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SEPTEMBER 2019 · SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

A REAL HEADACHE Kids Simply Being Kids Puts Them at Risk for Head Injury

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APPLES, STEW AND PUMPKIN SPICE

ARE YOU FLUENT IN STEM?

NEGOTIATING THE DRUG DEAL


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SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


PBIS I NTRODUCED IN ALL PCSSD SCHOOLS

New systems will build on our commitment to create a culture of inclusion Pulaski County Special School District (PCSSD) is integrating two new programs into district-wide curriculum. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) will teach kids about behavior, just as teachers teach about other subjects. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-level preventive system designed to improve learning or behavioral outcomes for ALL students. “PBIS and Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) systems are an extension of our RTI approach that can improve upon and enhance our efforts in reaching our students where they are,” said PCSSD Superintendent Charles McNulty. “We will continue to work tirelessly to build a culture of inclusion and community throughout the Pulaski County Special School District.” PBIS changes the focus to prevention from punishment to improve school safety and promote positive behavior with the understanding that kids can only meet behavior expectations if they know what the expectations are. Schools will still use discipline, but the punishment isn’t the focus - instead the focus is on teaching expectations and prevention problems. RTI provides struggling learners with interventions at increasing levels of intensity to accelerate their rate of learning. Components of the process include high quality, scientifically based classroom instructions, ongoing student assessment, tiered instruction and parent involvement in order to address each student’s specific needs.

PBIS

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports

purpose.pcssd.org

501.234.2000 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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September 2019 5 EDITOR’S NOTE 8 ADVENTURE & FUN

DIY DINO FOSSILS

CALENDAR, CRAFT & MORE!

12 ASK YOUR DAD ...

MY FINEST HOUR … OR NOT — SHANE FRAZIER

14 FAMILY & PARENTING

NEGOTIATING THE DRUG DEAL

18 EXPLORE & LEARN

ARE YOU FLUENT IN STEM?

22 GOOD EATS

APPLES, STEW AND PUMPKIN SPICE

PUMPKIN WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE

30 HEALTH & WELLNESS A REAL HEADACHE

38 KID APPROVED

CHECK OUT FAMILY-FRIENDLY APPS! —STEPHEN PAULSON

APPS APPS ALL THE APPS

ON THE COVER: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CONCUSSIONS

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SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Knowledge Is Power September is National Recovery Month and we offer up two insightful articles on the topic. Shane Frazier, CEO at Pinnacle Pointe Behavioral Healthcare, gives some parenting tips on how to (and not to) talk to your kids about trying drugs. But before you venture into no man’s land with “the talk,” flip to page 14 and get the lay of the land as Kelli Reep communications director at Methodist Family Health, gives some guidance on what drugs might be offered to your kids and where it’s likely coming from. As the opioid crisis continues to affect our friends, family members and children, it’s naive to think “that could never happen to MY kids.” Arm yourself with knowledge and be a proactive parent! There is so much to keep our kids safe from as parents, and if your child plays contact sports, concussions might be at the top of your list. We chat with Dr. Lauren Gibson-Oliver at UAMS about how kids get concussions, and it’s more common than you might think. Turn to page 30 to read about how to prevent, treat and heal from concussions. And as our kids are always “go, go, go,” this time of year, parents have to work double-time to keep up. Whether you’re running kids to and from practice, dance, rehearsal or social engagements you can’t detour around the question: “What’s for dinner?” Zara Abbasi offers a few fun ideas using seasonal ingredients to make the whole family happy on page 22. From recipes to family-friendly events, craft ideas, health advice from local experts and more, we hope you’ll find something in this issue of SAVVYkids to help your family transition smoothly into the season.

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvykids amy@arktimes.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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PUBLISHER BROOKE WALLACE | brooke@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER ART DIRECTOR | DIGITAL MANAGER KATIE HASSELL SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE KRYSTAL RHODES PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR MIKE SPAIN

Arkansas Times local ticketing: CentralArkansasTickets.com

UPCOMING EVENTS SEP 1, 6-8

The Weekend Theater The Rooster Rebellion

SEP 6

South on Main A Rowdy Faith :: SOMA After Dark

SEP 12 SEP 7

South on Main Jackie Venson

OCT 5

Clinton Parking Grounds 2019 World Cheese Dip Championship

OCT 10

The Mixing Room Preservation Conversation: Historic Hardware with Mike Smith

The Mixing Room Preservation Conversation: The History of UAMS at its 140th Birthday by Tim Nutt

OCT 5

Argenta Main & Maple 4th Street Block Party Headquarters R&B Cook Off!: Rhythm & Blues,Ribs & Butts BBQ Competition

OCT 12

Bus Trip Arkansas Times Blues Bus to the King Biscuit Blues Festival

Go to CentralArkansasTickets.com to purchase these tickets and more! Arkansas Times local ticketing site! If you’re a non-profit, freestanding venue or business selling tickets thru eventbrite or another national seller – email us phyllis@arktimes.com or hannah@arktimes.com – we’re local, independent and offer a marketing package!

LOCAL TICKETS, ONE PLACE

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SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY JORDAN LITTLE PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN CHILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ADVERTISING ASSISTANT HANNAH PEACOCK ACCOUNTING LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN PRESIDENT ALAN LEVERITT

©2019 ARKANSAS TIMES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 201 E. MARKHAM ST., SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985

FIND US ON

S AV V Y K I D S A R . CO M


contributors ANGELA E. THOMAS is a proud University of Arkansas at Little Rock graduate and a member of its Alumni Board. For 11 years, she served Central Arkansas as editor for a locally owned magazine. Thomas is founder and owner of the greeting card company GODsent Greetings.

William F. Laman Public Library North Little Rock Main Branch 2801 Orange St. Argenta Branch 420 Main St.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

ZARA ABBASI lives in Little Rock with her husband and three children. She is a licensed attorney but you know her better as Little Rock’s friendly pastry chef and custom cake maker. She keeps busy with dessert orders, pop-up dinners, writing articles and doing anything food-related. Follow her on Instagram @Zaramadeit for her newest cake creations and dinner ideas.

KATIE CHILDS is a wedding, lifestyle and commercial photographer based in North Little Rock. When she's not behind the camera, Katie, her husband Jon and their new addition, baby Jonas, can be found traveling the U.S. in a DIY camper van.

Dupree Park

1700 Redmond Rd., Jacksonville

September 27 & 28, 2019 Friday 3pm -7pm & Saturday 9am-7pm; Carnival closes at 10pm

Come join us for Carnival Rides & Games, Live Entertainment, Food Trucks, Vendor Showcase, K-9 demo, BINGO, Volleyball Tournament, Petting Zoo, Canoe rides, a Trap Shooting demonstration and a Kid’s Area including a junior firefighter challenge sponsored by Jacksonville Fire Dept., Fireworks & much more!

Sponsored by: Free admission & parking. Rides and some activities may cost. Handicap accessible. KELLI REEP is a writer and public relations practitioner in Little Rock. As the director of communications for Methodist Family Health, she oversees the marketing communications of the Methodist Family Health statewide continuum of care as well as the Methodist Family Health Foundation. In her free time, she fusses at her cats and searches for the state’s best pie.

SHANE FRAZIER is the CEO for Pinnacle Pointe Behavioral Healthcare System. Being a Dad is his greatest joy and he enjoys helping families in the community through his career and his work on the board of the Children’s Protection Center. When he questions whether or not he is making the best parenting decisions, he ultimately shrugs his shoulders and thinks, “Meh, surely less capable people have successfully reared children in this world; mine will probably turn out OK.”

For more info, call (501) 982-4171 or visit www.FestiVille.org. No refunds. Date, time, & location subject to change.

Sponsored by:

NEED MORE SAVVYkids? FIND US ONLINE AT SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

AND FOLLOW US ON

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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ADVENTURE & FUN Photo by Kari Shea on Unsplash

SEPTEMBER 2019 Sept. 6

NATIONAL READ A BOOK DAY Sept. 2

LABOR DAY Sept. 7

SUPERHERO DASH-N-BASH Throw on your favorite cape and soar over to War Memorial Stadium to help raise money for the hematology/oncology department at Arkansas Children's Hospital. In addition to participation in the Victory Walk, registration also includes many superherothemed activities for all ages. The event kicks off at 10 a.m.

Sept. 7

LITTLE ROCK PAPER AIRPLANE CHAMPIONSHIP Let your creativity soar at the Little Rock Paper Airplane Championship from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Clinton Presidential Center. This fundraiser for the Lymphomaniac Society includes competitions for distance and hang time, age divisions for children and adults and trophies for first, second and third place in all divisions.

lrpaperairplane.com

give.archildrens.org/superhero

Sept. 8

SUPER SUNDAY FREE FAMILY FUNDAY

The Arkansas Arts Center and CALS Children's Library and Learning Center team up to bring a free afternoon of artmaking for the whole family at Hillary Rodham Clinton Children's Library from noon-3 p.m.

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SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Sept. 14

LITTLE ROCK BRUNCH FEST

Indulge in the most decadent meal of the week at the inaugural Little Rock Brunch Fest on the grounds of Heifer Village. Look for more than 13 local restaurants, including Cathead’s Diner, EJ’s Eats and Drinks and more serving up sweet and savory treats to raise money for Centers for Youth and Families from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tickets start at $25; children under 3 are free.

centersforyouthandfamilies.net

Sept. 15

NATIONAL CHEESE TOAST DAY


Sept. 19

ZOO BREW

Sept. 14

TINKERFEST Come play, make, move and learn at Museum of Discovery’s Tinkerfest. From 9 a.m.-3 p.m. the public is invited to join in as tinkering takes over the entire museum and neighboring streets with more than 40 hands-on, interactive activities. Each activity engages both children and adults, teaches how everyday objects such as cars and computers work, and provides opportunities to explore the engineering and science behind building objects. Tinkerfest is included in regular museum admission ($10 for adults and $8 for children) or free for members.

museumofdiscovery.org

Sept. 21

Things are going to get wild at the Little Rock Zoo’s foamy fundraiser, Zoo Brew. Sample dozens of craft beer, meet new animal friends, hear live music and participate in some crazy competitions like Bear Pong. Food trucks will be serving up all kinds of goodies available for purchase. Must be 21 years old to attend.

littlerockzoo.com

Sept. 18

NATIONAL CHEESEBURGER DAY!

BARNAROO AT HEIFER HOUR Heifer Village and Urban Farm host a celebration of international farming with hands-on crafts for kids and adults, activities, barnyard animals and a variety of international foods at Heifer Village from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. heifer.org

Sept. 22

MAIN STREET FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL Enjoy a taste of everything as more than 60 food trucks and beer vendors come together to serve up food along the Main Street Creative Corridor. Find plenty of food and drink along with entertainment and craft vendors at this lively event in the heart of downtown from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Sept. 28

BRIDGING THE NEED FISH FRY Feed the whole family and help end hunger in the state at Bridging the Need Fish Fry, hosted by Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance at the DoubleTree Hotel from 5:30-8:30 p.m. The evening will include fried catfish and chicken tenders with all the fixin’s, iced tea, lemonade, water, beer and wine. Activites include a bouncy house for kids, music by Alex Summerlin and silent auction featuring art, outings, gift certificates and games. Tickets are $20 for adults; children 12 and under eat free. arhungeralliance.org

Sept. 29

NATIONAL COFFEE DAY

Please join us

mainstreetfoodtrucks.com

for the

15th Annual Sept. 27

Recovery Jam

NATIONAL PANCAKE DAY

Celebration

Celebrating people in recovery, the people who serve them, and their families.

Sept. 30

RECOVERY JAM CELEBRATION This community event, hosted by Empowerment Center, aims to pull the many families supporting a member through addiction recovery out of the shadows to celebrate them with a day of information, fun and food from 4-8 p.m. at the River Market Pavilion. Find health screenings, live entertainment, free food, door prizes, face painting and more. Email smitchell@bcdinc.org for more information. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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Dig Up Some Dino Fossils!

With a few ingredients and a little time you can make your own fossil rocks

You will need: 2 cups flour 1 cup salt 1 cup coffee grounds 1 cup water Dinosaur figures

KIDS LOVE TO HELP

How to:

1. In a mixing bowl combine the flour, salt, coffee grounds and water. Mix together until a soft dough is formed. 2. Take a section of dough and press a dinosaur figure into the dough, then form a ball around the figure. 3. Leave to air dry for two days or bake in the oven at 200 degrees for about four hours. Be sure to turn the rocks every hour to ensure even drying. 4. Use a hammer to break the fossil out of the rock. Enjoy!

10 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Spotlight on Nonprofits Arkansas Foodbank

Who’s Leading? Arkansas Foodbank’s team of creative, dedicated community servants is lead by Rhonda Sanders, former executive director of the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance. Serving alongside Sanders is a paid staff of almost 50 people, hundreds of community partners and thousands of volunteers all working for the same goal of eliminating hunger in our neighborhoods and communities. What’s It All About? Created Jan. 17, 1984, as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Arkansas Foodbank provides local agencies with a credible food source to help feed the hungry and food insecure across several Arkansas counties. Since then, Arkansas Foodbank has grown its local network to 450 partner agencies and delivers millions of pounds of food annually across its now 33-county service area. According to the 2014 Hunger in America study, the Foodbank serves 280,000 people.  In 2016, Arkansas Foodbank merged with Arkansas Rice Depot, a Little Rock-based hunger organization that launched the Food For Kids backpack program in local schools. The program allows food-insecure children, whose only reliable meal of the day is a school lunch, to take home a backpack of staple items to eat over the weekend.  Another Arkansas Foodbank program, Food For Seniors, delivers monthly food and household items to low-income, homebound seniors throughout Pulaski, Saline, Faulkner and Garland counties and in other Central Arkansas locations.   Where Can I Find It? The Arkansas Foodbank’s Donald W. Reynolds Distribution Center is located at 4301 W. 65th St. in Little Rock.   When Can I Attend? Tours of the Arkansas Foodbank warehouse are available for families to large groups. Walkins are welcome, but parties of eight or more are asked to call ahead to 501-565-8121. Corporate, civic or school groups are asked to call 501-569-4320 to set up a tour. The Arkansas Foodbank’s regular hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.  

Mark Your Calendar! September is Hunger Action Month, so make plans to support the Arkansas Foodbank at the Fourth Annual Harvest Night on Sept. 7 at the Foodbank warehouse from 5-8 p.m. The evening includes catfish, barbecue, craft beer, wine, live music, a live stream of SEC football and plenty of kid-friendly activities such as a petting zoo, face painting, balloon animals and bounce houses! Why Is It Important? Hunger is a social epidemic that hides in plain sight. In Arkansas alone, well over half a million people, 1 in every 6 Arkansans, struggle with hunger, per Feeding America. Of this total, over 167,000 are children. That’s 25 percent of the children in The Natural State who aren’t sure where their next meal is coming from.   How Can I Help? About 11,000 volunteers donate 33,000 hours to Arkansas Foodbank activities each year. The Arkansas Foodbank can accommodate volunteer groups of all sizes, from families to larger church or corporate groups. Volunteer opportunities include, but are not limited to, sorting incoming food donations, processing and organizing items for distribution, preparing backpack kits for children in schools, office work, delivering senior boxes and assisting with mobile distribution events. Contact the Foodbank’s Volunteer Engagement department to discuss the full range of volunteer opportunities. 

Arkansas Foodbank 4301 W. 65th St., Little Rock  501-565-8121  arkansasfoodbank.org 

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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ASK YOUR DAD ...

My Finest Hour … or Not BY SHANE FRAZIER

I

n the beginning, like many parents, we entered the childrearing phase of life fully intending to be the model parents and the cover family for “we may not be perfect, but we’re going to do this thing right!” Well, for every parent reading this, you know the “model” parental intentions usually slam into the proverbial brick wall when faced with real-life scenarios involving your own children. Because addiction is addressed in this issue of SAVVYkids, given my 21-year career in behavioral health, I want to share a story about a discussion I had on this topic with my son Corey. We have two beautiful boys, Corey, 9, and Jack Campbell, 4 going on 16. They are as different as the sun and moon, but they each equally capture our hearts on a daily basis. Corey is a sensitive, loving, safe, inquisitive processor with a hilariously dry sense of humor. Jack Campbell is a rough-but-loving, risktaking little general who is always looking for the next scene from “National Lampoon’s Animal House” in order to reenact a fraternity prank to garner cheers from his friends (remember, he’s 4)! Working in behavioral health, I am acutely aware of the impact addiction can have on families. I have seen adults lose everything. I have witnessed adolescents basically leave the planet and fail to ever return to their previous state of wellness. I have worked with very young children suffering the ill-effects of exposure to substances in utero.

“It’s almost as if I have been preparing my entire parental life for what could be my finest hour when the question comes from one of my kids, “Dad, what are drugs?” (FROM LEFT) SHANE, JACK CAMPBELL, CURTIS AND COREY PLAYING WITH THE DOLPHIN AT ATLANTIS IN THE BAHAMAS.

12 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Our children are adopted. My spouse and I have held many conversations regarding how to introduce age-appropriate discussions with our boys regarding their family history, and answer their questions openly and honestly, including questions related to addiction. It’s almost as if I have been preparing my entire parental life for what could be my finest hour when the question comes from one of my kids, “Dad, what are drugs?” Or, “Dad, why are drugs bad?” What could possibly go awry? Well, it went something like this. Corey and I were playing in the backyard a few months ago when he asked, “Dad?” “Yeah buddy?” “So, what’s going to happen to me if I take a drug?” I think it must have been the way he asked, “… if I TAKE A DRUG,” versus a general question about the topic of drugs that made it far too personal. It totally changed the well-prepared professional, well-equipped parent into a scared dad who just wanted to protect his baby boy from the dangers of this world. I would love to tell you that I took him in my arms, looked him in the eye, and shared some words of wisdom that transformed me from “Clark Kent” into “Superman” in that moment, or that we experienced “two roads diverged in a wood …” and my words would direct him down the substance-free road less traveled, but I didn’t. Instead, I panicked. I totally, utterly panicked! In a moment’s notice, at lightning speed, a million questions and visions flooded my mind for some reason and I spiraled into the following string of thoughts: “What? Why are you asking me this? Why are you asking the question in this


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KameelahtoHarris, Owner PAW PAW 30, 2019 Dino D hopefully conveyed my son that his safety is our top priority and September and the Fitness River Market Pavilion 4:00-8:00 pm DTrain Band should be his as well. PAW PAW Other Performers For more information please contact: Sober Sandra Mitche Moving forward, while our children areKameelah young, I’ll remain focused For more informationorplease contact: 400 President Clinton Ave Sober Sandra Mitchell @ contact: 501.663.7221 smitchell@bcdinc.org Harris, Owner PAW PAW OtherInc. Performers to be Announced For more information please Arlene William Living, Sober Sandra Mitchell 501.663.7221ororawilliams@bcdinc.org smitchell@bcdinc.org 4:00-8:00 pm to be Announced Sober Williams @@501.515.0954 Living, Inc. @Arlene on age-appropriate discussions around good choices and bad Sandra Mitchell 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org FREE FOOD, DOOR PRIZES, FACE Williams @ 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org Living, Inc. @ Arlene For more information please contact: For more information please contact: Rock, AR For more information please cont Arlene Williams 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org Living,River Inc. Little Market Pavilion For more information please contact: choices versus fear-based scare tactics we know do not Sober typically Sandra Mitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org Sober Sober Sandra MitchellMitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org Sandra @ 501.663.7221 or smitche Sober Sandra Mitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org For more information please contact: Arlene Williams @ please 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org Living, Inc. work anyway. However, when they become teenagers, I can make 400 President Clinton Ave Arlene Williams @ 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org Living, Inc.Inc. For more information contact: Arlene Williams @ 501.515.0954 or awilliam Living, River Market Pavilion Arlene Williams @ 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org Living, Inc. no promise our approach to teaching the kids about the dangers of Sober Sober FREE FOOD, DOOR PRIZES, FACE PAINTING, AND MORE Sandra Mitchell 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org Sandra@Mitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org For more information please contact: Little Rock, AR 400 President Clinton Ave substance useLiving, and addiction involveWilliams a vacation the Mojave Arlenein Williams 501.515.0954 or @ awilliams@bcdinc.org Living, Inc. Sober@ Sandra 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org Arlene @ 501.515.0954 orMitchell awilliams@bcdinc.org Inc. won’t Living, Inc. Arlene Williams @ 501.515.0954 or awilliams@bcdinc.org For more information please Desert to show them just how hot itcontact: can get there! Little Rock, AR

For more information please contact: Sandra Mitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org FREE FOOD, DOOR PRIZES, AND ArleneFACE WilliamsPAINTING, @ 501.515.0954 or MORE awilliams@bcdinc.org andra Mitchell @ 501.663.7221 or smitchell@bcdinc.org

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SAVVYKIDSAR.COM FREE FOOD, DOOR PRIZES, FACE PAINTING, AND MORE | SEPTEMBER 2019 13


FAMILY & PARENTING

14 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Negotiating the

Drug Deal

How to keep your head and your cool when talking to your kids about drugs BY KELLI REEP

T

hink you know all there is to know about drugs and how to keep your kid free from them? You don’t, and the trends in drug use have changed from alcohol, marijuana and cocaine in the ’80s and ’90s to opioids, synthetic drugs and hallucinogens today. While liquor and pot are still problems for many, it’s the drugs that addict users— predominantly tweens, teens and those kids entering college—in one or two uses and cause irreversible damage to the brain, nervous system and spirit that are insidious.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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According to the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, these are the drugs that kids are being exposed to and using: • Kratom, which is an “organic pain-reliever” but can be classified as an opioid by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While it is legal in some states, Kratom is illegal in Arkansas as well as Alabama, Indiana, Tennessee, Vermont and Wisconsin. Highly addictive and easily obtainable online, Kratom can cause respiratory depression and psychosis. • Synthetic drugs like cannabinoids (think K2, Spice or Fake Weed) and cathinones (you’ve heard of this as bath salts) have mind-altering and unpredictable side effects. These drugs can be smoked in cigarettes, e-cigarettes, joints and incense, and they aren’t detected in standard drug tests. Besides being unregulated and deadly, synthetic drugs can be purchased at the corner gas station, among other common shops in your community. • Hallucinogens are proving that what is old is new again. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin (magic mushrooms) and marijuana joints soaked in embalming fluid before smoking are seeing a resurgence. Regardless of the mind-altering effects of these drugs, the side effects include decreased lung function and an increased risk of cancer. • Opioids are particularly in vogue with young adults as, the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids states, “they consume more prescription medications recreationally than any other age group, sometimes in combination with alcohol.” The side effects of opioids include respiratory failure, permanent neuropathy, additional use of lethal drugs like heroin and fentanyl, disability and death. It’s overwhelming to think about, but the availability of these drugs and the consequences of obtaining and taking them can have dire consequences on your kids, your family and your marriage. A first step in preparing your children to remain drug-free is for parents, grandparents and other adults to lock up all prescribed medications at home, so they are not easily accessed. Drugs no longer used or outdated medications can be taken to a location like a police or fire station or local pharmacy that participates in a drug

16 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

take-back program. This program disposes of drugs properly so they aren’t a danger to others or the environment. After this, parents will have to have a conversation with their children about drugs and their effects. “No one wants to admit that their kids could be susceptible to illicit drugs,” said Dr. Brian Kubacak, a psychiatrist with Methodist Family Health. “The reality is that everyone’s kids are susceptible to it. It doesn’t matter what family, household, school, church or community you belong to as it can and does affect everyone. What parents must come to terms with is drug use is something their kids are facing, and they will have to address it with them.” That may seem easier said than done, but there are ways you can approach the subject without feeling out of your depth. First, find a time where you and your child can talk one-on-one with no distractions. You can share a meal, go for a drive or do an activity

“While liquor and pot are still problems for many, it’s the drugs that addict users—predominantly tweens, teens and those kids entering college—in one or two uses and cause irreversible damage to the brain, nervous system and spirit that are insidious.”


together where there are no distractions like television, smart phones, computers, etc. Next, stay calm and focused on the subject, even if you feel anything but. The way you handle yourself—relaxed body, calm voice—will help your child stay calm and focused, too. Tell your child you want to talk with her or him about something important and reassure her or him that they are safe and can trust you with anything she or he wants to tell you. “Your goal in this discussion is to learn what your child’s experience is with drugs,” Dr. Kubacak explained. “This will tell you your next step. If she tells you she has heard of these drugs, you ask where. If he tells you he knows other kids who have taken drugs, you ask who—are they kids you (the parent) know, are they his friends, are they at school or church or on his team— and what kind of drugs. “You also must ask if your child has tried any drugs,” Dr. Kubacak added. “I know this is no easy task but learning this from your child will set the stage for you to get your child help if they need it. It also will set the tone for your relationship from this day on as your child will see she or he can come to you with a problem without you getting upset or judging them. Empathy and compassion go a long way when it comes to establishing and reinforcing open, trusting communication between parents and their kids.” Keeping your children healthy and safe is no small task for any parent. Take the time to educate yourself about what your children are facing when you aren’t with them and initiate open, trusting conversations about the temptations and consequences of taking drugs.

WHERE TO TURN IF YOUR KID TURNS TO DRUGS If you want to learn more about what drugs are trending among adolescents and young adults in Arkansas, there are several resources available. • S ubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)—SAMHSA.gov has a wealth of information on how to talk about alcohol and drugs as well as warning signs to look for if you suspect your child is using. • S ociety for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM)—AdolescentHealth.org is a clearinghouse of resources for treatment, support groups and insurance information. • A rkansas Take Back—a partnership of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Arkansas State Police, ArTakeBack.org has information on substance abuse prevention, recovery and how the community can help keep citizens healthy. It also has dates and locations where citizens can turn in their nolonger-used or outdated drugs. • Arkansas Department of Human Services (DHS)—find community-based programs for juveniles throughout the state of Arkansas at HumanServices.Arkansas.gov/about-dhs/ dys/oversight/community-based-programs.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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EXPLORE & LEARN

ARE YOU FLUENT IN

Arkansas’s schools are preparing today’s students for a world grounded in STEM BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

I

t may seem that the term “STEM” has been a part of our vocabulary for, well, forever. However, the acronym—which stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics—is actually a fairly new term. It was introduced by administrators at the U.S. National Science Foundation in 2001. The U.S. Department of Education has stressed the need for increased STEM education: “If we want a nation where our future leaders, neighbors and workers have the ability to understand and solve some of the complex challenges of today and tomorrow, and to meet the demands of the dynamic and evolving workforce, building students’ skills, content knowledge and fluency in STEM fields is essential.”* Arkansas schools have accepted the charge, and while the state’s Department of Education does not have an official STEM school designation, STEM education is a part of its long-term strategic

18 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


goals. Many of the state’s schools, according to Kimberly Mundell, director of communications for the Department of Education, have been recognized by third-party accreditation systems and the material they’re teaching is vital. “Arkansas schools that have a STEM emphasis are focused on developing skills in students that are relevant to today’s and tomorrow’s job market. They are developing pathways that support the traditional four-year college route, but are also providing students who do not want to go to college with training that can lead to high-paying jobs right out of high school. They are helping their students become productive and marketable, not just helping them graduate.” One such school is Forest Heights STEM Academy. “Our students are exposed to engineering, bio-medical and computer science, based on their skill level. For instance, our kindergarteners learn how to code and will soon be able to talk about algorithms,” said Amber Harbin, STEM coordinator at the school. “And our middle-school students take two engineering classes each year.” Each of the STEM areas is taught, and students are encouraged to address real-world, global issues such as access to clean water. By the time they enter eighth grade, they’ll have studied and formulated solutions for nine world problems. “We want them to be globally aware, so they take on challenges in science and environmental issues, social justice issues and more. They research problems in the community, create solutions, and partner with a community organization to address the issue they choose.”

“We want them to be globally aware, so they take on challenges in science and environmental issues, social justice issues and more.”

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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“This exposes them to different ideas to, hopefully, ignite their passions to become problem-finders and problem-solvers.” Science teachers work with students on the environmental issues, engineering and social studies teachers work their students to address social justice issues, and engineering and math teachers work with student on infrastructure issues. “This exposes them to different ideas to, hopefully, ignite their passions to become problem-finders and problem-solvers,” Harbin said. LISA Academy’s curriculum has been STEM-based since its founding in 2004. The charter school has locations in Central Arkansas, and this year expanded into the northwest region with a location in Springdale. “We incorporate STEM exploration at each level,” said Luanne Baroni, assistant superintendent and director of communications. “One way we do this is through Project Lead the Way, a nationally recognized program. Our students study coding and robotics as early as the elementary level, then advance into middle and high school studying engineering as well.”

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STEM study is further emphasized through the school’s various competitive clubs such as Math Counts, Science Olympiad, Science Quiz Bowl and Math Kangaroo. LISA Academy students create science fair projects each year and compete locally, regionally and at the state level. Five years ago, the school organized The Arkansas STEM Festival. Now in its fifth year, the festival is hosted by the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in the spring and welcomes 2,000 students from across the state to present their hands-on, interactive projects. “The world needs students who are prepared in science, technology, engineering and math so they may pursue these areas in college and in the workforce. We want to ensure that our graduates are prepared for these areas when they leave,” Baroni added. The charter school graduated its first class in 2009 and has graduates who’ve been admitted to Ivy League schools, another who's gone on to United States Military Academy West Point, and still others who’ve become entrepreneurs and business owners. The Arkansas Department of Education’s Division of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) continues to focus on STEM education by identifying quality talent and building student-focused initiatives around the traditional STEM areas of science and mathematics. AR Math QuEST, a new state mathematics initiative, “helps students develop positive identities as doers of mathematics.” They’ve also developed ARKidsCanCode, a program sponsored by the department and Gov. Asa Hutchinson to encourage the pursuit of computer science. Forest Heights STEM Academy and LISA Academy along with eSTEM Public Charters Schools are just a few of the schools working to ensure Arkansas students are prepared for the future. “We recognize that STEM occupations, and other careers that require skill and knowledge provided by STEM education, are and will continue to be major contributors to economic growth,” Kimberly Mundell said. “Our state and students must be prepared for the technological displacement of labor that is facing their generation.” The schools’ and department’s efforts magnify the U.S. Department of Education’s assertion that “we must also make sure that, no matter where children live, they have access to quality learning environments. A child's ZIP code should not determine their STEM fluency.” *from ed.gov/stem

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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GOOD EATS

APPLES, STEW & PUMPKIN SPICE

Cool weather recipe season is so close we can taste it. As the temps begin to drop, grab what’s in season at the farmers market to make these delicious fall recipes.

BY ZARA ABBASI PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATIE CHILDS

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T

INSTANT POT BEEF STEW

he only thing that makes me miss summer less is knowing that fall is right around the corner. Although, here in Arkansas that might be a very long and deceiving corner filled with a few 90-degree days that seem to linger longer than necessary. Nevertheless, fall time will get here at some point. And, when it does, it just has a way of grabbing you. Fall reminds me of those old cartoons where a delicious smell takes the shape of a hand, grabs the cartoon character out of his seat and plops him down right in front of an apple pie. We know I’m right. And now we both want apple pie. When I was growing up in Boston (Lowell, Mass,. to be exact), fall wasn’t really my favorite. The looming season reminded me of school and responsibilities and all the bleh stuff that goes along with it. I mean sure, I loved seeing the leaves change color, and I was in the perfect part of the country to witness exactly that. And I liked the cool breeze after a wicked summer, but all in all it wasn’t my favorite. As I got older, fall still stayed far in the background for me where summer still took precedence. It was fun, carefree and a respite from chaos. However, it was only when I had kids that I understood the beauty that is fall. Fall is a time for rest and comfort. It’s breathing a sigh of relief not only from the brutal Southern heat, but also from the nonstop activities of the summer. It’s looking forward to actually throwing on a favorite cardigan or the boots you’ve passed by in your closet longingly. It’s football games, hearty stews and chilis, favorite recipes, family gatherings and a closeness you sometimes can’t find in the summer when everyone is off doing their own thing. Only when you see the true beauty of fall can you embrace it as the best (OK, second best) season. Any favorite I have in life usually has something to do with food. You’d be hardpressed to find an activity or season that I do not associate with food. I love the actual preparation, I love when people are brought together, and more importantly, I LOVE TO EAT FOOD! So I’m sharing some fall foods with you to get you in the fall spirit. Consider this a primer for the most important food holiday ever: Thanksgiving. This is the time I test out new foods for Thanksgiving, and when I make so much food, I end up filling my freezer for days. I hope you enjoy these recipes and give them a try in your homes this fall season. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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What’s the best way to top off a hearty stew? Probably a cup of hot chocolate as you sit by the fire and your family cleans up the mess you made in the kitchen trying to make that stew. I mean it’s the least they could do, right? Ha! But seriously, this hot chocolate is different than your ordinary one because it mixes pumpkin spice latte drinks with a hot chocolate. You will definitely have to adjust this to suit your needs because not everyone likes the same sweetness or textures. Here is the basic recipe. Add more milk to adjust thickness and add in more white chocolate (or even condensed milk) to adjust sweetness. 4 cups milk 1/2 cup pumpkin puree 3 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/2 cup white chocolate chips 1/4 cup heavy cream

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PUMPKIN WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE 1. Add milk in a sauce pan and heat on medium-low. Add in the pumpkin puree and spice, and whisk until completely mixed through. 2. Add in the chocolate chips and allow to melt slowly. Add in the heavy cream and mix through. 3. Taste for sweetness and texture. If it’s not sweet enough or spiced enough for your liking, add in more chocolate chips and/ or pumpkin pie spice. If it is too thick for you, add in more milk. If it is too thin for you, add in a little more pumpkin puree. 4. Pour into your favorite mug and top with whipped cream and sail away into a fall bliss and away from all the clatter of the dishes still happening in your kitchen. Don’t you dare even think about how they’re going to load your dishwasher and probably put everything in the wrong place. Don’t you dare. Go enjoy this moment!


STRUGGLE, GRIT, AND ACCOMPLISHMENT

I

’m a father of two boys, a pre-teen and a high-schooler. When my kids were little, I received a lot of parenting advice about how to encourage my children’s strengths, but not so much about challenging their weaknesses. My instinct has always been to put them in classrooms, sports and social settings where they will feel good about themselves right from the start. I don’t want my kids to suffer! But after my kids were born, a lot of research emerged showing that the earlier a child has to struggle some, the better. I’m not talking about traumatic struggles, like not having enough to eat or losing a parent. I’m talking about the struggle of daily tasks in which a child may fail on the first, second, third or even fifteenth try. I watch this dynamic play out in my job as a martial arts teacher. Some children sail through elementary education with no effort. Then they try martial arts and think it will be the same. They panic, quit or act out when they realize it’s not. No one has ever asked them to push themselves before, much less give 100 percent. I’ve watched kids who have little natural ability in martial arts (or piano, reading, math or soccer) develop amazing skills over time when their parents do a few important things: • They balance their child’s activities. They select some the child naturally excels at and some they don’t. • They don’t comment on their children’s natural abilities. Instead, they focus on how hard they worked or what problems they solved. • They look at failures with commitment instead of alarm! They know failure is fertile ground for planting the seeds of determination. Make sure your kids are challenged while they have you to guide and protect them. Something is going to teach them about getting knocked down. Make sure that you, and the coaches and instructors you put your child in the hands of are teaching them about getting back up.

(501) 664-0604 • WWW.UNITYMARTIALARTS.COM SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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26 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


INSTANT POT BEEF STEW

Have you jumped on the IP train yet? Most people I know have and haven’t looked back since. If you’re not familiar with the Instant Pot, then the best way to describe it is that it’s a computerized pressure cooker. Gone are the days of fearing for your face and home while cooking something in the pressure cooker. These nifty devices do all the heavy lifting an old-fashioned one would do, but it’s very user-friendly. I have been using an old-fashioned pressure cooker for over a decade now and swear by the cooking process. When these new contraptions came out, I was wary. After much research, I settled on the Ninja Foodi instead of the Instant Pot, only because it has a built-in air fryer, too. Both machines are very similar and the recipes for the most part are adaptable. This stew is one of those recipes. It’s extremely flavorful, tender and will whisk you away to a fall wonderland. It comes together pretty easily, too; however, I’d still save this for a night where you have a little extra time on your hands for the preparation because it’s not a “toss and go” crockpot recipe, but the work is worth the flavor. 2 pounds boneless chuck roast, cut into 1-1.5 inch cubes 3-4 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 1 large onion, diced 3-4 garlic cloves, smashed 5-6 medium carrots, peeled and cut into thick pieces 1 large russet potato, peeled and cut into thick pieces 1 14.5-ounce can low-sodium beef broth 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 8-ounce can low-sodium tomato sauce 2-3 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons water 2 cups fresh or frozen peas 1 package sliced button or crimini mushrooms Parsley for garnish 1. Turn IP to sautée mode, add in half the oil and sautée beef until nicely browned. Sprinkle in a little flour, a tablespoon or so per batch, and stir well. Work in batches and add more oil if necessary. Set aside when all the beef has been browned. 2. Add remaining oil to pot and add in diced onion. Allow to cook for a few minutes until light golden brown, then add in the carrots, potatoes, mushrooms and garlic cloves, bay leaf and thyme. Keep cooking another 5-6 minutes. 3. Deglaze pot by adding in the beef broth and scrape all the brown bits from the bottom. Add in the beef again and the Worcestershire sauce and stir. Add in the tomato sauce without stirring. 4. Close and seal the IP and cook on high pressure for 35-40 minutes, naturally release pressure and remove bay leaf and discard. 5. Mix cornstarch and water together to make a slurry and mix into the stew and allow it to thicken slightly. Add in the peas and freshly chopped parsley and serve hot. 6. For traditional method: Follow all the above directions but cook in a large Dutch oven, and instead of cooking in IP, cook covered in oven at 325 degrees for 3-4 hours. May need to add additional 2-3 cups cooking liquid (beef broth) because it will evaporate in the oven. Lift the lid and stir every hour or so. Add the slurry and peas in the last 15-20 minutes or so and garnish with parsley when ready to serve.

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STEWED APPLES Everyone needs to know how to make stewed apples. They are the base of so many things that I think it should be incumbent upon us to teach this to others. Not only can you have these by themselves, but you can also turn them into mini apple pies, applesauce, apple crumbles or use them in oatmeal, on top of pancakes or even in muffins. They are extremely versatile and the recipe is simple. Approximately 5-7 apples 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2-3 tablespoons honey 3 tablespoons brown sugar 1 cup boiling water or apple juice

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1. Peel, core and cut apples into whatever shape you’ll need (quartered, diced or sliced). 2. Add all ingredients (except water/juice) in a rimmed saucepan. Heat to medium-high and mix to coat all ingredients. 3. Pour in the boiling water or juice, cover the apples and simmer for approximately 20 minutes until apples are brown but retain their shape. 4. Examples of use: apple pie spring rolls. These are super easy to make. Take spring roll wrappers and add in about a tablespoon's worth of apples, ensuring not to over fill, roll wrappers and fold in ends with a little flour/ water paste. Fry in hot oil until browned or bake at 350 degrees until crispy. Serve with caramel and ice cream. Enjoy!


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HEALTH & WELLNESS

30 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


A REAL HEADACHE

Kids simply being kids puts them at risk for head injury  BY DWAIN HEBDA 

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T

ry as they might, parents just can’t childproof childhood. Kids are forever finding ways to injure themselves, be it learning to walk, falling off a bike or skateboard, colliding with a playmate or one of a million other scenarios. Getting banged up, it seems, just goes with the territory of being a kid. But even as they come to accept this fact of their kids’ lives, many parents are also becoming increasingly aware of—and concerned about—the effect of all that head trauma on their youngster. And, according to medical statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this isn’t just idle worry.  The CDC reports that in 2014, nearly 3 million cases of traumatic brain injury resulted in trips to the emergency room, hospitalization, or in some cases, death. Of that total, 812,000 were children.   TBI is defined as an injury caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain functioning, with or without the presence of other injuries. Mild TBI, commonly known as a concussion, represents the vast majority of cases every year.  “A concussion most often occurs with some type of head trauma, which could be by contact, like running into another kid playing sports, or it could be falling,” said Dr. Lauren Gibson-Oliver, a thirdyear medical resident in family medicine at UAMS. “It also could be an acceleration or deceleration or a rotational injury like in a car accident, ATV accident, going really fast and suddenly stopping for any reason.”  Gibson-Oliver said concussions are sometimes hard to detect by the naked eye, because children don’t always display the same symptoms. Loss of consciousness or dilated pupils alone are generally poor indicators of whether or not a concussion has occurred, she said.  “You will sometimes see loss of consciousness, but it’s really important to know that there is not

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“If a second concussion occurs pretty shortly after a first, second impact syndrome can result in some devastating neurological injuries. That can even cause death, coma, something you can’t really recover from.” 


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always a loss of consciousness,” Gibson-Oliver said. “In kids especially, some estimates are that only about 5 percent of kids actually lose consciousness with a concussion.” “As far as dilated pupils, that’s hard to say because some medications can cause dilated pupils. Depending on the age of the child, if they were taking any other substances, that could also cause dilated pupils. I don’t think that’s really a reliable source for parents to look at.”  Parents are also often fooled by the nature of the concussive incident itself. A person doesn’t have to suffer a blow to the head to get a concussion; a blow to the body that causes a whiplash motion can also do the trick. Football and hockey are generally seen as a breeding ground for concussions—and rightfully so—but experts warn that soccer, lacrosse or any other sport where there’s a chance for collision, falling or being struck by a fast-moving ball presents a risk of TBI.  Most garden-variety concussions clear up after a couple of days with “brain rest,” that is, staying still in a dark room and not thinking about

“A concussion most often occurs with some type of head trauma, which could be by contact, like running into another kid playing sports, or it could be falling.” 34 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


CONCUSSIONS: Youth Athletes & What to Do

F

all sports are in full swing. While sports are fun for athletes and fans, there’s always a risk of injury. Whether it’s the quarterback who takes a hard sack or the cheerleader whose tumble doesn’t end as planned, athletes need to remember that any impact that affects the head – even one that isn’t direct – puts them at risk for a concussion.

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that is caused by a bump or a blow to the head. Even a mild blow can be a serious matter.

How common are concussions?

of students

15 in

Reported having at least one sports related concussion, according to the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior survey. athletes who play contact sports will sustain a concussion this year.

Approximately

of all concussions

go undiagnosed.

In cheerleading, around

of sports injuries

are to the head or neck.

What to do if you think your child has a concussion

If you think your child has a concussion, seek medical attention right away. The CDC recently issued new guidelines for assessing and treating concussions. A health care professional will follow standardized assessment procedures, looking for warning signs and asking questions about pre-existing conditions. You will be given detailed instructions for home care and recommendations for when your child can return to school on a modified or full schedule.

When can a child return to play after a concussion?

The most important home-care instruction: follow the “return-to-play” protocol as instructed by your child’s physician. The brain needs time to heal after a concussion. Children who resume activity or begin playing too soon after an injury are at a bigger risk for getting another concussion. Second or multiple concussions can cause permanent brain damage or even death. After medical clearance, return to play should follow a step-wise protocol with provisions for delayed return to play based upon the return of any signs or symptoms.

What are some symptoms of concussion? Symptoms of concussion may last for days or weeks. Your young athlete may have a concussion if he/she: • • • • • • • • • •

Appears dazed or stunned Is easily confused Forgets instructions Vomits Moves slowly or clumsily Answers questions slowly Loses consciousness (even briefly) Shows behavior or personality changes Can’t recall events before or after the hit or fall Develops new problems in school, including changes in concentration and behavior

About Arkansas Children’s Sports Medicine

The Arkansas Children’s Sports Medicine department is staffed by pediatric orthopedic experts ready to treat your developing athlete’s sports-related injury and return them to school and play as safely and quickly as possible. Families benefit from a team that includes physicians, neuropsychologists, athletic trainers and social workers who follow athletes until they have fully recovered.

Offering a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment for sports injuries in children and teens. For more information: (501) 364-GAME | archildrens.org/sportsmedicine SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | SEPTEMBER 2019

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anything. This fact might lead some to wonder what the big deal is, if the injury will just reset itself on its own.   “One thing is, the symptoms could be prolonged a lot longer than they would have been if they did cognitive and physical rest,” Gibson-Oliver said. “The other thing would be something we call second impact syndrome. If a second concussion occurs pretty shortly after a first, second impact syndrome can result in some devastating neurological injuries. That can even cause death, coma, something you can’t really recover from.”  “Another thing a lot of parents have probably heard about is chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. It’s big in the news. Football players and other athletes who have a lot of impact, people who have suffered multiple concussions throughout their lives, later in life have permanent changes in mood, behavior, cognition and, in severe cases, dementia or Parkinson’s. So, it is really important to try to prevent second concussions.” 

CONCUSSIONS AT A GLANCE • Boys and girls are equally susceptible to concussions; however, boys tend to incur more of them because of their participation in high-contact sports such as football and hockey.  • According to Dr. Lauren Gibson-Oliver, the No. 1 sign of concussion in kids is a headache, occurring about 90 percent of the time. Dizziness, unsteadiness, difficulty concentrating and confusion or disorientation are all major red flags.   • Minor symptoms in children, occurring in less than 30 percent of cases, include vision changes, sensitivity to light, nausea, drowsiness, amnesia or irritability.   • Insist your children wear a properly fitted and certified helmet when riding a bike, skateboard, scooter or roller skating. Look for CPSC and ASTM certifications.  • I n the wake of a bump, bruise or whiplash, seek medical attention. Even if you don’t see the actual collision with another person or the ground, if your child is dizzy, disoriented or acting confused, play it safe with a trip to the emergency department.   • I f the injury occurred during sports, the child should immediately be removed from the game or practice and not allowed to participate further until being cleared by a physician.     

36 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


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kid approved Apps

FUN

MARCO POLO IS A GREAT VIDEO MESSAGING APP THAT THE KIDS AND I LOVE! WE SEND 10-15 SECOND VIDEO MESSAGES TO EACH OTHER ALL THE TIME, AND IT ALLOWS YOU TO HAVE A LITTLE FUN WITH IT BY CHANGING VOICES AND ADDING FILTERS OR EMOJIS TO YOUR MESSAGE.

(LIZZIE, STEPHEN, JOHN AND WILL)

STEPHEN PAULSON

IS A FATHER OF THREE AND HAS SERVED IN THE MILITARY FOR 15 YEARS. HE RECENTLY RETURNED HOME FROM A YEAR DEPLOYMENT IN KOSOVO, WHERE HE SERVED AS A FIELD ARTILLERY OFFICER WITH THE RANK OF CAPTAIN. WHILE NOT SERVING OUR COUNTRY, STEPHEN RUNS A HOME INSPECTION BUSINESS WITH HIS FATHER CALLED PILLAR TO POST. FOR FUN, STEPHEN ENJOYS BIKING WITH HIS FIANCÉ, ANGELA, AND SON JOHN. HE ALSO LOVES CAMPING, TRAVELING, HANGING OUT AND COOKING WITH FRIENDS AND GEEKING OUT ON THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY.

HOUSE PARTY IS A VIDEO GROUP CHAT APP THAT NOTIFIES YOU WHEN YOUR FRIEND GROUPS ARE ONLINE AND AVAILABLE TO CHAT. KIDS CAN PLAY GAMES OR CHAT WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY.

THE KIDS USE TIKTOK CONSTANTLY! IT ALLOWS THEM TO CREATE SHORT-FORM VIDEOS OF WHATEVER THEY WANT, AND THEN SHARE WITH THE PUBLIC, OR WITH THEIR FRIENDS. IT ALSO ALLOWS YOU TO SEARCH FOR YOUR FAVORITE TIKTOK CELEBS AND FOLLOW THEIR ADVENTURES!

CHILL

MY DAUGHTER, LIZZY, LOVES TO GET LOST IN SANDBOX PIXEL COLORING. SHE CAN SIT DOWN AND COLOR BY NUMBER JUST ABOUT WHATEVER SHE CAN THINK OF. THERE ARE SO MANY PICTURES TO CHOOSE FROM. SHE CLAIMS THAT IT REALLY CALMS HER DOWN WHEN SHE'S FEELING ANXIOUS.

PHOTOS

LEARNING THIS LIST WOULDN'T BE COMPLETE WITHOUT INSTAGRAM. THE KIDS AND I LOVE DOCUMENTING ACTIVITIES, LOOKING AT SILLY MEMES AND WE HAVE EVEN MADE INSTA ACCOUNTS FOR CHELSEA, OUR YELLOW LAB, AND INDY, OUR CAT!

WE LOVE TO SIT DOWN AS A FAMILY AND LOOK THROUGH ALL THE PHOTOS THAT WE'VE POSTED ON SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS OVER THE YEARS USING TIMEHOP! SET UP A REMINDER EVERY DAY SO YOU CAN RELIVE THOSE MEMORIES. THE CREATORS ALSO INCLUDE FUN FACTS ABOUT EACH PARTICULAR DAY IN HISTORY!

38 SEPTEMBER 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

I WOULD NEVER BE ABLE TO HELP WITH HOMEWORK WITHOUT KHAN ACADEMY. THERE ARE LITERALLY THOUSANDS OF LESSONS ON ANY SCHOOL SUBJECT YOU CAN IMAGINE. THERE ARE EVEN TUTORIALS ON WEB DESIGN AND COMPUTER PROGRAMMING.

WOLFRAM ALPHA IS ANOTHER EDUCATION APP WHERE YOU CAN SIMPLY TYPE IN YOUR COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEMS AND WAIT FOR STEP-BY-STEP SOLUTIONS. IT’S EXTREMELY VALUABLE FOR THOSE PARENTS WHO HAVE FORGOTTEN EVERY BIT OF MATH THAT WE EVER LEARNED!


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Profile for Arkansas Times

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SAVVYkids | September 2019  

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