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AUGUST 2019 · SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

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EQUITY AND EXCELLENCE Pulaski County Special School District is excited about providing equity and excellence to all students in the 2019-2020 school year. Entering his second year as superintendent, Dr. Charles McNulty began a shift to improving education, opportunities and collaboration across the district. PCSSD will implement several new programs in the 19-20 school year, including AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) and Driven Academy powered by Tech Trep ƒvˆŒ­âƜv®³®¨œ®ŒƨۜÀÈËv¨Ú³³¨½À³—Àv­ýŒƒœïƒv¨¨â–³ÀÈÀvˆœÈœ³®v¨š³­ŒÃƒš³³¨ÃÈˈŒ®ÈÃƛ AVID is a college and career readiness system centered on engaging professional learning that will be at several elementary schools as well as sixth grade in the middle schools and ninth grade at the high schools. AVID teams are eagerly preparing to implement this system that will increase student engagement, promote classroom collaboration and activate deeper levels of learning in their classrooms with practical, immediately useful tools and instructional strategies. Driven Academy powered by Tech Trep Academy is a K-12 personalized, blended approach to learning designed to create a diverse and interactive online learning environment for homeschool students. It combines the convenience of online learning with the support of one-on-one instruction –À³­vƒŒÀȜȌvƒšŒÀƛ*Èv¨Ã³½À³ÛœˆŒÃvÃÈÀ³®—Ã˽½³ÀÈ®ŒÈܳÀ§³–ÃÈˈŒ®ÈÃv®ˆȌvƒšŒÀÃܚœ¨Œ allowing you to work on your own time, at your own pace. In addition to new programs, PCSSD will continue PBIS (Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports) for the second year. This initiative will assist our schools with enhancing our school climates and provide additional support to all students. PCSSD is also a proud participant of the RISE program, Reading Initiative for Student Excellence, through the Arkansas Department of Education. For our Kindergarten through third-grade students, teachers received Phonics First training to help complete the statewide RISE initiative which focuses on reading. We also have teams that are charged with ensuring that our curriculum is multicultural and multi-sensory at every school.

purpose.pcssd.org

9œ¨¨Ã(œ—šOƒš³³¨v®ˆ9vË­Œ¨¨Œ(œ—šOƒš³³¨¦ËÃȃ³­½¨ŒÈŒˆȚŒïÀÃÈâŒvÀ³–L*_:ܚœƒšœÃv® exceptional opportunity for students who thrive in a blended learning environment. PCSSD is excited to launch DRIVEN at Robinson High School this school year. Students in this environment have to be willing to assume ownership and control of their education. They must be willing to work with teacher-mentors and demonstrate the self-discipline needed to take full advantage of ȚŒðŒáœ‚œ¨œÈâ³––ŒÀŒˆȳȚŒ­ƛ

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POPSICLE STICK CRAFTS

5 EDITOR’S NOTE 8 ADVENTURE & FUN CALENDAR, CRAFT & MORE!

12 MAMA SAID ...

A BUSY MOM’S GUIDE TO DOING HER BEST — STACY HAMILTON

14 FAMILY & PARENTING LITTLE FISH, BIG POND

18 AFTER-SCHOOL CARE

20 MINUTE CHICKEN STIR-FRY

LOCAL PROGRAMS

22 GOOD EATS

EASY PEASY WEEKNIGHT DINNERS

30 HEALTH & WELLNESS WHAT'S YOUR GERM IQ?

34 EXPLORE & LEARN

WORKING SMARTER, NOT HARDER

38 KID APPROVED BACK 2 SCHOOL —JESSICA TAVERNA

WHAT'S YOUR GERM IQ? MUST HAVE BACK-2-SCHOOL ITEMS!

ON THE COVER: PHOTO COURTESY OF PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT

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AUGUST 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


BACK TO SCHOOL ALREADY? Going back to school is always bittersweet. It signals the end of summertime and days at the pool, family vacations, late mornings and epic family movie nights. While everyone at the Gordy house lives for summer … there is something comforting about getting back into the routine of school days (right?). The first day (Aug. 13 for LRSD!) is right around the corner, and if you are still in back-to-school denial, a quick flip through this issue of SAVVYkids should get you in a positive mindset. We got everything you need to get your family in order before you pack that first lunch and wade through the first-day drop-off line. On page 14 we take a look at some of the big transitions—elementary to middle school, middle school to high school and high school to college. We get advice from professionals on how you can better prepare your child for these big changes (new school, new friends, bigger class load, more homework). Going back to school also means exposing our kids to all kinds of germs and bacteria. Want to know your Germ IQ? Flip to page 30 to see just how much you really know about germs, how they spread, where they like to hide, the best ways to kill them and a few facts and myths. Do you have an academic over achiever in the family? More students are getting ahead and saving on tuition when they take advantage of concurrent college credit. There are many Arkansas institutions that offer deeply discounted college credits to high school students. Check out page 34 for more info! As you check off your kid’s supply list (tax-free weekend is Aug. 3-4!), finish up all that back-to-school clothes shopping, organize your aftercare (find a list of great programs on page 18) and send the kids off on the first day … just remember fall break is right around the corner!

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvykids amy@arktimes.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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PUBLISHER KATHERINE DANIELS | katherine@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER ART DIRECTOR | DIGITAL MANAGER KATIE HASSELL SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS

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contributors ANGELA E. THOMAS is a proud University of Arkansas at Little Rock graduate and a member of its Alumni Board. For 11 years, she served Central Arkansas as editor for a locally owned magazine. Thomas is founder and owner of the greeting card company GODsent Greetings.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

William F. Laman Public Library North Little Rock Main Branch 2801 Orange St. Argenta Branch 420 Main St.

For 120 Years, Methodist Family Health has counseled Arkansas children and families ...

MELISSA TUCKER spends her days working in web marketing. When not at work, you'll probably find her at the gym, on the playground with her kids or checking out too many books from the library.

ZARA ABBASI lives in Little Rock with her husband and three children. She is a licensed attorney but you know her better as Little Rock’s friendly pastry chef and custom cake maker. She keeps busy with dessert orders, pop-up dinners, writing articles and doing anything food-related. Follow her on Instagram @Zaramadeit for her newest cake creations and dinner ideas.

KATIE CHILDS is a wedding, lifestyle, and commercial photographer based in North Little Rock. When she's not behind the camera, Katie, her husband Jon, and their new addition, baby Jonas, can be found traveling the US in a DIY camper van.

STACY HAMILTON and her husband, Nathan, recently opened The Baker, a new boutique luxury inn in downtown North Little Rock (stayatthebaker.com). Stacy also works as a full time residential Realtor with Desselle Real Estate, specializing in historic houses in Little Rock and North Little Rock. The Hamiltons have two precious kiddos: Calvin, starting kindergarten this fall, and Ellis, 2½ .

Today, we also counsel adults. Call us. 1600 Aldersgate Rd., Suite 100B Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 501-537-3991 * DWard@MethodistFamily.org MethodistFamily.org

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Photo by Kelli Tungay on Unsplash

ADVENTURE & FUN

August 2019

August 4

SUMMER BLOCK PARTY

August 3-4

TAX-FREE WEEKEND

The Mobile Video Game Station and Graffiti Apparel are throwing a fun-filled party from 3-6 p.m. at Murray’s Lock and Dam pavilions. The whole family is invited to this free summer bash to help kids get ready for school and have a good time. Look for giveaways on tons of free school supplies, free food, haircuts, face painting, balloon artists, a bounce house, battlefield laser tag and more. facebook.com/MVGStation

Get your back-to-school shopping done on this tax-free weekend! Shop for certain school supplies, art supplies, school instructional materials and clothing without paying sales tax.

Back to School Little Rock School District’s first day is

August 13!

August 10

FIRE & GLOW

Enjoy an evening at Wildwood Park for the Arts with a special fire infused performance by Arkansas Circus Arts. This light, acrobatics and dance show will also include vendors, face painting, food trucks, beverages and live music. Bring a blanket or lawn chair. arcircus.com

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AUGUST 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

August 22-25 FILMLAND

This curated film festival hosted by the Arkansas Cinema Society in downtown Little Rock features a wide selection of local and national films and shorts, filmmaker talks, parties and more. One of the headline films this year is "Toy Story 4," with an appearance by two-time Academy Award winner Andrew Stanton. arkansascinemasociety.org


Spotlight on Nonprofits Junior League of Little Rock

August 17

THE BIG BIRTHDAY SHAKE UP WITH YARNELL'S! Big Orange is celebrating its 8th birthday by throwing the coolest party in town at the Promenade at Chenal. Kids 12 and under are invited to participate in a Yarnell’s ice cream eating contest and a shake recipe contest to win big prizes all beginning at 11 a.m. facebook.com/bigorangeburger

August 17

BREAKFAST WITH THE PENGUINS

Meet some of the coolest animals at the Little Rock Zoo at this chill morning event. From 8-10 a.m. get up-close with the penguins and the keepers who care for them. This experience includes breakfast in Cafe Africa with special keeper chats and close-up encounters and photo opportunities with the penguins. All guests must be 6 years old or older. littlerockzoo.com

August 24

AUDITION FOR BALLET ARKANSAS'S “THE NUTCRACKER SPECTACULAR”

The community is invited to experience the magic of Ballet Arkansas’s "Nutcracker Spectacular" on stage each holiday season. To audition, dancers must be at least 6 years old, with a minimum of one full year of ballet instruction and be currently enrolled in dance classes. balletarkansas.org.

What’s It All About? Junior League of Little Rock (JLLR) is one of the oldest women’s groups in the city, tracing its roots back to 1922. It was formed to promote volunteerism and to develop the potential of women to effect positive change. JLLR membership opportunities are open to women of every race, religion and national origin who share a commitment to improving the community. As a service organization, Junior League of Little Rock has contributed millions of dollars and thousands of service hours over its history. Some of Little Rock’s best-known and most-loved institutions came about with the help of the JLLR, including the Arkansas Arts Center, Riverfest, Potluck Food Rescue and Museum of Discovery. The group’s fundraisers and events include: Boosters & Big Rigs, August 10: This family-friendly, free community event provides children with dental, vision and wellness screenings. The event also provides children with an educational and fun opportunity to explore and touch community vehicles such as ambulances, fire trucks and police cars. Boosters & Big Rigs is presented in partnership with UALR Children International. Where Can I Find It? JLLR is housed at 401 S. Scott St. in downtown Little Rock. When Can I Attend? Membership applications and information are available at jllr.org. Who’s Leading? Junior League of Little Rock is governed by a 12-member board. The 2019-20 president of the organization is Jennifer Goss. Why Is It Important? Junior League of Little Rock has been the driving force behind the kinds of initiatives and institutions that make the Little Rock community a healthier, more vital place to live. After nearly 100 years, it’s still living out that mission, most recently with a 10-year strategic plan unveiled in 2010. That plan outlined goals and objectives, including decreasing childhood obesity in Little Rock by increasing access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity and to improve literacy skills among Pulaski County students by narrowing the readiness gap. In these and many other ways, the Junior League has established itself as the premier source of female leadership development in Little Rock. How Can I Help? In addition to attending fundraiser events or joining the group outright, donations may be made via the JLLR website, jllr.org. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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BRACELETS AND BOOKMARKS Try these easy popsicle stick classroom crafts kids will love!

YOU WILL NEED: Popsicle sticks Sauce pan Small jars Markers Washi tape Fabric scraps Mod Podge

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HOW TO BOOKMARKS: 1. Just decorate the popsicle sticks however you like!


HOW TO BRACELETS: 1. Boil the popsicle sticks on the stove for 15 minutes. Then let them sit in the water for an additional 30 minutes. 2. Remove the sticks one at a time and gently bend the sticks into a crescent shape and place in the small jars. 3. Leave to dry overnight. 4. Remove the bracelets from the jars and decorate using markers, paint, washi tape or fabric and Mod Podge.

TIP MAKE A FEW EXTRA BRACELETS IN CASE ANY BREAK.

TIPS CRAYONS DO NOT WORK AS WELL AS MARKERS.

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4822 N. HILLS BLVD. NORTH LITTLE ROCK 501.978.3154 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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MAMA SAID ...

A BUSY MOM’S GUIDE TO DOING HER BEST BY STACY HAMILTON

As I write this my almost 3-year-old has been screaming at me for an hour, refusing to go to bed—so remember any advice I give you (really, anyone gives you) about parenting, must include caveats galore; “… some of the time it works”; “… but every kid is different”; “… it used to work but they grew out of it.” But then there is advice about routines. I love routines. In my humble opinion, routines are about the closest thing I’ve found that can be universally good for kids. It’s no secret routines provide stability and security … and I’m terrible at them. My husband is terrible about them. And so, the kids are terrible about them. Maybe we’re not as bad as that, but it feels like we are. Because we’re good at setting routines, and our path to disorganized hell is paved in gold-plated good intentions of following the routine, but we never seem to get it just right.

And that’s OK. I have to remind myself (I’m doing it right now as my littlest is peacefully, finally, asleep) that the routine itself is not the end goal. That would mean we all strive to be robots. I like to think of my routines as guidelines for our lives—they are our “best practices” for how to run our family. We stray often but we always have the routine to return to for a dose of sanity. With our oldest beginning kindergarten this month, we’ve been fine-tuning our new morning routine over the summer. The goal is to get out of the house, on time, with all the accessories, and everyone reasonably happy with each other. We find our chances of success are greatly improved when the kids are dressed before anything else happens. If the adults get all ready first and then turn our attention to the kids, well by then they have become far too comfortable with not getting ready and that’s a big ship to try and turn around with not a lot of time to do it. Rip the Band-Aid off quick. Do the clothes and shoes first. Side note: My husband has an arbitrary rule that the definition of “fully dressed” includes socks and shoes—but that’s only because the lost shoe phenomenon can costs us an additional 20 minutes every morning. On a few occasions he has been known to drop a kid off at daycare with no shoes. In order to keep my days on track, I find it incredibly helpful to wake up at least an hour before the rest of the house. I fill that time with walking the dog, yoga or getting ahead on work lists. It’s a treasured, peaceful time alone with my first good cup of coffee and

(FROM LEFT) CALVIN, STACY AND ELLIS HAMILTON.

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my thoughts, and I don’t think I could survive mentally without it. In addition to the near impossible task of raising two kids, my husband and I balance our full-time jobs, his law school at night, running a tiny hotel (The Baker), and trying to be good kids to our own parents. We fail sometimes. Our kids’ daycare has “Lunchbox Fridays”—one day a week. That’s it. Just one day a week they ask you to remember to make your kids a lunch. You don’t know shame until your sad 5-year-old looks you in the eye at pick-up time and says, “You forgot my lunch.” With so many different schedules it’s critical for us to have defined daily responsibilities. My husband does school drop off and all the grocery shopping. I do laundry and dishes. We’ve found those are the biggies. Of course, we have to have help. We know that yard work can be done quicker and more efficiently by hiring someone else, and it’s worth it to us to spend that money and keep our limited time with the kids. Finally, we’re learning every day. The routines change. We get better. We hit obstacles. We overcome them. It’s important to be flexible and just concentrate on the guidelines. Every now and then take some time to reflect and see what routines you want to get back to and which ones (the bad habits) need to be changed. Routines are only as good as the purpose behind them. Time spent on figuring that out is not time wasted.


UPCOMING AUGUST EVENTS

Aug. 28 1-4

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1-3, 9-11

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The Studio Theatre Mamma Mia the Musical

South on Main Sessions :: Nick Black

The Weekend Theater Between Riverside and Crazy

2

South on Main The Ginsingers :: SOMA After Dark

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South on Main Sessions :: Lachaz Holloway

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South on Main Seth Walker

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Four Quarter Bar Groovement

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South on Main Route 358 & Ten Penny Gypsy

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South on Main Sessions :: Dazz & Brie

The Mixing Room Preservation Conversation: Quapaw Tribal Pottery with Betty Geadtke

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La Terraza Rum & Lounge National Rum Day!

23-25

The Studio Theatre The Old Maid and the Thief: A 1939 Radio Hour

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Quapaw Quarter Association QQA Summer Suppers: Dinner in the Valley, An Artist’s Home

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South on Main Sessions :: Funkanites

LOCAL TICKETS, ONE PLACE

Arkansas Times local ticketing site! If you’re a non-profit, freestanding venue or business selling tickets thru eventbrite or another national seller – email us phyllis@arktimes.com or hannah@arktimes.com – we’re local, independent and offer a marketing package!

CENTRALARKANSASTICKETS.COM

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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FAMILY & PARENTING

LITTLE FISH, BIG POND

Each graduation—from elementary to middle, from middle to high and from high school to college—is a cause for celebration accompanied by a bit of trepidation and anxiety as your child moves from a place of familiarity to the unknown. We share information to help you and your child make the transitions as smoothly as possible. BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

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Each step in the maturation process is a thrill and an adjustment. After all, even the

most well-adjusted and the highest achievers will go from being a big fish in the little pond to a little fish in a big, unfamiliar and sometimes scary pond. Sending your baby off to pre-K or kindergarten, in many cases, involves prying him off your leg and not looking back as you hear his cries, or trying soothe your hurt feelings as he happily leaves your grasp. Here are several things you can do to prepare him for elementary school: • Set up and maintain routine times for meals, study time, playtime and bedtime. • Teach your child how to constructively handle his negative emotions, such as anger, disappointment and frustration. • Make sure he knows how to take turns, share and respect others’ boundaries. • Set rules and boundaries and appropriate consequences for breaking them. • Regularly talk with your child; ask questions that require elaboration. This will help establish communication and trust, which will become critical as he matures. Preparing your child to enter elementary school and prepare for middle school are the easiest of the transitions. Getting him ready to enter and transition from middle school are the most difficult periods. Moving from elementary school to middle school—sixth, seventh and eighth grades, ages 12 to 15—is a pretty big deal. “This transition is, perhaps, the biggest, and the one parents dread the most. Children are going through a lot of changes,” said Patricia Erwin, counselor at Pulaski Heights Middle School in Little Rock. “One of the most significant changes is in their peer groups. While children are in elementary school, their parents and families were the most influential in their lives. However, in middle school the children become more peer oriented, both socially and emotionally.” Erwin has worked in education for 32 years and previously served in elementary schools.

She said children’s friendship groups change; when children are younger, proximity plays a big part, meaning they’ll typically befriend those they see most often. In middle school, they tend to expand and branch out, and these new friendships may be based on common interests, physicality and social status, etc. “Twelve to 15-year-olds experience a lot of change psychically and this impacts their feelings about other things. They may also experience anxiety because they’re developing faster or slower than their peers. They are still trying to figure out who they are and trying to be accepted. And when they’re not accepted by a person or group they admire, it can be hard. Some children are strong and resilient, but many are insecure about that,” Erwin said. Parents, you should also prepare yourselves: your child will test the boundaries. This is a part of establishing independence. “Of course, we want our children to become independent, but this can be a painful process,” she added. They’re not adults, but they’re no longer babies. So, there are times when you’ll need to let them figure it out. There will be other times, Erwin said, that you’ll want to intervene. “For instance, social media is a big issue because what’s going on online bleeds into school.” Parents should monitor their children’s’ online presence and address issues at home. “If something inappropriate is going on and/or if something odd is being texted, let your child’s counselor know. We are there to listen and be supportive,” she added.

Moving from elementary school to middle school—sixth, seventh and eighth grades, ages 12 to 15—is a pretty big deal.

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The move to middle school also brings changes in environment—not only are the children moving to an unfamiliar, larger building, they’ll go from working with one or two teachers to as many as eight teachers. This means adjusting to shorter classes, a faster pace, different classmates, various classroom rules, and different teachers’ personalities and expectations (talk about stress!). Erwin suggests parents assist their children with two key practical skills: time management and organization. “This is a big issue. Parents should teach their children how to ask for specific instructions, deadlines and due dates and how to use a planner or agenda book to keep up with assignments, test dates, etc. Don’t assume that your child knows how to use his agenda.” You’ll also want to schedule time to complete homework and study for tests. Additionally, Erwin suggests you and your child meet with his counselor to ensure he is taking the correct classes—whether he’s college bound or planning to pursue a vocation after high school. “Make certain your child knows that everything from here on counts. Students take tests to assess their interests and strengths to help them choose a career path. Of course, this choice isn’t set in stone, but it’s good to start thinking about the long term,” she said. Middle school is also when most children experience the biggest hormonal and physical changes. While many Arkansas schools include sex education as a part of the fifth-grade

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Little Ro c k Sc ho o l Distri ct

First day of school is Tuesday, August 13th! July 15 - August 12: Online Check-in Portal Available July 31 - August 1: Back to School Campus Check-in for Elementary, Middle and High Schools

The move to middle school also brings changes in environment—not only are the children moving to an unfamiliar, larger building, they’ll go from working with one or two teachers to as many as eight teachers.

For more details visit LRSD.org or call 447-2950. 2019-2020 LRSD Student Calendar Available online now Print calendar coming soon!

We are excited that the 2019-20 school year is upon us! Some wonderful accomplishments to celebrate: • • • •

• • • • • •

curriculum, you may want to address this issue more thoroughly. Often children learn about the mechanics of reproduction from their peers, which, as you may know from experience, can be erroneous and frightening. Erwin suggests you approach the topic using your judgment and based on your child’s maturity level. The transition from middle school to high school can be trying. However, Erwin’s advice is to teach your child how to manage his time as well as how to become organized, and meeting with his counselor to schedule classes to prepare him for college or vocational training is essential as his workload will increase during these last four years. You’ll also want to visit the high school your child will attend during his eighth-grade year. Erwin said, “Our high schools offer potential students the opportunity to shadow current students. This is a great way for your child to get a preview of a typical high school day and to get a tour of the school.” In addition to enrolling in classes that will prepare your child for his next step, you may want to consider choosing a school with an emphasis in his interests. For instance, if he is interested in the arts, or science and technology, you may choose a high school that focuses on these areas. Lastly, make sure your child is prepared to take responsibility for meeting deadlines for assignments and school projects. For instance, my son was especially forgetful. I made countless trips to his middle school to bring homework, lunches, projects, coats, etc. I even faxed homework assignments to the office! When he entered 10th grade, I instituted a new rule: he had three chances per school year to ask me to bring something or fax something to the school. By his senior year, he’d become less forgetful as the consequences had become quite painful. One thing Erwin stressed for students’ entire school career: parental involvement. Remain involved in your child’s life and in his school. Volunteer, and be certain his teachers and counselors know you care and that you’re just a phone call away. Information from National Education Association, nea.org.

Graduation rates improve from 74% three years ago to 82% this year LRSD’s 2018 Teacher of the Year selected as 2019 Arkansas Teacher of the Year - Stacey McAdoo State Champs in Swimming and Tennis 2nd Lien Loan Projects – HVAC, roofs, security camera/alarm upgrades, air conditioning at all high school gyms, resolution of drainage issues at Dunbar, turf/track/field improvements for Central, Fair and Hall Scholarship total of $23.0 million ViPS Partnerships - $27.2 million in volunteer support $150,000 grant for new Health Clinic at Chicot Elementary to support the Southwest community Little Rock Southwest High School, slated to open in 2020, will be one of the largest state-of-the-art secondary campuses in Arkansas LRSD’s Pre-K/Early Childhood Centers continue to serve as one of the strongest early learning programs in the State Career Education Expansion – doubled student numbers in medical program and Police and Fire Academies

We look forward to seeing all our students and staff for an AMAZING 2019-2020 school year!

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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SIGN UP FOR AFTER-SCHOOL CARE Keep kids safe and engaged with these local programs BY DWAIN HEBDA

Looking for a safe place for your child to burn off some excess energy, make new friends and even get some homework done? Check out these quality after-school programs that provide educational, social, physical and even artistic stimulation.

ADVENTURELAND ACADEMY

1015 Autumn Road, Little Rock 501-227-0880, adventureland-academy.com After-school care for students ages 5-12 includes after-school snacks, homework assistance and reading tutoring.

ARKANSAS REGIONAL INNOVATION HUB

201 E. Broadway, North Little Rock 501-907-6570, arhub.org The after-school programs target students ages 10-16 and include focused classroom lab sessions with one session building into the next.

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BILLY MITCHELL BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

3107 W. Capitol, Little Rock 501-666-9486, arclubs.org Membership required; programs include art, gardening, chess, tutoring and athletics.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS LIBRARY SYSTEM

100 Rock St., Little Rock 501-918-3086, cals.org All 14 CALS branches feature after-school programs that include crafts, puppets, cooking classes, concerts, movies and, of course, quiet time for homework or reading. Visit cals.org for specific activities at a branch near you.

GLENVIEW COMMUNITY CENTER

4800 E. 19th St., North Little Rock 501-945-2921, nlrpr.org Community Center membership required; after care is $5/ week; $15/month with discount for multiple children. Open to elementary and middle grades, the ASPire after-school program provides educational (EDutopia), health and fitness (Play 45), and art (CreARTivity) activities.

HAMILTON BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

600 N. Palm St., North Little Rock 501-945-3162, arclubs.org Membership required; programs include music, tutoring, scouts and athletics.

DALTON WHETSTONE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

46 Harrow Drive, Little Rock 501-562-4082, arclubs.org Membership required, programs include music, art, tutoring, scouting and athletics.

DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTER

1001 W. 16th St., Little Rock 501-376-1084, littlerock.gov Little Rock Parks & Rec after-school programs provide homework assistance, indoor and outdoor games, clubs and more for students kindergarten through eighth grade.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER

324 W. Eighth St., Little Rock 501-372-2327 The Be Cool After School program features daily activities, USDA-approved snacks, a homework room and exercise time for kids pre-K through eighth grade. The First Arts program is an after-school music and art education opportunity for second- through eighth-grade children in Little Rock. First Arts offers private lessons in many musical instruments as well as group-learning sessions in theater/drama and visual art.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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LITTLE ROCK ATHLETIC CLUB

4610 Sam Peck Road, Little Rock 501-225-3600, lrac.com A state-licensed after-school care program for students grades pre-K through sixth grade featuring fitness activities, classes, community involvement, arts and crafts, homework help and snacks.

LITTLE SCHOLARS ACADEMY

East Campus: 10910 Maumelle Blvd., Maumelle West Campus: 112 Audubon Drive, Maumelle 501-803-0300, lilscholarsmaumelle Offers before- and after-school care that includes recreation and education via a broad range of engaging activities and homework help.

NORTH LITTLE ROCK ATHLETIC CLUB

3804 McCain Park Drive, North Little Rock 501-812-5555, nlrac.com A state-licensed after-school care program for students grades pre-K through sixth grade featuring fitness activities, classes, community involvement, arts and crafts, homework help and snacks.

NORTH HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CENTER

4801 Allen St., North Little Rock 501-791-8576, nlrpr.org Community Center membership required; after care is $5/ week; $15/month with discount for multiple children. Open to elementary and middle grades, the ASPire after-school program provides educational (EDutopia), health and fitness (Play 45), and art (CreARTivity) activities.

20 AUGUST 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

PENICK BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

1201 Leisure Place, Little Rock 501-666-5494, arclubs.org Membership required; programs include art, tutoring, scouts and athletics.

RIVER CITY GYMNASTICS

5310 S. Shackleford Road, Little Rock 501-407-8000, river-city-gymnastics.com Each session starts with a healthy snack and includes supervised play time and quiet time for homework or reading.

ROSE CITY COMMUNITY CENTER

400 Rose Lane, North Little Rock 501-945-8036, nlrpr.org Community Center membership required; after care is $5/week; $15/month with discount for multiple children. Open to elementary and middle grades, the ASPire after-school program provides educational (EDutopia), health and fitness (Play 45), and art (CreARTivity) activities.

SHERMAN PARK COMMUNITY CENTER

624 Beech St., North Little Rock 501-340-5373, nlrpr.org Community Center membership required; after care is $5/week; $15/month with discount for multiple children. Open to elementary and middle grades, the ASPire after-school program provides educational (EDutopia), health and fitness (Play 45), and art (CreARTivity) activities.


SOUTHWEST COMMUNITY CENTER

6401 Baseline Road, Little Rock 501-918-3975, littlerock.gov Little Rock Parks & Rec after-school programs provide homework assistance, indoor and outdoor games, clubs and more for students kindergarten through eighth grade.

STEPHENS COMMUNITY CENTER

3720 W. 18th St., Little Rock 501-603-9974, littlerock.gov Little Rock Parks & Rec after-school programs provide homework assistance, indoor and outdoor games, clubs and more for students kindergarten through eighth grade.

THRASHER BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

3301 S. State St., Little Rock 501-376-2988, arclubs.org Membership required; programs include music, art, scouts and athletics.

WETHERINGTON BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB 1212 Jim Wetherington Place, North Little Rock 501-374-0309, arclubs.org Membership required; programs include music, dance, tutoring and athletics.

WHAT IS EARLY AND FIRST-EPISODE PSYCHOSIS? Early psychosis, also known as first-episode psychosis (FEP), is often frightening, confusing and distressing for the person experiencing it and difficult for his or her family to understand. FEP can start at any age, but young adults are at in increased risk because of hormonal changes in the brain that occur during puberty. Early diagnosis and treatment provide the best hope for recovery.

Know the Signs These warning signs may signal early psychosis: - Hearing, seeing, tasting or believing things that others don’t - Suspiciousness or extreme uneasiness with others - Withdrawing from family and friends - A sudden decline in self-care - Strong and inappropriate emotions or no emotions at all

HELP IS AVAILABLE. REACH OUT TO LEARN MORE AND TO KEEP YOUNG LIVES ON TRACK.

The Centers

|

First-Episode Psychosis Program

www.cfyf.org

501-666-8686 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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GOOD EATS

Easy Peasy Weeknight Dinners After-school and post-practice dinners can still happen (and be healthy!) when they’re this easy

BY ZARA ABBASI PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATIE CHILDS

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20 MINUTE CHICKEN STIR FRY SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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RememberLAZY how LASAGNA I was saying last month that I’m not one of those moms who like summer vacation to be over? Yeah, well it’s August and I’m in full denial mode right now. I don’t want it to be August already. I don’t want to shop for crayons and folders and backpacks. I want to still sleep in late and play all day with my babies. I know each person is different and back to school is welcomed in many other households, but I think I get just as sad as the kiddos around this time of the year. I loathe the rushing, the early mornings, the after-school routines and hunger pangs and early bedtimes. All of it is my nemesis. All of it. Especially because we are starting a new school this year. Bleh. But, nevertheless, the school year is here and once it is, it’s like sprinting a year-long marathon. Between homework, school plays, projects and then the after-school activities, there is simply not enough time for anything else. Especially not enough time to come up with quick meals. And, if you have more than one after-school activity, forget it; I’ll meet up with you at David’s Burgers and call it a night! Seriously, there’s no room for judgment here. And, a cheeseburger is known in the medical field to cure pretty much all that ails us. Don’t look that up! But for the nights we have a miniscule desire to cook as well as a smidge of time to do so, we want healthy recipes we can whip up in a few minutes. Actually, what we want is a personal chef to do all our cooking for us, am I right? Well, in lieu of a personal chef at home, let me help by at least providing a few ideas to get us started. Sometimes coming up with the ideas is the hardest part! My goal here was to provide quick, healthy meals that you’d hopefully actually make. I know time is hard to come by, so if you can prepare by having the ingredients handy, these meals will come together for you in a snap. I love using grocery delivery to lighten my load; it has been the one time-saver I have utilized consistently in making my life easier and smoother. If you are able and interested, I’d highly recommend using such a service to gather all your ingredients while you’re sitting through a basketball practice.

“The school year is here and once it is, it’s like sprinting a year-long marathon.”

24 AUGUST 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


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26 AUGUST 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


20-Minute Chicken Stir Fry

Talk about a quick meal! This one is seriously quick and utilizes coleslaw, which you wouldn’t think to use, but I love the carrots and cabbage in there and there’s no extra chopping for you! See my note at the end for a quick tip on rice. 1 pound chicken, cut into strips 2 cups coleslaw mix 2 cups broccoli florets 1 red bell pepper, sliced thinly 2 teaspoons garlic paste For the sauce: ½ cup soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil ½ teaspoon ginger powder 2 teaspoons honey 2 teaspoons cornstarch Salt and pepper to taste Garnish: 1 to 2 teaspoons sesame seeds Optional: Crushed red chili flakes or chili paste to taste 1. Add sauce ingredients into a bowl, mix and set aside. 2. Add oil into a large skillet and heat to medium-high heat. Add in chicken and cook until no longer pink. 3. Add in the broccoli and peppers and cook for about 6-8 minutes, until tender. 4. Add in coleslaw mix and sauce and cook for another 3-4 minutes. 5. Garnish with sesame seeds and serve with steamed rice. (I love buying the frozen brown rice from Whole Foods for nights when I’m in a hurry. It’s been a real time-saver.)

PARENT-GUIDED PERSISTENCE

Well-chosen extracurricular activities help kids develop important social, cognitive and physical skills. For example, music or foreign language lessons open up new pathways in the brain. Martial arts or gymnastics lessons develop coordination and grit. When parents introduce their kids to a new activity, they’re often excited to try them out. However, when a fun activity starts to involve real skill-building, kids often balk at the new level of effort required. They need parents’ help to persist beyond the honeymoon phase of learning. I regularly see new students at Unity Martial Arts light up when basic kicks and punches come easy to them. They swell with pride and howl with delight. Some kids sail through beginner ranks faster than others and feel they’ve found an activity that is a perfect match. Their mindset is, “Wow! These skills really work for me!” Then each student inevitably reaches the end of the honeymoon. There is no training montage like they’ve seen in the movies that turns months and years of works into a transitional scene set to fun music. They realize that turning kicks and punches into functional, powerful self-defense skills is going to take sweat, thought and lots of repetition. At this point, many kids recoil. They need parents to help them move from a mindset of “these skills work for me,” to a mindset of “I work on these skills.”

Here are a few ways parents can help their kids make this transition:

· Be consistent. Don’t let your child talk you into skipping lessons. · Transition time. Have them turn off screens and get focused with time to spare. · Show interest in their progress. Ask kids to teach you what they are learning. · Look at their teacher’s recommendations and help them work on them. · Always praise them for hard work instead of their innate smarts or strength. · Don’t chide them when they try and fail.

The difference between a fun experience that lasted a year or two and a skill-set that augments a person’s life forever can come down to those months when progress is hard. In my programs, the kids who grow up to be the best martial artists are not those with the most natural talent, but those whose parents continually whisper, “Keep trying, you can get there.”

(501) 664-0604 • WWW.UNITYMARTIALARTS.COM SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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Lazy Lasagna

If you have picky eaters or just a younger audience, sometimes you want something you know they’ll eat and you just want to be done with it … and I so get that. Fret not, the Lazy Lasagna is a saving grace at our house. This dish is ridiculously simple because you’re barely cooking (and, isn’t that what we want sometimes?) and it’s actually more versatile than it appears because you can change it up by adding 1 bag of frozen ravioli 24-ounce jar of your favorite pasta sauce 2 cups shredded mozzarella 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning 1 teaspoon garlic powder ½ cup parmesan cheese, grated 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees and grease a large baking or lasagna pan. 2. Add seasonings into the jarred sauce and stir to combine. 3. Spread ¼ of the sauce on the bottom of the pan and arrange half of the frozen ravioli on top in a single layer. 4. Top with half of the sauce and half of the mozzarella. Repeat with the remaining ravioli, sauce and cheese. Sprinkle top with the parmesan. 5. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Remove foil and bake for another 10-15 minutes until the top is bubbly. 6. Let cool for a few minutes and then dig in! 7. Variation 1: Beef ravioli, bell peppers, thin-sliced sausage, same cheeses and spicy red sauce. Variation 2: Mushroom ravioli, bell peppers and onions, shredded rotisserie chicken, same cheeses and alfredo sauce. Variation 3: Cheese ravioli, alfredo sauce, same cheeses and pesto.

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SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

WHAT’S YOUR GERM IQ? Are you a self-diagnosed germaphobe? See how much you really know about bacteria, viruses and prevention. BY MELISSA TUCKER

As kids get reacquainted with homework, old friends and classroom routines, they may also be re-encountering some germs they haven’t seen all summer. And as kids are once again exposed to bacteria and viruses, parents could also stand to brush up on good hygiene habits to get schoolkids and their younger siblings through fall and into flu season unscathed. So, here’s a little pop quiz for the parentals in the room. Grade yourself. High scores get fewer visits to the pharmacy.

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Hand sanitizer can’t kill the stomach bug norovirus.

Parental Pop Quiz 1. Define germs: Answer: “Germs” is a catch-all term for bacteria, viruses and fungi. Basically anything that’s too small for human vision to identify that can also make us sick. 2. What’s best for getting rid of germs, hand sanitizer or hand washing and why? Answer: When hand-washing is available, it’s the best method for getting rid of germs. It reduces germs, pesticides and metals on your hands. When handwashing is not available, a hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol is the next best option. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hand sanitizer can’t kill the stomach bug norovirus, some parasites and Clostridium difficile, which causes severe diarrhea. Hand sanitizer is also not effective when your hands are visibly dirty or greasy. “Whenever possible, use soap and water,” Arkansas Children’s Hospital pediatrician Hannah Renno said. “But if you’re at the amusement park and can’t wash your hands but want to eat your lunch, it might be better to use hand sanitizer than nothing.”

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3. To avoid spreading germs, where is the best place to cough or sneeze? Answer: The crook of your elbow. “You’re not likely to greet people with your elbow, and the goal is to avoid contact with your hands,” Renno said, “If you’re holding your shirt up or something like that, your hand will be in the line of fire and you want to avoid that.” 4. What place in the home is most likely to be hiding germs? Answer: The kitchen sink. “The kitchen sink and the kitchen sponge are the dirtiest place in the house,” Renno said. “If you’re washing a plate with a grimy sponge and using it again and again, you’re covering your plate in bacteria.” She suggested cleaning the sink frequently with soap and water and using a bristle brush that can be sanitized in the dishwasher. The metal scrub pads aren’t harboring as many germs as the sponge, she said. “If it’s metal, it doesn’t have the same porous quality as the sponge. You can grow a lot more on your sponge than something that’s a harder surface.”

“The kitchen sink and the kitchen sponge are the dirtiest place in the house.” 5. What two ways do germs travel? Answer: Via air and water (or droplets). “How germs move depends on the type of germ. Some are airborne and some are droplets,” she said, such as droplets from a sneeze and mucus or saliva. The airborne germs can remain in the air for up to two hours and expose anyone who enters, even if they don’t touch the person who is sick. “Parents should be aware there are different ways germs are shared,” she said. “For example, measles is airborne and that’s why it’s so contagious and scary. Chicken pox, or varicella, is also airborne. But the flu is spread through droplets.” 6. Bonus question: How do you know if you’re contagious? Answer: Ask your doctor. “If someone actively has a fever, they are contagious and should not be sent to daycare,” Renno said. “During flu season, be more careful with your baby under 2 months old. Make sure no one is sick around that baby.” She said when a child is diagnosed with something, parents should ask their pediatrician about their level of contagion and how to prevent spreading that sickness.

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A LITTLE DIRT NEVER HURT While parents may fret about hand-washing and sanitizing sponges, Renno says parents shouldn’t stress too hard about germs because of the Hygiene Hypothesis. She said the surfaces of our skin and the insides of our bodies are a mix of bacteria, many of which are helpful and healthy. It’s best not to overdo it when it comes to cleaning and disinfecting because our immune system benefits from exposure to germs on a low level and “learns” how to handle invaders. “I think parents are trying to do well here and are accidentally ruining it,” she said. “Having the right amount of healthy bacteria on our skin helps prevent infections from unhealthy bacteria. You need to be populated with healthy bacteria so the bad germs can’t come in and take advantage of your system.” The Hygiene Hypothesis speculates that widespread use of antibacterial soaps and cleansers may have led to an increase in allergies. The solution? Promote cleanliness but also make allowances for some dirt. Don’t bathe your newborn more than once a week, she suggested. And let the kids play outside. “If your kid is covered with mud, wash their hands before they eat, but don’t keep them from playing in the mud,” Renno said. “In general, playing outside, getting dirt in hands and toes is great for your immune system.” To find out more on the Hygiene Hypothesis, search for it on fda.gov.

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EXPLORE & LEARN

WORKING SMARTER, NOT HARDER More students are getting ahead and saving on tuition when they take advantage of concurrent college credit BY DWAIN HEBDA

When the Greenbrier High School Class of 2019 walked the stage at graduation, several members of the class received more than their high school diplomas. Thanks to the school’s concurrent credit program through the University of Arkansas-Little Rock, a cohort of students also got a major head start on their future. “Greenbrier High School, which we’ve partnered with for a number of years, is one of our major success stories,” said Lisa Davis, director of distributed learning and career center who administers the UA Little Rock concurrent program among 13 Central Arkansas high schools. “Greenbrier has invested in enough teachers and offered enough courses to their student body that this year we had 30 Greenbrier High School seniors graduate with an Associate of Arts degree in General Studies.”

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ARKANSAS CONCURRENT CREDIT INSTITUTIONS Arkansas Northeastern College, Blytheville 870-762-1020, anc.edu Concurrent college credit allows students to complete college coursework at little to virtually no cost while still in high school. This not only represents less out-of-pocket expense up front, but also cuts down on the time the student spends to finish their four-year degree. Or, they can take their two-year associate’s degree and head straight into the working world without incurring any additional debt at all. “The classes that they’re getting in high school are essentially classes that they have to take in college anyway,” said Pat Bilbrey, mathematics teacher and concurrent credit coordinator at Little Rock’s Parkview High School. “My students take it because they can get things like college algebra and college trig out of the way.” Such programs are not new—Parkview has offered it for more than 12 years and UALR more than 20—but in the current age of skyrocketing college costs, concurrent credit is particularly relevant as a sensible alternative to crushing amounts of student loan debt. Consider, the 30 Greenbrier student each amassed 60 hours of coursework en route to their Associate’s degrees. For illustration purposes, let’s say each course is worth three credit hours which equals 20 courses to be completed. At a cost of $100 per course, each Associate’s degree cost $2,000. Per UALR.edu, those same 60 hours earned during freshman and sophomore year of college would cost $19,057.20 or $9,528.60 per year in tuition and fees, not to mention the additional expense of counting room, board and other costs. Taking those 60 hours online runs you $280 per credit hour, per ualr.edu, or a total of $16,800. Even when allowing for scholarships, it’s a no-brainer to see the better value.

“We want to give college-bound students a cost-effective jumpstart on college."

Arkansas State University, Beebe 501-882-3600, asub.edu Arkansas State University, Jonesboro 870-972-2100, astate.edu Arkansas State University, Mountain Home 870-518-6100, asumh.edu Arkansas State University, Newport 870-512-7800, asun.edu Arkansas Tech University, Russellville 479-968-0343, atu.edu Black River Technical College, Pocahontas 870-248-4000, blackrivertech.org College of the Ouachitas, Malvern 800-337-0266, coto.edu University of Arkansas-Cossatot Community College, De Queen 800-844-4471, cccua.edu East Arkansas Community College, Forrest City 870-633-4480, eacc.edu Henderson State University, Arkadelphia 870-230-5000, hsu.edu National Park College, Hot Springs 501-760-4222, np.edu North Arkansas College, Harrison 870-743-3000, northark.edu

Continued pg 32 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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CONTINUED ARKANSAS CONCURRENT CREDIT INSTITUTIONS Northwest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville 479-986-4000, nwacc.edu Ozarka College, Melbourne 870-368-7371, ozarka.edu Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, Helena 870-338-6474, pccua.edu Southern Arkansas University-Tech, Camden 870-574-4500, sautech.edu University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville 870-612-2000, uaccb.edu University of Arkansas Community College at Hope 870-777-5722, uacch.edu University of Arkansas Rich Mountain Community College, Mena 479-394-7622, uarichmountain.edu John Brown University, Siloam Springs 479-524-7455, jbu.edu Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia 870-235-4040, saumag.edu University of Arkansas at Fort Smith 479-788-7000, uafs.edu University of Arkansas at Little Rock 501-569-3000, ualr.edu University of Arkansas at Monticello 870-460-1033, uamont.edu University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff 870-575-8000, uapb.edu University of Central Arkansas, Conway 501-450-5000, uca.edu Source: Arkansas Department of Higher Education (adhe.edu)

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“Concurrent college credit allows students to complete college coursework at little to virtually no cost while still in high school. �


And in some programs, the cost scenario is even more attention-grabbing. Arkansas Tech University in Russellville has offered concurrent credit for 20 years and has partnerships with 18 high schools. University officials report that in 2018-19 alone, concurrent students earned college credit worth more than $5 million in tuition and fees and didn’t pay a dime. “Through cost-sharing agreements with the high school partners, many Arkansas high school students can earn college credit from ATU without incurring any personal tuition or fee expenses,” said Sam Strasner, director of university relations. "The heart of this program is access. ATU seeks for any eligible student in Arkansas who wants to earn college credit to be able to do so by removing existing barriers. ATU does not believe that a student’s financial situation, school district or geographic location in the state should be a barrier to an opportunity to better prepare for college while saving money.” Unlike college correspondence courses of the past, concurrent classes are approved courses within the high school’s existing curriculum. Students must be at least in ninth grade and must be accepted to the partner college or university, but that’s about the extent of eligibility requirements.

Concurrent courses also provide advantages over Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs in that coursework reflected on a college transcript is far more likely to be accepted via transfer. And unlike AP or IB programs, students don’t need a minimum score to “test out” of the courses they complete. “The problem with some of the AP courses, as we know from test scores, is not everyone is successful on a one-time test,” Parkview's Bilbrey said. “However, those same students are often very successful in the classroom throughout the year. This program gives them credit for that work.” Most significantly, concurrent college credit programs provide students an early taste of higher-level coursework, and statistics have shown that introduction helps them do better in future college classes. That, said Strasner, is a particularly important payoff. “We want to give college-bound students a costeffective jumpstart on college while also instilling confidence in first-generation students or students who are undecided about college,” Strasner said. “We want to show them they have the ability to be successful and hopefully remove some of the fear of the unknown.”

Big Rock Mini Golf & Fun Park BIG FUN FOR ALL YOUR FAMILY OUTINGS!

rial Adventure Newly Updated Arcade • Amazing Mazeer• Ae Boats • Batting Cages Go-Karts • Mini Golf • Lazer Frenzy • Bump ages!

Party house available for all

501-455-3750 | bigrockfunpark.com 11411 Baseline Road Little Rock (Near Bass Pro Shops) SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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kid approved Back 2 School IN ORDER TO UTILIZE YOUR LOCKER SPACE, THIS SHELF WILL GIVE YOU MULTIPLE PLACES FOR YOUR BOOKS, BINDERS, PENCILS POUCHES, ETC.

JESSICA TAVERNA AND

NINA LIVE IN HILLCREST AND LOVE PULASKI HEIGHTS MIDDLE SCHOOL! JESSICA IS THE ART DEPARTMENT CHAIR AND ART CLUB SPONSOR AT PHMS, AND HAS TAUGHT ART FOR 18 YEARS. SHE IS ALSO A COMMISSION MURALIST, FURNITURE PAINTER AND ARTIST. NINA IS A RISING SEVENTH GRADER AT PHMS AND LOVES TENNIS, ART, EAST AND HANGING OUT WITH FRIENDS.

AN IRIDESCENT LIGHT FEATURE MAKES YOUR SPACE FEEL LIKE HOME BY GIVING SOME WARMTH TO A METAL LOCKER.

NINA TRIED A.M./P.M. BINDERS FOR CLASSES AS A SIXTH GRADER, BUT BY THE SECOND NINE WEEKS WE SWITCHED TO A TRAPPER KEEPER BINDER FOR ALL CLASSES. IT WAS JUST EASIER FOR HER, BUT IT’S TRULY AN INDIVIDUAL CHOICE.

BE CREATIVE WITH COLOR AND DESIGN BY USING WALLPAPER IN YOUR LOCKER TO MAKE IT MORE PERSONALIZED AND FUN!

THIS MAGNETIC ORGANIZER IS UNIQUE BECAUSE IT HAS A DRY ERASE FEATURE AND NINA LOVES TO DRAW.

A STUDENT’S DAY-TO-DAY CAN BE TEDIOUS AND STRESSFUL, BUT THESE MAGNETS CAN HELP INSPIRE SELF-CONFIDENCE WHEN IT’S MOST NEEDED.

MAKE SCHOOL FUN! THESE PENCILS ARE BENDY, COLORFUL AND WILL BRIGHTEN ANY STUDENT’S DAY.

EXTRA PENCILS IN YOUR LOCKER ARE A MUST! BE SURE TO KEEP A PENCIL POUCH STOCKED YEARROUND.

WHEN YOU HAVE EIGHT CLASSES, IT’S IMPERATIVE TO GET A HANDLE ON ORGANIZATION. SEPARATE YOUR CLASSES WITH FOLDERS TO KEEP UP WITH ALL THINGS FOR THAT CLASS. PARENTS: START THIS WITH WEEK ONE OF SCHOOL AND IT BECOMES SO EASY FOR THE REST OF THE YEAR!

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THESE POUCHES IN YOUR BINDERS ARE AN EASY WAY TO KEEP PENCILS, COLORED PENCILS, PENS AND MARKERS HANDY FOR CLASSES.


CALL FOR TEAMS PRESENTS

SPONSORED BY

SPONSORED BY

BENEFITING THE ARGENTA ARTS DISTRICT EVENT DATE: Saturday, October 5th from 1-5pm ENTRANT CHECK-IN: October 4th at 10pm PLACE: Flyway Brewing at the corner of 4th and Maple in Argenta

25 TEAM LIMIT • $125 ENTRY FEE Edwards will provide 40 lbs of Pork Butts to each team. Additional “Anything but Butts” can be purchased at Edwards.

WINNING CATEGORIES:

Best Butt, Best Ribs, Best Anything But, Best Side, Best Dessert Contact Chris Kent for more details at CKENT@ARGENTADC.ORG

LIVE MUSIC BY FUNKANITES AND LAGNIAPPE • FLYWAY BREWING IS SELLING STREET CORN BEER GARDEN FEATURING

Tickets Available at

FOR PURCHASE

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | AUGUST 2019

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Carleigh Powell Russellville, AR

Elmer Evangelista Danville,AR

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Emily Torrealba Arlington, TX

Michael Post Mayflower, AR

Alidea Gutierrez Dardanelle,AR

Lindsey Greenup Mount Vernon,AR

Drew Purifoy Bluff City, AR

Profile for Arkansas Times

SAVVYkids | August 2019  

Back to School 2019-20 Little Fish, Big Pond Transitions between grades Get college credit in high school What's Your Germ IQ?

SAVVYkids | August 2019  

Back to School 2019-20 Little Fish, Big Pond Transitions between grades Get college credit in high school What's Your Germ IQ?