261 10451 Bells Ferry Rd., Canton

44

John Lutz, PhD

Chick Fil A Leadercast www.internationalfamily.org

67

Cotton Mill Deli (770) 591-2227

29

Featherstone’s Grille at Towne Lake Hills (770) 926-6097

39

J.D.’s Bar-B-Que (678) 445-7730

63

Cherokee Internal Medicine (678) 238-0301

69

45

5

Northside Hospital (770) 720-5100 201 Hospital Road, Canton www.northside.com

7

Northside Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine (770) 928-0016

30

Plastic Surgery Center of the South (770) 421-1242 www.plasticsurgerycenterofthesouth.net

69

Progressive Audiology Center Inc. (770) 592-4744, (706) 253-7244

39

Rebound Physical Therapy (678) 445-9799

56

St. Judes Internal Medicine, LLC (678) 324-7406

53

81

Roswell Woodstock Plumbing (770) 663-0600

Cherokee County Animal Shelter (770) 345-7270 www.petfinder.com/shelters/GA460.html 1015 Univeter Road, Canton

5

11, 25

Tile Masters (404) 368-3067

17

Wood Floors Are Us (678) 977-1327

30

Between The Pines (770) 591-8863

25

Wellstar www.wellstar.org/heart

Calvary Landscaping (770) 720-1727

17

Woodstock Physical Therapy (770) 516-9191

Landscape Matters (770) 403-5813

33

Real estate & related services

42

Keller Williams, Kurt & Sheila William Johnson Back Cover (404) 954-2486 www.kurtandsheila.com 91

31

Lake Nantahala (828) 321-3101 www.visitlakesend.com Reflection - Lake Nantahala www.reflectionlakenantahala.com

96

Lawn Maintenance/Landscaping

Lawn Squad, The (678) 472-0200

Optometrist/Eyewear Towne Lake Eye Associates (770) 926-2858

Photographer Kim Bates Photography (770) 617-7595 www.kimbatesphotoart.com

7

Pet/Veterinarian Services & Supplies A Home Away From Home

25

Animal Atlanta

75

Animal Hospital at Towne Lake (770) 591-9500

53

Cat Clinic of Woodstock (770) 780-2800

53

1, 68

96

Recreation and Fitness

Little Caesars (770) 591-7664, 770-479-9399 www.teamtogatoga.com

Cover, 50, 51

Monti’s Food Express (678) 809-4333

68

Quiznos (678) 494-9989

31

Town Lake Diner (770) 675-3390

41

Tuscany (678) 453-0888

77

Zest & Zing (770) 591-4000

18

Services/Retailers Miscellaneous Critter Catchers

49

Habitat for Humanity No. Central Georgia (770) 345-1024

7

Justina’s Accessories Boutique (678) 494-6331

5

La Chic Boutique (678) 402-5788

75

Dancentre South (770) 516-7229

41

Mom’s Helping Hand (770) 345-7134

45

Endless Fitness Center (678) 402-6755 1025 Rose Creek Drive, Woodstock

89

Towne Lake Arts Center (678) 494-4251 www.tlaclive.org

85

Etowah Eagles Basketball www.etowaheagles.com

35

Towne Lake Insurance ((678) 494-8038

67

Towne Lake Tech/webkudzu.com

85

Etowah Eagles Football www.etowaheaglesfootball.com april 2011 AroundAbout — TowneLaker

75

Woodstock Furniture Outlet

75

95


Send Us Your Prom Photos! email: editor@townelaker.com Please identify people in the photos from left to right. Deadlines: Etowah, April 10; Woodstock, June 10 96

AroundAbout — TowneLaker

april 2011


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