Page 1

What Can I do With a Major In...

Armstrong offers 33 different undergraduate majors. Each major gives students a wide educational base that they can use in many different jobs and careers. For an overview of each major and the types of jobs related to those majors, explore our "What Can I Do With a Major In?"


What can I do with a major in

APPLIED PHYSICS? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED PHYSICS

Possible Job Titles

The Bachelor of Science with a major in applied physics is a versatile undergraduate degree that prepares the student with a broad-based, intellectually challenging academic experience. A degree in physics will improve a student’s critical thinking skills and mathematical abilities greatly. The curriculum provides a solid academic foundation in physics with an emphasis on engineering applications, such as electronics and computer interfacing. The opportunity for learning is promoted by the small, friendly university environment in which students are able to seek and receive individual help outside of class. The applied physics degree program has room for electives to allow students to pursue study in an area of special interest.

• Atmospheric & Space Scientist • Aviation Inspector • Clinical Research Coordinator • Doctor • Field Study Coordinator • Geologist • Health Program Administrator • Hydrologist • Lab Tech Assistant • Laboratory Supervisor • Medical Equipment Sales Rep • Medical or Science Librarian • Medical or Science Writer • Meteorologist • Nuclear Engineer • Nuclear Physicist • Occupational Health & Safety Specialist • Oceanographer • Patent Examiner • Pharmaceutical Sales Rep • Physician Assistant • Physicist • Process Engineer • Radiologist • Research Aid/Assistant • Safety Manager • Seismologist • Soil & Plant Scientist • Systems Analyst • Teacher • Technical Salesperson • Test Engineer

All applied physics majors must complete at least 30 semester hours of credit in physics courses, numbered 3000 or above with a grade of C or better. In addition to completing the core curriculum requirements in humanities, laboratory science/mathematics, social science and physical education, majors take calculus (through Calculus III), linear algebra and differential equations. Tracks have been developed to allow the student to choose combinations of courses that include additional advisor-approved courses from engineering, computer science, chemistry and math that will prepare the individual student for his or her career goal. The tracks include astrophysics, biophysics, classical physics, computational physics, geophysics, nuclear/particle physics, solidstate physics and traditional applied physics.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Applied Physics Majors • • • • • • • • • •

Seek opportunities within physics or related science fields to investigate, collect, and analyze data in a variety of specializations Supplement curriculum by working on Physics Department research teams Gain experience practicing precision in reporting in all classes Gain experience collecting and reporting relevant data while perceiving patterns and structures in every study discipline Attain an internship in an applied field of physics within your first several semesters to ensure major choice and enhance employability Seek research experiences that allow for attendance at appropriate conferences, make presentations if possible Develop the ability to prepare poster presentations and volunteer to help Physics faculty with program materials Develop skill at developing research at away locations through study abroad & the National Student Exchange. Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence with contacts Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field or in related fields, continue correspondence with all previous contacts

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS Dr. Will Lynch, Department Head | 912.344.3219 | Fax 912.344.3433 | Will.Lynch@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities The American Physical Society (APS) has recently recognized that applied/industrial physics is the fastest growing segment of the physics community. Nearly half of all APS members are involved in industrial applications of physics. Graduates from the Applied Physics program will enter a variety of careers including those in industry, government, military service, health care and education, with industry providing the greatest interest and most opportunities. Some graduates will choose to continue their education by attending graduate or professional school. A physics degree is used by many as the gateway to career opportunities not normally thought of as being connected to physics such as meteorology, medicine, radiology, geology, and oceanography. Statistically, physics majors have the highest success rate of all science/math fields on the MCAT entrance exam to medical school.

Additional Resources American Physical Society www.aps.org/ American Association of Physics Teachers www.aapt.org/ American Institute of Physics www.aip.org/ Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov/oco O*Net www.onetonline.org

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Corps of Engineers Southeast District Office Fort Stewart Army Post Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Laboratory Georgia Pacific Corporation Great Dane Trailers Georgia Ports Authority Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Herty Foundation Hunter Army Airfield Intermarine USA International Paper Kemira, Inc. Kings’ Bay Naval Base Savannah Sugar Refinery Skidaway Institute of Oceanography U.S. Customs Southeast Laboratory

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

ART / ART EDUCATION? Possible Job Titles

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ART EDUCATION Art Students who earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art study various means of artistic production combined with art history and aesthetics. Armstrong offers five major focus areas: drawing and painting, ceramics and ceramic sculpture, fiber arts, photography, and graphic design. The 15 hour block of elective hours gives our students ample opportunity to explore other studies in the natural and physical sciences, the humanities, and social economics. The electives, along with the core curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts, prepare our students with a foundation for understanding the artist’s role in western culture. They gain the intellectual skills to produce and critically evaluate artistic production. Art Education Art Education students are art majors who have a desire to teach others about art. They demonstrate a commitment to understanding the nature of art and the practices involved in its production. They are adaptive, resourceful and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of art, the nature of the learner, and the materials and methods from which they work. The Bachelor of Science in Art Education offers undergraduate students a solid foundation for teaching art by helping them become skilled in all areas of studio practice; to become knowledgeable about art history, aesthetics, and criticism; and to develop an understanding of the pedagogical practices of art education.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Art / Art Education Majors • • • • • • • • • •

Seek internship opportunities or volunteer at an art museum or government archives Develop strong skills in research, fund-raising, public speaking, and writing Earn an advanced degree in an academic discipline or museum studies for greater career opportunities Prepare a strong portfolio and join a guild or organization Work on campus publications in design or layout and seek out experience with magazines or newspaper publishers Learn to compare art works developing on your comparative analysis skills Develop sensitivity to cultural viewpoints and learn to analyze the artistic qualities of everyday objects Determine origins of art works and gain understanding how the making of art has changed across time Possess aptitude for spatial relationships and recognize differences in shapes, shading & color Make critical observations & appropriate decisions and be able to present ideas & emotions creatively

• Advertising Artist Creative • Appraiser • Architectural Representative • Archivist • Art Restorer • Art Therapist • Book Illustrator • Ceramic Artist • Cinematographer/ Filmmaker • Courtroom Sketcher • Curator of Exhibits • Design Associate • Display/ Set Designer • Editor/ Writer Assistant • Exhibit Designer • Faculty Member • Fashion Designer • Graphic Designer • Illustrator • Interior Designer • Jewelry Designer • Layout Artist • Model Builder • Muralist • Museum Employee • Photo Journalist/ Photo Editor • Pre K-12 Art Teacher • Researcher

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ART, MUSIC & THEATRE Dr. Tom Cato, Department Head | 912.344.2556 | Fax 912.344.3419 | Tom.Cato@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Art

The College Art Association

Because of the flexibility of the Bachelor of Arts degree in Art at Armstrong Atlantic State University, students are able to develop the varied skills in art that are required in today’s dynamic job market. Armstrong graduates have been and are currently employed as:

www.collegeart.org/

• • • • • •

American Association of Museums www.aam-us.org/ American Society For Aesthetics

Archeological, Biological, Book, and Medical Illustrators Professional Artists and Craft Persons Curators of Art Galleries and Museums Photographers and Photographic Technicians Educators in Nonacademic, Public Service Programs Teachers in Public and Private Schools (after completing our post-bac certification program)

http://aesthetics-online.org/ Society of American Archivists www.archivists.org/ Association of Art Historians www.aah.org.uk/

Art Education The Society of Architectural Historians The art education degree opens the door for opportunities in a wide range of teaching areas that are not available to the Bachelor of Art major. The primary career for a student of art education is teaching at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels in public or private schools.

www.sah.org/ American Art Therapy Association www.arttherapy.org

Savannah-Chatham County Board of Education is the largest employer of art educators in the area employing more than forty art teachers. Employment is also available in rapidly growing school systems in surrounding counties in Georgia and across the border in South Carolina. Additionally, many private schools in the area employ art teachers in both full and part-time positions. Rounding out these primary career positions are jobs with institutions such as day care centers, art camps, art centers, museums and church related programs. Armstrong graduates holding this degree have enjoyed excellent success finding jobs around the state in art education. Salaries usually begin around $33,000 and range beyond $45,000 for candidates with experience and further degrees.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

BIOLOGY?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY

Possible Job Titles

Biology is the scientific exploration of the vast and diverse world of living organisms, and this exploration grows as we make more and more advances in areas as diverse as molecules and landscapes. Biologists study how we may continue to fit into the complex ecology of our world, and also consider ethical implications of our actions, which is immediately relevant to the ways we live worldwide.

• Bacteriologist • Biochemist • Clinical Pathologist • Clinical Research Coordinator • Conservation/ Environmental Scientist • Crime Lab Analyst • Cytotechnologist • Field Study Coordinator • Forensic Scientist • Food and Drug Inspector • Health Program Administrator • Hemotherapist • Histologist • Infectious Disease Specialist • Lab Tech Assistant • Laboratory Supervisor • Medical Equipment Sales Rep. • Medical Investigator • Medical or Science Librarian • Medical or Science Writer • Microbiologist • Nuclear Medicine Specialist • Nurse Anesthetist • Optometrist or Ophthalmologist • Parasitologist • Pharmaceutical Sales Rep • Phlebotomist • Physician Assistant • Public Health Specialist • Research Immunologist • Surgeon - Surgical Nurse • Toxicologist

The Bachelor of Science in Biology curriculum utilizes labs which are spacious and fully equipped with modern instrumentation to support student learning. Also, because class sizes are small, students and faculty have great interaction in labs and on frequent field trips. Internship options in research, applied biology, medical professions and environmental education are available in labs, local hospitals and in physician, veterinary and dental offices. A degree in Biology prepares students for a wide variety of careers, further study in graduate programs in the discipline or admittance to professional schools in the health sciences. Majors may also elect to obtain a multi-disciplinary forensic science certificate while completing the biology degree. The opportunity to concurrently enroll in tracks for pre-medicine, dental, pharmacy, or physician assistant programs also exists.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Biology Majors • • • • • • • • •

Seek opportunities within biology to investigate, collect, and analyze data in a variety of specializations Supplement curriculum by working on Biology Department research teams Gain experience practicing precision in reporting in all classes Gain experience collecting and reporting relevant data while perceiving patterns and structures in every study discipline Attain an internship in an applied field of Biology within your first several semesters to ensure major choice Seek research experiences that allow for attendance at appropriate conferences, make presentations if possible Develop the ability to prepare poster presentations and volunteer to help Biology faculty with program materials Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence with contacts Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field, continue

correspondence with all previous contacts

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Dr. Robert Gregerson, Department Head | 912.344.2566 | Fax 912.344.3499 | Robert. Gregerson@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Students who complete a biology degree have developed a breadth of knowledge in the biological sciences and a strong foundation in math and chemistry. Coupled with the skills and knowledge gained from Armstrong Atlantic State University’s general education courses, the scientific expertise developed by biology majors allows them to choose careers in the following:

The American Institute of Biological Sciences

• • • •

Health Professions (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, physician assistant, anesthesiologist’s assistant, and pharmacy) Research Conservation Biology Environmental Management Teaching

Armstrong biology graduates are very competitive for admission to graduate and professional programs of study. Successful applicants must have a very good academic record, experience with the chosen field of study (internships and/or research), and close working relationships with faculty who can write letters of recommendation on their behalf. Similarly, students who seek immediate employment should have developed a thorough understanding of their field of interest and have a strong academic record.

www.aibs.org/core/index.html AIBS / Member Societies — 50 member Societies of the American Institute of Biological Sciences www.aibs.org/society-membership-directory/ American Society for Microbiology www.asm.org/ Genetics Societies www.faseb.org/genetics/ Ecological Society of America (ESA) www.esa.org

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Animal Hospitals BioLab Biotechnology Firms Center for Disease Control (CDC) Center of Limnology Clinics/Hospitals Cryolife Department of Natural Resources Diagnostic Testing Companies Emory University Hospital Environmental Protection Agency Food and Drug Administration Georgia Bureau of Investigation Georgia State Department of Health Hematology/Oncology of NE GA Joseph W Jones Ecological Medical Laboratories Meditech Media Merieux Laboratories Inc. National Institute of Health New England Medical Center Ocean Aquariums Pharmaceutical Companies Veterinary Specialists armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

CHEMISTRY?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY

Possible Job Titles

Chemistry majors are trained to think both analytically and creatively to solve practical and research problems. Chemistry majors work in all primary work sectors: nonprofit, education, government, and industry, while others proceed to law or medical degrees. Nearly 70 percent of chemists work in industry. Half of the chemists work with research. Students with a bachelor’s degree qualify for employment with the federal government in quality control and analytical positions, research and for the development of fuels and medicines.

• Chemical Distributor • Chemical Engineer • Children’s Hospital Chemist • Cosmetics Engineer • Customer Training Specialist • Defense Industry Chemist • Developmental Scientist • Drug Developer/Tester • Electron/Chemical Researcher • Environmental Chemist • Environmental Specialist • Glass Industry Manager • Industrial Production Inspector • Industry Chemist • Medical Sales • Medical Chemical Specialist • Nuclear Chemical Technician • Paint Industry Scientist • Petroleum Industry Scientist • Pharmaceutical Scientist • Production Facilities Manager • Quality Control Specialist • Research Technician • Researcher • R & D Manager/Consultant • Scientific Writer/Editor • Nutritional Chemist • Testing Labs Researcher • Textiles Industry Chemist

The bachelor’s degree with a major in chemistry is a versatile undergraduate degree that prepares the student with a broad, intellectually challenging, academic experience. The curriculum provides a solid academic foundation with an emphasis on the skills necessary for problem solving. Students may elect to complete requirements to enter professional schools, such as medicine, pharmacy, or dentistry, concurrently with earning the chemistry degree. The opportunity for learning is promoted by the small, friendly university environment in which students are able to seek and receive individual help outside of class.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Chemistry Majors • • • • • • • • • •

Seek opportunities within chemistry to investigate, collect, and analyze data in a variety of specializations Supplement curriculum by working on Chemistry Department research teams Gain experience practicing precision in reporting in all classes Gain experience collecting and reporting relevant data while perceiving patterns and structures in every study discipline Attain an internship in an applied field of Chemistry within your first several semesters to ensure major choice Seek research experiences that allow for attendance at appropriate conferences, make presentations if possible Develop the ability to prepare poster presentations and volunteer to help Chemistry faculty with program materials Develop skill at developing research at away locations through study abroad & the National Student Exchange. Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence with contacts Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field, continue

correspondence with all previous contacts

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS Dr. Will Lynch, Department Head | 912.344.3219 | Fax 912.344.3433 | Will.Lynch@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

What can you do with a degree in chemistry? The best way to answer that question is to see what students who have gotten this degree are doing. We examined the record of chemistry graduates from Armstrong and it revealed that the chemistry degree offers many career and professional opportunities. Our students have gone into fields including the following:

ACS Publications

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

http://pubs.acs.org/about.html ChemWeb http://www.chemweb.com/ American Association Advancement of Science

Medicine Pharmacy Dentistry Veterinary Medicine Podiatric Medicine Biochemistry Chemical Engineering Industrial Research Medical Research Quality Control Crime Laboratories Environmental Controls Sales Teaching Business Law

http://www.aaas.org/ Journal of Chemical Education http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/ Web of Science http://apps.isiknowledge.com/ American Chemical Society Job Bank http://pubs.acs.org/plweb/indexp1.html

Employers Approximately two-thirds of Armstrong’s chemistry majors have chosen to enter the workplace in a variety of industries, not only in Savannah, but all over the southeast. Employment opportunities for chemistry majors at both the bachelors and graduate level have been excellent. Some of the employers of Armstrong chemistry graduates are EM Industries, GBI Crime Lab, Tronox, Test America, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, International Paper and U.S. Customs. The other one-third of graduating majors have attended professional and graduate schools all over the United States. Schools attended by recent chemistry graduates are Medical College of Georgia, University of Georgia, Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University, North Carolina State University, Institute of Paper Chemistry, University of South Carolina, Clemson University, Johns Hopkins, Auburn University, Wake Forest University, and University of Colorado.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

COMPUTER SCIENCE? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Computer Science requires creativity, insights, background, and skill in problem solving, and this problem solving involves a mix of studying theoretical frameworks and practice. The major includes a core of courses designed to accomplish the following primary objectives: • • • •

Have students be prepared for employment in business or industry in the wide variety of positions in which computer science is required. Have students be prepared to pursue graduate studies in computer science or a cognate field. Have students develop Fundamental skills in computer science in order to be in a position to adapt to rapid technological changes involving computing. Have students develop an understanding of the algorithmic approach to problem solving, including the development, representation, communication, and evaluation of algorithms.

The major includes emphasis on two tracks: software or systems. The program is flexible, so students at the senior level are able to explore other areas of interest along with their track. We encourage our students to participate in undergraduate research or in sponsored projects under the guidance of a Computer Science faculty advisor. The Computer Science degree is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). It was first accredited in 1991 and is presently one of the few accredited programs in the state.

Skills and Interests Associated with Computer Science Majors • Ability to trace problems to their sources • Analyzing communication situations and developing faster or more efficient alternatives • Skilled at clarifying problems or situations • Systematically organizing material • Organizing and classifying data • Anticipating and diagnosing problems • Perceiving and defining cause and effect relationships • Problem solving • Decision making

Possible Job Titles • Analyst • Applications Research Programmer • Associate Computer Consultant • CAD/CAM Designer • Consultant • Database Administrator • Developer Support Engineer • eCommerce Developer • Educational Programs Specialist • Java/ J2EE Developer • Market Research Analyst • Mathematician • Network Engineer • PeopleSoft Administrator • Programmer • Professor • Project Manager • Quality Control Supervisor • Risk Analyst • Security Engineer • Software Engineer • Special Effects (FX) Specialist • SQL Database Administrator • Systems Administrator/Analyst • Systems Engineer • Technical Writer • Unix Administrator • VoIP Engineer • Web Developer/Designer • Wireless Developer

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION, COMPUTING & ENGINEERING Dr. Hong Zhang, Interim Department Head | 912.344.2542 | Hong.Zhang@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

We expect virtually all graduates of our program to immediately enter the computer science professions, or to be competitive in entering graduate school, and to enter the professions after completing graduate coursework. Professions in computer systems include software, hardware, people and data.

Association for Computing Machinery www.acm.org Association for Information Systems www.aisnet.org

Software Systems Computer scientists who work with software can be involved in the development of new software programs or in the maintenance of existing computer systems. In a small working group, one person may see a project through all phases of software development, from analyzing the need, to designing and coding the solution, to installing the end product for the user. In a large working group the tasks of analysis, design, implementation, testing and installation may be divided among many different people or teams that may be not be geographically co-located. Some computer scientists work in new areas of software capability, such as computational intelligence, robotics and haptics, while others are concerned with specialized software application in areas like embedded systems, Web programming, and computer graphics. Hardware Systems Although the task of designing new hardware systems typically falls to electrical engineers, the job of keeping computers, peripherals and networks running smoothly and efficiently falls to computer scientists. These computer scientists, often called system administrators or network administrators, become proficient in using and modifying the complicated system software that governs the behavior of computers and networks.

Association for Women in Computing www.awc-hq.org/ Computer Software/Systems Jobs www.nationjob.com/computers Institute for the Certification of Computer Professionals www.iccp.org/ Internet Society www.isoc.org Technology Professional Job Search www.dice.com

People and Data Systems Entry-level computer jobs centered on people include positions that focus on sales and service of a particular product. In addition, there are an increasing number of positions for computer professionals who train the non computer scientists of a company and provide support for a variety of software and hardware products for them. Later in a career, a computer scientist may hold a position focused on managing a number of other computer professionals. Jobs in data and information services as well as cyber security provide many new opportunities for computer scientists. With the rapid growth of the Internet, companies are recognizing the value of information and the challenge of retrieving and protecting pertinent information. A degree in computer science can be an important career starting as outlined in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics biannual report.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

CRIMINAL JUSTICE? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Possible Job Titles

A Criminal Justice major leads to a Bachelor of Science Degree and offers undergraduate students the opportunity to pursue studies leading to a career in administration of justice, related fields, or select professional and graduate programs. Career opportunities for students who study Criminal Justice are vast. In fact, those who seek employment immediately after completing their degree generally have good prospects in such areas as local, state, and some federal law enforcement, state and federal probation and parole, correctional counseling, court services and administration, juvenile justice and family services, and private security.

• Border Patrol Agent • Campus Security Officer • Case Worker • Court Clerk • Credit Manager • Crime Scene Technician • Deputy Sheriff • Detective • Enforcement Agent • Family Services Coordinator • Federal Agent • Judge • Juvenile Probation Specialist • Law Enforcement Trainer • Lawyer • Legal Advocate • Legal Associate • Loss Prevention Consultant • Management Trainee • Manager • Medical Examiner • Paralegal • Parole Officer • Police Officer • Private Security Officer • Probation Officer • Real Estate Paralegal • Social Worker • Victim’s Advocate

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice consists of core courses in the administration of justice, criminology, ethics and criminal procedure coupled with a concentration in juvenile justice, law enforcement, research methods, penology and law. In addition, students without previous criminal justice work experience undertake a mandatory, full-time, semester-long internship in a criminal justice agency. This serves to acquaint the student with real-world experiences critical to one’s success in criminal justice. It also opens doors to students by establishing important professional contact for further employment.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Criminal Justice Majors • • •

• • • •

Seek courses or training in topics such as victimology, social problems, diversity issues, or grieving. Supplement curriculum with courses in psychology, sociology, or social work. Gain experience working with a juvenile population in any capacity (i.e., sports teams, summer camp counselor, parks and recreation programs, and community/religious youth groups). Gain related experience in employment interviewing, social casework, substance abuse, and rehabilitation. Learn to work well with people of diverse backgrounds. Consider learning a second language. Earn a master’s degree in social work or counseling for therapy positions. Obtain a masters degree in criminal justice or business for upper-level positions in facilities management or administration.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, SOCIAL & POLITICAL SCIENCE Dr. Zaphon Wilson, Department Head | 912.344.2593 | Fax 912.344.9498 | Zaphon.Wilson@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Our nation recognizes the necessity of well-educated criminal justice professionals. The bachelor’s degree prepares students for entry-level opportunities including the following:

American Bar Association www.abanet.org/ American Criminal Justice Association

• • • • • •

www.acjalae.org

Police Officers Private Security Professionals Correctional Officers Intake and Classification Specialists Probation and Parole Officers Juvenile Justice Agency Personnel

American Society of Criminology www.asc41.com National Assoc. of Legal Assistants

Coupled with relevant work experience, the degree sharpens the candidate’s competitive edge for state and federal law enforcement openings, court administration positions, and state and federal probation and parole positions. In addition, the degree is invaluable for midcareer advancement.

www.nala.org/ National Criminal Justice Association www.ncja.org National Federation of Paralegal Associations

Students will also find the criminal justice degree helpful in preparing them for graduate and professional education and training. Many of our students go on to law schools and master’s degree programs in criminal justice and public administration. Indeed, many of our graduates are now attorneys, college professors, federal law enforcement agents, state investigators, private security managers, court investigators, assistant district attorneys, judges, probation and parole supervisors, police officers and managers, and criminal justice researchers.

www.paralegals.org Archive of Criminal Justice http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACJD National Criminal Justice Service www.ncjrs.org

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Athens-Clarke County Police Boeing Company Clarke County Solicitor General Cobb County Community Center Customs & Border Protection Department of Homeland Security Domestic Violence Shelters Drug Enforcement Agency Federal Government Garcia, Rose, & Wiltshire, LLC Georgia Bureau of Investigation Georgia Department of Corrections Georgia State Probation Office Institute for Family Centered Services Office of Child Support Services Savannah Chatham Metro Police Department State of Georgia US Air Force US Capitol Police

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS The Communication Sciences and Disorders area is concerned with training of speech/ language pathologists, audiologists, and teachers of the hearing impaired. The bachelor’s degree is a general degree that will prepare students to work in many areas or to apply to graduate school. Students who wish to work as licensed and certified speech-language pathologists must complete additional training after the bachelor’s degree. To obtain full professional credentials and certification from the Georgia Department of Education, students must obtain a Master’s degree from an accredited program. Armstrong Atlantic State University’s Communication Sciences and Disorders program prepares students for graduate study in the fields of speech-language pathology and/or audiology. Professionals in these fields evaluate and develop intervention plans for individuals of all ages with speech, language, cognitive, swallowing, and hearing impairments.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Communications Sciences & Disorders Majors • • • • • •

Complete a bachelor’s degree program in Communications Sciences & Disorders or Speech Pathology, focusing on getting good grades for entrance to graduate school Obtain entrance into a master’s level program for Communications Sciences & Disorders or Speech Pathology Obtain certification as a Speech Pathologist Acquire experience working with patients with speech difficulties through volunteer work Get involved in student organizations related to speech pathology Job shadow or perform informational interviews a professional speech pathologist to gain insight into the job

Possible Job Titles • Activities Director • Audiologist • Behavioral Specialist • Disability Coordinator • Medicaid Eligibility Specialist • Medical Transcriptionist • Observationalist • Occupational Therapist Tech • Pathologist • Rehabilitation Aid • Service Coordinator • Speech Aide • Speech and Hearing Therapist • Speech Language Pathologist • Speech Pathologist • Speech Pathology Aide • Speech Pathology Assistant • Speech Therapist • Speech Therapy Aid • Speech Therapy Assistant • Teacher Assistant • Teacher

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS Dr. Jean Neils-Strunjas, Program Coordinator | 912.344.2969 | Fax 912.344.9493 | Jean.Neilsstrunjas@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

With nearly 10 percent of the world’s population affected by communication disorders, the field of communication sciences and disorders is an area of critical need. Work sites include schools, hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, home health care, and private practice. Graduates will meet the expanding need in southeast Georgia, the state, region, and country.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

B.S. graduates in this field need a Master’s degree for entry level employment and our baccalaureate graduates are well prepared for advanced studies at the graduate level. With graduate level training careers include: • Speech-Language Pathologist • Audiologist • Research Scientist

www.asha.org/ Georgia Board of Speech Language Pathology & Audiology www.sos.ga.gov/plb/speech/ Georgia Department of Education www.doe.k12.ga.us/ National Student Speech Language Hearing Association www.nsslha.org/default.htm TeachGeorgia – Georgia’s Official Teacher Recruitment Website www.teachgeorgia.org/home.aspx

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Athens Regional Medical Center Athens Speech & Language Services Athens-Clarke County Schools Atlanta Ear, Nose, Throat Audiological Consul of Atlanta Bay Medical Center Brooks Rehabilitation Center Chattanooga Ear Nose Throat Childrens Communications Center Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Cobb Pediatric Speech Services Columbus Speech & Hearing Center Dekalb County Schools Egleston Children’s Hospital Frye Regional Medical Center House Ear Clinic Huntington Ear, Nose & Throat LaFayette Nursing & Rehabilitation Northeast Georgia Medical Center Progressive Therapy, Inc. Rockdale County School System Screven County Schools Speech Care, Inc. Speech Pathology Education Center Team Rehab, Inc. The Emory Clinic VA Medical Center Winter Haven Hospital

U.S. Department of Education www.ed.gov/index.jhtml

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Teachers can have great impact on the social, personal, and intellectual development of individuals. Their influence stems from a love of learning, a talent for awakening students to new modes of thinking, an understanding of the human development process, and professional skills. Teachers can be found in almost every sector of society, and they instruct a wide range of topics. While specific course requirements vary among disciplines, most teachers will fulfill the academic requirements of a major in a chosen field, will be literate in the history, philosophy, psychology, sociology and methodology of education, and have developed initial teaching skills through supervised clinical experiences. Graduates with a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education receive an initial T-4 license upon completion of requirements and are certified to teach preschool through fifth grade in the state of Georgia. Our degree program is Accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and certified by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC).

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Early Childhood Education Majors • Develop skills related to problem-solving and quick thinking • Learn how to work effectively with parents and adults as well as children • Develop soft skills such as fostering a positive learning environment, communicating/ presenting material in multiple ways, and developing meaningful relationships • Volunteer with the Boys & Girls Club or Big Brothers Big Sisters to develop a long term relationship with a child and to learn motivation techniques • Earn good grades in your freshmen and sophomore level courses to establish a solid academic record for being accepted to the program • Establish a good working relationship with your cooperating teacher during your student teacher experience senior year as their reference will be invaluable to you

Possible Job Titles • Alumni Relations Coordinator • Athletic Coach • Camp Director • Child Life Specialist • Customer Service Representative • Education & Training Coordinator • Educational Materials Coordinator • Educational Therapist • Elementary School Teacher • Employee Training Instructor • Information Specialist • In-Home Day care • Learning Specialist • Library Assistant • Management Trainee • Missionary Worker • Organizational Trainer • Outdoor Educator • Paraprofessional Teacher • Personnel Consultant • Preschool Teacher • Project Coordinator • Recreation Coordinator • Religious Education Coordinator • Resource Teacher • Social Services Volunteer

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CHILDHOOD & EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION Dr. John Hobe, Department Head | 912.344.2564 | Fax 912.344.3443 | John.Hobe@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Graduates of Early Childhood Education programs are in demand, and the employment outlook for elementary teachers is positive. Our graduates are employed in Chatham County as well as surrounding counties, in other parts of the state, and nationally.

American Association of School Administrators www.aasa.org/about/index.cfm American Educational Research Association www.aera.net

Upon completion of this degree, students are eligible to teach elementary school in the State of Georgia in both public and private schools. While a master’s degree is not required to begin teaching in Georgia, some of our students do choose to pursue additional education for advancement opportunities.

American Federation of Teachers www.aft.org/ Georgia Department of Education www.doe.k12.ga.us/

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

National Education Association

Amazon.com American Air Lines Atlanta Veterans Administrative Business and Industry Camps Campus Crusade for Christ Churches Clarke County Schools Colleges and Universities Community Centers Consulting Firms Educational Publishers Emory University First Baptist Church of Decatur HealthSouth Corporation Hospitals Human Resource Offices Libraries Non-Profit Agencies Private Tutoring Agencies Professional Organizations The University of Georgia Career Center Elementary and Social Studies Education Department Public & Private Schools Public Relations Firms Savannah Country Day State & Federal Government Textbook Companies Waseca Learning Environment

www.nea.org/index.html U.S. Department of Education www.ed.gov/

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

ECONOMICS?

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS

Possible Job Titles

Economics is the study of the ways people make a living; produce, distribute, and consume goods and services; and reach decisions about the use of scarce resources. With coursework in statistics and business administration, the student will understand how to analyze problems such as inflation, unemployment and efficient uses of natural resources. For students interested in business careers, economics is an essential foundation for business education. Similarly, when it’s viewed in the broader sense of a liberal arts education, economics is a core discipline and an integral part of a wellrounded course of study.

• Account Executive • Analyst • Analyst Associate • Assistant Professor • Associate Consultant • Billing Specialist • Campus Staff • Client Services Representative • Consultant • Data Analyst • Development Analyst • Director • Economist • Financial Analyst • Financial Planner • General Manager • Human Resource Manager • Implementation Analyst • Intelligence Analyst • Internet Manager • Investment Associate • Junior Auditor • Junior Associate • Operation Manager • Personal Assistant • Research Analyst • Sales Associate • Veteran Service Representative

The modern market economy is perhaps the most complex information network that ever existed. Economists are the people who study this system, model it and seek to explain how it functions. Economics at Armstrong Atlantic State University is a rigorous and intellectually demanding program. The Department of Economics offers a bachelor of arts in economics with a choice between a general economics track and an international economics track. Both tracks of the economics B.A. require courses in economic theory, econometrics and a senior thesis. The general track offers a wide variety of courses in applied, quantitative, global, and policy-related fields. The international track requires courses in international economics, a foreign language and at least three credits in an earned international study program.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Economics Majors • •

• • •

Choose a career focus and structure curricular and extra-curricular activities to achieve your goals. Obtain volunteer, part-time, summer, or internship experience to enhance your career path. For example, complete a finance-related internship if interested in a career in banking, or a government-related internship if you are interested in politics. Develop an excellent background in research, math, statistics, and computers. Earn a graduate degree in economics, business, or other related fields for increased marketability. Do informational interviewing with professionals across disciplines to learn more about fields of interest.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS Dr. Yassaman Saadatmand, Department Head | 912.344.2539 | Fax 912.344.3485 | Yassaman.Saadatmand@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

The demand for economists is high. According to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are approximately 225,000 positions held by economists and market and survey researchers at the present time. The projected increase in demand for economists by the year 2016 is up to 7%. The outlook is particularly good for those economists skilled in quantitative methods. Economics is the largest and most highly paid field in social science. According to a 2008 survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, persons with a bachelor’s degree in economics received offers averaging $52,926 a year.

American Economic Association www.aeaweb.org Georgia Center for Nonprofits www.gcn.org/ National Association of Business Economics www.nabe.com The Economist

Most economists are concerned with practical applications of economic policy in a particular area. They use their understanding of economic relationships to advise businesses and other organizations, including the following:

www.economist.com National Bureau of Economics www.nber.org

• • • • • •

Insurance Companies Banks Securities Firms Industry and Trade Associations Labor Unions Government Agencies

Economics Research Network www.ssrn.com/ern/index.html

Graduates with a bachelor’s degree may find jobs in industry and business as management or sales trainees. Large accounting firms are also interested in hiring economists. Economists with quantitative skills are qualified for research assistant positions in a broad range of fields. Those who meet state certification requirements may become high school economics teachers. Economists who work for government agencies may assess economic conditions in the United States or abroad in order to estimate the economic effects of specific changes in public policy or legislation. Other jobs for economics graduates include financial analysts, underwriters, actuaries and budget officers.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

ENGINEERING?

ENGINEERING STUDIES PROGRAM

Possible Job Titles

The Engineering Studies Program at Armstrong provides several unique opportunities for engineering students. Through the program, students build a solid foundation in humanities, mathematics, sciences and engineering. Learning takes place in a friendly, small college environment where students can obtain individual help from and maintain close contact with professors outside of classes. Students completing the Armstrong Atlantic Engineering Transfer Program have been very successful transferring to various engineering schools, which include Georgia Tech, Auburn, Clemson, University of Florida, Mercer University, North Carolina State and the University of South Carolina.

• Application Engineer • Biomedical Engineer • Civil Engineer • Conservation Engineer • Controls Engineer • Design Engineer • Distribution Engineer • Electrical Engineer • Environmental Engineer • Fleet Engineer • Food Engineer • Industrial Engineer • Manufacturing Engineer • Mechanical Engineer • Molding Analysis Engineer • Packaging Engineer • Pharmaceutical Engineer • Plant Process Engineer • Process Engineer • Product Application Engineer • Project Engineer • Quality Control Lab Technician • Research Engineer • Service Manager • Software Engineer • Systems Engineer

RETP and GTREP The Regents’ Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) and the Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) are articulated programs between Georgia Tech and Armstrong. In these programs, students complete their first two years of engineering coursework at Armstrong, and those who successfully complete the program and who meet the GPA transfer requirements are admitted to Georgia Tech as juniors. GTREP students can complete bachelor of science degrees in civil, computer, electrical, environmental, or mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech while remaining in Savannah at Georgia Tech’s Savannah campus. RETP students can complete bachelor of science degrees in aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, materials science, mechanical, nuclear and radiological, or polymer and fiber engineering at Georgia Tech’s Atlanta campus. Guidelines for admission to the RETP and GTREP programs fall under two categories. Freshmen admission requires the student to meet a minimum SAT score of 1090 (combined verbal and mathematics sections) including a minimum 440 verbal score and 560 mathematics score, and a high school grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Students who are not eligible for freshman admission may start as pre-engineering majors and formally enter the programs as sophomores provided they complete the freshman year course requirements with a Regents’ grade point average of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale. Any student admitted or eligible for admission to Georgia Tech can also enter Armstrong as an RETP or GTREP student.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Engineering Majors • • • • • •

Obtain related experience through co-ops or internships for business/industry-related careers Develop strong verbal and written communication and interpersonal skills Learn federal, state, and local government job application procedures Learn to work well within a team Develop physical stamina for outdoor work Get experience in organizing and directing workers and materials Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION, COMPUTING & ENGINEERING Dr. Cameron Coates, Interim Program Coordinator | 912.344.2571 | Fax 912.344.3415 | Cameron.Coates@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Engineers apply science and mathematics to solve everyday problems and improve how we live our day-to-day lives. Starting salaries for entry level engineers are among the highest of college graduates holding a bachelor’s degree. A bachelor’s degree in engineering is usually required to become a licensed professional engineer. Some engineer career options are civil, computer, electrical and mechanical.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological

Civil engineers plan, design, construct, and operate the infrastructure of our society. They design, build, and maintain bridges, roads, airports, water systems and waste systems. Civil engineers also work to protect against natural hazards such as: earthquakes, floods and hurricanes. Civil engineers work in areas such as: transportation, construction, geotechnics and water and environmental systems.

Institute of Biological Engineering

Computer engineers combine theories from computer science and electrical engineering to develop microchip technology, design and improve computing devices, accessories, and electronic hardware and develop software systems. Computer engineers work in areas such as: telecommunications, medicine, computer hardware, microelectronics, embedded systems and software engineering.

Engineers www.asabe.org/ American Society of Mechanical Engineers www.asme.org/

www.ibeweb.org/ Biomedical Engineering Society www.bmes.org American Society of Civil Engineers www.asce.org Society of Women Engineers http://societyofwomenengineers.swe.org/

Electrical engineers design, develop and improve products and technologies for electronics, power generation, machinery controls, navigation systems and telecommunications. Electrical engineers work in areas such as: analog electronics, systems and controls, digital signal processing, optics, power generation, electromagnetics and communications. Mechanical engineers conceive, construct, test, and operate mechanical, thermal and biological devices. They design and develop manufacturing systems, robots, automobiles, aircraft and medical equipment. Mechanical engineers work in areas such as: bioengineering, materials, manufacturing, robotics and microelectromechanical systems.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

ENGLISH?

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

Possible Job Titles

English is a major branch of the language arts with a primary focus on writing, reading, literature, and speech. Although accurate use of the English language is essential to every college graduate, encountering the humanizing forces of languages and literature is the primary objective for students in this major. An English major will gain skills in critical thinking and articulate self-expression as well as knowledge of English and American Literature, language history and usage, and the critical contexts that help us to interpret our own language as well as others. Although the program encourages breadth and variety, it also offers ample opportunity for intensive study of particular interests, such as linguistics or creative and technical writing.

• Bacteriologist • Academic Advisor • Account Executive • Advertising Assistant • Announcer (Radio/TV) • Assistant Language Teacher • Attorney • Author • Bibliographer • Broadcast Journalist • Communications Specialist • Congressional Aide • Copy Writer/Editor • Disc Jockey • Foreign Correspondent • Human Resources • Immigration Assistant • Information Specialist • Interpreter • Interviewer • Journalist • Linguist • Manager Trainee • Marketing Assistant • Mass Media Assistant • Media Specialist • Mortgage Loan Specialist • Playwright • Publicity Coordinator • Research Journalist • Teacher • Technical Writer/Editor

English majors have a choice of pursuing either a traditional English track that focuses on literature or an English/Professional Communications track that emphasizes writing in particular professional contexts. Both programs require 36 credit hours of upperlevel, major courses.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for English Majors • • • • • • •

Develop your skills related to public speaking and professional writing Gain experience in critical reading and thinking through the reading in your classes Attain an internship in your desired field of English/Communications within your first several semesters to ensure major choice Learn to speak an additional language fluently Consider a study abroad or work abroad experience to broaden you understanding of language Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence with contacts Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field, continue

correspondence with all previous contacts

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES, LITERATURE & PHILOSOPHY Dr. David Wheeler, Department Head | 912.344.2594 | Fax 912.344.3494 | David.Wheeler@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Our programs provide students with the foundation for almost any career they might want to follow. Majoring in English will broaden and deepen understanding and enjoyment of literature, enhance appreciation of the surrounding culture, develop analytical and critical skills and prepare students for a host of opportunities. We have approximately 250 students pursuing English majors and these students will have a variety of career options upon graduation. Many of our recent graduates have pursued advanced degrees in English, creative writing, law, history, comparative literature and foreign languages. Our students have been accepted into prestigious universities including Yale, University of Florida, University of Georgia, Michigan State University, Notre Dame and Columbia University. A number of our graduates teach locally in public and private schools or pursue careers in education administration.

American Copy Editors Society

Our English majors are not restricted to the field of teaching, however. A recent survey shows that a majority of our graduates choose nonacademic professions. These graduates have found rewarding employment in business and the public sector. Their career choices attest to the diversity of an English degree. This diverse group of employers includes publishers, newspapers and magazines, insurance companies, public relations departments, real estate firms, banks, and government offices.

www.copydesk.org American Society of Journalists & Authors www.asja.org National Council of Teachers of English www.ncte.org American Library Association www.ala.org Magazine Publishers of America www.magazine.org National Writers Association www.nationalwriters.org American Society of Journalists & Authors www.asja.org Association of Literary Scholars and Critics www.bu.edu/literary/

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Alloy Industrial Contractors Armstrong Atlantic State University Armstrong Atlantic State University Library Derenne Middle School Hyatt-Regency Hotel Public Relations Department of the City of Savannah Richmond Hill High School Savannah Chamber of Commerce Savannah High School Savannah Magazine Savannah Sand Gnats Baseball Team United Shipping Lines Windsor Forest High School WSAV Television WTOC Television

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

GENDER & WOMEN’S STUDIES? BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GENDER & WOMEN’S STUDIES

Possible Job Titles

Women’s studies provides you with all the benefits of a liberal arts degree. Liberal arts education emphasizes critical thinking, which can be applied to a multitude of careers. It demonstrates to a potential employer that you have the confidence, skills, and maturity to earn a college degree; that you are well-rounded, having studied a wide variety of topics rather than one narrow skill area; that you likely are able to think more globally than many other job applicants. Managers often prefer liberal arts majors because they are skilled at organizing material, writing well, and making oral presentations. Moreover, a Women’s Studies major equips you with significant additional advantages.

• Accounts Coordinator • Alcoholism Counselor • Case Manager • Chemical Dependency Specialist • Community and Family Development Specialist • Community Health Specialist • Direct Care Counselor • Director of Graduate Education • Educator for Planned Parenthood • English as a Second Language Teacher • High School Teacher • HIV Counselor • In-Patient AIDS Social Worker • Intake Coordinator • Legal Aid Attorney • Librarian • Managing Attorney for Legal Aid Society • Office Manager • Program Advisor/Assistant • Project Director • Public Affairs Specialist • Public Interest Lawyer • Reproductive Health Counselor • Small-Business Owner • Social Worker • Staff Attorney • Vocational Counselor • Volunteer Program Coordinator

Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program that examines the social, cultural, and biological constructions of gender and sexuality. The program is founded on close collaboration between academic departments, allowing our students to work with methodologies that cross traditional academic disciplines. In the spring of 2000, Armstrong approved the creation of an undergraduate minor in Women’s Studies, renamed Gender and Women’s Studies in 2004 to reflect the growing curricular and theoretical changes in the discipline. In the fall of 2007, Armstrong began to offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in Gender and Women’s Studies.

Skills Associated with Gender & Women’s Studies Majors • Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively • Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. • Monitoring: Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. • Social Perceptiveness: Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do. • Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. • Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making. • Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. • Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. • Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF GENDER & WOMEN’S STUDIES Dr. Teresa Winterhalter, Program Coordinator | 912.344.3363 | Fax 912.344.3494 | Teresa.Winterhalter@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

The need for graduates with a background in the study of gender and women’s issues is growing. Professionals must develop, assess and implement programs designed to address problems of violence against women, illiteracy and inadequate healthcare, among many others. These problems are often impacted by gender and racial or ethnic differences. Traditional academic disciplines sometimes address these issues though “adding-on” discipline-specific units or courses, but approaches to gender and diversity are now so complex and the body of gender-related research is so substantial that this kind of additive approach is no longer sufficient. A major in GWST addresses these societal and academic needs in a way that creates a breadth of focus not available in many traditional undergraduate degrees.

Career Opportunities for Women’s Studies

These attributes make GWST students valuable candidates for jobs in many fields. Some of the potential career options for these students include those in the areas of the arts, business, social work and psychology, media, politics and law, sports, education and health care.

Alberta Occupational Profiles

https://www.msu.edu/~wmstdy/wsmjr5.htm Georgia Career Information Center www.gcic.peachnet.edu (must obtain access code from Career Services) O*Net Online http://online.onetcenter.org Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov/oco

www.alis.gov.ab.ca/occinfo/frameset.asp

There are many practical applications for Women’s Studies training on the job. For example, as more women work, business and corporations find the need for more sensitivity to women’s issues such as sexual harassment, flex-time, parental leave, pay equity, and equal employment opportunities. The development of women’s agencies and organizations is spurring demand for graduates with specializations in Women’s Studies. There is growing demand in the professions of law, medicine, social work, teaching, counseling, and government service for expertise on gender issues. Similarly, women’s studies specialists are increasingly being used as consultants in industry, higher education, insurance companies, and personnel firms. Perhaps most importantly, many Women’s Studies graduates say that their education gave them the confidence to pursue careers traditionally held by men.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION The physical education major is designed to prepare the student for a career of teaching health and physical education with contemporary facilities and equipment in the public/private school systems at the preschool to high school level. Classes are offered by experienced faculty. The Department of Health and Physical Education is located in the Sports Center adjacent to the 10-court tennis complex and general parking lot. The fully equipped Sports Center features four classrooms, a fitness center, a human performance lab, athletic training facilities, locker rooms, the Hall of Fame Room, a computer lab, a conference room, a jogging track, offices, and the Alumni Arena (seating 3000). The varsity baseball field, varsity softball field and intramural and recreation fields are located next to the Sports Center. The department also uses the Aquatic and Recreation Center for aerobic, aquatic, dance and team sports classes as well as many intramural activities. All health and physical education majors must complete 60 semester hours in their major field of study. They must also complete additional semester hours of professional education courses to qualify them for teacher certification. The total semester hour requirement for a baccalaureate degree is 123 semester hours.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Health & Physical Education Majors • Complete a college level teacher preparation program • Obtain teacher certification for desired subject area and/or grade level • Obtain dual certification for better employability, or consider coaching a sport team at the school • Acquire teaching experience through practicum and clinical experiences • Get involved in student teacher organizations • Obtain masters degree to increase employability and income potential • Volunteer with local organizations such as the Boys & Girls Club or Big Brothers Big Sisters

Possible Job Titles • Assistant Baseball Coach • Assistant Football Coach • Assistant Golf Coach • Assistant Gymnastics Coach • Assistant Women’s Basketball • Coach • Assistant Strength & Conditioning Coach • Assistant Director of Event Management • Assistant Facilities Coordinator • Bench Club Facility Manager • Conferences & Leagues Coordinator • Corporate Sponsorship • Director of Sports Marketing • Director/Program Promotions • Health & Fitness Industry • Health Coordinator • Human Resources Manager • Marketing & Promotions Manager • Marketing Director • Operations Coordinator • Recreation Coordinator • Senior Promotion Coordinator • Sponsorship & Promotions Rep • Teacher/Athletic Trainer • Teacher/Coach

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ADOLESCENT & ADULT EDUCATION Dr. Greg Wimer, Program Coordinator | 912.344.3508 | Fax 912.344.3450 | Greg.Wimer@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Our graduates find careers as teachers in both public and private schools, and some graduates go on to earn advanced degrees that prepare them to teach college physical education. Alternative career opportunities for physical educators include the following:

Cool Works

• • • • • •

www.coolworks.com/showme/ On-Line Sports Career Center www.onlinesports.com/pages/CareerCenter.html

Equipment Design Health/Medical Rehabilitation and Therapy Sports Administration/Management Sports Communication Sports Marketing Physical Activity Instruction

Coach U www.coachu.com Sports Mark Management Group, Ltd.

The list of potential area employers in physical education includes the Chatham County School System, the Effingham County School System, Bryan County School System, McIntosh County School System, Screven County School System, and the many private schools in those counties.

www.smgnet.com/ Professional Management Inc. www.professionalmanagement.com/ American Journal of Health Promotion www.healthpromotionjournal.com/

Possible Employers:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bolletticri Sports Chipola Junior College Disney Sports Attractions Fitness Centers Georgia Southern University Nashville Arena/Leisure Management National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Oconee County Schools Peach Bowl Pinellas County Schools Rockdale County Schools Sea Island Company US Military Academy UGA Athletic Association United States Army United States Military Academy University of West Alabama University of Dayton University of Houston University of Richmond University of South Carolina Walker County School System Walnut Grove Elementary School Westpoint Military Academy Winder-Barrow Schools

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

HEALTH SCIENCE? Possible Job Titles

BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE Health Science is not a profession in itself; rather it’s a body of knowledge and set of skills that enable the student to develop expertise in health-related areas. Armstrong’s health science program allows students to focus in one of the following emphasis areas: public and community health, health services administration, health & fitness management, and allied health. Students wishing to design, implement, teach and manage health delivery systems will learn the fundamentals of program planning, implementation and evaluation, and the intricacies of the skills necessary to assist those who strive to maintain their health and the health of others. The Health Services Administration track includes the administration and management of health care programs in a variety of settings, including hospitals, group practices, the private sector, the health and fitness industry, sales, gerontology, and public health. The Public & Community Health track covers the improvement of the quality of life and overall well being by assisting individuals, communities, and societies to adopt healthy behaviors, policies, and environments. Employment settings may include public health programs, private sector programs, corporate wellness programs, gerontology, and the health and fitness industry. In the Health and Fitness Management track students are responsible for optimizing the health and performance of those involved in sporting activity at all levels. Employment settings may include hospital-based wellness centers, corporate wellness programs, nonprofit wellness programs, and health and fitness centers.

Skills Associated with Health Science Majors • • •

• • • • • •

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively. Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one. Management of Personnel Resources: Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job. Social Perceptiveness: Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Time Management: Managing one’s own time and the time of others. Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

• Administrative Services Manager • Computer and Information Systems Manager • Dietitian and Nutritionist • Education Administrator • Environmental Science and Protection Technician • Epidemiologist • Fitness and Wellness Coordinator • Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioner • Health Educator • Health Specialties Teacher • Health Technologist and Technician • Home Health Aide • Industrial Safety and Health Engineers • Medical and Health Services Manager • Medical and Public Health Social Worker • Medical Records and Health Information Technician • Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Worker • Occupational Health and Safety Specialist • Quality Assurance Assistant • Recreation and Fitness Studies • Teacher • Registered Nurse

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCE Dr. Sandy Streater, Department Head | 912.344.2548 | Fax 912.344.3490 | Sandy.Streater@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

There is a need for health science professionals in health service settings for two reasons. First, the economics of our health care delivery system demands that Americans significantly reduce health care costs and provide more efficient health services. Second, the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in this country are largely preventable and are related to a person’s life-styles and health choices.

American College of Healthcare Executives

With these reasons in the forefront, a paradigm shift is now underway in the health sciences, which will place further emphasis upon the skills of qualified health promotion and education, health administration and fitness professionals. Armstrong’s health science program has been designed with these present and future needs in mind.

www.ache.org/ Explore Health Careers explorehealthcareers.org/en/home Georgia Career Information Center www.gcic.peachnet.edu (must obtain access code from Career Services) O*Net Online http://online.onetcenter.org

A health science graduate will find employment opportunities in a variety of health promotion, enhancement, rehabilitation, management and education areas. Educational and administrative opportunities in programs exist in the following areas: • • • • • • •

Life-Style Risks Nutrition Fitness Acute Care and Chronic Disease Management Weight Reduction Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation Epidemiology Practice Management Growth and Development

Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov/oco Alberta Occupational Profiles www.alis.gov.ab.ca/occinfo/frameset.asp

The health science graduate will find these opportunities in a variety of settings, such as schools, hospitals, public and nonprofit health organizations, wellness centers, fitness centers and spas, and industry. Our health science graduates work in the southeast in many of these settings; however, many of our students choose to defer employment so that they may pursue a master’s degree.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

HISTORY?

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY

Possible Job Titles

History is the study and research of major social, economic, political and cultural events of the past. A sound component of liberal arts education, history serves practical needs by providing solid background for pursuing graduate studies or a career in law, education, business, advertising, ministry, journalism, government service, or preservation. The history major meets an important need for the business world by providing the ability to analyze and write effectively, and by developing a sense of balanced judgment. For those who choose to teach, the major provides necessary subject-matter content. Finally, the history major prepares students for professional careers that require a satisfactory acquisition of knowledge and skills related to the study of the past.

• Archeologist • Architectural Historian • Archivist • Biography Writer • Case Manager • CIA / FBI Agent • Congressional Staff Aide • Curator • Customer Service Representative • Disability Benefits Coordinator • Editor • Exhibits Specialist • Foreign News Correspondent • Historical Interpreter • Historical Society Director • Intelligence Analyst • Journalist • Lawyer • Library Assistant • Lobbyist • Manager Of Membership Services • Management Analyst • Museum Guide • Museum Recruiter • National Park Ranger • News Director • Paralegal • Professor • Program Analyst • Public Relations Associate • Receptionist • Teacher

The Bachelor of Arts in History provides the student with a fuller understanding of self and society. By studying the fascinating developments of past cultures, historians seek to better comprehend who we are today and where we are going. On a more pragmatic level, the Bachelor of Arts in History offers rigorous training in critical thinking, research and writing skills highly valued in today’s job market. Students majoring in history may choose to concentrate in American, European or NonWestern history. Training in public history is also a strength of the department.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for History Majors • • • • • • •

Develop your skills related to public speaking and professional writing Gain experience in critical reading and thinking through the reading in your classes Attain an internship in your desired field of History within your first several semesters to ensure major choice Learn to speak an additional language fluently to be highly competitive for government positions Consider a study abroad or work abroad experience to broaden you understanding of history and other cultures Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence with contacts Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field, continue

correspondence with all previous contacts

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY Dr. Michael Price, Department Head | 912.344.2763 | Fax 912.344.3451 | Michael.Price@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Increasingly, business professionals are coming to realize that they need people who have the ability to collect and synthesize data, think on their feet and write well. The history major excels in all these skills. In addition to entering the private business sector, many of Armstrong Atlantic State University’s history majors have found work in archives, museums and libraries across the southeastern United States. Some have chosen to teach while others are participating in the burgeoning tourism trade. A degree in history is also ideal preparation for law school and graduate programs in the humanities.

American Association for State and Local History www.aaslh.org American Association of Museums www.aam-us.org American Historical Association www.historians.org National Archives www.nara.gov

Employers

National Trust for Historic Preservation www.nthp.org

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Arbitration Association Angle Press Appalachian State University Atlanta History Center Atlanta Media Bradburn Company Chambers of Commerce Department of Natural Resources Department of Community Affairs Flint River Academy Georgia’s District Attorney Office Grayson County Schools Historical Societies InteliTeach Jones County School District Justice Department Library of Congress Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum Morris Communication Newnan Times Herald Owens Thomas House Research Foundations The University of Georgia The Vanguard Group US Military

Organization of American Historians www.oah.org Society of American Archivists www.archivists.org

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY? BACHELOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Possible Job Titles

The Department of Information Technology at Armstrong offers a Bachelor of Information Technology degree and an online Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree. We expect that virtually all of the graduates will immediately enter the profession of Information Technology. The major includes courses designed to accomplish the following primary objectives:

• Account Executive • Accounting Systems Analyst • Billing and Coding Supervisor • Business Systems Analyst • Client Server Support Analyst • Computer Systems Engineer • Consultant • Customer Support Specialist • Data Network Security Administrator • Foreign Systems Integration Analyst • Engineer • Interface Designer • IT Auditor Associate • LAN Site Manager • Logistics Manager • Network Administrator • Project Managers • Revenue Management Analyst • Risk Management Associate • Software Consultant • Software Developers • Software Engineer • Systems Analyst • Systems Programmer • Technical Consultant • Technology Analyst • Training Instructor • Web Developer

• • •

Prepare students for IT positions in a wide variety of organizations. Provide a sound foundation in IT together with practical aspects of the discipline. Provide knowledge of selecting, designing, developing, managing, integrating, and deploying computer systems in order to achieve organizational objectives through effective resource utilization. Provide students with fundamental skills in IT to be prepared to adapt to technological changes.

Computer Science courses generally deal with fundamentals, principles and theoretical aspects of design, development and maintenance of computer systems. The focus of IT is on practical aspects of design, deployment, integration and management of these systems. The two disciplines overlap and complement one another. The WebBSIT is a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree offered online via the Internet. It is a collaborative project of five University System of Georgia colleges and universities. The WebBSIT program reflects the academic standards of the on-site IT department, while providing the convenience and flexibility for busy people who find it difficult to travel to a campus. The program of study provides a solid background in the technical, user-centric and managerial skills required by information technology managers. All WebBSIT students must be enrolled at one of the five WebBSIT institutions, which includes Armstrong.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Information Technology Majors • • • • • • •

Develop problem solving and logical thinking skills through technical courses Utilize critical reasoning and analytical skills to develop solutions to problems Focus on accuracy and attention to detail when putting together reports and projects Gain experience training others or teaching technical skills to strengthen your own skill set or to prepare for your career Take a public speaking course to develop your verbal and nonverbal communication skills Find job shadowing or internship experience that will help you focus your interest area and give you experience for your resume Develop relationships with professors and supervisor in related fields to use as references for employment or graduate school

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION, COMPUTING & ENGINEERING Dr. Hong Zhang, Interim Department Head | 912.344.2542 | Hong.Zhang@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

IT professionals are involved with many facets of deployment and use of computer systems. Jobs are often centered on using organizational resources effectively, including hardware, software, and people. There are an increasing number of positions for computer specialists to train non-computer specialists of a company, as well as roles troubleshooting and dealing with a variety of software and hardware issues. Jobs in data and information services provide many new opportunities for IT specialists. With the continued growth of the Internet, companies are recognizing the value of effective secure storage and retrieval of information.

American Society for Information Sciences www.asis.org Association for Computing Machinery www.acm.org Association for Women in Computing www.awc-hq.org/ Institute for Certification of Computing Professionals www.iccp.org

Employers

Computer Software/Systems Jobs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

www.nationjob.com/computers

Apple Computer CISCO City of Savannah Data General Delta Airlines Department of Homeland Security Digital Equipment Corporation Georgia Ports Authority Georgia Power Go Software Gulfstream Aerospace Honeywell IBM Lockheed Martin Memorial Medical Center Oracle Systems Raytheon Savannah Electric Savannah Foods Savannah Labs Skidaway Institute of Oceanography Union Camp Verisign Wal-Mart WTOC

Tech Careers www.techweb.com Technology Professional Job Search www.dice.com Hoovers Job Bank www.hoovers.com

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

LAW & SOCIETY? BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LAW & SOCIETY

Possible Job Titles

A Law and Society degree provides:

• Administrative Law Judge, Adjudicator, and Hearing Officer • Crime Statistician • Community Relations Officer • Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teacher • Editor • Exhibit Designer • Federal Agent • Fingerprint Examiner • Historian • Immigration and Customs Inspector • Industrial Safety and Health Engineer • Law Clerk • Law Teacher • Lawyer • Librarian • Mediation Specialist • Non-Profit Worker • Paralegal/Legal Assistant •Police Fire and Ambulance Dispatcher • Police Officer • Probation Officer • Research Assistant • Sociologist • Reporter/Correspondent • Youth Counselor

• • • •

An interdisciplinary liberal arts education focused on the relationship between societal issues, the law, and government. Preparation for careers in public service. Exposure to relevant topics in government, criminal justice, history, political theory, sociology, economics, philosophy and psychology. Preparation for the pursuit of graduate studies in related fields.

Students who earn four-year degrees at Armstrong in Law and Society will be able to understand complex issues that affect American society, how those issues relate to the Constitution, and how the various levels of government manage those issues responsibly. This innovative academic program is one of very few in the Southeast United States. As a multi-disciplinary academic program, students may choose from a broad array of courses in the social sciences. Students graduating with a major in Law and Society have gone on to pursue advanced degrees in some of the nation’s most prestigious universities. The faculty is nationally acclaimed and includes professors from the disciplines of Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Gender and Women’s Studies, History, Political Science, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology. The B.A. in Law and Society consists of academic tracks in government and judicial studies, human behavior and law, as well as social theory and philosophy. The B.A. in Law and Society consists of 123 hours of course work including 60 hours of general education requirements.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Law & Society Majors • • • • •

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Time Management: Managing one’s own time and the time of others. Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, SOCIAL & POLITICAL SCIENCE Dr. William Daugherty, Program Coordinator | 912.344.2593 | William. Daugherty@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities Law and Society prepares graduates for careers in public service at the local, state or federal level; non-profit public assistance organizations; graduate studies in the social sciences, or law school. As an interdisciplinary program, the Law and Society major, with its exposure to a broad range of knowledge, is attractive to a variety of prospective employers in both the public and private sectors, and provides the graduate with the flexibility to pursue any number of career options.

Additional Resources

As our modern, highly diverse society continues to grow and mature, government agencies and non-profit organizations will seek graduates who are educated in the issues, good or otherwise, that affect American life, but who also understand the process of working within organizations that are governed by an array of laws, rules, and regulations. The ability to understand clearly the nexus between these problems and protocol is the essence of a degree in Law and Society. For those who are considering postbaccalaureate graduate education, this degree will prepare the student for studies in any of the sub-disciplines that compose the Law and Society program.

American Historical Association

American Association for State and Local History www.aaslh.org American Association of Museums www.aam-us.org

www.historians.org National Archives www.nara.gov National Trust for Historic Preservation www.nthp.org Organization of American Historians www.oah.org Society of American Archivists www.archivists.org

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Amnesty International Customs & Border Protection Department of Homeland Security Drug Enforcement Agency FBI / CIA Georgia Bureau of Investigation Georgia Parole Department Georgia Ports Authority Law Offices NAACP Private Security Firms Savannah Chatham Metro Police Department US Military

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

LIBERAL STUDIES? BACHELOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES

Possible Job Titles

A student with academic interests for which no suitable major is offered by any single department in the College of Arts and Sciences may pursue an Liberal Studies major. A Liberal Studies major plans a program of study and senior thesis with a faculty advisor and an advisory committee, who are chosen by the student and the Liberal Studies Coordinator. The Liberal Studies program is a rigorous one that requires early planning on the student’s part. The first step for students interested in a Liberal Studies major is to contact the Coordinator of Liberal Studies for further information. Liberal Studies offers students the opportunity to develop individualized cross-disciplinary majors utilizing courses from the social sciences, the humanities, and/or the professional schools and colleges.

• Archeologist • Architectural Historian • Army Recruiter • Biography Writer • Case Manager • Childcare Provider • CIA / FBI Agent • Congressional Staff Aide • Curator • Designer • Digital Artist • Disability Benefits Coordinator • Editor • Foreign News Correspondent • Graphic Designer • Historical Society Director • Internet Developer • Journalist • Library Assistant • Lobbyist • Marketing Assistant • Museum Recruiter • Network Services Specialist • Non-Profit Administrator • Paralegal • Production Artist • Public Relations Associate • Writer

The Liberal Studies Major is unique in the College of Letters and Science in the importance it assigns to the advising role. This multi-disciplinary degree emphasizes breadth of learning. In place of the traditional major field courses, Bachelors of Liberal Studies students take additional courses in the humanities, social sciences, mathematics and sciences, and communication arts.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Liberal Studies Majors • • • • • • • •

Learn to be skillful at analytical reasoning and ample command of grammar and vocabulary Develop excellent written and oral communication skills and develop attention to detail Develop skills by obtaining a leadership role in student organizations and get involved in student government Familiarize yourself with the government application process for opportunities in federal and state government Familiarize yourself with proposal writing and gain as much experience as possible through volunteer positions, internships, or part-time jobs Participate in activities such as debate or literary clubs, campus publications, or student government Involve yourself in roles of leadership such as resident advisor, peer mentor, or student advisor Develop on transferable skills and strong statistics background for research positions

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM Dr. Peggy Clifton, Program Coordinator | 912.344.2613 | Fax 912.344.3460 | Peggy.Clifton@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

The Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree is designed for mature students with clearly defined academic and career goals. Working closely with an advisor, the student prepares an individual program of study that is consistent with his or her expectations and plans. Bachelor of Liberal Studies graduates find employment with social service agencies, governmental organizations, industries and businesses. Many employers seek broadly educated individuals for managerial and/or administrative positions for which specific orientation is provided after employment.

O*NET online.onetcenter.org (Click on Find Occupations) Georgia Career Information Center www.gcic.peachnet.edu (Must obtain log in from Career Services) Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov/oco (Type in general term for career of interest)

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Atlanta History Center Atlanta Media Balt-Trading, International Bermuda Biological Station Bradburn Company Chambers of Commerce Department of Resources Department of Community Affairs Digital Insight Educate Asian Environmental Research and Ethnoscience Fallon Products Flint River Academy Flying Rock Enterprises Georgia’s Attorney Office GTE Directories Hitachi Power Tools Jones County School District Justice Department Library of Congress New World Graphics Newnan Times Herald Patent, Inc. Research Foundations SMI Summit School The University of Georgia The Vanguard Group

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Mathematics is a powerful tool in many diverse careers. It is a language of technology. In a highly technological age, those at the forefront of mathematics and statistics are integral to rapid progress within all societies. Math plays a major role in actuarial science, astronomy, chemistry, physics, computer science, economics, engineering, biology, geophysics, operations research, oceanography, meteorology, linguistics, library science, cryptology, seismology, and environmental science. A strong mathematics background has become nearly a prerequisite for advanced study in the natural and social sciences. Critical problems in government, health, the environmental fields, private industry, and the academic world require advanced mathematical and statistical techniques for they provide exacting analytical and quantitative tools necessary. The study of mathematics satisfies a wide range of interests because it promotes the study of patterns and structures, trains in clear and logical thought, and develops the imagination. Mathematics plays an integral role in a variety of professions. The mathematics program at Armstrong offers a very strong and flexible major. Three basic concentrations in mathematics are available to students: pure mathematics, applied mathematics and mathematics education. The strength and flexibility of the program allow a student to acquire the academic background to pursue graduate studies in a variety of different disciplines or to prepare to seek employment in a variety of work environments.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Mathematical Sciences Majors • • • • • • • • •

Seek opportunities to investigate, collect, and analyze data, while maintain accuracy applying creativity in all electives Supplement curriculum by working on Mathematical Department research teams Gain experience practicing precision in reporting in all classes Gain experience collecting and reporting relevant data while perceiving patterns and structures in every study discipline Attain an internship in an applied field of mathematics within your first several semesters to ensure major choice Seek research experiences that allow for attendance at appropriate conferences, make presentations if possible Develop the ability to preparing poster presentations and volunteer to help mathematical researchers with development Attain appropriate Internships and work experiences throughout your 4 years & maintain correspondence Consider the full variety of masters and PhD programs in the field, continue correspondence with all previous contacts

Possible Job Titles • Accountant • Actuary • Appraiser • Bank Examiner • Biometrician/ Biostatistician • Budget Analyst • Controller • Cost Estimator/ Analyst • Cryptographer/ Cryptologist • Econometrician • Financial Auditor • International Trade Specialist • Investment Banker • Inventory Control Specialist • IRS Investigator • Logistician • Math Teacher • Mortgage Researcher • Numerical Analyst • Operations Research Analyst • Public Health Statistician • Research Analyst • Risk & Insurance Specialist • Securities Broker • Senior Technical Advisor • Software System Consultant • Software Support Specialist • Transportation Planner

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Dr. Lorrie Hoffman, Department Head | 912.344.2557 | Fax 912.344.3461 | Lorrie.Hoffman@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Skills at problem solving and analysis developed in a mathematics major are readily applicable in a wide range of work assignments, including many work assignments that are not specifically mathematical in nature. Industries that employ significant numbers of mathematics majors include the banking and finance industry, utilities, manufacturing, and insurance. Many mathematics majors choose to enhance their preparation for a profession by attending graduate school.

American Mathematical Society www.ams.org The Mathematical Association of America www.maa.org/ Society for Industrial & Applied Math www.siam.org/

The intellectual skills developed by studying mathematics are highly regarded by graduate and professional programs. Graduates with these skills are warmly received and are academically successful in such programs as public administration, business, law, medicine, meteorology, environmental science and industrial hygiene. Beyond these opportunities, there is always a need for energetic, dedicated mathematics teachers to assume positions of responsibility in our schools.

Occupational Outlook Handbook stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos043.htm SIAM-AMS Nonacademic Careers in Math www.ams.org/careers/

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Aerospace Companies Banks Bureau of Labor Statistics Colleges & Universities Defense Logistics Agency Defense Mapping Agency Drug Enforcement Administration Engineering Technician Health Care Financing Administration Hewitt Associates ICF Kaiser Engineering Group. Insurance Justice Department Local & State Planning Offices Lost Control Representative Market Research Firms Mercer HR Consulting Mortgage Companies NASA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Institute of Standards & Technology National Security Agency NOAA PRC Environmental Management Public Financial Management Research & Development Firms Test Development Corporation Transportation Department US Customs Service US Navy Weights and Measures Office

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE This degree program prepares students to be successful on the American Society for Clinical Pathologists Board of Registry or the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel Certification exams. We are pleased that the majority of our graduates continue to pass versus the national average of approximately 65 percent. Bachelor’s degree programs in medical laboratory science include courses in chemistry, biological sciences, microbiology, mathematics, and statistics, as well as specialized courses devoted to knowledge and skills used in the clinical laboratory. Many programs also offer or require courses in management, business, and computer applications. The on-campus Medical Laboratory Science student laboratory is well equipped with a variety of instrumentation, supplies and computerization. We maintain clinical affiliation agreements with facilities in Georgia, South Carolina and Florida. Other agreements may be arranged to accommodate students who desire to live outside of Savannah. The 54-hour professional sequence is composed of didactic courses in the major laboratory areas (clinical chemistry, blood banking, microbiology, hematology, serology and urinalysis) and the clinical practicum. The professional sequence is completed on the Armstrong campus and at its clinical affiliates.

Possible Job Titles • Clinical Laboratory Manager • Clinical Laboratory Scientist (CLS) • Clinical Laboratory Technologist • Cytology Laboratory Manager • Laboratory Assistant • Laboratory Associate • Laboratory Supervisor • Laboratory Technician • Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) • Medical Technologist (MT) • Microbiologist • Non-Registered Technician • Phlebotomist • Research Assistant • Toxicology Laborator

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Medical Laboratory Science Majors •

• • • • •

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one. Monitoring: Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. Quality Control Analysis: Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance. Complex Problem Solving: Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE Dr. Hassan Aziz, Department Head | 912.344.2549 | Fax 912.344.3427 | Hassan.Aziz@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Armstrong graduates have a successful track record of finding employment in their field, and the need for technologists is expected to continue since there is a state and nationally recognized shortage.

American Medical Technologists

Medical Technologists work in medical laboratories where they perform and/or supervise the testing of blood, urine, spinal fluid and other body specimens. Applying knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and biology, medical technologists use both manual and automated techniques to provide diagnostic data to physicians. Many technologists specialize in a specific area such as clinical chemistry, immunology, microbiology, or hematology. While some medical technologists prefer to work at the bench, directly performing clinical analyses, some combine skills and interests to work as laboratory administrators, educational coordinators, technical or sales representatives for commercial suppliers of clinical laboratories, or medical research technologists. Employment may be sought in hospital labs, physicians’ offices, clinics, public health centers, military, and commercial firms.

www.amt1.com/ Georgia Career Information Center www.gcic.peachnet.edu (Must obtain log in from Career Services) O*Net Online http://online.onetcenter.org Occupational Outlook Handbook www.bls.gov/oco Alberta Occupational Profiles www.alis.gov.ab.ca/occinfo/frameset.asp

Job Outlook Employment of clinical laboratory workers is expected to grow by 14 percent between 2008 and 2018, faster than the average for all occupations. The volume of laboratory tests continues to increase with both population growth and the development of new types of tests. Although hospitals are expected to continue to be the major employer of clinical laboratory workers, employment is expected also to grow rapidly in medical and diagnostic laboratories, offices of physicians, and all other ambulatory healthcare services. Job opportunities are expected to be excellent because the number of job openings is expected to continue to exceed the number of jobseekers. Although significant, job growth will not be the only source of opportunities. As in most occupations, many additional openings will result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations, retire, or stop working for some other reason. Willingness to relocate will further enhance one’s job prospects.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION Georgia middle school (grades 4-8) initial certification may be obtained through the undergraduate middle school education program and through an “M.Ed. plus certification” option. This preserves teachers specialize in two subject areas from among language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies and develop an understanding of the unique cognitive, social, and emotional needs of young adolescents. The education and content courses we offer prepare our candidates to be effective teachers in today’s diverse classrooms. The curriculum includes core curriculum requirements and professional courses including a 15-week teaching experience. We expect our students to become proficient in the use of technology in the classroom, and technology is woven into every education course. In addition, The Technology Center for teacher educators offers a variety of technologies available for classroom infusion. Graduates, upon completion of all requirements, are certified to teach fourth through eighth grades in the State of Georgia. Our degree program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and certified by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC).

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Middle Grades Education Majors • Develop skills related to problem-solving and quick thinking • Learn how to work effectively with parents and adults as well as children • Develop soft skills such as fostering a positive learning environment, communicating/ presenting material in multiple ways, and developing meaningful relationships • Volunteer with the Boys & Girls Club or Big Brothers Big Sisters to develop a long term relationship with a child and to learn motivation techniques • Earn good grades in your freshmen and sophomore level courses to establish a solid academic record for being accepted to the program • Establish a good working relationship with your cooperating teacher during your student teacher experience senior year as their reference will be invaluable to you

Possible Job Titles • Alumni Relations Coordinator • Athletic Coach • Camp Director • Child Life Specialist • Computer Graphics Instructor • Education & Training Instructor • Educational Administrator • Educational Materials Coordinator • Educational Therapist • Employee Training Instructor • Information Specialist • In-Home Daycare • Learning Specialist • Library Assistant • Management Trainee • Missionary Worker • Organizational Trainer • Outdoor Educator • Recreation Coordinator • Religious Education Coordinator • Resource Teacher • Section Supervisor • Social Services Volunteer • Teacher

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF MIDDLE & SECONDARY EDUCATION Dr. Patrici Colberly-Holt, Interim Department Head | 912.344.2568 | Fax 912.344.3443 | Patricia.Colberly@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Upon completion of this degree, students are eligible to teach elementary school in the State of Georgia in both public and private schools. Teachers in middle grade levels are in demand, and our graduates are employed in Chatham County as well as surrounding counties, in other parts of the state, and nationally.

American Association of School Administrators www.aasa.org/about/index.cfm American Educational Research Association www.aera.net

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Amazon.com Atlanta Veterans Administrative Business and Industry Camps Campus Crusade for Christ Churches Clarke County Schools Colleges and Universities Community Centers Consulting Firms Educational Publishers Emory University HealthSouth Corporation Hospitals Human Resource Offices Libraries Non-Profit Agencies Private Tutoring Agencies Professional Organizations Public & Private Schools Public Relations Firms Savannah Country Day State & Federal Government Textbook Companies Wal-Mart Pharmacy Waseca Learning Environment Woodward Academy Youth Service Center

American Federation of Teachers www.aft.org/ National Education Association www.nea.org/index.html

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

MUSIC?

Possible Job Titles

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION The Bachelor of Arts in Music degree provides students with a strong foundation in music combined with a broad liberal arts core curriculum. The music major at Armstrong has the choice of a variety of areas of specialization including keyboard, voice or instrumental applied study; composition; or a liberal arts track. Each of these programs includes a strong component of music history and theory that equips the graduate to succeed in a variety of music related professions. Music education students are musicians who desire to teach other people about music. They demonstrate a commitment to understanding the nature of music and the practices involved in being a performer whether as soloist or ensemble member. They are adaptive, resourceful and must demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of music, the nature of the learner and the materials and methods from which they work. The music teacher faces many demands musically, yet the profession is rewarding for those who want to work in the field. The Bachelor of Music Education degree offers a broad-based curriculum with a strong and relevant content for undergraduates desiring certification as P-12 music teachers in band, choral and elementary music. The academic components of the degree compel the student to acquire knowledge in music subject areas such as theory, history and literature. The performance component of the degree prepares the student with acceptable solo and ensemble performance skills on one primary instrument (brass, guitar, percussion, piano, string, voice or woodwinds) and functional piano skills. Armstrong music education students enjoy ample opportunity to regularly perform along side performance majors in ensemble concerts and chamber recitals in the beautifully renovated Fine Arts Hall Auditorium.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Music Majors • • • • • • • • • •

Gain internship experience working for music companies and enhance ability to read and write music Demonstrate creativity and artistic expression and concentrate & practice intensely for long periods Perceive patterns/structures and learn different Performance techniques Develop creative writing skills and an ability to explain processes and concepts Thinking critically, and an ability to compare and contrast Learn to evaluate ideas, sources and presentations Planning and presenting specific viewpoints and interpretations An awareness of messages, cultural and institutional values Ability to measure media effects and have an attention to details Develop planning, management, reporting and editing skills

• Assistant Band Director • Background Music Designer • Composer/ Arranger • Copyright Specialist • Critic • Educational Program Specialist • Engineer/ Mixer • Film Music Director/ Editor • Instrument Manufacturer • Instrument Technician • Manager Trainee • Music Equipment Sales Rep • Music Publicist • Music Software • Music Therapist • Orchestra Librarian • Orchestra Manager • Project Coordinator • Public Relations Specialist • Recording Technician • Sales/Marketing • School Band Director • Special Events Coordinator • Studio Musician • Talent Agent • Technical Writer

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ART, MUSIC & THEATRE Dr. Tom Cato, Department Head | 912.344.2556 | Fax 912.344.3419 | Tom.Catoi@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Music

American Music Therapy Association, Careers

Students graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Music degree have a wide variety of professional opportunities before them. Armstrong graduates have pursued advanced degrees in church music, music education and performance. The Bachelor of Arts in Music degree also qualifies the graduate to pursue study in areas such as music library studies, music management and commercial music. In addition to classical studies, the department also has an active jazz music program with ample performance opportunities in the community. Following graduation, musicians find that continued performance avenues in chorus work and wind ensembles also exist locally. Many graduates also pursue careers as private music teachers or as church musicians.

www.musictherapy.org/ Careers in Music www.berklee.edu/careers/default.html Music Careers www.menc.org/industry/job/careers/careers.html Music Online: Orchestras in the U.S. www.musicalonline.com/orchestra/orchestra.htm Women in Music www.womeninmusic.com/careers.htm

Music Education The primary career of a music educator is teaching band, choral, orchestra, and/or general music at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Our music education graduates have had excellent success finding jobs in various areas of Georgia. The Savannah-Chatham County Board of Education is the largest employer of music educators in the area with more than sixty band, choral, general music and orchestra directors. Employment is also available in rapidly growing school systems in adjacent counties including Bryan, Liberty and Effingham counties in Georgia and across the state border in South Carolina. Additionally, there are many private schools in the area that employ both full and part-time music teachers. Besides these primary career positions, jobs are available with institutions such as day care centers, music camps and churches. Positions in outlying areas are commonly easier to find than in urban areas such as Savannah. Salaries generally begin around $33,000 and go beyond $45,000 for candidates with experience and higher degrees.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

NURSING?

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING

Possible Job Titles

The Armstrong Atlantic State University baccalaureate nursing program has an excellent reputation for preparing successful graduates. Our nursing program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and is nationally accredited. The American Nurses Association, the National League for Nursing and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing have adopted a position statement calling for the baccalaureate degree in nursing as the academic preparation for professional nursing practice, making the B.S. in nursing a must have for anyone desiring to be a nurse. Graduates of Armstrong’s program are prepared to provide comprehensive nursing care for people in a variety of settings. The BSN also provides the foundation for graduate education in nursing.

• Acute Care Nurses • Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse • Cardiac Care Unit Nurse (CCU Nurse) • Certified Nurse Operating Room (CNOR) • Charge Nurse • Clinical Nurse Specialist • Coronary Care Unit Nurse (CCU Nurse) • Critical Care Nurse • Home Health Aides • Informatics Nurse Specialist • Medical and Health Services Managers • Nurse (OR RN) • Nurse Midwife • Nurse Practitioner • Nursing Aids, Orderlies and Attendants • Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary • Oncology RN (Oncology Registered Nurse) • Operating Room Registered • Psychiatric Nurse • Psychiatric Technician • Registered Nurse (RN) • Relief Charge Nurse • School Nurse • Staff RN (Staff Registered Nurse)

Admission is competitive and criteria include the following: (1) admission to Armstrong; (2) a grade of C or better in each required science course, Area A course (English 1101, 1102, Algebra), Area D (Statistics) and Area F course (Psych 1101 and Human Growth and Development); (3) completion of all Areas A, D, and F courses; and (4) a minimum adjusted GPA of 2.7 on all prerequisite courses. Following admission to Armstrong, a department of nursing admission application must be submitted.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Nursing Majors • •

• • • • • • •

Social Perceptiveness: Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Coordination: Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions. Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Service Orientation: Actively looking for ways to help people. Monitoring: Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF NURSING Ms. Rita Brownlee, Degree Program Assistant | 912.344.2575 | Fax 912.344.3481 | Rita.Brownlee@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

As the largest healthcare occupation, registered nurses held about 2.6 million jobs in 2008. Hospitals employed the majority of RNs, with 60 percent of such jobs. About 8 percent of jobs were in offices of physicians, 5 percent in home healthcare services, 5 percent in nursing care facilities, and 3 percent in employment services. The remainder worked mostly in government agencies, social assistance agencies, and educational services.

American Nurses Association

Professional nurses holding bachelor’s degrees are prepared to function in hospitals, schools, industry, clinics, community and home health. Professional nurses are well prepared for advancement in clinical and management settings. Graduates are employed in Southeast Georgia as well as nationally and internationally.

www.gcic.peachnet.edu

Overall job opportunities are expected to be excellent for registered nurses. Employers in some parts of the country and in certain employment settings report difficulty in attracting and retaining an adequate number of RNs, primarily because of an aging RN workforce and a lack of younger workers to fill positions. Despite the slower employment growth in hospitals, job opportunities should still be excellent because of the relatively high turnover of hospital nurses. To attract and retain qualified nurses, hospitals may offer signing bonuses, family-friendly work schedules, or subsidized training. Although faster employment growth is projected in physicians’ offices and outpatient care centers, RNs may face greater competition for these positions because they generally offer regular working hours and more comfortable working environments. Generally, RNs with at least a bachelor’s degree will have better job prospects than those without a bachelor’s.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

www.nursingworld.org/ Discover Nursing www.discovernursing.com/ Georgia Career Information Center (Must obtain log in from Career Services) O*Net Online http://online.onetcenter.org

www.bls.gov/oco

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • •

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta East Georgia Regional Jefferson County Hospital Liberty Regional Medical Center Mayo Clinic Memorial University Medical Center OB/GYN Associates of Savannah Satilla Medical Center South Georgia Medical Center St. Joseph’s/ Candler Hospital System St. Luke’s Hospital US Army

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

POLITICAL SCIENCE? BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Possible Job Titles

Political science studies governments around the world by concentrating on how a government’s structure and function affect social order. Students who major in political science gain a solid awareness in the diversity of government around the globe and the various political theories, parties, and interest groups that correspond with these systems. In addition, students develop an understanding of international relations, public laws, public administration, personal rights and freedoms, justice, and political authority. Like all good liberal arts majors, political science helps students develop their analytical and problem-solving abilities, as well as improve their written and oral communication skills. It provides excellent preparation for graduate education in law and public administration, as well as doctoral programs in political science. Political Science is also a good foundation for careers in public service, campaign work, and various management positions in the private sector.

• Campaign Coordinator • Case Clerk • Communications Assistant • Congressional Aide • Customer Service Representative • Detention Officer • Historical Interpreter • Human Resource Specialist • Insurance Agent • Lawyer • Legal Services Representative • Legislative Assistant • Litigation Clerk • Management Analyst • Manager in Training • Marketing Assistant • Paralegal Consultant • Patrol Officer • Peace Corps Volunteer • Political Analyst • Probation / Parole Officer • Program Officer • Project Coordinator • Public Relations Specialist • Real Estate Title Examiner • Research Technician • Sales Representative • Special Agent

A political science degree provides: • A broad liberal arts education in politics, law and government • Preparation for a career in public service • Academic training in political science (historical perspective as well as behavioral techniques and data) for the pursuit of graduate studies in the field. Earning a four-year degree at Armstrong in political science will enable the student to understand American government relations, comparative politics, international relations, and political science.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Political Science Majors • • • • • •

Be prepared to begin a political career as a volunteer before moving to full-time or paid positions Volunteer or do an internship with the staff of a local, state, or Federal government official Participate in an industry specific internship during the Spring/Fall semester Become involved in student organizations focusing on politics, government, or other fields of interest Obtain leadership skills by volunteering for community service projects and developing familiarity with opportunities in the Savannah nonprofit community Become a member of a professional association not just the student chapter

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, SOCIAL & POLITICAL SCIENCE Dr. Zaphon Wilson, Department Head | 912.344.2593 | Fax 912.344.9498 | Zaphon.Wilson@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Political Science prepares graduates for careers in the legal profession, urban planning; public policy research; journalism; local government, federal and state agencies, the military, college teaching and international business. Political science graduates from Armstrong have gone on to a variety of rewarding careers including criminal prosecution, public defense; federal, state, and local law enforcement; journalism; local and state planning; Congressional aides; politics; and college teaching and administration.

American Association of Political Consultants www.theaapc.org American League of Lobbyists www.alldc.org American Political Science www.apsanet.org

In the post-Cold War era, government agencies seek students trained in political economy, computer sciences and foreign languages. For those who are considering graduate careers in political science, it is projected that the academic market will begin to improve early in the next century due to faculty retirements and an increase in undergraduate enrollment. Many political science graduates traditionally find employment in business fields, such as marketing, personnel, advertising, public relations, banking and finance. Others obtain management-training positions with public and private corporations. Business firms in the United States and abroad will continue to hire many young political scientists with foreign language and area-study backgrounds.

Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management www.appam.org Best Federal Places to Work www.bestplacestowork.org Government Departments and Agencies www.firstgov.gov Georgia Governor’s Intern Program www.ganet.org/governor/intern Georgia Local Government Access

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Atlanta Journal – Constitution Clerk of Superior Court Coca-Cola Company Consultec Datastream System Democratic Campaign Committee Ernest & Julio Gallo Georgia Power Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Hewitt Associates Jackson EMC JET Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta Katz Media Group National Rifle Association Peace Corps Proctor & Gamble Prudential Securities Teach For America Trico Investments US Department of Justice US News Wire US Military

www.glga.org Georgia Municipal Association www.gmanet.com National Association of Counties www.naco.org National Association of Schools of Public Affairs & Administration www.naspaa.org Part Time Federal Employment Opportunities www.studentjobs.gov Partnership for Public Service www.makingthedifference.org

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

PSYCHOLOGY?

Possible Job Titles

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY Psychology is the study of human and non-human animal behavior (normal and abnormal) and the cognitive, emotional, social, and biological processes related to that behavior. Majoring in psychology can prepare a student for a number of different roles: teacher, researcher, service provider, administrator, or consultant. Psychology is a diverse field with room for students with many different interests and abilities. The Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology offers students a traditional liberal arts education with an emphasis on the science of behavior and mental processes. This degree option prepares students to enter the workforce soon after graduation or, alternatively, can help prepare students for careers in other professions, such as law, health sciences and business. In order to earn the B.A. in psychology, students need to complete an approved senior internship in the community so that they are exposed to at least one work setting for which their education has prepared them and also a sequence of two courses in either a foreign language or accounting to help them develop marketable skills. The Bachelor of Science degree in psychology emphasizes the research skills and experiences that prepare students for rigorous graduate programs in a variety of areas of psychology including clinical, social, developmental and industrial-organizational. B.S. students complete at least two, but preferably more, research projects that involve data collection, statistical analysis and professional presentation of the project. Students work closely with the department’s faculty members to design, carry out, write up, present and potentially publish their research projects.

Skill Sets & Interests Associated with Psychology Majors • • • • • • • •

Understanding of Diversity Research Problem-Solving Analysis/Synthesis of Different Views Written and Oral Communication Skills Ability to Work with a Variety of People Critical Thinking Interpersonal Skills

• Assessment Coordinator • Behavioral Data Specialist • Case Manager • Clinical Assistant • Counselor • Creative Director • Customer Service Manager • Direct Care Counselor • Director of Research • Family Case Manager • Health Science Specialist • Human Resource Generalist • Management Trainee • Mental Health Assistant • Office Manager • Pharmaceutical Representative • Placement Coordinator • Police Officer • Psychiatric Technician • Recruiter • Research Assistant/ Associate • Residential Counselor • Retirement Specialist • Service Corps Fellow • Social Worker • Teacher • Volunteer Coordinator

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Dr. Jane Wong, Department Head | 912.344.2762 | Fax 912.344.3484 | Jane.Wong@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

A four-year Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology means that a student graduates with a strong general education and preparation for entry-level employment in many career fields which are open to those who hold liberal arts degrees. Students can enhance their employability by using the undergraduate years as a time of exploration: interviews with people in various careers, internships, volunteer work and part-time jobs. A national survey showed that one-year after graduation, 50 percent of psychology majors were employed in business and industry, 17 percent in science and engineering, 15 percent in educational institutions, 10 percent in nonprofit organizations and 8 percent in government. Fields that bachelor’s degree graduates in psychology have entered include administration, employment interviewing, gerontology, marketing and public relations, technical writing, sales, personnel, child-care, health services, probation and parole and casework.

American Art Therapy Association

The Bachelor of Science degree in psychology is strongly based in the scientific tradition, and the students are trained to use the tools of science through multiple experiences in original, independent research. Students discuss and conduct research with faculty who are trained in their areas of interest. Graduates of Armstrong have been extremely successful in graduate and professional schools. Students who plan on further study should work closely with faculty in meeting entrance criteria. These include better than average grades and GRE scores, letters of recommendation and research experience.

National Association of School Psychologists

www.arttherapy.org American Assoc. for Marriage and Family Therapy www.aamft.org American Counseling Association www.counseling.org American Music Therapy Association www.musictherapy.org American Psychological Association www.apa.org

www.nasponline.org National Board for Certified Counselors www.nbcc.org Mental Health America www.nmha.org Society for Human Resource Management

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advantage Behavioral Health Athens Regional Medical Center Athens-Clarke County Government Bethesda Home for Boys Better Business Bureau Broadcasting Companies (PBS) Charter Behavioral Health Clarke County Detention Center Department of Rehab Services Department of Revenue Deveruex Treatment Center Department of Family and Children Services Federal Bureau of Prisons Federal Judicial Center Georgia Department of Corrections Georgia Department of Labor Glaxo Smith Kline North Carolina Hillel State Court Office US Veterans Administration

www.shrm.org or www.shrmatlanta.org Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology http://siop.org

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES Tracks in Radiography, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine, Sonography & Cardiovascular Interventional Sciences Students who earn bachelor’s degrees in Radiologic Sciences become qualified health care professionals who aid physicians in medical practice. At Armstrong, students choose among the tracks in Radiography, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine, Sonography, and Cardiovascular Interventional Sciences. Each track has its own accreditation, educational, and clinical training requirements. Program graduates of Radiography, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine are eligible to sit for the national certification examination of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Sonography graduates are candidates for the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) national certificate. Graduates of the CVIS track are eligible to sit for the Cardiovascular Invasive Specialist (RCIS) national certification. Students who wish to earn a degree in Radiologic Sciences must apply to the program in addition to applying to the university. Specific information on how to complete the application process is located on the department web site.

Skills Associated with Radiologic Sciences Majors • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Active Listening Operation and Control Services Orientation Coordination Operation Monitoring Social Perceptiveness Instructing Judgment and Decision Making Oral Comprehension & Expression Near Vision Arm-Hand Steadiness Information Ordering Problem Sensitivity Control Precision Deductive Reasoning Finger Dexterity Multilimb Coordination

Possible Job Titles • Radiographers examine the patient for broken bones, ulcers, tumors, diseases, or malfunctions of various organs through the production of radiographs (x-rays). Radiographers can also specialize in CT, MRI, and mammography. • Radiation Therapists operate sophisticated equipment and communicate with patients who receive daily radiation treatments. They work with physicians to make sure those radiation therapy treatments are efficient, of high quality, and recorded accurately. • Nuclear Medicine Technology is a specialist track in which radioactive pharmaceuticals are used to diagnose or treat disease. The technologist administers small amounts of radioactive pharmaceuticals into the patient. The radiation is detected by specialized equipment, which converts it to images. • Sonographers image organs, tissues and vessels with high frequency sound waves emitted into the body. These waves bounce off tissues and send back “echoes” that are converted into images. • Cardiovascular Interventional Science (CVIS) Specialists are members in cardiac catheterization departments, electrophysiology laboratories, and angiography departments. They help diagnose and treat blood vessel and heart diseases.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES Dr. Elwin Tilson, Department Head | 912.344.2802 | Fax 912.344.3469 | Elwin.Tilson@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Employment Outlook

Bureau of Labor Statistics – Radiologic

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the long-range employment picture for radiographers, radiation therapists, nuclear medicine technologists, sonographers and cardiovascular interventional specialists is excellent. Upon graduation, radiographers, nuclear medicine technologists, and sonographers are employed by hospitals, physician’s offices, clinics, public heath service agencies, and private industries. Radiation therapists work in hospitals or freestanding cancer centers. Cardiovascular Interventional Science graduates are employed by hospitals and physician groups who diagnose and treat cardiovascular diseases.

Technologists and Technicians

Employment change

Technology

Employment of radiologic technologists is expected to increase by about 17 percent from 2008 to 2018, faster than the average for all occupations. As the population grows and ages, there will be an increasing demand for diagnostic imaging. With age comes increased incidence of illness and injury, which often requires diagnostic imaging for diagnosis. In addition to diagnosis, diagnostic imaging is used to monitor the progress of disease treatment. With the increasing success of medical technologies in treating disease, diagnostic imaging will increasingly be needed to monitor progress of treatment.

www.bls.gov/oco/ocos105.htm The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists https://www.arrt.org/ American Society of Radiologic Technologists https://www.asrt.org/ Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic www.jrcert.org/

Although hospitals will remain the principal employer of radiologic technologists, a number of new jobs will be found in offices of physicians and diagnostic imaging centers. As technology advances many imaging modalities are becoming less expensive and more feasible to have in a physician’s office. Job prospects In addition to job growth, job openings also will arise from the need to replace technologists who leave the occupation. Those with knowledge of more than one diagnostic imaging procedure—such as CT, MRI, and mammography—will have the best employment opportunities as employers seek to control costs by using multi-credentialed employees. Demand for radiologic technologists and technicians can tend to be regional with some areas having large demand, while other areas are saturated. Technologists and technicians willing to relocate may have better job prospects. CT is continuing to become a frontline diagnosis tool. Instead of taking x rays to decide whether a CT is needed, as was the practice before, it is often the first choice for imaging because of its accuracy. MRI also is increasingly used.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

REHABILITATION SCIENCE? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN REHABILITATION SCIENCE

Possible Job Titles

The Bachelor of Science degree in Rehabilitation Science is designed to prepare students for graduate study in physical therapy, occupational therapy or sports medicine (athletic training). This degree combines core courses with a major curriculum specifically designed by the physical therapy faculty to meet the needs of students entering either the fields of physical therapy, occupational therapy or sports medicine.

• Athletic Administration • Athletic Trainer (e.g., high school, college, professional sports, clinics) • Cardiac Rehabilitation (e.g., hospitals, clinics) • Coach • Commercial, Community and Corporate Fitness • Health/ Wellness Programming (e.g., hospitals, universities, hotels, recreation agencies) • Home Care Physical Therapist • Outpatient Physical Therapist • Pediatric Physical Therapist • Personal Trainer • Physical Education Teacher • Physical Therapist • Recreation Director • Registered Physical Therapist (RPT) • Rehabilitation Services Director • Sports Medicine • Staff Physical Therapist • Strength & Conditioning Coach • Teaching (e.g., elementary, high school, college)

The bachelor’s degree program combines a strong science curriculum (chemistry, physics, biology, and anatomy and physiology) with a strong background in the behavioral sciences (general and abnormal psychology and health and human development). The students’ knowledge of exercise and exercise principles is developed in a three-course sequence of courses that focuses in turn on the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular and cardiovascular-pulmonary bases of exercise. An opportunity is given to customize each program with up to six elective courses that can be chosen from the biological, behavioral and health sciences Rehabilitation Science is one of several degree paths that can be used to enter physical therapy, occupational therapy, or graduate sports medicine (athletic training) programs. This degree requires the completion of university core and prerequisite sciences, including statistics, general biology (2 courses), chemistry (2 courses), anatomy and physiology (2 courses), and physics (2 courses). The upperdivision courses in Rehabilitation Science include such topics as exercise physiology, kinesiology, applied anatomy and neuroscience.

Skills & Abilities Associated with Rehabilitation Science Majors •

• • • • • • •

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems Social Perceptiveness: Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do Time Management: Managing one’s own time and the time of others Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one Monitoring: Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action Service Orientation: Actively looking for ways to help people

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY Dr. David Lake, Interim Department Head | 912.344.2580 | Fax 912.344.3469 | David.Lake@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

There is a tremendous demand for rehabilitation professionals in Georgia and the nation, with current and future shortages reported by the Bureau of Labor. The employment outlook is projected to remain favorable. Those who major in rehabilitation science may go on to graduate school (e.g., Advanced degree in physical therapy, sports medicine, occupational therapy, exercise physiology, kinesiology) Employment is expected to grow much faster than average. Employment of physical therapists is expected to grow by 30 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. Changes to restrictions on reimbursement for physical therapy services by third-party payers will increase patient access to services and, thus, increase demand. The increasing elderly population will drive growth in the demand for physical therapy services. The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to chronic and debilitating conditions that require therapeutic services. Also, the baby-boom generation is entering the prime age for heart attacks and strokes, increasing the demand for cardiac and physical rehabilitation. Medical and technological developments will permit a greater percentage of trauma victims and newborns with birth defects to survive, creating additional demand for rehabilitative care.

American College of Sports Medicine www.acsm.org/ American Occupational Therapy Association www.aota.org/ American Physical Therapy Association www.apta.org/ Bureau of Labor Statistics - Physical Therapists www.bls.gov/oco/ocos080.htm National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org/ Therapy Jobs www.therapyjobs.com

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bryan County Health and Rehabilitation Center DeKalb Medical Center Innovative Therapy Concepts Lakeside Manual Physical Therapy Center Memorial University Medical Center Piedmont Fayette Hospital Savannah Rehabilitation and Nursing Center Shepherd Center Spine and Sport St. Joseph’s/ Candler UHS Pruitt Corporation US Military Winn Army Community Hospital

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

RESPIRATORY THERAPY? BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RESPIRATORY THERAPY

Possible Job Titles

The healthcare field of respiratory therapy focuses on treating patients with cardiopulmonary (heart/lung) illnesses and breathing difficulties. Armstrong’s program is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) and has an advanced practitioner, registered respiratory therapist (RRT) outcome goal. Our graduates are eligible to sit for the credentialing exams administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and our graduates consistently pass their boards at a rate 20 to 25 percent higher than the national mean. We have a near 100 percent job placement history and our annual graduate employer surveys indicate a high level of satisfaction with the program.

• Cardiac Technician • Cardiology Technician • Cardiopulmonary Technician • Cardiovascular Technician • Cardiovascular Technologist (CVT) • Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) • Certified Respiratory Therapy Technician (CRTT) • Clinical Coordinator of Respiratory Therapy • Director of Cardiopulmonary Services • Echo Cardiographer • EKG/ECG Technician • Health Specialties Teachers • Medical Assistants • Medical and Health Services Managers • Radiation Therapists • Registered Cardiovascular Invasive Specialist (RCIS) • Registered Pulmonary Function Technologist • Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) • Registered Cardiac Sonographer (RCS) • Respiratory Care Practitioner (RCP) • Respiratory Technician • Respiratory Therapist (RT) • Respiratory Therapy Director • Respiratory Therapy Technician • Staff Respiratory Therapist

Students in the Respiratory Therapy program will have opportunities to train and observe in sleep, neonatal-pediatrics, long-term acute care, home care, durable medical equipment, cystic fibrosis and asthma patient education, and other diverse diagnostic and patient respiratory care specialties. Students also receive intensive preparation for the board and credentialing examinations. Armstrong has standing agreements with many regional hospitals, and the first four semesters of clinical practicum are done at local hospitals and clinical sites outside of Savannah. In the fifth semester, students may apply for a respiratory therapy externship at hospitals across the states of Georgia, South Carolina, and North Florida. If a hospital and the university agree to provide the student an opportunity, the student may work with a preceptor at a hospital where they would like to be employed after graduation.

Skills and Abilities Associated with Respiratory Therapy Majors •

• • • • • • •

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Instructing: Teaching others how to do something. Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Monitoring: Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. Time Management: Managing one’s own time and the time of others. Operation Monitoring: Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly. Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF RESPIRATORY THERAPY Dr. Douglas Masini, Department Head | 912.344.2549 | Fax 912.344.3472 | Douglas.Masini@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

The U.S. Department of Labor projects a 49 percent increase in demand for respiratory care providers (RCP) in the next 10 years. The scope of practice for the respiratory therapist has expanded during the past 15 years, largely due to advances in medicine and technology.

American Association for Respiratory Care

As the scope of practice has changed, new subspecialty areas in pulmonary and sleep diagnostics, neonatal/pediatric or adult intensive care, rehabilitation, and home care have emerged. Registered therapists may use their education and experience to enroll in physician assistant, anesthetist and perfusionist programs, or medical school. Along with working in hospital settings, our graduates find careers in research clinical trials management, asthma education, private business, health administration, education or management.

www.aarc.org/ Bureau of Labor Statistics - Respiratory Therapists www.bls.gov/oco/ocos321.htm National Board for Respiratory Care www.nbrc.org/ The Journal of Pulmonary Technique www.respiratorytherapy.ca/

Older Americans suffer most from respiratory ailments and cardiopulmonary diseases, such as pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and heart disease. As the number of older persons increases, the need for respiratory therapists is expected to increase as well. In addition, advances in inhalable medications and in the treatment of lung transplant patients, heart attack and accident victims, and premature infants—many of whom depend on a ventilator during part of their treatment—will increase the demand for the services of respiratory care practitioners. Job opportunities are expected to be very good, especially for those with a bachelor’s degree and certification, and those with cardiopulmonary care skills or experience working with infants. The vast majority of job openings will continue to be in hospitals. However, a growing number of openings are expected to be outside of hospitals, especially in home healthcare services, offices of physicians or other health practitioners, consumer-goods rental firms, or in the employment services industry as a temporary worker in various settings.

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

SPANISH?

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH-TEACHER CERTIFICATION Students majoring in Spanish will take courses that combine the study of literature, language, culture, and linguistics, which will lead to a development of language proficiency and understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. This world primarily consists of language, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking countries found in South America and Spain. Proficiency in a foreign language also helps students with this major find employment in the public and private sectors. Having a greater sense of the Spanish culture, students are prepared for professions in government, politics, international relations, business, banking, trade, travel, or a host of other professions. Even if students don’t use their ability to speak Spanish, the cultural awareness gained is a transferable skill that will be highly prized. Students who earn a four-year degree in Spanish at Armstrong will study and comprehend the historical role and cultural value of the Spanish-speaking world, and will be able to use this knowledge in communication settings. A degree in Spanish provides: • • •

A broad liberal arts education with emphasis on both Peninsular and Latin American language, culture, and literature Preparation for those seeking careers in teaching Academic training for those who wish to pursue graduate studies in the field

Strategies Associated with jobs for Spanish Majors • • • • • •

Develop cultural sensitivity by learning about other cultures, traditions, and events Take upper level Spanish courses to further your proficiency in written and spoken Spanish Consider doing a study abroad for a semester to gain a true understanding of Spanish culture Use your upper level courses in Spanish to analyze and synthesize different viewpoints Take advantage of class projects and activities where you can showcase your communication skills Join a campus club or organization such as HOLA or the International Student Organization to learn how to work with a variety of people

Possible Job Titles • Anthropologist • Assistant Project Manager • Business Manager • CIA/FBI Special Agent • Community Relations • Copy Editor • Corporate Specialist • Courier • Customs Officer • Development Assistant • Director of Volunteer Services • Education Services Representative • Employment Interviewer • Flight Attendant • Foreign News Journalist • Historian • Human Resources Manager • Immigration Specialist • Intelligence Specialist • Interpreter • Language Researcher • Lawyer • Librarian • Linguist • Loan Analyst • Personal Banker • Production Associate • Researcher • Sports Reporter • Technical Writer • Translator

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES, LITERATURE & PHILOSOPHY Dr. David Wheeler, Department Head | 912.344.2594 | Fax 912.344.3494 | David.Wheeler@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Spanish prepares graduates for careers in teaching, federal and state agencies, the military, international business or law, the diplomatic corps, translation and social services. With the influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants as well as the native Spanish-speaking population, the United States has become the third largest Spanish-speaking country. Consequently, the Hispanic segment of society will become the most prevalent minority group. The burgeoning Hispanic population will increase demands for bilingual education, public officials and public servants. Moreover, bilingual graduates will have an advantage in the health professions and in business.

American Association of Language Specialists www.taals.net National Association of Hispanic & Latino Studies www.naaas.org American Translators Association www.atanet.org College Language Association www.clascholars.org American Dialect Society

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advertising Department/Agencies Air, Bus, and Rail Lines American Red Cross American Resorts International Archstone Company Bank of America Corporation Bell Atlantic Teleproducts Bell South Chambers of Commerce CNN International Crawford Communications Devcon Construction Federal Express Import/Export Companies LOMA Mitchell & Mitchell Translators National Achieves News Bureaus Public Relations Firms SAGA Communications Savannah Chatham Metro Police Department US Customs & Border Protection US Department of Education US Department of Homeland Security US State Department Visitors Bureaus Vistronix Wendel Translators

www.americandialect.org Society for Spanish & Portuguese Historical Studies www.ku.edu/~ideria/ssphs_main.html

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

THEATRE?

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE

Possible Job Titles

Theatre is a creative art in which true excellence can only be achieved through total mastery of the mind, body and technical craft. The Theatre Arts curricula combine rigorous studio class work with a demanding production schedule to provide students with in depth training and practice in theatre. Undergraduate training options include acting, scenic, costume and lighting design, theatre and costume technology, and production and management training. First year students learn a foundation in theatre and its history, expository writing, art history and receive a specially designed theatre course relating to the student’s area of interest. Students begin intensive theatre study as sophomores. The continued development of the visual media is expanding the volume of opportunities for majors in theatre. Networking, job experience, internships and expertise in your specialty are paramount to success.

• Actor • Advertising Specialist • Booking Manager • Box Office Manager • Casting Director • Communications Specialist • Company Manager • Copy Writer • Copyright Specialist • Costume Designer • Design/Sales • Drama Therapist • Dramatization Teacher • Executive Director • Film Editor • Furniture Designer • Instructor of Performing Art • Labor Relations Specialist • Lighting Designer • Make-up Artist • Marketing Director • Miniature Set Designer • Personal Manager • Project Coordinator • Promoter • Public Relations Manager • Stage Manager • Talent Agent • Technical Theatre

A Bachelor of Arts in Theatre will allow you to indulge your passion for the stage while providing you with a firm foundation for a life in the theatre. The program of study includes courses common to all majors in acting, directing, stagecraft and script analysis. Students also select an area of concentration from the performance, design and technology, or management tracks. In these concentration areas, we offer specialized coursework in voice, movement, camera acting, design, video production and related fields such as art, music, dance and dramatic literature. Through theatre labs, workshops, and directed studies our students hone their skills in acting, directing, design, stage management, and theatre management.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Theatre Majors • • • • • • • •

Consider a minor in a foreign language Develop creative writing skills and an ability to explain processes and concepts Use upper level courses to develop critical thinking skills, and an ability to compare and contrast Learn to evaluate ideas, sources and presentations and give constructive feedback on others’ work Plan and present specific viewpoints and interpretations through class discussions and presentations Do at least one internship while in school to gain experience in your chosen area of theatre Take Business Writing and/or Technical Editing to develop reporting and editing skills Gain an understanding of market research

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ART, MUSIC & THEATRE Dr. Tom Cato, Department Head | 912.344.2556 | Fax 912.344.3419 | Tom.Catoi@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Entertainment is the fastest growing industry in America. The business requires dedication, discipline and hard work. A theatre degree is your first step in a career on stage or backstage, on screen or behind the camera, as well as in the box office, the publicity department, the scene and costume shops, the sound booth and the light grid. The professional stage and screen, which includes regional theatres, video, and local television, are obvious employers of trained actors, designers, directors and technicians. The entertainment and tourist industries, trade show companies, United States National Park Service and various public relations firms specializing in events programming also provide a growing number of employment opportunities for trained theatre professionals.

American Association of Community Theatre www.aact.org Southeastern Theatre Conference www.setc.org/ Conference of Drama Schools www.drama.ac.uk/ Theater/Performance Organizations www.yahoo.com/arts League of American Theatres and Producers www.broadway.org/

Employers

Playwrights on the Web

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

www.stageplays.com/writers.htm

Advertising Agencies Armed Forces College and University Marketing & Sales Departments Entertainment Companies For A Good Time Theatre Company Georgia Fine Arts Academy Industry Trade Papers Music Industry Media Firms Production Companies Music and Film Studios Publishing Music and Video Stores Music Companies Newspapers Orchestra and Bands Performing Arts Centers Public Relations Firms TV Stations Walt Disney World Westridge School

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!


What can I do with a major in

VISUAL ART?

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN VISUAL ART

Possible Job Titles

Students in Visual Arts are guided by accomplished artists/teachers to pursue their goals in ceramics, graphic design, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and Intermedia. Generally, visual artists fall into two categories - “graphic artists” and “fine artists” - depending on the artist’s purpose in creating a work of art. Graphic artists put their artistic skills and vision at the service of commercial clients, such as major corporations, retail stores, advertising, design, or publishing firms. Fine artists create art to satisfy their own need for self expression, and may display their work in art galleries, museums and homes. Fine artists work independently, choosing their mediums and subject matters as they see fit. Often, they specialize in one or more forms of art, i.e. painting, sculpting, or printmaking. In many instances visual artists work in more commercially connected endeavors, while pursuing their “fine arts” goals.

• Art Teacher • Art Therapist • Artist • Advertising Specialist • Ceramist • Curator • Communications Specialist • Company Manager • Copy Writer • Costume Designer • Design/Sales • Executive Director • Fashion Designer • Furniture Designer • Graphic Artist • Interior Decorator • Lighting Designer • Marketing Director • Miniature Set Designer • Personal Manager • Photographer • Photojournalist • Project Coordinator • Promoter • Public Relations Manager • Talent Agent

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Art (BFA) is based a liberal arts core that prepares our students with a foundation for understanding the artist’s role in western culture and also provides the intellectual skills to produce and critically evaluate artistic production. This degree requires study in various means of artistic production combined with instruction in art history, art criticism and aesthetics. The degree program includes a significant block of elective hours, which allows ample opportunity for our students to develop specializations in photography, computer art, painting, drawing, ceramics, graphic design, sculpture, or fiber arts. The BFA focuses on the individual student’s selected area of specialization more intensely than does the Bachelor’s of Art degree. This is accomplished through additional upper level studio courses focusing on art production and art history, culminating in a capstone exhibition following work on a BFA project.

Strategies Associated with Jobs for Visual Art Majors • • • • • • •

Develop an understanding of how art impacts society through art history courses Take courses in related areas of study such as art history, theatre, and music to develop cross-subject competencies Develop creative writing skills and an ability to explain processes and concepts Use class discussions and presentations to develop critical thinking skills and an ability to compare and contrast Learn to evaluate ideas, sources and presentations and offer construction feedback on others’ work Understand how messages, cultural and institutional values are communicated through various art forms Have an attention to detail

Memorial College Center, Room 101 | 912.344.2563 | careers@armstrong.edu symbol


ARMSTRONG DEPARTMENT OF ART, MUSIC & THEATRE Dr. Tom Cato, Department Head | 912.344.2556 | Fax 912.344.3419 | Tom.Cato@armstrong.edu

Career Opportunities

Additional Resources

Increasingly, business professionals are coming to realize that they need people who have the ability to collect and synthesize data, think on their feet and write well. The history major excels in all these skills. In addition to entering the private business sector, many of Armstrong Atlantic State University’s history majors have found work in archives, museums and libraries across the southeastern United States. Some have chosen to teach while others are participating in the burgeoning tourism trade. A degree in history is also ideal preparation for law school and graduate programs in the humanities.

The College Art Association www.collegeart.org/ American Association of Museums www.aam-us.org/ American Society For Aesthetics http://aesthetics-online.org/ Society of American Archivists

Employers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Arbitration Association Angle Press Appalachian State University Atlanta History Center Atlanta Media Bradburn Company Chambers of Commerce Department of Natural Resources Department of Community Affairs Flint River Academy Georgia’s Attorney Office Grayson County Schools Historical Societies InteliTeach Jones County School District Justice Department Library of Congress Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum Morris Communication Newnan Times Herald Owen Thomas House Research Foundations The University of Georgia The Vanguard Group US Military

www.archivists.org/ Association of Art Historians www.aah.org.uk/ The Society of Architectural Historians www.sah.org/ American Art Therapy Association www.arttherapy.org

armstrong.edu/Departments/career_services | FIND US ON FACEBOOK & LINKEDIN!

What can I do with a major in...  

Explore the various majors that Armstrong offers and the typical career paths students choose to pursue after graduation.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you