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SEPTEMBER SUN. 19 RPI TROY, N.Y. SAT. 25 MANSFIELD MAINESBURG, PA.

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WEST POINT, N.Y. WEST POINT, N.Y. WEST POINT, N.Y. PHILADELPHIA, PA.

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ANNAPOLIS, MD.

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U.S. MILITARY ACADEMY QUICK FACTS Location ........................................................ West Point, N.Y. Founded ........................................................ March 16, 1802 Enrollment ..................................................................... 4,400 Superintendent ........................ Lt. Gen. David H. Huntoon Jr. Athletic Director .............................................Kevin Anderson Nicknames ...........................................Black Knights, Cadets Mascot ............................................................................ Mule Motto................................................... “Duty, Honor, Country” Colors ...................................................Black, Gold and Gray Conference ....................................................................CSFL

TABLE OF CONTENTS 2010 Schedule...................................... Inside Front Cover Table of Contents and Quick Facts................................... 1 About the Academy .......................................................2-3 Why West Point? .............................................................. 4 Distinguished Graduates .................................................. 5 Academy Leadership ........................................................ 6 Athletic Director Kevin Anderson ...................................... 7 2010 Outlook .................................................................... 8 Coaches and Support Staff .........................................9-12 2010 Roster .................................................................... 13 Senior Profiles ...........................................................14-19 2009 Results and Statistics .......................................20-29 Collegiate Sprint Football League .................................. 30

COACHING STAFF Interim Head Coach............................ Lt. Col. Mike McElrath Defensive Coordinator ......................................Frank Nucaro Offensive Coordinator..................................... Mike Popovich Defensive Line Coach ................................ Lt. Col. Ted Reich Offensive Line Coach ..................................... Andrew Beach Running Backs Coach ....................... Lt. Col. Frank Maresco Wide Receivers Coach ......................... Capt. Primitivo Davis Team Captains...................................................Carlos Cook, ........................................................................Abram Wathen Athletic Trainer..................................................Dana Putnam Head Officer Representative .............. Lt. Col. Dan McCarthy Athletic Intern............................................ 2nd Lt. Kyle Bates Strength Coach................................................... Pete Athans Equipment Manager ................................................ Dick Hall

ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS Sr. Executive Assoc. AD/Athletic Communications ........... Bob Beretta Assistant/Sprint Football Contact ................. Pamela Flenke Athletic Communications Phone.................. (845) 938-3303 Flenke’s Direct Line ..................................... (845) 938-6996 Flenke’s E-Mail ........................... pamela.flenke@usma.edu Athletic Communications Fax ...................... (845) 446-2556 Army “A” Line........................................... (845) 938-ARMY Official Web site........................... www.goARMYsports.com

On the Cover: Senior captains Carlos Cook and Abram Wathen

CREDITS The 2010 Army Sprint Football Media Guide is an official publication of the U.S. Military Academy Office of Athletic Communications. The guide was designed, written and edited by Pamela Flenke. Editing assistance was provided by Tracy Nelson. Photos courtesy of the USMA Department of Information Management Creative Imaging Center, Jon Malinowski and Mady Salvani.


ABOUT THE AVADEMY

2 The United States Military Academy is renowned because of its historic and distinguished reputation as a military academy, and as a leading, progressive institution of higher education. Made legendary in books and movies produced over the years, the Academy’s “Long Gray Line” of graduates includes some of our nation’s most famous and influential men: Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, George S. Patton, Omar Bradley, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower and Norman Schwarzkopf. Because of this superb education and leadership experience, West Point graduates historically have been sought for high level civilian and military leadership positions. Their numbers include two U.S. presidents, several ambassadors, state governors, legislators, judges, cabinet members, educators, astronauts and corporate executives. Today, West Point continues to provide hundreds of young men and women the unique opportunity to develop physically, ethically and intellectually while building a foundation for an exciting, challenging and rewarding career as an Army officer in the service of our nation. Cadets have much more responsibility in running the Academy than students in most other colleges or universities. It adds to the leadership experience. Cadets succeed at West Point because of the support they receive from the staff and faculty. After all, many faculty members are West Point graduates and understand the challenge cadets face on a daily basis. They also serve as ideal role models, showing cadets what Army life is like. The U.S. Military Academy’s primary strength is its ability to develop leaders of character who are committed to “Duty, Honor, Country” and selfless service to our nation.


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commanders were graduates. World War II would see many graduates reach brigadier general or higher, to include Eisenhower, MacArthur, Bradley and Patton. In more recent conflicts, MacArthur, Ridgway, Westmoreland, Abrams, Schwarzkopf and Abizaid were in command. Academy graduates have also excelled in air and space exploration, and countless others went on from military service to become leaders in medicine, law, business, religion and science. Since its founding, the Military Academy fulfills the same mission as it always has . . . to educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets. It accomplishes this mission by developing cadets in three essential areas: intellectual, physical and military. These developmental paths are balanced and fully integrated into the daily life of each young man and woman at the Academy. Intellectual growth is fostered through an academic curriculum that provides a broad liberal education in the arts and sciences. The electives program builds upon the foundation of the core, allowing cadets to develop even greater competence in selected areas. In addition, the fields-of-study and majors nurture the development of creativity, critical thinking, and selfdirected learning, essential characteristics of 21st century officers. The four-year academic experience leads to a bachelor of science degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the Army. Physical development is achieved through a rigorous athletic and physical education program. Each cadet participates at the intercollegiate, club or intramural level each semester. This readies the cadet for the physical demands of military life and helps teach good judgment and selfdiscipline, even while under mental and physical stress. Military development begins with the cadet’s first day at West Point. Most military training takes place during the summer, with new cadets undergoing Cadet Basic Training, or Beast Barracks, their first year, followed the second summer by Cadet Field Training. Cadets spend their third and fourth summers serving in active Army units around the world; attending specialty training such as airborne, air assault or northern warfare or helping to train the first- and second-year cadets. The Cadet Leader Development System seeks to give the cadets increasing responsibility until they are ready to receive their commissions and assume their duties as leaders in today’s Army. Moral and ethical values guide cadets throughout their four years at West Point. Commitment to the Academy’s “Bedrock Values,” based on integrity and respect for the dignity of others, begins on the first day. Integrity is reflected in the Cadet Honor Code which states: “A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.” Respect denotes that cadets treat others with the same respect and dignity they themselves would expect. At West Point, it is not enough to train leaders—they must be leaders of character. Admission is keenly competitive and is open to young men and women from all states and territories and from every socioeconomic level. Prospective cadets must receive a nomination by a member of Congress or from the Department of the Army. The Academy seeks candidates who possess records of success in academics, athletics and leadership indicative of well-rounded individuals. Although the life of a cadet is demanding, there remains an array of club activities ranging from golf, skiing, boxing, crew and orienteering to such organizations as the cadet radio station, Habitat for Humanity and Big Brothers-Big Sisters. Additionally, the U.S. Corps of Cadets hosts a Special Olympics event each spring. Today’s Military Academy is a vastly different institution from the small academy legislated into being by Congress in 1802. Originally just 1,800 acres, the Academy has grown to more than 16,000 acres. The first graduating class numbered just two men; today’s classes graduate more than 900 new officers annually, both men and women, who are prepared for leadership roles within the Army. With the expansion of knowledge and the changing needs of the United States Army and the nation, life at West Point has changed to keep pace. Ever mindful of its rich heritage, the U.S. Military Academy is developing leaders for tomorrow, and its focus remains the national needs of the 21st century.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY

The mission of the U.S. Military Academy is to educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country; professional growth throughout a career as an offi cer in the U.S. Army; and a lifetime of selfl ess service to the Nation. Founded on March 16, 1802, the Academy celebrated its Bicentennial in 2002. But West Point’s role in America’s history dates to the Revolutionary War, when both sides realized the strategic importance of the commanding plateau on the west bank of the Hudson River. Gen. George Washington considered West Point to be the most strategic position in America. He personally selected Thaddeus Kosciuszko, one of the heroes of Saratoga, to design the fortifi cations in 1778 after problems arose with French engineers originally placed in charge of the design. In 1779, General Washington transferred his headquarters to West Point. Continental soldiers built forts, batteries and defensive barriers. A 100-ton iron chain was extended across the Hudson to control river traffic. Today, several links from that chain are arranged at Trophy Point as a reminder of West Point’s original fortifi cations. In 1802 President Thomas Jefferson signed the legislation establishing the U.S. Military Academy to create an institution devoted to the arts and sciences of warfare. This effectively eliminated America’s wartime reliance on foreign engineers and artillerists. West Point became the nation’s first engineering school and served as the model for engineering programs which were eventually established at other colleges. Col. Sylvanus Thayer, the “Father of the Military Academy,” served as Superintendent from 1817 through 1833. He upgraded academic standards, instilled military discipline and emphasized honorable conduct. Early graduates were largely responsible for the construction of the nation’s initial railway lines, bridges, harbors, and roads. Although the curriculum maintains its focus on engineering, in recent decades the program of instruction has markedly changed, providing cadets a selection of more than 40 majors. This tradition of academic and military excellence, guided by a demanding standard of moral and ethical conduct, remains the cornerstone of the West Point experience. It is said at West Point that “much of the history we teach was made by those people we taught.” The Academy has produced famous leaders throughout its illustrious past…Civil War Generals Grant, Sherman, Lee, and Jackson, to name but a few. In World War I, 34 of the 38 corps and division


WHY WEST POINT?

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“You have ahead of you the best of all professions. Being a leader is the best thing you can possibly be and you’re at a school that will make you the best possible leader. West Point is the ring. It’s the foundation of everything I have done.” - HEAD COACH MIKE KRZYZEWSKI

“I was so proud to be on the verge of entering the only institution in American society at that time that was totally integrated, in which I would have the opportunity to rise, based solely on performance and ability. The nation always looks to West Point and always looks to each and every one of you to follow always the angels of your nature.” - GENERAL COLIN POWELL

“I believe in the code ... ‘Duty, Honor, Country.’ I believe in service to one’s country. The institution of the armed forces has thrived on its commitment to developing excellence. It is meritocracy in action. Race, religion, wealth, background count not.” - PRESIDENT GEORGE H.W. BUSH

“From the birth of our existence, America has had a faith in the future -- a belief that where we’re going is better than where we’ve been, even when the path ahead is uncertain. To fulfill that promise, generations of Americans have built upon the foundation of our forefathers -- finding opportunity, fighting injustice, forging a more perfect union. Our achievement would not be possible without the Long Gray Line that has sacrificed for duty, for honor, for country.” - PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA


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Ulysses S. Grant ’43 Grant distinguished himself during the Civil War at the Battle of Vicksburg in 1863; his victory secured control of the Mississippi River for the Union. President Abe Lincoln later appointed him Commanding General of the Army in March 1864. On April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House, Va., Robert E. Lee (USMA 1829) surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to him, ending the Civil War. Grant later served as the 18th President of the United States from 1869 to 1877. Today, his image graces the $50 bill. George W. Goethals ’80 Goethals became an architect and was builder of the Panama Canal, 1904 to 1914. John J. Pershing ’86 Considered the second most senior officer in Army history, behind only George Washington, Pershing served as commander of the American Expeditionary Force during World War I. The two-million-plus troops of the AEF made a decisive contribution to the defeat of Imperial Germany. Pershing’s abilities as a leader distinguished him among European commanders, and through repeated successes on the battlefield, promoted American prestige around the world. He served as Army Chief of Staff in 1921, and was named General of the Armies of the United States upon his retirement in 1924.

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Douglas MacArthur ’03 After World War I, MacArthur returned to West Point to serve as the Academy’s 31st Superintendent from 1919 to 1922. During that time, he was responsible for the revitalization of the Academy. He was later promoted to General of the Army and served as Supreme Allied Commander in the Pacific Theater during World War II. During that time, he received the Medal of Honor for leading defense preparation and operations on the Philippine Islands. He later served as Supreme Allied Commander, Japan, and as commander, United Nations Command in the Far East. He was one of only five officers to be promoted to General of the Army (five stars). George S. Patton Jr. ’09 “Old Blood and Guts,” Patton was one of the most colorful commanders in the Army. During World War II the famed commander of the 2nd Armored Division and later the Third Army displayed courage and daring as prominently as the pair of ivory handled revolvers he wore. Patton accomplished one of the most remarkable feats in military history in December 1944, when he quickly turned the Third Army northward to reinforce the Allied southern flank against the German attack in the Battle of the Bulge. The General’s doctrine of aggressive employment of massive armor forces continue to prove themselves in combat arenas around the world. Omar N. Bradley ’15 During his career, Bradley earned a reputation as one of the best infantry commanders in World War II. He commanded the 82nd Airborne and 28th Infantry Divisions before going on to command the 1st Army and the 12th Army Group. After the war he served as Army Chief of Staff from 1948 to 1949 and served as the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1949 to 1953. He was the last Army officer to be promoted to General of the Army (five stars), and the Bradley fighting vehicle is named in his honor.

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Dwight D. Eisenhower ’15 During World War II, Eisenhower served as Supreme Commander of Allied Forces Europe from 1943 to 1944, during which he led the D-Day invasion of Europe. During that time, he was promoted to General of the Army (five stars). After the war, he served as Army Chief of Staff from 1945 to 1948 and was named President of Columbia University in 1948. He served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961 and was one of only five officers to be promoted to General of the Army (five stars). Alexander M. Haig Jr. ’47 Haig served as Chief of Staff to President Richard Nixon from 1973 to 1974; Supreme Allied Commander in Europe 1974 to 1979; President of United Technologies Corporation 1980 to 1981 and Secretary of State during the Reagan administration from 1981 to 1982. Frank Borman ’50 An astronaut from 1962 to 1970, Borman commanded the first circumlunar flight of the earth. He later served as President of Eastern Airlines. Fidel V. Ramos ’50 One of the Academy’s international cadets, Ramos served as a Philippine Army officer after graduation. He eventually became the country’s military Chief of Staff and later Secretary of National Defense. He also served as President of the Republic of the Philippines from 1992 to 1998. Edwin E. Aldrin ’51 An astronaut from 1963 to 1972, Aldrin participated in the first manned lunar landing with Michael Collins (USMA ’52) and was the second man to walk on the moon. Edward White ’52 An astronaut from 1962 to 1967, White was the first man to walk in space and was one of the three astronauts killed in the Apollo I disaster in 1967.

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H. Norman Schwarzkopf ’56 As Commander-in-Chief, United States Central Command from 1988 to 1991, Schwarzkopf’s command ultimately responded to Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait with the largest U.S. deployment since the Vietnam War, including portions of the Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps as well as units from dozens of nations around the world. After retiring, Schwartzkopf received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Peter M. Dawkins ’59 Dawkins was Cadet Brigade Commander (First Captain of the U.S. Corps of Cadets) as a senior and became the third Heisman Trophy winner in Army football history. He later served as chairman and CEO of Primerica. James V. Kimsey ’62 Kimsey was the founding chairman of America Online, and was named chairman emeritus in 1996. He founded the Kimsey Foundation in 1996. Michael W. Krzyzewski ’69 Krzyzewski served as head basketball coach at West Point from 1974 to 1979 before assuming similar duties at Duke University. Krzyzewski has led the Blue Devils to three national championships and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in October 2001. He coached the U.S. at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Raymond T. Odierno ‘76 Odierno commanded the 4th Infantry Division during the fall of 2003 which, along with Special Forces units, captured Saddam Hussein in December of that year. Odierno helped plan and coordinate the raid that netted Iraq’s fallen dictator. Robert S. Kimbrough ’89 Kimbrough was named one of 11 new astronaut candidates by NASA in May 2004. Kimbrough ranks among Army Baseball’s career leaders in saves. A veteran of Desert Storm, he currently works for NASA in Houston as a flight simulation engineer and is scheduled to participate in a space shuttle mission this fall.

DISTINGUISHED GRADUATES

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Robert E. Lee ’29 The Academy’s ninth Superintendent (1852-55), Lee was a model cadet during his four years at West Point. He graduated second in his class and never earned a single demerit during his four years at the Academy. At the beginning of the Civil War, he was selected to serve as Commanding General of the Army, but instead resigned his commission and was named General-In-Chief of the Confederate Army from 1861 to 1865. Lee’s surrender to Ulysses S. Grant (USMA 1843), at Appomattox Court House, Va., ended the Civil War. Fort Lee, Va., was named in his honor.


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Lieutenant General David H. Huntoon, Jr. became the 58th Superintendent of the United States Military Academy in July 2010. He had previously served as Director of the Army Staff in January 2008.

ACADEMY LEADERSHIP

Huntoon was commissioned from West Point in 1973. From 1973-1986, he served as an infantry officer in a series of command and staff assignments with the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Fort Myer, Va., the 9th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Wash., the 7th Army Training Command at Vilseck, Germany, and with the 3rd Infantry Division in Aschaffenburg, Germany. From 1986-1988, Huntoon attended the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. and the School for Advanced Military Studies. He then served in the Directorate of Plans, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, N.C., as Senior War Plans Officer (Operation Just Cause), Deputy Director of Plans (Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm), and Director of Plans. Huntoon commanded 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry (Mechanized) at Camp Casey, Korea, and served as Chief of Plans, CJ3, Combined Forces Command and United Nations Command, Yongsan from 1992-94. In 1994-95, he was the Army’s National Security Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He then took command of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), Fort Myer, Va. Huntoon’s next assignment was the Executive Officer to the Chief of Staff of the United States Army. Prior to that assignment, he served as the Assistant Division Commander of the 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas, and from 2000-2002, he was the Deputy Commandant of the US Army Command and General Staff College.

SUPERINTENDENT

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DAVID H. HUNTOON, JR.

Huntoon moved on to become the Director of Strategy, Plans and Policy, Army G3, at the Pentagon. In August 2003, he was assigned as the 46th Commandant, United States Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Huntoon’s awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit (6th Award), and the Bronze Star; Expert Infantryman’s Badge, Parachute Qualifi cation Badge, and the Ranger Tab. He has a Masters of Arts in International Relations from Georgetown University and a Masters in Military Arts and Sciences from the CGSC Advanced Military Studies Program. Brigadier General William E. Rapp graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1984 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. His civilian education includes a Bachelor of Science degree from USMA, a Masters of Arts in Political Science and a PhD in International Relations from Stanford University. His military education includes the Engineer Officer Basic Course, Infantry Officer Advanced Course, US Army Command and General Staff College, the Army War College where he earned a Masters of Arts in National Security Policy, and the Joint Forces Staff College. He was the distinguished honor graduate of his Infantry Officer Advance Course, Ranger School class, Jumpmaster class, and the Strategist Program at CGSC. Brigadier General Rapp is a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Virginia. Brigadier General Rapp’s early assignments included duties as a Platoon Leader, Executive Officer, Assistant S3, and the Corps Operations Officer in Germany and at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He commanded an airborne engineer company during Operation Desert Storm. Brigadier General Rapp was selected for the Council of Foreign Relations Fellowship at the Institute for International Policy Studies in Tokyo, Japan. He returned to the States in the summer of 2003 to attend the Army War College before proceeding to Fort COMMANDANT Lewis to serve as the Chief of Plans (G3) for I Corps Headquarters. In June 2005, he assumed command of 555th Combat Engineer Group and deployed in support of the 101st Airborne Division for Operation Iraqi Freedom. OF CADETS In 2007, Brigadier General Rapp completed his command and returned to Iraq as the Director of the Commander’s Initiatives Group serving under Gen. Petraeus in Multi-National Forces-Iraq. In his most recent assignment, Brigadier General Rapp served as the Commanding General of the Northwestern Division of the Corps of Engineers in Portland, Oregon.

BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM E. RAPP

Brigadier General Rapp’s awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star with oak leaf cluster, the Meritorious Service Medal with five oak leaf clusters, and the Army Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters. He has earned the Combat Action Badge, Master Parachutist wings, Air Assault wings, Ranger Tab, and the Engineer Regiment’s Bronze DeFleury Medal. Brigadier General Rapp is married to the former Debbie Biggi of Sacramento, Calif. They have three children: Anna Marie, David and Robby. Brigadier General Timothy E. Trainor, PhD., became the Dean of the Academic Board at the United States Military Academy in the summer of 2010. He previously served as professor and head of the Department of Systems Engineering at West Point where he taught courses in engineering management, systems engineering and decision analysis. Trainor graduated with a Bachelor of Science from West Point in 1983 and entered the Engineer Branch of the U.S. Army. As an engineering officer, Trainor has served in operational assignments around the world, including Germany, Honduras, Fort Bragg, N.C., Fort Riley, Kan. and Sarajevo, Bosnia. Trainor has a Master of Business Administration from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke and a doctorate degree in industrial engineering from North Carolina State University. He is a member of the Military Applications Society of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences the Military Operations Research Society, the American Society for Engineering Management and the American Society of Engineering Education. He is a past president of Epsilon Mu Eta, the national Engineering Management Honor Society. Trainor is also a member of the Board of Fellows for the David Crawford School of Engineering at Norwich DEAN OF University. As an analyst, Trainor helped develop the Installation Status Report that provides the Army a standardized means to assess infrastructure and environmental conditions on installations to support resource allocation decisions. He has applied decision analysis methods in completing an organizational analysis of the Army’s Installation Management Agency and in assessing defense security cooperation programs. Trainor deployed to Basrah, Iraq in the summer of 2007 and worked with the British-led Provincial Reconstruction Team in helping the provincial Iraqi leaders improve their infrastructure revitalization plans.

THE ACADEMIC BOARD

BRIGADIER GENERAL TIMOTHY E. TRAINOR

Trainor is married to Col. Donna Brazil, a 1983 graduate of West Point, who is a professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at the Academy. They have a daughter Cory, who is currently attending West Point, and two sons, Danny and Zach.


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Since Kevin Anderson was introduced as Army’s Director of Athletics on Dec. 13, 2004, West Point’s intercollegiate athletic program has enjoyed immense success both on and off the “fields of friendly strife.” Boasting more than two decades of leadership and experience, Anderson departed his post as executive associate athletic director at Oregon State University to accept the challenge of re-invigorating Army’s proud athletic program. The veteran administrator has played a large role in accomplishing that goal during his six years along the banks of the Hudson. In that time, Army has sent 22 intercollegiate athletic teams to the NCAAs, captured its first National Championship in more than 50 years, witnessed the revitalization of its hockey, men’s basketball and lacrosse programs, and experienced unparalleled success in several others, such as baseball, softball, women’s volleyball, women’s tennis and women’s basketball. This past spring, Army’s lacrosse team became West Point’s 11th different intercollegiate program to advance to the NCAAs under Anderson’s watch, while the women’s volleyball team reached the NCAAs for the first time in school history last fall. During the 2004-05 academic year, Anderson’s first at West Point, Army’s athletic program won a National Championship in rifle, sent a record seven teams to postseason appearances, defeated Navy in the year-long series for the first time since 1978 and forged an overall winning percentage of .582. It marked Army’s finest overall performance in more than a decade. Seventeen of Army’s 25 intercollegiate teams carved records of .500 or better that year as the Black Knights put forth their highest year-long winning percentage since a .604 effort in 1993-94. In addition, Army reclaimed the Patriot League’s Presidents’ Cup—signifying the league’s all-sports champion—for the first time since 1997. Army sent its rifle, gymnastics, baseball, lacrosse, men’s tennis, women’s tennis and golf squads to postseason play, surpassing the previous standard of six teams in NCAA action. Six of Army’s eight spring teams won Patriot League titles that year. Army’s success opposite Navy snapped a 27-year drought in the all-sports rivalry, giving the Black Knights their first series win over Navy since going 9-8-1 (.528) in 1977-78. Additionally, four Army teams earned NCAA Tournament appearances in 2005-06, highlighted by the women’s basketball team, which earned its first postseason berth at the Division I level. In 2006- 07, Anderson presided over a resurgence of Army’s men’s basketball and hockey programs, as well as the continued success of the Black Knights’ women’s basketball squad, which set a single season school record for victories at the Division I level. All three programs flourished again the following year with hockey earning its first Atlantic Hockey Association regular-season crown and the men’s basketball squad advancing in the Patriot League postseason for the second straight year, a first since 1995 and 1996. Additionally, a young Black Knights’ baseball team captured its third regular season Patriot League championship in five years and Army’s women’s tennis team earned its fourth consecutive conference championship and accompanying NCAA berth. Three Army teams traveled to the NCAAs during the 2008-09 academic year, headlined by the women’s soccer and baseball squads. The Black Knights’ baseball team gained national attention by reaching the finals of

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ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

KEVIN ANDRESON • Athletic Director • • San Francisco State, ‘79 •

the Austin Regional and nearly upsetting national top seed and NCAA runnerup Texas in a “championship” game. Women’s soccer, meanwhile, made its first trip to the NCAAs. Off the field, construction of the Foley Athletic Center, a spacious indoor practice facility for football, was completed in the winter of 2007. During Anderson’s time at West Point, Randall Hall, which houses offices, locker rooms and team rooms for men’s and women’s basketball, as well as luxury suites that overlook historic Michie Stadium, was also unveiled. Army’s fabled football home received additional state-of-the-art amenities with the installation of a new FieldTurf playing surface and a sparkling 30-foot-by50-foot scoreboard, complete with a 20-foot-by-50-foot high-definition video board. In the last two years, Anderson led the searches that resulted in the hiring of Rich Ellerson as Army’s 36th head football coach, Zach Spiker as the Black Knights’ 30th men’s basketball mentor, Michelle DePolo as Army’s eighth softball coach and Russell Payne as Army’s 11th men’s soccer field boss. In Ellerson’s first season, Army fell one win shy of earning its first postseason bowl bid in 13 years last fall. Anderson was also instrumental in negotiating a broadcast extension with CBS Sports to televise the Army-Navy football game through 2018, a new national television deal with CBS College Sports Network for Army’s football program, separate contracts with three different cities to serve as host for future Army-Navy games, and a landmark agreement with the New York Yankees that will result in Army’s football team playing one game in each of the next six seasons at Yankee Stadium. As part of the deal, Army will battle Notre Dame this fall in the first college football game to be played at the Yankees’ majestic new home. Anderson has also secured postseason bowl tie-ins for Army’s football team for each of the next four years. Prior to his most recent hectic stretch, Anderson brokered major broadcast agreements for Army’s football program with ESPN and WABC Radio (770-AM), as well as aligning the Black Knights’ athletics teams with Nike, as part of a significant apparel deal, and Learfield Sports Properties. The Army “A” Club has continued to flourish under Anderson’s leadership, establishing school records for annual giving during each of his six years at the Academy. During his time at Oregon State, Anderson directed the athletic department’s external operations, to include marketing and promotions, sports information, ticket operations and the Beaver Athletic Student Fund. He also oversaw Oregon State’s highly successful football, men’s basketball and baseball programs, leading the search and recruitment for head football coach Mike Riley. Anderson, who ranks as the first African-American to hold the position of director of athletics at West Point, was a member of an OSU management staff that balanced the athletic department’s budget for the first time in nearly 15 years. Anderson took residence in Corvallis, Ore., in December 2002 after serving as executive associate athletic director for external affairs at the University of California. He joined the California staff in November 1997 as assistant athletic director for annual programs and was promoted to associate athletic director for development, tickets and the Bears’ baseball team in March 1999. Before accepting his position with the Golden Bears, Anderson served as area executive director of the YMCA of the East Bay from 1995 to 1997. He was director of annual giving with Stanford University’s athletic department from 1993 to 1995. Anderson graduated from San Francisco State University in 1979 with a bachelor’s degree in political science. He is also a 1981 graduate of the Xerox Corporation’s New Manager School and the Xerox Marketing School in 1986. He completed the executive management program at the Sports Management Institute in 1995. In addition to his duties at West Point, Anderson has served as chairman for the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) Division I-A Athletic Directors McClendon Minority Scholarship Steering Committee and is a member of the NCAA’s Basketball Academic Enhancement Group. He also serves as chairman of the Division I Men’s Basketball Issues Committee and was elected Second Vice President of NACDA this past June. Kevin and his wife, Moira, have four children: daughters, Olivia and Michaela; and sons, Kevin Jr. and Chauncey.


2010 SEASON OUTLOOK

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The 2010 Army sprint football team is coming off its most successful season in a decade, finishing 2009 with a 6-1 mark. The six wins are the most since the 2000 season, while the 6-1 record marks the Black Knights’ first winning season since 2005, when they went 4-3. Army outscored its opponents 203-56, averaging 29 points per game while limiting the opposition to eight. The Black Knights dominated the running game, tallying 1,511 rushing yards compared to just 286 for their opponents. On the defensive side of the ball, Army recorded 27 sacks and snagged 15 interceptions, while opponents were limited to three and five, respectively. The opposition was held without a rushing touchdown all season while also limiting passing TDs to five. Despite the Black Knights’ overwhelming statistical superiority in 2009, the one glaring stat is their one loss in the season finale, falling to Navy in the College Sprint Football League title game 7-6. The Mids have won the CSFL title the past three seasons, but Army interim head coach Mike McElrath believes this to be the Black Knights’ banner year. OFFENSE The Black Knights bring in first-year offensive coordinator Mike Popovich to direct the Tony Franklin Spread for the relatively young offense which returns only four seniors. The predominantly passing system run from the shotgun will rely on sophomore quarterback Tim Meier. Meier started all seven games for the Black Knights in 2009, compiling a 128.5 efficiency rating and throwing for 826 yards and 10 touchdowns. His 442 rushing yards were second-most on Army, while his three rushing touchdowns listed third. Classmate Javier Sustaita will also take snaps for the Black & Gold. Sustaita appearanced in three games last season, completing 1-of-2 pass attempts and running for 24 yards on 10 carries. “With Meier and Sustaita competing at quarterback, we have a ton of depth at that position,” said McElrath. “Either one could be in the game and we wouldn’t miss a beat.” Meier and Sustaita will have plenty of experienced targets to throw to as Army returns five of its top six receivers from a year ago. Highlighting the class of returnees is junior Ben Johnson. Johnson had a team-leading 440 receiving yards off 15 catches to go along with a team-best eight touchdowns in 2009. “Wide receiver is probably the position at which we have the most depth. There are a number of guys with big-play potential and are major deep threats,” said McElrath. Sophomore Cody Nyp, junior Franklin Yu and senior James McCarthy have the potential to be big-play guys for McElrath as well. Tim Meier’s older brother Mike joins the Black Knights for the first time as a junior and will look to have an immediate impact on the running game.

Alongside sophomore Marquis Morris, the two will look to fill the gap left by the graduation of Ricky Lentz who led Army with 749 yards and eight rushing touchdowns last season. Morris finished 2009 with 221 yards and four TDs, ranking third and second, respectively. Senior guard Abram Wathen will anchor the offensive line. The co-captain will be joined by juniors Nate Markette and Weston Boose, as well as possibly one of the biggest surprises of preseason – freshman Joel Boose. Wathen’s job will be to maintain the composure of the offense when things don’t go their way. McElrath’s biggest concern for the young team is how they handle adversity when they face it – something you don’t get to see until game day. Wathen, along with co-captain Carlos Cook on defense, will aim to keep the Black Knights patient and follow with their team motto of “play the next play”. DEFENSE Cook leads an experienced defense which features nine senior starters. Cook and classmate Bryan Girouard formed a one-two defensive punch last year. Girouard tallied a team-best 58 tackles, while Cook finished second with 54. The duo also combined for five sacks in 2009. With Army football’s all-time leading tackler as the head coach, the standards for the secondary are high for the Black Knights. McElrath’s biggest concerns lie in the defensive backfield as experience is limited. Senior Jamal Olatunde is making the transition from football to sprint football, while classmate Joe Simon enters the season less than 100-percent healthy. Sophomore Mark Maley played in four games last season and will be making his first career start on Sept. 19 at RPI. SPECIAL TEAMS Special teams is arguably where Army needs to make the most improvement from last year is in. The Black Knights hit only 2-of-12 field goal attempts in 2009. Entering preseason, McElrath had four kickers on the roster. In order to cut that number down, kickers went through “kick-offs” after practice, starting at the extra-point mark and moving back five yards at a time. Sophomore Kevin Scruggs prevailed and got the starting nod. Freshman Mason Strain also showed off his strong leg in practice and will get some opportunities this season. The freshman impact will stretch into punt returners as well, as plebe Tom Jeffers will be the top return man in 2010. SCHEDULE The Black Knights open the 2010 season on the road at RPI on Sept. 19. Army will face RPI’s junior varsity squad which can pose a difficult challenge for the Black Knights, given the absence of the 172-pound weight limit. Army remains on the road for Game 2, when they travel to Mansfield on Sept. 25. The Black Knights’ homestand begins Oct. 8 against Cornell, followed by Princeton on Oct. 15 and new CSFL member Post on Oct. 22. Army will play its final two games on the road, starting with Penn on Oct. 29, before wrapping the season in Annapolis, Md., at Navy on Nov. 5.


Former Army football player Lt. Col. Mike McElrath has been named interim head coach of the Army sprint football team for the 2010 season.

Lt. Col. Mike McElrath

McElrath takes the reins from Lt. Col. Mark West, who stepped down to serve a one-year tour of duty in Iraq. In his second season as head coach, West guided the Black Knights to a 6-1 record after the team fell to 2-5 in his first campaign. A four-year starting defensive back (1989-92) and team captain as a senior, McElrath ended his time with the Black Knights as the program’s all-time leading tackler with 436 total career hits, including an Army-best 282 solo stops. He is also tied for second all-time with 10 career interceptions, trailing only Heisman Trophy winner Glenn Davis (14). As a senior, McElrath made 157 tackles, a total that ranks third among Army’s single-season leaders. McElrath was a First Team All-East Region selection from 1990-92, and received All-America honors following the 1992 season.

In September of 2010, McElrath became a member of the seventh class to be inducted into the Army Sports Hall of Fame. Now in his third stint at the Academy, McElrath will also continue his role as Associate Athletic Director for Operations in addition to his coaching duties. In his current position he is responsible for planning and synchronizing athletic events, competitions, and activities for 25 NCAA teams with USMA staff and West Point supporting agencies, while planning and executing game-day operations and coordinating team travel. Before returning to West Point, McElrath served as a Battalion Operations Officer, Brigade Chief of Operations, and Division Plans Officer for the 4th Infantry Division at Fort Hood, Texas and Baghdad, Iraq from 2005-09. Throughout his four years, McElrath gained an increasing amount of responsibility within the Division, and was a member of a 10person team responsible for planning and synchronizing combat operations for over 30,000 soldiers. In his second stretch at West Point From 2002-04, McElrath was an assistant professor and Economics instructor in the Department of Social Sciences. As the department’s economic counselor, McElrath mentored and managed schedules for 200 Economics majors, while teaching courses in economics and money and banking to 60 students per semester. McElrath was a Company Commander at Fort Jackson, S.C. from 1998-2000, where he led, managed, and supervised a 240-person basic combat training company. Upon graduation, McElrath spent four years with the 4th Infantry Division, culminating in a one-year span as Battalion Maintenance Officer. In that role, McElrath managed a $600,000 budget and directed repairs and services for a fleet of vehicles valued at more than $35 million. An outstanding student, McElrath graduated in the top five percent of his class and was on the Dean’s list for eight consecutive semesters. For his performance in the classroom, he was the recipient of the National Football Foundation, NACDA, NCAA, and CFA scholar-athlete awards. McElrath (USMA ‘93) holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and an M.B.A. from Duke University. He resides in New Windsor, N.Y. with his wife Jen, and their children Tom (12), Amber (10), and Tyler (8).

COACHES AND STAFF

Interim Head Coach Second Season USMA ‘93

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COACHES AND STAFF

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After serving as the wide receivers coach last year, Lt. Col. Frank Maresco returns as the running backs coach for his third season after serving previously as the wide receivers coach. Running Backs Coach A 1988 graduate of West Point, Maresco played on the sprint football Fourth Season team for four years. USMA ‘88 After serving on Active Duty, Maresco joined the United States Army Reserve and is currently a Lieutenant Colonel assigned to the Systems Department at West Point. Maresco worked in the private sector and returned to West Point in 2003 as a Information Technology Specialist with the Math Department.

LT. COL. FRANK MARESCO

He resides with his wife, Rose.

Mike Popovich enters his first season as offensive coordinator for the Black Knights. Popovich comes to West Point after serving eight years at Bunker Hill High School in Illinois. As head coach, Popovich led the Minutemen to their first winning season and first playoff appearance in program history. He earned numerous accolades at BHHS, including 2007 Alton Telegraph Small School Coach of the Year, 2007 Jacksonville Clinic Coach of the Year and 2008 West Central All-Star Game Coach of the Year. Popovich left the Bunker Hill as the winningest coach in program history. He comes to the Academy joined by his wife Amanda and son Britton.

Offensive Coordinator First Season

MIKE POPOVICH

Frank Nucaro becomes an Army assistant after 30 years of high school football coaching experience. He has spent the last 16 years at Valhalla High School in New York, serving 12 years as an offensive and defensive lines coach before being promoted to head coach in 2006. At Valhalla, Nucaro helped lead the Vikings to three sectional championships, two sectional finals, four league championships and an Defensive undefeated state championship season in 1996. Most recently, he was Coordinator named 2009 League Coach of the Year after leading the Vikings to a First Season league championship with an 8-1 record. Nucaro resides in Valhalla with his wife Paula and daughters Alyssa and Dana. Alyssa is a senior member of the field hockey and basketball teams at Rhode College, while Dana is a sophomore member of the SUNY-Plattsburgh basketball team. He is a physical education teacher at Roosevelt High School in Yonkers, N.Y.

FRANK NUCARO


Andrew Beach enters his first season as the offensive line coach.

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ANDREW BEACH

Lt. Col. Reich, West Point’s Assistant Athletic Director for Logistics, enters the season with a wealth of experience guiding cadet-athletes.

Defensive Line Coach First Season USMA ‘90

LT. COL. TED REICH

Reich, a 1990 graduate of the Academy, spent over seven years as an Officer Representative and over eight years coaching youth football, soccer and hockey. After earning a masters degree in philosophy at Texas A&M, he returned to West Point and taught philosophy and English from 2000-03. Reich returned to the teaching ranks again in 2007, where he remains today. He and his wife Lisa, along with their son Ryan and daughter Elizabeth reside at West Point.

Chaplain Davis’ primary role is as the team chaplain/spiritual coordinator. He will also serve as the wide receivers coach.

Wide Receivers Coach/Spiritual Coordinator First Season Oakwood Univ. CHAPLAIN PRIMITIVO DAVIS

He is a native of Philadelphia, Pa., Davis graduated from Oakwood University, with a B.A. in Ministerial Theology and Andrews University with a Masters of Divinity. His current assignment is as a Regimental Chaplain to the United States Corp of Cadets, and as the Senior Pastor of the Post Chapel 1230 Protestant Service. Prior to being assigned at West Point, Chaplain Davis served four years in the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division with the 502nd Infantry Regiment, and three years in 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Ft. Bragg, N.C. He has served three combat tours, for a total of 32 months, in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Chaplain and Mrs. Davis have three children, P.J., C.J. and Aneece.

COACHES AND STAFF

Beach spent the past three seasons coaching at Oshkosh West High Offensive Line School in Oshkosh, Wis. Coach First Season A native of Monroe, Wis., Beach graduated from Wisconsin-Oshkosh Wisconsin-Oshkosh in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in education. He played collegiate ‘09 football at Wisconsin-Lacrosse.


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YEAR-BY-YEAR RESULTS

COACHES AND STAFF

SUPPORT STAFF

2LT Kyle Bates Athletic Intern

Pete Athans Strength Coach

Dick Hall Equipment Manager

LTC Dan McCarthy OfďŹ cer Representative

Dana Putnam Athletic Trainer

Pamela Flenke Athletic Communications

MANAGERS Benton Conque Michael Dolan JB Economy Steve Hagy Alex Harry

Josh Lipke Josh Miller Alan Siegle William Webb

Year 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971* 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979* 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986% 1987* 1988 1989& 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996# 1997 1998$ 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total

W 5 6 5 5 5 6 2 6 5 6 4 6 4 6 5 6 6 6 4 6 3 3 4 6 4 3 8 5 5 5 5 6 5 6 5 4 5 6 6 6 5 5 5 6 5 4 5 4 4 3 2 2 6 260

L 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 1 0 1 2 0 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 3 3 5 5 1 67

T 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Head Coach Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton Eric Tipton George Storck George Storck George Storck George Storck Maj. Larry Henley Maj. Bob Knapp Maj. Bob Knapp Tim Mingey Tim Mingey Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Bob Thompson Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Gene McIntyre Joe Sessa Lt. Col. Mark West Lt. Col. Mark West .792 (53 seasons)

Championship Seasons (30) in bold * Shared league title with Navy % Shared league title with Navy and Cornell # Shared league title with Navy and Penn & Shared league title with Princeton $ Shared league title with Penn


Yr. Sr. Fr. Sr. Fr. Fr. Jr. Jr. Fr. Sr. So. So. Sr. Jr. So. Fr. Fr. Fr. So. Sr. So. So. Jr. So. Fr. Fr. Fr. Jr. Sr. Sr. Fr. So. So. Jr. Sr. Jr. So. So. So. So. Fr. Sr. So.

Pos.Hometown/High School (Previous School) DL El Paso, Texas/Capt. John L Chapin RB Bradenton, Fla./Saint Stephens Episcopal DL Houston, Texas/Second Baptist DB OL Norwalk, Ohio/Norwalk St. Paul OL Norwalk, Ohio/Norwalk St. Paul P Newtown, Pa./Council Rock North (USMAPS) DL Decatur, Ala./Austin High School DL Dallas, Texas/Marcus High School DL Sleepy Eye, Minn./Sleepy Eye Public OL Marton, N.J./Cherokee LB Corsicana, Texas/Corsicana DB Papillion, Neb./Papillion/La Vista South (USMAPS) DL Attica, Ind./Attica WR LB Chantilly, Va./Westfield High School LB Cedar Grove, Wis./Cedar-Grove Belgium DB Rio Grande Valley, Texas/Marine Military Acad. LB Lemont, Ill./Marist LB Ely, Minn./Ely Memorial WR Woodstock, Ga./The Walker School OL Abrams, Wis./Oconto Falls DB Prince Frederick, Md./Calvert WR LB Marietta, Ga./Marietta WR Batesville, Ind./Batesville High School WR West Point, N.Y./James I. O’Neill DL Thousand Oaks, Calif./Thousand Oaks OL Walden, Colo./North Park High School QB LB Gurnee, Ill./Warren Township DB Lancaster, Ohio/Lancaster OL Albany, Ga./Deerfield Windsor TE Richardson, Texas/L.V. Berkner RB Fairfax, Va./Robinson Secondary (USMAPS) QB Fairfax, Va./Robinson Secondary RB Decatur, Ala./Austin OL Sound Beach, N.Y./Rocky Point (Marian Military Inst.) WR Stanton, Mich./Central Montcalm DB Sunderland, Md./Huntingtown DB Olney, Md./Sherwood DB Joppa, Md./Joppatowne

So. So. Sr. So. So.

OL LB LB OL DB

Birmingham, Ala./Briarwood Christian Columbus, Ohio/St. Charles McHenry, Ill./Prairie Ridge Morton, Ill./Morton Upland, Calif./Claremont (USMAPS)

13 87 16 61 6 32 22 35 64 48 37 65 13 59 93 26 66 56 11

Scott, Joshua Scruggs, Kevin Seneca, Martin Shirley, Eric Simmons, Lamar Simon, Joseph St. Pierre, John Steckler, Jake Stepat, Frederick Strain, Mason Sturgell, Jared Sustaita, Javier Thompson, Franklin Timmins, Edward Turi, Mario Wathen, Abram Wright, Nick Yu, Franklin

Sr. So. Fr. Sr. Sr. Sr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. So. Jr. So. So. Jr. So. Jr.

TE Irvington, N.Y./Irvington K Roseville, Calif./Mira Loma LB Centreville, Va./Centreville LB Baroda, Mich./Lakeshore F/H Baltimore, Md./Parkville (USMAPS) DB Tampa, Fla./Walter L. Sickles DB South Hamilton, Mass./Pingree School LB Voorhees, N.J./Eastern Regional LB Woodstock, Ga./The King’s Academy K Woodstock, Ga./Sequoyah OL QB Troy, Texas/Troy OL Fort Hood, Texas/Cole DL Alpine, Ariz./Round Valley DB Evansville, Ind./Central OL Mooresville, Ind./Mooresville LB Portage, Mich./Portage Central WR Fremont, Calif./Mission San Jose

2010 NUMBERICAL ROSTER

No. Name 24 Acosta, Toby 34 Ayala, Cameron 91 Bambrick, Tyler 25 Billisits, Nathan 74 Boose, Joel 51 Boose, Weston 12 Caraccio, Jeff 84 Chambers, Travis 82 Clark, Timothy 77 Clevenger, Josh 50 Conway , Jack 8 Cook, Carlos 1 Cooper, JP 60 Currie, Noah 85 DeWoody, Robert 57 Doty, Dylan 43 Drewry, Nathan 31 Fite, Sam 10 Girouard, Bryan 55 Hall, Matt 19 Herina, John 62 Hickey, Brendan 28 Hornick, Lucas 81 Horovitz, Zachary 47 Houston, Erik 18 Jeffers, Tom 88 Johnson, Ben 40 Kanney, Eric 67 Landis, Jason 14 Maack, Chris 45 Magnuson, Caleb 21 Maley, Mark 76 Markette, Nathan 80 McCarthy, James 5 Meier, Michael 4 Meier, Tim 2 Morris, Marquis 52 Noto, Peter 7 Nyp, Cody 33 O’Brien, Conor 23 Olatunde, Jamal 36 Pratt-Chambers, Kiandre 71 Proctor, Luke 54 Reckner, Rob 3 Rife, Clayton 53 Risinger, Jacob 20 Rivera, Anthony


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SENIOR PROFILES

2010 ARMY SENIOR PROFILES

Top Row (L-R): Tyler Bambrick, Timothy Clark, captain Carlos Cook, Eric Shirley, Bryan Girouard, Jason Landis, captain Abram Wathen, Nelson Simmons, Joe Simon, James McCarthy, manager JB Economy Front Row: Eric Kanney, Clayton Rife, Jamal Olatunde, Toby Acosta, Joshua Scott


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BAMBRICK: Son of Tommy and Blare Bambrick ... father played football at Baylor ... four-year letterwinner at Second Baptist ... team captain ... won two baseball state championships ... favorite teams are the Houston Texans and Houston Astros ... is an uncle ... likes to eat and play golf in his spare #91 time ... engineering management Defensive Line major. Houston, Texas

Second Baptist

TYLER BAMBRICK

CLARK: Son of Mark and Janet Clark ... earned two letters in football and three in track at Marcus High School ... English Honor Society ... loves 80s music ... favorite athlete is Jason Witten ... favorite team is the Dallas Cowboys ... #82 likes to read, watch movies and hang Defensive Line out with friends in his free time ... majoring in defense and strategic Dallas, Texas studies. Marcus HS

(USMAPS) TIMOTHY CLARK

SENIOR PROFILES

ACOSTA: Two-year letterwinner at John L. Chapin High School ... football team captain ... 180-pound District Champion wrestler ... all-district honorable mention ... academic all-state ... senior #24 year led football team to regional ďŹ nals, Defensive Line going undefeated in district ... favorite El Paso, Texas athlete is Emmitt Smith ... favorite John L. Chapin HS team is the Dallas Cowboys ... (USMAPS) self-taught guitar player ... likes to cook and listen to music in TOBY ACOSTA his spare time ... engineering management major.


SENIOR PROFILES

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COOK: Son of Lisa and Ken Cook ... stepmother Paula ... brothers Jack and Leland ... sister Devin ... earned two letters in football #8 and two in track at Corsicana ... Top Academic Performer Award in Linebacker football ... National Honor Society Corsicana, Texas ... graduated No. 4 in his class ... Corsicana HS favorite athlete is Ray Lewis ... favorite team is the Baltimore Ravens ... grew up on a 2,500CARLOS COOK acre cattle ranch ... likes to read philosophy and listen to music in his free time ... majoring in art, philosophy and literature.

GIROUARD: Son of Tom (USMA ‘82) and Barbara Girouard ... brothers Brendan and Sean ... sister Allison .. earned two letters in football at Marist ... all-conference linebacker ... favorite team is the Chicago Bears ... likes to work out, play #91 basketball and hang out with friends Linebacker in his spare time ... economics major. Lemont, Ill.

Marist HS

BRYAN GIROUARD

KANNEY: Son of Katherine and Ed Kanney ... brother Cameron ... earned two varsity letters at Thousand Oaks ... all-league defensive lineman in 2006 ... favorite athlete is Andre Ethier ... favorite team is the Los Angeles Dodgers ... likes to read #82 and watch movies in his free time ... Defensive Line plans to attend medical school ... Thousand Oaks, Calif. life sciences major.

Thousand Oaks HS

ERIC KANNEY


LANDIS: Son of Matt and Connie Landis ... brother Kennon ... National Honor Society ... biggest thrill in sports was defeating the district’s top-ranked basketball #67 team in three overtimes ... mechanical engineering major. Offensive Line

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Walden, Colo. North Park HS

McCARTHY: Son of Cindy and Dennis McCarthy ... brother Robert ... lettered in football, track and lacrosse at L.V. Berkner ... biggest thrill in sports was defeating Dallas Carter High School by a last-second field goal in the #80 playoffs .. National Honor Society Receiver ... favorite teams are the Dallas Cowboys and Texas Rangers ... Richardson, Texas likes to play video games and L.V. Berkner work out in his spare time ... majoring in history. JAMES McCARTHY

OLATUNDE: Son of Tajudeen and Tai Olatunde ... lettered in football and indoor and outdoor track at Sherwood ... National Technical Honor Society ... favorite teams are the Washington Redskins, Nationals, Wizards and Capitals ... likes to #23 make music, write songs and fish in his Defensive Back free time ... majoring in mechanical engineering. Olney, Md.

Sherwood HS

JAMAL OLATUNDE

SENIOR PROFILES

JASON LANDIS


SENIOR PROFILES

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RIFE: Son of Tim and Cathy Rife ... brothers Adam and Barrett (USMA ‘08) ... sister Tessa ... wants to branch Infantry ... likes #3 to spend time on his boat, slaloming Defensive End or barefooting in his free time ... majoring in defense and strategic McHenry, Ill. studies. Prairie Ridge HS

CLAYTON RIFE

SCOTT: Son of Jon and Sharon Scott ... brother of Jonah, Savannah and Sierra ... earned allleague honors at Irvington ... biggest thrill in sports was scoring the game-winning touchdown in the Division II, Class-B semifinal game ... favorite athlete #87 is Rod Smith ... favorite team is the Receiver Denver Broncos ... formerly a Irvington, N.Y. sponsored snowboarder and mountain biker ... plays video Irvington HS games and snowboards in his free time ... systems management major. JOSHUA SCOTT

SHIRLEY: Son of Mike and Gail Shirley ... has three older sisters ... earned three letters in football and four letters in wrestling at Lakeshore ... all-conference in both sports ... academic all-state ... #6 National Honor Society ... biggest Defensive End thrill in sports was setting the Baroda, Mich. Michigan record for largest Lakeshore HS comeback state playoff history, facing a 38-0 deficit ... favorite athlete is Peyton Manning ... likes ERIC SHIRLEY to golf, fish and watch movies in his free time ... engineering management major.


SIMMONS: Spent the past three seasons as a running back with the football team before joining sprint football for his senior season ... was the quarterback at Parkville High School ... favorite athlete #32 is Steve Smith ... favorite team is the Receiver Baltimore Ravens ... likes to hang Baltimore, Md. out with his friends, laugh and eat Parkville in his free time ... operations (USMAPS) research major.

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SIMON: Son of Joseph and Mary Grace Simon ... sister Christina ... earned three letters in football and four in track at Walter L. Sickles ... all-district and all-region honors in track from 2004#22 06 ... National Honor Society ... Defensive Back favorite athlete is Jerry Rice Tampa, Fla. ... favorite teams are the San Walter L. Sickles HS Francisco 49ers and Tampa Bay (USMAPS) Rays ... likes to lift and run in his free time ... majoring in systems engineering management and JOSEPH SIMON foreign area studies: Europe.

WATHEN: Son of Roger and Natalie Wathen ... brother Zachary ... sisters Lydia and Rachel ... engaged to Amber Joy Percival ... earned three letters in football, three in wrestling and two in track at Mooresville ... academic all-state in football and wrestling ... team captain ... Wendy’s High School Heisman award nominee ... #66 National Honor Society ... favorite Offensive Line athlete is Ray Lewis ... favorite Mooresville, Ind. team is the Indianapolis Colts ... Mooresville HS loves reggae and Hawaiian music ... likes to hang out with friends ABRAM WATHEN and family, dance, longboard and play yahtzee in his free time ... engineering management major.

SENIOR PROFILES

NELSON SIMMONS


2009 STATISTICS

20 TEAM STATISTICS SCORING Points Per Game FIRST DOWNS Rushing Passing Penalty RUSHING YARDAGE Yards gained rushing Yards lost rushing Rushing Attempts Average Per Rush Average Per Game TDs Rushing PASSING YARDAGE Comp-Att-Int Average Per Pass Average Per Catch Average Per Game TDs Passing TOTAL OFFENSE Total Plays Average Per Play Average Per Game KICK RETURNS: #-Yards PUNT RETURNS: #-Yards INT RETURNS: #-Yards KICK RETURN AVERAGE PUNT RETURN AVERAGE INT RETURN AVERAGE FUMBLES-LOST PENALTIES-Yards Average Per Game PUNTS-Yards Average Per Punt Net punt average TIME OF POSSESSION/Game 3RD-DOWN Conversions 3rd-Down Pct 4TH-DOWN Conversions 4th-Down Pct SACKS BY-Yards MISC YARDS TOUCHDOWNS SCORED FIELD GOALS-ATTEMPTS ON-SIDE KICKS RED-ZONE SCORES RED-ZONE TOUCHDOWNS PAT-ATTEMPTS ATTENDANCE Games/Avg Per Game Neutral Site Games

ARMY 203 29.0 107 74 25 8 1511 1663 152 324 4.7 215.9 17 826 50-112-5 7.4 16.5 118.0 10 2337 436 5.4 333.9 18-316 16-122 15-85 17.6 7.6 5.7 11-6 60-554 79.1 39-1438 36.9 32.3 31:05 29/89 33% 4/12 33% 27-198 0 28 2-12 0-0 14-20 70% 14-20 70% 25-28 89% 2917 3/972 1/2089

Score by quarters 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Total Army 50 43 62 48 203 Opponents 9 13 3 31 56

OPP 56 8.0 81 25 41 15 286 622 336 244 1.2 40.9 0 916 80-196-15 4.7 11.4 130.9 5 1202 440 2.7 171.7 34-624 18-99 5-29 18.4 5.5 5.8 8-4 39-381 54.4 57-1787 31.4 28.2 28:52 28/115 24% 5/13 38% 3-11 25 5 7-8 0-0 7-12 58% 1-12 8% 5-5 100% 435 3/145

RUSHING R. Lentz T. Meier M. Morris W. Orr B. Johnson J. Sustaita C. Foreman G. Rumph S. Hagy F. Yu J. Scott J. Caraccio R. Mandel TEAM Total.......... Opponents..

GP 7 7 4 3 6 3 1 7 3 6 5 7 7 7 7 7

Att 162 86 27 15 3 10 7 1 1 4 0 1 1 6 324 244

Gain 783 468 228 52 39 35 27 11 9 9 2 0 0 0 1663 622

Loss 34 26 7 5 8 11 5 0 0 2 0 3 13 38 152 336

PASSING T. Meier J. Sustaita Total.......... Opponents..

GP 7 3 7 7

Effic 128.5 50.0 127.1 73.2

Cmp-Att-Int 49-110-5 1-2-0 50-112-5 80-196-15

RECEIVING B. Johnson R. Lentz F. Yu J. Scott J. McCarthy J. Herina S. Hagy G. Rumph C. Foreman Total.......... Opponents..

GP 6 7 6 5 3 1 3 7 1 7 7

No. 15 14 6 5 3 3 2 1 1 50 80

Yards 440 91 86 71 48 14 49 27 0 826 916

PUNT RETURNS T. Griffin C. Nyp S. Hagy E. Timmins Total.......... Opponents......

No. 6 5 4 1 16 18

INTERCEPTIONS T. Griffin R. Mandel E. Follett J. Simon C. Rife B. Holcomb W. Orr JP Cooper C. Cook Total.......... Opponents......

No. 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 15 5

Net 749 442 221 47 31 24 22 11 9 7 2 -3 -13 -38 1511 286 Pct 44.5 50.0 44.6 40.8

Avg 4.6 5.1 8.2 3.1 10.3 2.4 3.1 11.0 9.0 1.8 0.0 -3.0 -13.0 -6.3 4.7 1.2

TD 8 3 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0

Long 30 57 68 8 39 21 13 11 9 8 0 0 0 0 68 30

Yards 826 0 826 916

TD 10 0 10 5

Long 66 0 66 76

Avg 29.3 6.5 14.3 14.2 16.0 4.7 24.5 27.0 0.0 16.5 11.4

TD 8 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 10 5

Long 66 29 33 26 26 11 40 27 0 66 76

Yards 29 32 57 4 122 99

Avg 4.8 6.4 14.2 4.0 7.6 5.5

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0

Long 14 17 23 4 23 15

Yards 4 18 0 43 0 0 4 0 0 85 29

Avg 1.0 4.5 0.0 43.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 5.7 5.8

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Long 0 18 0 43 0 0 4 0 0 43 31

Avg/G 107.0 63.1 55.2 15.7 5.2 8.0 22.0 1.6 3.0 1.2 0.4 -0.4 -1.9 -5.4 215.9 40.9 Avg/G 118.0 0.0 118.0 130.9 Avg/G 73.3 13.0 14.3 14.2 16.0 14.0 16.3 3.9 0.0 118.0 130.9


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No. 4 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 18 624

Yards 107 64 60 13 6 14 0 20 13 19 316 18.4

Avg 26.8 21.3 20.0 6.5 6.0 14.0 0.0 20.0 13.0 19.0 17.6 0

TD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69

Long 34 23 28 14 6 14 0 20 13 19 34

FUMBLE RETURNS No. M. Talley Total.......... Opponents...... 0

Yards 1 1 0

Avg 85 85 0.0

TD 85.0 85.0 0

Long 1 85 1 85 0

PATs SCORING B. Johnson R. Lentz S. Herbert M. Morris T. Meier S. Hagy J. Scott C. Foreman M. Talley TEAM Total.......... Opponents..

TD 9 8 0 4 3 1 1 1 1 0 28 5

TOTAL OFFENSE T. Meier R. Lentz M. Morris W. Orr B. Johnson J. Sustaitaa C. Foreman G. Rumph S. Hagy F. Yu J. Scott J. Caraccio R. Mandel TEAM Total.......... Opponents......

FGs Kick 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-12 25-28 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-00 0-0 0-00 -0 0-0 0-0 -0 0 0-0 0-0 0-00 0-0 -12 25-28 2-12 7-8 5-5 P GP 7 7 4 3 6 3 1 7 3 6 5 7 7 7 7 7

Rush 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 -0 0-0 0 0-0 0-0 0 00-0 000 0-0 0-00 0-00 0-0

Rcv 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Rus Pass Pas Plays Rush 4 44 196 442 826 162 749 0 27 221 0 15 47 0 3 31 0 12 24 0 7 22 0 1 11 0 1 9 0 4 7 0 0 2 0 1 -3 0 1 -13 0 6 -38 0 436 1511 826 440 286 916

Pass Pass 0-0 0-00 0-0 0-00 00-0 0-00 0-0 0-0 0-0 000 0-0 00 0-0 0-0 0-00 all Total 688 1268 749 221 47 3 31 24 22 11 9 7 2 -3 -13 -38 2337 1202

D DXP 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FG SEQUENCE Army Opponents Fairleigh Dickinson 29,39 Rensselaer (25),48 Princeton 44,40 Penn (45),(40),(31),(32) Mansfield Cornell (42),49,55 (30),(36),(27) Navy 38,44,40 42 Numbers in (parentheses) indicate field goal was made.

Saf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0

Pts 54 48 31 24 18 6 6 6 6 4 203 56

Avg/G 181 1 181.1 107.0 55. 55.2 15 7 15.7 5.2 8.0 22.0 1.6 3.0 1.2 0.4 -0.4 -1.9 -5.4 333.9 171.7

FIELD GOALS Made-Att Pct 01-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-99 Long Blkd S. Herbert 2-12 16.7 0-0 1-2 0-2 1-7 0-1 42 4

PUNTING J. Caraccio TEAM Total.......... Opponents...

No. 37 2 39 57

KICKOFFS S. Herbert Total.......... Opponents...

No. 37 37 21

URPOSE OSE ALL PURPOSE R. Lentz B. Johnson nson T. Meier M r M. Morri Morris S. Ha Hagy G. Rumph C. Nyp C F. Yu F Y J. Scott J. McCarthy J. W Orrr W. J. Simon mon T. Griffi riffin J. Sustaita ustaita C. Foreman C J.. Son S n E. Follett J. Herina M. Turi 53 R. Mandel E. Timmins J. Caraccio TEAM Total.......... Opponents......

Yards 1425 13 1438 1787

Avg 38.5 6.5 36.9 31.4

Long 68 15 68 51

TB 4 0 4 3

FC 1 0 1 12

I20 11 0 11 2

50+ 5 0 5 2

Blkd 2 0 2 0

Yards 2106 2106 1064

Avg 56.9 56.9 50.7

TB 1 1 0

OB Retn Net YdLn 2 2 18.4 39.5 30 0 17.6 35.6 34

GP P 7 6 7 4 3 7 3 6 5 3 3 4 7 3 1 1 5 1 4 1 7 3 7 7 7 7

Rush uss 749 31 442 221 9 11 0 7 2 0 47 47 0 0 24 22 0 0 0 0 0 -13 0 -3 -38 1511 286

Rc Rcv 91 440 440 0 0 49 27 0 86 71 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 826 916

PR 0 0 0 0 57 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 122 99

KR IR Total 19 0 859 0 0 471 4 0 0 442 2 20 0 241 60 0 1175 107 0 145 114 9 64 0 96 0 0 93 0 0 73 13 0 61 0 4 51 0 43 43 0 4 33 0 0 24 0 0 22 0 16 16 14 0 14 0 0 14 13 0 13 6 0 6 0 18 5 0 0 4 0 0 -3 0 0 -38 316 85 2860 624 29 1954

Avg/G 122.7 78.5 63.1 60.2 58.3 20.7 32.0 15.5 14.6 20.3 17.0 10.8 4.7 8.0 22.0 16.0 2.8 14.0 3.2 6.0 0.7 1.3 -0.4 -5.4 408.6 279.1

2009 STATISTICS

KICK RETURNS G. Rumph C. Nyp S. Hagy M. Turi 53 E. Follett T. Malejko M. Morris J. McCarthy R. Lentz Total.......... Opponents...... 34


2009 DEFENSIVE STATISTICS

22 DEFENSIVE LEADERS 10 B. Girouard 8 C. Cook 83 T. Malejko 91 T. Bambrick 57 M. Talley 6 E. Shirley 31 R. Mandel 3 C. Rife 1 JP Cooper 90 T. Acosta 5 T. GrifďŹ n 30 E. Follett 88 A. Mellon 24 B. Holcomb 48 M. Otterstedt 21 A. Billisits 40 E. Kanney 22 J. Simon TM TEAM 95 A. Trobee 43 M. Maley 9 G. Rumph 60 N. Currie 54 R. Reckner 33 T. Hanson 18 S. Herbert 70 T. Espe 36 M. Turi 93 E. Timmins 81 81 55 M. Hall 39 M. Daily or 71 L. Proctor enholm 41 C. Stenholm el 63 J. Steimel J McCarthy 80 J. 19 F. Yu 69 N. Wright 56 J. Dellinger 4 T. Meier 41 41 28 R. Lentz 37 J. Son 44 W. Orr Total.......... Opponents......

GP 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 4 4 6 3 4 4 7 4 4 7 2 3 2 7 3 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 6 1 1 7 1 7 1 3 7 7

Solo 34 20 19 17 14 15 13 6 15 7 8 8 3 9 6 3 5 4 6 3 3 1 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 . . 1 . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 . . 244 285

Ast 24 34 23 21 12 9 8 15 5 10 5 4 9 2 5 6 3 3 . 3 2 3 . . . . . . 1 1 1 . 1 1 . . . . . . 1 . . . 212 170

Tackles Total 58 54 42 38 26 24 21 21 20 17 13 12 12 11 11 9 8 7 6 6 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . . 456 455

TFL-Yds 10.5 - 36 8.0 - 32 13.5 - 52 7.5 - 32 6.0 - 25 4.0 - 30 1.5 - 3 2.0 - 5 1.5 - 17 6.0 - 30 0.5 - 2 . 2.5 - 6 . . 0.5 - 1 . . . 2.0 - 28 . . 4.0 - 100 . . . 1.0 - 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 - 314 40 - 110

Sacks No-Yds 3.5 - 20 1.5 - 13 6.0 - 36 3.0 - 18 2.0 - 14 3.0 - 28 . . 1.5 - 17 3.0 - 16 . . 0.5 - 3 . . . . . . 2.0 - 28 . . . . . . 1.0 - 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 - 198 3 - 11

Pass Defense Int-Yds BU . . 1-0 5 . . . 2 . 1 .1 1 . .. . . 4 - 18 . 1-0 3 1-0 6 . . 4-4 1 1-0 5 . . 1-0 2 . 5 . . . . 1 - 43 2 . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 - 16 . 1-4 . 15 - 85 35 5 - 29 9

PD . 6 . 2 1

Qbh . . . . .

Fumbles Rcv-Yds . 1-0 . . 1 - 85

FF 1 1 . 1 1

Blkd Kick . . . . .

4 4 7 . 5 6 . 3 5 . . 3 . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 50 14

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 1-0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 85 6-0

. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Saf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 .


23

GAME 1 Score by Quarters 1 2 3 4 Score Fairleigh Dickinson. 0 0 0 0 - 0 Record: (0-1) Army................ 0 2 13 14 - 29 Record: (1-0)

FDU FIRST DOWNS................... 7 RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ 26--23 PASSING YDS (NET)............. 84 Passes Att-Comp-Int........... 21-8-4 TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS... Fumble Returns-Yards.......... 0-0 Punt Returns-Yards............ 0-0 Kickoff Returns-Yards......... 5-104 Interception Returns-Yards.... 0-0 Punts (Number-Avg)............ 7-33.4 Fumbles-Lost.................. 1-1 Penalties-Yards............... 12-126 Possession Time............... 25:52 Third-Down Conversions........ 2 of 11 Fourth-Down Conversions....... 0 of 2 Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... 0-0 Sacks By: Number-Yards........ 0-0

ARMY 20 44-169 156 23-12-0 47-61 67-325 0-0 2-45 1--1 4-39 4-32.5 1-1 14-123 34:08 1 of 12 2 of 4 3-5 6-39

RUSHING: Fairleigh Dickinson-3 1-3; 4 3-2; 10 3-2; 9 1-2; TEAM 1-minus 1; 30 1-minus 2; 24 4-minus 3; 1 6-minus 12; 12 6-minus 14. Army-R. Lentz 20110; T. Meier 16-45; W. Orr 5-16; J. Sustaita 2-1; J. Caraccio 1-minus 3. PASSING: Fairleigh Dickinson-1 4-12-1-53; 12 4-9-3-31. Army-T. Meier 12-23-0-156. RECEIVING: Fairleigh Dickinson-81 3-28; 25 2-42; 82 2-9; 85 1-5. Army-F. Yu 3-58; B. Johnson 3-35; J. Herina 3-14; R. Lentz 2-9; S. Hagy 1-40. INTERCEPTIONS: Fairleigh Dickinson-None. Army-T. Griffin 2-minus 4; J. Simon 1-43; JP Cooper 1-0. FUMBLES: Fairleigh Dickinson-30 1-1. Army-J. Sustaita 1-1. Stadium: Shea Stadium Attendance: 300 Kickoff time: 2 p.m. End of Game: 4:30 Total elapsed time: 2:30 Officials: Referee: T. Mawhinney; Umpire: D. Collins; Linesman: M. Gazaille, Sr; Line judge: A. Solimine; Back judge: K. Brownell; Field judge: R. Bogert; Side judge: T. Ignaffo; Scorer: D. Miller; Temperature: 70 Wind: 7 mph NW Weather: Sunny

Although the two teams combined for 26 penalties totaling 249 yards, it was the Army defense that kept the Devils off the board for the duration, as the Black Knights’ stop unit recorded 11 tackles for loss, six sacks, and generated five turnovers, including four interceptions. For the game, Army held FDU to a scant 61 yards of total offense and limited the Devils’ ground game to minus-23 yards. The swarming Army defense secured the game’s only points of the first half to make the best of a special teams miscue. After the Devils blocked their second Army field goal attempt of the half and recovered the loose ball deep in their own territory, the Black Knights returned the favor by breaking through the FDU offensive line on back-to-back plays for a safety. Robby Mandel’s first down stop backed the Devils up to their own one-yard line, with Clayton Rife and Tyler Bambrick bringing down the FDU ball carrier in the end zone on second down to give Army the lead, 2-0. Led by freshman quarterback Tim Meier, Army’s offense erupted in the second half for 27 points while the defense held the door shut on FDU. Meier, who completed 5-of15 pass attempts for a meager 18 yards in the first half, dissected the FDU defense in the second half for 132 yards and a touchdown on 7-of-8 attempts to close the game. Senior captain Ricky Lentz added three rushing touchdowns, two of which came in the final stanza, and finished the game with 110 yards on 20 carries. Army, which failed to turn any of its seven first half possessions into points, registered touchdowns on five of its final seven drives to put the game out of reach. Coming out of the locker room, the Black Knights took an 8-0 lead on a 40-yard connection from Meier to Stephen Hagy before Lentz plunged into the end zone from four yards out to give Army a 15-0 cushion. Playing in FDU territory for much of the second half, Army turned an interception into a scoring drive, before Lentz’s final TD run of the day gave Army the final margin midway through the fourth. Carlos Cook led all tacklers with 10 hits and also forced and recovered a first-quarter fumble. Thomas Malejko and Matthew Talley were credited with two tackles for loss. Senior safety Taylor Griffin made two interceptions, while JP Cooper and Joe Simon each picked off a pass for the Black Knights.

2009 RESULTS

Scoring Summary: 2nd 08:49 ARMY - TEAM safety, , FDU 0 - ARMY 2 3rd 10:28 ARMY - S. Hagy 40 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick blockd), 4-70 2:20, FDU 0 - ARMY 8 03:29 ARMY - R. Lentz 4 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 5-35 2:04, FDU 0 - ARMY 15 4th 12:57 ARMY - R. Lentz 10 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 4-39 2:03, FDU 0 - ARMY 22 07:48 ARMY - R. Lentz 10 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 5-50 2:57, FDU 0 - ARMY 29

WEST POINT, N.Y. - The Army sprint football team used a stifling defense in the first half and got its offense going over the final 30 minutes to cruise to a season-opening 29-0 shutout of visiting Fairleigh Dickinson University (Florham) junior varsity squad on Sunday at Shea Stadium.


24

TROY, N.Y. - Freshman quarterback Tim Meier rushed for 76 yards and a touchdown, and added two more scores through the air as the Army sprint football team notched a 24-14 win over Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s junior varsity team in Troy, N.Y. on Sunday. The Black Knights (2-0) remain unbeaten heading into CSFL play, and have allowed just two touchdowns in eight quarters of play.

GAME 2

2009 RESULTS

Score by Quarters Army................ Rensselaer..........

1 2 3 4 Score 7 3 14 0 - 24 Record: (2-0) 0 0 0 14 - 14 Record:

Scoring Summary: 1st 15:00 ARMY - B. Johnson 58 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 3-74 0:00, ARMY 7 - RPI 0 2nd 15:00 ARMY - S. Herbert 25 yd field goal, 10-28 0:00, ARMY 10 - RPI 0 3rd 15:00 ARMY - T. Meier 21 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 7-62 0:00, ARMY 17 - RPI 0 15:00 ARMY - B. Johnson 40 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 1-40 0:00, ARMY 24 - RPI 0 4th 15:00 RPI - TEAM 17 yd pass from TEAM (TEAM kick), 4-22 0:00, ARMY 24 - RPI 7 15:00 RPI - TEAM 4 yd pass from TEAM (TEAM kick), 9-47 0:00, ARMY 24 - RPI 14

FIRST DOWNS................... RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ PASSING YDS (NET)............. Passes Att-Comp-Int........... TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS..... Fumble Returns-Yards.......... Punt Returns-Yards............ Kickoff Returns-Yards......... Interception Returns-Yards.... Punts (Number-Avg)............ Fumbles-Lost.................. Penalties-Yards............... Possession Time............... Third-Down Conversions........ Fourth-Down Conversions....... Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... Sacks By: Number-Yards........

ARMY 13 32-138 161 24-9-0 56-299 0-0 2-2 2-32 1-18 7-39.4 1-1 11-108 30:00 6 of 13 0 of 0 0-0 4-21

RPI 9 37-51 114 21-12-1 58-165 0-0 5-25 5-136 0-0 7-34.1 2-1 6-60 30:00 4 of 15 1 of 3 0-1 1-3

RUSHING: Army-T. Meier 14-76; R. Lentz 12-55; G. Rumph 1-11; W. Orr 3-7; TEAM 2-minus 11. Rensselaer-TEAM 37-51. PASSING: Army-T. Meier 9-24-0-161. Rensselaer-TEAM 12-21-1-114. RECEIVING: Army-R. Lentz 3-19; B. Johnson 2-98; J. Scott 2-26; S. Hagy 1-9; F. Yu 1-9. Rensselaer-TEAM 12-114. INTERCEPTIONS: Army-R. Mandel 1-18. Rensselaer-None. FUMBLES: Army-TEAM 1-1. Rensselaer-TEAM 2-1. Stadium: ‘86 Field Attendance: 75 Kickoff time: 1 p.m. End of Game: 3:30p.m. Total elapsed time: 2:30 Officials: Scorer: D. Miller; Temperature: 72 Wind: Weather: Sunny and clear

Recording another strong defensive performance after a 29-0 whitewash last week, Army used a goalline stand to keep the Engineers’ out of the end zone early on in the first quarter. With a first and goal from the Army 10-yard line, the Black Knights gave little ground on four consecutive rushing plays, highlighted by a fourth-and-goal tackle for loss by Toby Acosta and Taylor Griffin. After an RPI three-and-out several series later, Army opened the scoring with a 58-yard aerial connection from Meier to Benjamin Johnson to give Army the lead, 7-0. Meier and Johnson would find each other again in the third quarter, as the duo scorched the Engineers’ secondary for a 40-yard bomb up the sideline that gave Army a 24-0 cushion. Over the final half of the fourth quarter, the Engineers attempted a comeback by mounting two scoring drives, including one with just under a minute remaining, but Army recovered the ensuing onside kick and ran down the clock to end the threat. Following a 25-yard field goal from senior Sam Herbert that gave Army a 10-0 lead going into the locker room, Meier scrambled 21 yards through the left side of the RPI defense to push the Black Knights’ lead to 17. The score capped a seven-play, 62-yard drive for the Black Knights, one of several sustained surges that lifted Army to victory. Army surrendered just 1.3 yards per rush to the host Engineers and forced six three-and-out possessions. Linebacker Bryan Giroaud tallied 11 tackles, including a half-sack and three tackles for loss to lead the team, while Tyler Bambrick and Clarlos Cook each collected 10 stops. Thomas Malejko recorded two sacks and nine tackles. For the Army offense, running back Ricky Lentz amassed 74 total yards (55 receiving) on 15 touches.


GAME 3 Score by Quarters 1 2 3 4 Score Army................ 16 21 7 13 - 57 Record: (3-0,1-0) Princeton........... 0 0 0 0 - 0 Record: (0-3,0-1)

FIRST DOWNS................... RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ PASSING YDS (NET)............. Passes Att-Comp-Int........... TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS.... Fumble Returns-Yards.......... Punt Returns-Yards............ Kickoff Returns-Yards......... Interception Returns-Yards.... Punts (Number-Avg)............ Fumbles-Lost.................. Penalties-Yards............... Possession Time............... Third-Down Conversions........ Fourth-Down Conversions....... Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... Sacks By: Number-Yards........

ARMY 18 56-316 106 8-4-0 64-422 0-0 2-14 2-28 5-12 3-39.0 2-1 7-68 30:23 5 of 13 1 of 4 4-7 5-53

PRIN 7 34--55 58 25-7-5 59-3 0-0 0-0 9-188 0-0 8-18.9 1-0 2-13 30:27 1 of 15 1 of 2 0-0 0-0

RUSHING: Army-R. Lentz 23-151; T. Meier 13-75; M. Morris 6-69; W. Orr 7-24; J. Sustaita 3-22; S. Hagy 1-9; F. Yu 1-0; R. Mandel 1-minus 13; TEAM 1-minus 21. Princeton-R. Fritz 1-15; Z. Sobel 7-5; K. Thompson 1-0; R. Addis 1-minus 6; N. Moffat 12-minus 10; K. Infante 10-minus 15; N. Genta 1-minus 21; TEAM 1-minus 23. PASSING: Army-T. Meier 4-8-0-106. Princeton-N. Moffat 7-25-5-58; N. Genta 0-0-0-0. RECEIVING: Army-B. Johnson 1-39; G. Rumph 1-27; J. Scott 1-26; R. Lentz 1-14. Princeton-K. Thompson 3-32; N. Genta 2-15; L. Taylor 1-7; Z. Sobel 1-4. INTERCEPTIONS: Army-T. Griffin 1-8; W. Orr 1-4; B. Holcomb 1-0; E. Follett 1-0; T. Malejko 1-0. Princeton-None. FUMBLES: Army-TEAM 1-0; T. Griffin 1-1. Princeton-TEAM 1-0. Stadium: Princeton Stadium Attendance: 175 Kickoff time: 7:00 pm End of Game: 09:40 Total elapsed time: 2:40

PRINCETON, N.J. - The Army sprint football team raised its record to 3-0 (10 CSFL) on Friday night in a dominating win over host Princeton in its first Collegiate Sprint Football League contest. In total, the Black Knights gained 316 yards and scored six touchdowns on 56 rushing attempts in a 57-0 win over the Tigers (0-3, 0-1). “I thought we played extremely hard,” said secondyear head coach Mark West. “We looked good in all phases of the game: special teams, offense, and defense.” With three wins this season, West has already guided the team to more wins than each of the two previous seasons (2-5) and as many games as the 2006 team (3-3). Senior captain Ricky Lentz finished the game with 23 carries for 151 yards and two touchdowns, the first of which was a one-yard plunge to break open the scoring. After Army’s second safety of the season gave the Black Knights a 9-0 cushion, freshman quarterback Tim Meier got into the act with the first of his two TD passes to put the Black Knights up by 16 at the 9:12 mark of the first period. Meier threw all four of his completions to different receivers, and had a hand in each of Army’s next two tallies, scoring from one yard out on a run, and picking up his second aerial touchdown of the day on a 39-yard connection to Benjamin Johnson. Lentz capped a four play, 33-yard drive with a sixyard scamper at the 1:12 mark of the second quarter to give Army a 37-0 lead at the intermission. Meier scored on a 57-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter, and ended the contest with 75 yards and two TDs on just 13 carries, before freshman running back Marquis Morris added fourth quarter touchdowns on runs of 18 and 21 yards. Morris rushed for 69 yards on six carries. The Army defense shut down the Tigers from start to finish. The Black Knights held Princeton to just three total yards while making 14 tackles for loss, five sacks, and intercepting five passes.

2009 RESULTS

Scoring Summary: 1st 11:51 ARMY - R. Lentz 1 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 4-15 1:09, ARMY 7 - PRIN 0 13:14 ARMY - TEAM safety, , ARMY 9 - PRIN 0 09:12 ARMY - J. Scott 26 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 3-35 1:40, ARMY 16 - PRIN 0 2nd 14:57 ARMY - T. Meier 1 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 3-2 1:13, ARMY 23 - PRIN 0 13:14 ARMY - B. Johnson 39 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 2-43 0:57, ARMY 30 - PRIN 0 01:12 ARMY - R. Lentz 6 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 4-33 1:28, ARMY 37 - PRIN 0 3rd 01:02 ARMY - T. Meier 57 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 1-57 0:10, ARMY 44 - PRIN 0 4th 09:57 ARMY - M. Morris 18 yd run (S. Herbert kick blockd), 4-24 2:11, ARMY 50 - PRIN 0 06:00 ARMY - M. Morris 21 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 5-57 2:24, ARMY 57 - PRIN 0

25


26 GAME 4

2009 RESULTS

Score by Quarters Penn................ Army................

1 2 3 4 Score 3 13 0 10 - 26 7 7 7 14 - 35

Record: (3-1,1-1) Record: (4-0,2-0)

Scoring Summary: 1st 04:47 PENN - Santos, Raiam 45 yd field goal, 7-21 3:06, PENN 3 - ARMY 0 01:32 ARMY - B. Johnson 8 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 7-67 3:07, PENN 3 - ARMY 7 2nd 07:51 PENN - Santos, Raiam 40 yd field goal, 10-34 5:05, PENN 6 - ARMY 7 03:25 PENN - Shaw, Whit 76 yd pass from Busler, Todd (Santos, Raiam kick), 2-80 0:55, PENN 13 - ARMY 7 00:52 ARMY - B. Johnson 12 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 5-62 2:26, PENN 13 - ARMY 14 00:11 PENN - Santos, Raiam 31 yd field goal, 6-56 0:36, PENN 16 - ARMY 14 3rd 05:13 ARMY - R. Lentz 9 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 10-97 4:32, PENN 16 - ARMY 21 4th 11:45 PENN - Santos, Raiam 32 yd field goal, 8-54 3:04, PENN 19 - ARMY 21 07:55 ARMY - M. Morris 6 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 8-65 3:44, PENN 19 - ARMY 28 06:43 PENN - Shaw, Whit 43 yd pass from Busler, Todd (Santos, Raiam kick), 5-73 1:06, PENN 26 - ARMY 28 05:49 ARMY - M. Morris 68 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 2-71 0:48, PENN 26 - ARMY 35 FIRST DOWNS................... RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ PASSING YDS (NET)............. Passes Att-Comp-Int........... TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS..... Fumble Returns-Yards.......... Punt Returns-Yards............ Kickoff Returns-Yards......... Interception Returns-Yards.... Punts (Number-Avg)............ Fumbles-Lost.................. Penalties-Yards............... Possession Time............... Third-Down Conversions........ Fourth-Down Conversions....... Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... Sacks By: Number-Yards........ FIRST DOWNS...................

PENN 25 31-50 429 42-27-1 73-479 0-0 4-26 6-79 0-0 4-41.0 1-0 6-60 30:57 10 of 18 1 of 1 3-5 0-0 13

ARMY 18 45-304 151 13-8-0 58-455 0-0 2-6 6-94 1-16 5-37.4 2-0 11-95 27:52 4 of 9 0 of 0 4-4 6-40 9

RUSHING: Penn-Bagnoli, Mike 14-42; Busler, Todd 17-8. Army-M. Morris 13-140; T. Meier 12-84; R. Lentz 17-75; F. Yu 1-8; TEAM 2-minus 3. PASSING: Penn-Busler, Todd 27-42-1-429. Army-T. Meier 8-13-0-151. RECEIVING: Penn-Shaw, Whit 9-274; Armatis, Clarke 8-72; Hubsher, Dave 5-54; Bagnoli, Mike 3-14; Wetherell, Matt 2-15. Army-B. Johnson 4-108; R. Lentz 3-19; J. McCarthy 1-24. INTERCEPTIONS: Penn-None. Army-J. Son 1-16. FUMBLES: Penn-Armatis, Clarke 1-0. Army-R. Lentz 1-0; T. Griffin 1-0. Stadium: Shea Stadium Attendance: 350 Kickoff time: 7 p.m. End of Game: 9:43p.m. Total elapsed time: 2:43 Officials: Referee: C. Vaccaro; Umpire: T. Viola; Linesman: B. Buchalski; Line judge: M. Tarleton; Back judge: E. Lewis; Field judge: R. Bogert; Side judge: G. Zbonack; Scorer: D. Miller; Temperature: Low 50s Wind: S 5mph Weather: Misty

WEST POINT, N.Y. - Clinging to a slim lead late in the fourth quarter, the Army defense came through with a key interception that halted a Penn drive deep in Army territory and helped to preserve a 35-26 win for the Black Knights. In a matchup of previously undefeated CSFL teams Army raised its record to 4-0 overall, 2-0 CSFL, while University of Pennsylvania fell to 3-1, 1-1 with the loss. Penn trailed by the two-score margin with 2:04 still to play, but the Quakers refused to give in, led by an outstanding performance from quarterback Todd Bussler. Bussler, who completed 27-of-42 passes for a whopping 429 yards and two touchdowns, steered Penn’s final drive down to the Army nine-yard line before throwing a costly interception to Robby Mandel at the one-yard line. The two teams combined for 934 yards of total offense and exchanged the lead five times. With Army leading 7-6 after the second of four field goals, including a 45-yarder, from Penn’s Raiaim Santos, both offenses got back on track over the final four minutes of the first half and continued to move the ball at will for the remainder of the contest. The Quakers took their first lead of the game at the 3:25 mark of the second stanza after a 76-yard TD connection from Bussler to Whit Shaw, who frustrated the Black Knights’ secondary for 274 yards on just nine receptions. Just 2:33 later, Army answered and regained the lead, 14-13, on Benjamin Johnson’s second touchdown of the evening from Tim Meier, capping a five-play, 62-yard drive. Not to be outdone, Penn drove 56 yards in just 36 seconds to take a 16-14 lead into the locker room after a 31-yard field goal split the uprights. Coming out of the break, it was the Army defense that came up big as JP Cooper and Thomas Malejko recorded a firstdown sack that the Penn offense couldn’t overcome. The Quakers’ subsequent punt pinned the Army offense at its own three-yard line with 9:45 remaining in the third. Needing a score to regain the momentum, Army’s offense marched 10 straight plays without a setback to find the end zone on a nine-yard run off right tackle from senior captain Ricky Lentz. The drive was also highlighted by a 47-yard catch-and-run from Johnson, who registered 108 receiving yards. Penn pulled to within two, 21-19, after another field goal from Santos, but saw the lead grow back to nine, 28-19, after Morris’ six-yard run with 7:55 remaining in the game. Penn surged back again, as Bussler found a wide-open Shaw for Penn’s final score of the game from 43-yards out to trim the lead to just two at 28-26. Army freshman running back Marquis Morris burst through the line for a 68-yard TD scamper up the sidelines just two plays later to set up the late-game heroics from Mandel. Linebacker Bryan Girouaud led the Army defense with 12 tackles (six solo), while Eric Shirley and Thomas Malejko added seven hits apiece. Malejko also registered three tackles for a loss of 14 yards, including two sacks.


GAME 5 Score by Quarters 1 2 3 4 Score Mansfield........... 0 0 0 0 - 0 Record: (1-4,1-4) Army................ 14 7 14 7 - 42 Record: (5-0,3-0)

MANS-SFB FIRST DOWNS................... 11 RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ 35-90 PASSING YDS (NET)............. 87 Passes Att-Comp-Int........... 30-10-0 TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS.... 65-177 Fumble Returns-Yards.......... 0-0 Punt Returns-Yards............ 2-5 Kickoff Returns-Yards......... 6-79 Interception Returns-Yards.... 2-0 Punts (Number-Avg)............ 12-32.4 Fumbles-Lost.................. 1-1 Penalties-Yards............... 6-63 Possession Time............... 26:57 Third-Down Conversions........ 2 of 17 Fourth-Down Conversions....... 1 of 2 Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... 0-0 Sacks By: Number-Yards........ 1-1

ARMY 22 52-286 216 17-9-2 69-502 0-0 4-24 1-14 0-0 4-39.5 3-1 5-40 33:03 4 of 10 0 of 2 2-2 1-10

RUSHING: Mansfield-Lucas Bailey 13-65; Desmen Johnson 4-14; Michael Steele 4-10; S. La Mountain 3-4; Paul Frederick 1-2; J. Estremera 1-minus 1; Kode Plank 8-minus 1; Daniel Ruiz IV 1-minus 3. Army-R. Lentz 23-180; T. Meier 9-44; B. Johnson 2-34; C. Foreman 7-22; M. Morris 5-5; J. Sustaita 5-1; F. Yu 1-minus 2; J. Scott 0-2. PASSING: Mansfield-Kode Plank 7-17-0-52; S. La Mountain 3-13-0-35. Army-T. Meier 8-15-2-216; J. Sustaita 1-2-0-0. RECEIVING: Mansfield-Ryan Bernaiche 5-46; J. Estremera 3-23; Lucas Bailey 1-10; Dominik Brown 1-8. Army-B. Johnson 4-152; F. Yu 2-19; R. Lentz 1-29; J. McCarthy 1-16; C. Foreman 1-0. INTERCEPTIONS: Mansfield-Michael Wang 2-0. Army-None. FUMBLES: Mansfield-Lucas Bailey 1-1. Army-F. Yu 1-0; C. Nyp 1-0; J. McCarthy 1-1.

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. Sophomore receiver Benjamin Johnson amassed 186 total yards and scored four touchdowns en route to Ken Kunken Most Valuable Player honors in a 42-0 Army win over Mansfield in the 2009 Adirondack Trust Allegiance Bowl in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. on Saturday. With the win, Army lifted its record to 5-0 overall, 3-0 CSFL, while Mansfield, a first-year CSFL member, fell to 1-4, 1-4. Johnson caught scoring passes of 66, 44, and 19 yards and finished with 152 receiving yards on just four catches. He also scored on a 39-yard run on an end-around play in the third quarter. “We are very happy with the way Ben played,” said secondyear head coach Lt. Col. Mark West. “He’s a talented player and that’s certainly no secret to anyone in the league anymore.” After hauling in a pair of TD passes in the win over Penn last weekend, Johnson pulled down the first of his two first-half scores to put Army on the score board four minutes into the game. Freshman signal caller Tim Meier, who found Johnson just inside the endline for the 19-yard connection, threw for 216 yards on 8-of-15 passing. The Black Knights’ defense, led by 11 tackles and a sack from Carlos Cook, forced a three-and-out on the Mountaineers’ next possession and Army wasted little time in capitalizing, marching 70 yards on eight plays to push the lead to 14-0. Senior captain Ricky Lentz capped the drive with a 22-yard scamper up the right sideline. Lentz carried the ball 15 times for 133 yards in the first half alone, and finished the game with 180 yards on 23 attempts. Meier found Johnson again to give the Black Knights a 210 cushion at the half with a pass that just barely cleared the outstretched arms of a Mansfield defender. Johnson pulled the ball from the air and raced to the end zone to complete the 66yard catch-and-run. On the Mountaineers’ opening possession of the second half, Army linebacker Brian Girouaud knifed through the Mansfield offensive line and forced a fumble that was recovered by JP Cooper. Johnson lined up wide to the left side on Army’s firstdown play but ran back into the formation as the ball was snapped to take the handoff. The Mountaineers appeared to have the angles to prevent the touchdown, but Johnson outran one defender before breaking a pair of tackles to put Army in control, 28-0. Army forced another three-and-out after Mansfield’s Michael Wang recorded his second interception of the day, and went up 35-0 when Meier and Johnson hooked up again, this time from 44 yards out. Wang totaled five tackles, two interceptions, and a fumble recovery for the Mansfield defense in a losing effort.

Stadium: Saratoga High School Attendance: 2089 Kickoff time: 1 p.m. End of Game: 3:42p.m. Total elapsed time: 2:42 Officials: Referee: M. Kluczynski; Umpire: S. Geraghty; Linesman: K. Vaverchak; Line judge: G. Botsch Jr.; Back judge: K. Maxwell; Field judge: S. Curry Jr.; Side judge: E. Lewis; Scorer: D. Miller; Temperature: Low 40s Wind: NE 5-10 Weather: Mostly cloudy

Colton Foreman ended a six-play, 42-yard scoring drive with a 2-yard TD run to give the Black Knights the final margin.

2009 Allegiance Bowl - Mansfield vs. Army Army wins Adirondack Trust Championship Trophy Benjamin Johnson (Army) named Ken Kunken MVP.

“We were glad to get the win today,” said West. “It keeps us in contention for the League Championship.”

For the game, the Black Knights outgained the Mountaineers 502-177 and forced 12 punts. Mansfield was just 2-of-17 on fourth down.

2009 RESULTS

Scoring Summary: 1st 11:33 ARMY - B. Johnson 19 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 6-49 3:27, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 7 05:02 ARMY - R. Lentz 22 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 8-70 4:00, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 14 2nd 01:45 ARMY - B. Johnson 66 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 4-76 1:06, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 21 3rd 14:04 ARMY - B. Johnson 39 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 1-39 0:11, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 28 02:18 ARMY - B. Johnson 44 yd pass from T. Meier (S. Herbert kick), 7-73 3:54, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 35 4th 01:33 ARMY - C. Foreman 2 yd run (S. Herbert kick), 6-42 2:05, MANS-SFB 0 - ARMY 42

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28 GAME 6

2009 RESULTS

Score by Quarters Army................ Cornell.............

1 2 3 4 Score 0 3 7 0 - 10 Record: (6-0,4-0) 6 0 3 0 - 9 Record: (3-3,3-2)

Scoring Summary: 1st 06:09 COR - Perilstein, Ale 30 yd field goal, 7-16 3:29, ARMY 0 - COR 3 03:32 COR - Perilstein, Ale 36 yd field goal, 4--5 0:47, ARMY 0 - COR 6 2nd 09:42 ARMY - S. Herbert 42 yd field goal, 4-6 1:43, ARMY 3 - COR 6 3rd 06:02 COR - Perilstein, Ale 27 yd field goal, 7-41 3:25, ARMY 3 - COR 9 01:40 ARMY - M. Talley 85 yd fumble recovery (S. Herbert kick), , ARMY 10 - COR 9 ARMY FIRST DOWNS................... 7 RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ 40-84 PASSING YDS (NET)............. 27 Passes Att-Comp-Int........... 15-4-2 TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS... 55-111 Fumble Returns-Yards.......... 1-85 Punt Returns-Yards............ 1-0 Kickoff Returns-Yards......... 4-101 Interception Returns-Yards.... 2-0 Punts (Number-Avg)............ 8-37.1 Fumbles-Lost.................. 2-2 Penalties-Yards............... 6-45 Possession Time............... 26:36 Third-Down Conversions........ 5 of 15 Fourth-Down Conversions....... 0 of 0 Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... 0-1 Sacks By: Number-Yards........ 3-19

COR 14 47-125 106 31-10-2 78-231 0-0 3-19 2-20 2--2 9-28.9 2-1 3-33 33:24 7 of 22 0 of 2 3-5 1-7

RUSHING: Army-R. Lentz 28-57; T. Meier 10-29; F. Yu 1-1; TEAM 1-minus 3. Cornell-Rowoth, Daniel 8-56; Schiavetta, DJ 12-39; Pierce, Matthew 8-19; Corey, Elliot 19-11. PASSING: Army-T. Meier 4-15-2-27. Cornell-Corey, Elliot 10-31-2-106.

CORNELL, N.Y. - Army junior linebacker Matthew Talley returned a fumble 85 yards for a touchdown with 1:40 left in the third quarter of a thrilling 10-9 Army win at Cornell in a CSFL matchup on Friday night. With the win, the Black Knights lifted their record to 6-0, 4-0 while the Big Red fell to 3-3, 3-2 on the season. In Army’s second meeting between unbeaten teams this season, the Black Knights will host arch-rival Navy (6-0, 4-0) next Friday at Shea Stadium for the outright CSFL Championship. After being gashed for a 30-yard run earlier in Cornell’s eightplay 48-yard drive to the Army 17-yard line, the Army defense dug in and came up with the game’s only touchdown when Talley stripped Cornell’s Elliot Corey of the ball and returned it 85 yards the other way to put Army ahead by the final margin. Holding a 9-3 lead, behind three field goals from Ale Perilstein, the Big Red’s threatening drive deep into Army territory could have been the nail in the coffin, but defense prevailed for both teams from start to finish. Each stop unit rallied to force several punts after Army took the lead, with the Black Knights picking off two passes in the fourth quarter to seal the win. Robby Mandel’s interception gave the Army offense the ball at Cornell’s 43-yard line, but the Big Red defense answered defensively with a sack and interception on back-to-back plays to get the ball back at its own 21-yard line with just 2:17 remaining. Although the Cornell offense managed just 146 total yards on the day, the Big Red put together their most sustained drive of the day with the game on the line. Cornell marched 36-yards on 11 plays to get into position for a desperation Hail Mary just across midfield, but Army senior defensive back Taylor Griffin grabbed his fourth pick of the season with seven seconds left to keep the Black Knights quest for a 31st unbeaten season alive. Army linebacker Brian Girouaud led all tacklers with 13 stops, including 1.5 tackles for loss and a sack. Carlos Cook registered 10 tackles, two of which were for a loss, while Emerson Follett made six solo hits. Cornell kicked the first of its three field goals on the day from 30 yards out to take the lead midway through the first quarter. After Army fumbled the subsequent kickoff, the Black Knights

RECEIVING: Army-J. Scott 2-19; J. McCarthy 1-8; R. Lentz 1-0. defense was strong on a fourth-and-short attempt from the Cornell-LaBerge, Chris 5-36; Sarker, Upal 3-57; Schiavetta, DJ 1-9; Stanton, five, and held the Big Red to just a field goal, 6-3, when Army fumbled the ball its first-down run. Chris 1-4. INTERCEPTIONS: Army-T. Griffin 1-0; R. Mandel 1-0. Cornell-Levy, Evan 1-0; Mackintosh, Joh 1-minus 2. FUMBLES: Army-T. Meier 1-1; C. Nyp 1-1. Cornell-Corey, Elliot 1-1; Rowoth, Daniel 1-0. Stadium: Schoellkopf Field Attendance: 185 Kickoff time: 7:00 pm End of Game: 9:30 pm Total elapsed time: 2:30 Officials: Temperature: 49 Wind: 13 MPH S Weather: Light rain

Senior captain Sam Herbert cut the lead in half at the 9:42 mark of the second quarter when he drilled a 42-yard attempt to cap a short Army drive. The two squads battled back and forth until the 6:02 mark of the third quarter when Cornell took a 9-3 lead on Ale Perilstein’s third and final field goal of the day. Senior running back and captain Ricky Lentz led the Army offense with 57 yards on the ground. Freshman quarterback Tim Meier threw for 27 yards on 4-of-15 passing with two interceptions on a windy, wet night at Schoellkopf Field.


GAME 7

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Score by Quarters 1 2 3 4 Score Navy................ 0 0 0 7 - 7 Record: (7-0,5-0) Army................ 6 0 0 0 - 6 Record: (6-1,4-1) Scoring Summary: 1st 07:48 ARMY - R. Lentz 3 yd run (S. Herbert kick blockd), 9-66 4:38, NAVY 0 - ARMY 6 4th 01:51 NAVY - Cash, Brad 9 yd pass from Terronez, Tyler (Reifenberg, Dav kick), 9-47 3:30, NAVY 7 - ARMY 6 ARMY 9 55-214 9 12-4-1 67-223 0-0 3-31 2-48 2-0 8-34.1 0-0 6-75 35:30 4 of 17 1 of 2 1-1 2-16

Navy, which managed just 86 total yards for the game, and had just one drive of more than 20 yards, was aided by a 15-yard facemask after a 14yard run on its final drive. Following Nate Stewart’s run and the penalty, a net gain of 29 yards for the Mids, the Army defense held strong on three straight running plays to set up a 4th-and-8. Navy’s Tyler Terronez, who went 6-for-26 passing for 38 yards and two interceptions, found Eric Montgomery for 14 yards to get the first down, and connected with Brad Cash for a nine-yard touchdown just inside the right pylon two plays later. Dave Reifenberg’s extra point gave the Midshipmen the deciding point of the game. The Black Knights got the ball back at their own 38, but failed to connect on any downfield passes after the Midshipmen ran down a first-down screen play. Army QB Tim Meier, who completed just four of 12 passes with an interception, and WR James McCarthy nearly hooked up on a 4thand-14 that would have extended the drive, but the high pass just missed a fully-extended McCarthy, ending Army’s bid for an unbeaten season.

After exchanging punts to open the game, Meier powered a nine-play, 66-yard scoring drive with a 44-yard run up the left sideline on a keeper that led to the only points of the first half. The freshman called his own number again, and came through with a second-effort surge on 4th-andshort to sustain the drive. Behind Ricky Lentz’s three-yard TD run on 3rd-and goal, the Black Knights got on the scoreboard, but led only 6-0 as Navy defensive lineman K.C. Middleton got a hand on the extra point RUSHING: Navy-Stewart, Nate 20-66; Foley, Jordan 3-1; McLaughlin, Mik attempt. Lentz carried the ball 39 times for 121 yards and a touchdown 1-1; Meehan, Marty 3-minus 2; TEAM 3-minus 6; Terronez, Tyler 4-minus in the loss.

12. blocked two kicks on the night in a tight game in which special Army-R. Lentz 39-121; T. Meier 12-89; M. Morris 3-7; B. Johnson 1-minus Navy teams, defense, and critical penalties eventually decided the contest. 3. PASSING: Navy-Terronez, Tyler 6-26-2-38. Army-T. Meier 4-12-1-9. RECEIVING: Navy-Montgomery, Eri 2-17; Cash, Brad 2-11; McLaughlin, Mik 2-10. Army-R. Lentz 3-1; B. Johnson 1-8.

After exchanging punts over the first half of the second quarter, the Black Knights appeared to be in position to add to their 6-0 lead going into the locker room, but failed to capitalize on two separate scoring chances, and had a near-touchdown erased by a penalty, in the final 3:16 of the second quarter.

The Army offense managed to get into position for a kick attempt from 38 yards out, but Navy defensive back Jared Tate blocked Sam Herbert’s INTERCEPTIONS: Navy-Stone, Zzmarr 1-31. Army-R. Mandel 1-0; C. Rife kick, which Navy recovered and returned to its own 17-yard line. Army linebacker Clayton Rife picked off Navy’s first-down pass to get the 1-0. offense the ball back at Navy’s 23, but again the Black Knights failed to convert on a scoring chance. Lentz, who carried the ball 20 times in the FUMBLES: Navy-None. Army-None. first half alone, broke through the right side of Navy’s defense and would have been down inside the five, but a costly holding penalty erased the Stadium: Shea Stadium Attendance: 2267 run and moved the Black Knights back. Two plays later, Herbert’s 44-yard boot caromed off the inside of the left upright to keep the score at 6-0. Kickoff time: 7 p.m. End of Game: 9:24p.m. Total elapsed time: 2:24

Officials: Referee: B. Fowler; Umpire: S. Geraghty; Linesman: R. Castrovinci; Line judge: D. Donormeyer; Back judge: R. Bogert; Field judge: G. Zbonack; Side judge: E. Lewis; Scorer: D. Miller; Temperature: Wind: Weather: Navy wins 2009 CSFL Championship (5-0)

Both team’s defenses took over in the third quarter. Army senior Thomas Malejko led the Black Knights’ effort with seven tackles including 2.5 for losses, while Tyler Hawkins paced the Navy defense with a game-high 17 stops. Army regained possession with 12:36 remaining in the game and used seven straight running plays, including five from Lentz, to gain 26 yards and use up 4:01. After Meier’s third-down run came up short, Army missed a 40-yard field goal attempt wide to the left with 8:35 left to play. The two service academy rivals exchanged punts before Navy earned their 11th consecutive win over Army with the late touchdown drive. Army, under second-year head coach Lt. Col. Mark West, finished the season with the most wins since the 2000 squad went 6-1 under Gene McIntyre.

2009 RESULTS

NAVY FIRST DOWNS................... 8 RUSHES-YARDS (NET)............ 34-48 PASSING YDS (NET)............. 38 Passes Att-Comp-Int........... 26-6-2 TOTAL OFFENSE PLAYS-YARDS.... 60-86 Fumble Returns-Yards.......... 0-0 Punt Returns-Yards............ 4-24 Kickoff Returns-Yards......... 1-18 Interception Returns-Yards.... 1-31 Punts (Number-Avg)............ 10-35.0 Fumbles-Lost.................. 0-0 Penalties-Yards............... 4-26 Possession Time............... 24:30 Third-Down Conversions........ 2 of 17 Fourth-Down Conversions....... 1 of 1 Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... 1-1 Sacks By: Number-Yards........ 0-0

WEST POINT, N.Y. - Although Army held a 6-0 lead for three quarters following a touchdown and blocked extra point in the first quarter, visiting Navy rallied to score a touchdown and the go-ahead PAT with just 1:51 remaining to record a 7-6 victory against the Black Knights (6-1 overall, 5-1 CSFL) in front of a capacity crowd at West Point’s Shea Stadium on Friday night. With the win, the Midshipmen (7-0, 5-0) claimed their fifth CSFL Championship in the last six years and extended their win streak to 23 games overall.


COLLEGIATE SPRINT FOOTBALL

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One of the most unique conferences in all of collegiate athletics is the Collegiate Sprint Football League which, until the 1998 season, had been known as the Eastern Lightweight Football League. The Eastern Lightweight Football League was founded in 1934 as the Eastern 150pound Football League. The seven charter members were: Cornell, Lafayette, Pennsylvania, Princeton, Rutgers, Villanova and Yale. Lafayette and Yale left the league just prior to World War II and were replaced by Navy (1946) and Army (1957). Columbia was a participant from 1955 through 1976. Rutgers left the league prior to 1990, lowering ELFL membership to five teams. With athletic budgets under tight constraints across the country, lightweight football has proven to be a sport that requires much less financial support than other programs, yet it provides a competitive outlet for upwards of 100 athletes at each school. The league was originally founded as a means of encouraging football among lighter athletes. Today, it gives anyone interested in playing football an opportunity to do so at the collegiate level. No lightweight football player receives a scholarship. The game is a fast-paced, action filled affair that has grown in popularity and attracts crowds at each school.

Four days before a game, all players must weigh in at 172.0 pounds and weigh in again two days before the game at 172.0 pounds. If players do not meet both standards, they are ineligible for that week’s game. When the league was founded, the weight limit was set at 150 lbs. and later increased to 158 lbs. in 1967. In 1996, the limit was increased to 165, and elevated to 172 lbs. in 2005. The athletics directors of the ELFL voted to officially change the name to the Collegiate Sprint Football League in the summer of 1998.This change coincided with a renewed effort by the league to seek expansion opportunities. Consistent with this goal, the athletics directors also approved “open” competition, which would allow colleges to add sprint football on the varsity or non varsity level and compete in the league. The League expanded to six full-time members beginning in 2008 with the addition of Mansfield University (Pa.), and seven in 2010 with Post University. Army All-Time Against Current CSFL Teams Team Began G W L T Pct. Last Meeting Cornell 1957 67 52 15 0 .776 2009 (W, 10-9) Mansfield 2009 1 1 0 0 1.000 2009 (W,42-0) Navy 1957 69 30 38 1 .442 2009, (L, 6-7) Penn 1957 54 48 6 0 .889 2009, (W, 35-26) Post 2010 0 0 0 0 .000 N/A Princeton 1957 56 51 3 2 .929 2009 (W, 57-0) Total 247 182 62 3 .743


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2010


2010 Sprint Football Guide