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JULY 2018 · SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

THE WIDE WORLD OF

YOUTH SPORTS lus

pIS HOMESCHOOL

RIGHT FOR YOU?

GIRLS ON A MISSION

HANDLING YOUR HEADSTRONG CHILD


Neurological Care That Goes Beyond. 1 in 6 children will be diagnosed 1 in 6a children will be diagnosed with with neurological disorder. a neurological disorder. Does your child suffer from tremors, headaches, weakness or balance Does your child suffer from an illness affecting the brain, spinal problems? These symptoms could be a sign of a neurological cord, nerves or muscles? disorder. The Neuroscience Center at Arkansas Children’s includes a team of more than 200 health care professionals workatogether The Neuroscience Center at Arkansas Children’s who includes team to comprehensive neurological care for thework children of of provide more than 200 health care professionals who together Arkansas and beyond. care for the children of Arkansas and to provide neurological beyond. Find Find out out more more at at

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archildrens.org/neuro

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JULY 2018

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5 EDITOR’S NOTE

8 ADVENTURE & FUN CALENDAR, CRAFTS & MORE!

12 MAMA SAID THIS TOO SHALL PASS

13 IS HOMESCHOOL RIGHT FOR YOU? GET THE FACTS ON WHAT’S INVOLVED AND RESOURCES

14 HEALTH & WELLNESS HANDLING YOUR HEADSTRONG CHILD

16 SNOW CONES & SUMMERTIME

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COOL OFF AND RAISE MONEY FOR YOUR FAVORITE CHARITY

20 THE WIDE WORLD OF YOUTH SPORTS A GUIDE TO GET YOUR SPORTY YOUNGSTER ON THE FIELD, COURT, COURSE OR MAT!

27 GIRLS ON A MISSION FIVE CENTRAL ARKANSAS TEENS ARE ON A MISSION TO HELP AND INSPIRE OTHERS

30 KID APPROVED STEPHANIE KEET

16 (FROM LEFT) KATHARINE BROWE-OLSON, HAYDEN SMITH, GIANA CHAMBERS, AVA SINGLETON AND JONATHAN CARTER AT THE BURNS PARK SOCCER COMPLEX. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON.

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They Grow Like (Summer) Weeds Summertime with the kids can be a lot of fun, a lot of work and very revealing. Taking this pause from the daily grind of homework, packing lunches and rushing to the carpool lane to be able to watch the kids play into the twilight in the yard, listen to their exciting stories about camp and spend some quality time in (very) close quarters on a family vacation affords us opportunities to get glimpses into their growing and changing personalities. We just have to look. You might find you have a budding athlete on your hands. Team sports are such a great character builder for little ones and Central Arkansas has so many opportunities to get your kid involved. We delve into some of the most popular team sports, including basketball, baseball, soccer and some solo sports like gymnastics, martial arts, swimming, golf and climbing, to give parents the scoop on how, when and where to get involved and what to expect for time and financial commitments. No matter your kid’s age, ability or interest, you’ll find some great, sporty advice beginning on page 20. Maybe you have a budding activist or public servant? We put a spotlight on a handful of Girls on a Mission on page 27. These impressive ladies have heard a calling to serve and have taken the lead to fill a need in their communities. From Special Olympics of Arkansas, to Ronald McDonald House and mentoring programs for African-American girls in Central Arkansas, meet five teens who are stepping up and making a difference. And while summer is a great time for growth, family bonding and exploring new hobbies at summer camp, it’s also the official season of the snow cone! In the spirit of summertime (and philanthropy), Kerry Guice and her kids create their own snow cone stand/fundraiser, complete with delicious, all-natural handmade syrups. Check out her take on Lemon Lavender, Piña Colada, Orange Creamcicle and more on page 16. So, grab a snow cone, a soccer ball or find a way to get your little ones involved in the community and don’t forget to pause and watch them as they grow and change during this fast-moving summer break!

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvy Kids amy.gordy@savvykidsar.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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PUBLISHER KATHERINE DANIELS | katherine@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER | mandy@arktimes.com ART DIRECTOR KATIE HASSELL | katie@arktimes.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE KIMBERLY BENNETT | kim@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE KAYE WITHERS | kay@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE KATELYN JOHNSTON | katelyn.johnston@savvykidsar.com PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN | roland@arktimes.com

r at t h e e m m u S

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR LARISSA GUDINO | larissa.gudino@savvykidsar.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS MIKE SPAIN | JASON HO IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/OFFICE MANAGER KELLY JONES

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BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN

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contributors

KERRY GUICE is a writer, recipe developer and photographer living in Little Rock with her husband and two busy kids. When she’s not working or driving kids from one activity to the next, she’s planning her family’s next outdoor adventure.

ANGELA E. THOMAS is a proud University of Arkansas at Little Rock graduate and a member of its Alumni Board. For 11 years, she served Central Arkansas as editor for a locally owned magazine. Thomas is founder and owner of the greeting card company GODsent Greetings.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

KATIE CHILDS is a wedding, lifestyle and commercial photographer based in North Little Rock. When she’s not behind the camera, Katie and her husband, Jon, can be found rock climbing with their two pups in Northwest Arkansas and listening to embarrassing rap music.

MELISSA TUCKER spends her days working in web marketing. When not at work, you’ll probably find her at the gym, on the playground with her kids or checking out too many books from the library.

Get tickets NOW: MethodistFamily.org or 501-906-4209

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Fun Food Cool Prizes Arcade Games And More! Bumper Boats Mini-Golf

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Register Online: Camps.jumpforward.com/trojanswimacademy SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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July

THROUGH JULY

ADVENTURE & FUN

4 POPS ON THE RIVER Enjoy a night of breathtaking fireworks and music provided by the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra at this Central Arkansas tradition. Pops On The River, in it’s 35th year, is a free community event and fireworks show that now includes free children’s activities, a shopping marketplace, food trucks and entertainment inside the First Security Amphitheater. arkansasonline.com/pops

9 NATIONAL

SUGAR COOKIE DAY!

JULY MARKS THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF MAGIC SPRINGS THEME AND WATERPARK! Head to the Spa City to spend a day at the waterpark or enjoy the newest thrill ride, Brain Drain. There are events planned all month long, including concerts, drive-in movies, free admission days for educators and more!

21 YOUTH HOME’S 8TH ANNUAL CASINO NIGHT Ante up for Youth Home’s 8th Annual Casino Night and Texas Hold’em Tournament at Next Level Events. This fundraiser supports Youth Home’s mental health programs for people of all ages. It’s a night of fun featuring craps, roulette, blackjack, slot machines and more, all staffed by experienced and knowledgeable dealers. youthhome.org

ARKANSAS TRAVELERS Catch an Arkansas Travelers game at Dickey-Stephens Park. The July schedule is packed with tons of home games and great promotions to keep the kids entertained. Look for postgame fireworks on July 27! www.milb.com/arkansas

MOVIES IN THE PARK Enjoy a free movie night with the family at Movies in the Park. The films are family-friendly and begin at sunset. Arrive at the First Security Amphitheater in Rivetrfront Park early to get a good spot, and feel free to bring a blanket and cooler. moviesintheparklr.net

JULY 11, “STAR WARS THE FORCE AWAKENS,” PG-13 JULY 18, “NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB,” PG JULY 25, “BEAUTY AND THE BEAST,” PG 8

JULY 2018 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

WYE MOUNTAIN FLOWERS AND BERRIES Spend a day and fill some buckets with delicious blueberries and blackberries at Wye Mountain Flowers and Berries. Kids love picking berries and all the delicious muffins, cobblers and jam you can make! After you finish picking, check out the barnyard petting area, ride the berry choo-choo and grab some fresh-cut flowers. wyemountain.net


SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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ADVENTURE & FUN

Chalk It Up To Summer Fun Creativity is endless with this easy recipe for sidewalk chalk

You will need:

Plaster of Paris Tempera paint Silicon mold Water Disposable cups—1 cup for each color Plastic spoons—1 for each color

Make a Splash with a

Hawaiian Bash INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES 10 JULY 2018 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


How to:

1. Fill each plastic cup with ⅓ cup cold water. 2. Add 2 tablespoons of tempera paint to each plastic cup. Use the plastic spoons to mix the water and paint together. 3. Add ⅔ cup plaster of Paris to each plastic cup. Stir until thoroughly combined. If too dry, add a small amount of water. 4. Carefully pour or spoon your mixture into the silicone mold. Then gently tap the mold on your work surface to release any air bubbles. 5. Set the mold in the sun to help it cure. Let dry for 24 hours. Drying time is dependent on the size of your mold. Small molds take only a few hours. 6. Carefully remove the chalk from your molds and enjoy! Warning: Do not put plaster of Paris down drains—it can cause pipe damage. Older children can help with the mixing, but small kids should not. Tip: You can layer colors for multicolored chalk!

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• INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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MAMA SAID...

This Too Shall Pass

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ast week at the pool, two friends walked by as I sat on a lounge chair halfway through a novel. They teased—quickly, for they were chasing toddlers—how nice it must be to kick back and relax. But it wasn’t that long ago I was the one throwing death stares at the tanned and tranquil parents lounging on beach towels. Oh, what a difference a year makes. Gone are my days of swim diapers and the shallow end. I’m happy to say I recently held an entire conversation pool-side and went home with dry hair. This too shall pass. It’s something we say to a mom struggling in the grocery store with a baby on one hip and a screaming 3-year-old at her feet. It’s a way to say, “Hey, girl, I’ve been there. I made it to the other side with only minimal loss of sanity and you will, too.” Crying babies eventually find their words and sleepless nights fade into normal sleep patterns until they hardly seem real at all. For me, some of the hardest times as a parent were those first few months. Sleep-deprived, only conscious enough to resent the stubborn baby weight, uncertain about … everything, and the demoralizing feeling you’re nothing more than a glorified feed bag. Not my favorite. I remember such relief at the four-month mark because it’s when I felt I could finally put my

boob away for a minute. The teeny-tiny newborn stage had passed. And then it was gone. That’s the scary thing. This too shall pass, but it doesn’t return. They’re not little for long. Oh, what I wouldn’t give to hold one of my three again and inhale that new-baby smell. Their aromas now are … less appealing. And once they learn to talk, they never shut up. Just when I want to cling to her, my preteen daughter already has one foot out the door. I’m all for independence, but the last decade went by in a blink. I know one day much too soon I’ll look up to find her leaving for college. The old-timers said it would happen this way. I should have listened. But I was too busy wishing the difficult early days were over. Now they are. Now there’s back-talking and crop tops and iPads. Give me back my toddlers! I’ve been thinking a lot lately about not letting my role as a parent become my sole identity. That’s a tough thing to do when the kids are primarily what I’m thinking about. They’re certainly where most of my time and energy and money go. But when the time for children living under my roof has passed, I don’t want to feel lost. I’m trying to nurture a career and friendships I know will last. When soccer schedules and school commitments call shotgun, I’m trying to keep myself in the driver’s seat. For when they’re gone. For when their time of needing me has passed. To new parents and those girls at the pool I say meals and bedtime won’t always be such a hassle. You won’t forever smell of spit-up. And one day soon you’ll throw a book in your bag and throw the floaties out. This too shall pass, but grip tightly as it slips through your fingers.

YOU’LL GO FROM CHASING TODDLERS TO CHILLING POOLSIDE WITH YOUR FAVORITE BOOK IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE!

Jen Holman is determined to be a voice of reason amongst reality TV and momjudgment-gone-wild. Her newest novel (as yet unpublished) won the 2017 Rosemary award for excellence in young adult fiction. She lives in Little Rock with her husband and three (im)perfect children.

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Is Homeschool Right for You?

Before you take the plunge into homeschool, get the facts on what’s involved and resources to help your child have the best learning experience possible BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

S

chool choice empowers parents to make the best possible choice for their children’s education, and for many parents the best choice is homeschool. In Arkansas, nearly 19,500 students “attended” school provided by their parents or legal guardians in 2016-17. Is homeschooling right for your family? Following are the most frequently asked questions regarding the topic, with information provided by Kimberly Friedman, MPA, director of communications for the Arkansas Department of Education.

Why do most parents choose to homeschool? Arkansas does not require parents/legal guardians to provide a reason for their choice. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, most parents cite concerns about the environment in schools as well as their desire to provide religious and/or moral instruction as their reasons. And according to statistics provided by the Arkansas Department of Education, the majority of students who are homeschooled are high school age. What’s required, legally speaking? By law, Arkansas parents who have custody or charge of any child 5 to 17 years of age “shall enroll and send the child to a public, private or parochial school or provide a homeschool for the child in accordance with the requirements of the homeschool law.” Parents/guardians who choose to homeschool must complete a Notice of Intent (NOI). The form is posted on the Homeschool page of the Arkansas Department of Education’s (ADE) website. It can be completed online or can be downloaded and printed. The paper version of the form can either be hand-delivered, emailed, mailed or faxed to the resident school district’s superintendent’s office. The notice must be filed at the beginning of each school year, no later than Aug. 15. What is the time commitment? Am I required to follow my local school district’s schedule? Homeschool students’ schedules are determined by their parents or legal guardians. State law does not require parents or legal guardians to have prescribed schedules for schooling their child(ren). Am I required to use their instruction materials? In addition to setting their instruction schedules, parents may choose the books, curriculum and materials they use. The ADE publishes a Fact Sheet on Homeschooling and lists several websites for testing. Of those, A Beka and Bob Jones University each offer homeschool curriculums.

Google the term “homeschool materials” or “homeschool curriculum,” and you’ll find a good number of online programs.

What about testing? Arkansas no longer requires parents/guardians test their students; however, if parents/guardians choose to do so, they are responsible for the costs. Seton Home Study School, A Beka Testing, Bob Jones University and Brewer Testing Services are just some of the companies the department lists as a resource. Additionally, the department does not monitor student activity or work, so it’s a good idea to maintain attendance records, a portfolio of the students’ work and a transcript. This is advisable as the Arkansas Department of Education does not provide diplomas for students who are homeschooled. May my child(ren) participate in my nearest district’s extracurricular activities? Yes. When a student leaves a public school to be homeschooled, he or she is required to wait a full calendar year before he/she competes in sports activities for grades 8-12. The year begins the day the student withdraws from a public school. Homeschool students may participate in sports activities but cannot compete until the waiting period is completed. This means that students can practice but cannot compete. As far as other extracurricular activities, such as band, choir, etc., homeschool students can immediately begin to participate without having to wait a calendar year. Can my child(ren) receive a high school diploma through the Arkansas Department of Education? No; however, a student who has been taught at home may enroll or re-enroll in his/her local public school and attend classes for at least nine months immediately before graduation to become eligible to graduate from public school with a diploma. Students 16 and older who are not enrolled in a high school may earn an Arkansas high school diploma by passing the GED (General Educational Development) assessment. The test and free instruction to prepare for the test are available through Arkansas Department of Career Education. For more information about their programs, log on to aalrc.org or call 877-963-4433. For more information about homeschooling your child(ren) in Arkansas, log on to arkansased.gov or call 501-682-1874. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Handling Your Headstrong Child When to try conflict resolution and when to get help BY MELISSA TUCKER

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e’ve all witnessed, or been an unwilling participant in, this scene at the playground, swimming pool or park: A parent says, “It’s time to go!” and a child assertively answers, “No!” The conflict and ensuing tantrum rolls on from there. “Every child attempts to assert themselves and to take control from time to time. It’s often how children learn about decision-making, boundaries and their role in the world,” said Ashley Petray, a licensed clinical social worker at Methodist Counseling Clinic in Little Rock. Parents dealing with conflict-prone children may call them “strong-willed” or, if the problem worsens, begin to wonder if professional help is necessary. Dr. Glenn Mesman, director of education for the UAMS Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, says temper tantrums are fairly common among children ages 3-5. “It’s developmentally appropriate for them to be saying ‘no’ and learning mastery over things in their own life,” he said. “They’re supposed to be saying ‘no,’ and I’m more concerned in

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that age range if they’re not exhibiting strong-willed behavior.” As children age, however, this behavior becomes less common but is still problematic. “We typically see tantrums less in the 7-12 age range. So, I look at the age of the child and how often are these behaviors happening, how long do they last, and what are the specific behaviors that are occurring,” he said. Categorizing a child as “strong-willed” means the child will seek control in most situations, is challenging to redirect, argumentative and frequently displays disruptive behavior, Petray said. On the positive side, strong-willed behavior does not indicate a mental health disorder, and can often be helpful later in life. “A child who is strong-willed often clearly knows what he or she wants and likes or dislikes. With the help and guidance of parents and other positive adults, children can learn to use these characteristics in positive ways to develop into leaders, be less likely to give into peer pressure, and be assertive,” she said.


STOP THE POWER STRUGGLE

But she admits the bright future for these children is of little consolation to parents dealing with their assertive behavior now. “Parenting a strong-willed child can be challenging, frustrating and exhausting. It can often feel as though the child is battling the parent every step of the way and, at times, she is!” Petray said. She offers a few suggestions to avoid the trap of engaging in power struggles with your child. “Providing limited choices for a child is a powerful tool parents can use to encourage positive behaviors, reduce power struggles and promote decision-making skills. For example, if a parent is wanting their child to clean up, a parent can offer, ‘You were hoping to keep playing, but play time is finished. You can pick up the cars first or the blocks first. Which one works for you?’ This keeps the parent in a position of authority while giving the child a chance to exert some control,” she said. “It can also be helpful for parents to ‘reframe’ their thinking about their child’s behavior. Rather than viewing the child’s behavior as an intentional attempt to be disrespectful or defiant, a parent can remind themselves that their child is attempting to be independent and make their own decisions.” Mesman suggests improving the parent-child relationship first and foremost. “The first step is developing a stronger relationship, and also parents and children spending one-on-one time together in an activity that is enjoyable to the child, at least five minutes a day,” he said. “Just having parents spend more time with their kids in a positive activity is beneficial.” He also suggests positive feedback, and ignoring minor disruptive behavior. “Parents should catch their child being good. Kids will do anything for attention, they don’t care if it’s good behavior or bad behavior, so helping them realize they’re only getting attention for good behavior and ignoring bad behavior is best,” he said. “And they’ll eventually realize negative behaviors aren’t getting them the attention they want.”

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WHEN TO GET HELP

A few signs your child’s behavior is something more than a strong-willed personality: “If a child displays behavior that is unsafe, aggressive or has a significant impact on his or her ability to carry out the daily job of being a child, such as making friends, learning at preschool or school, remaining focused for an age appropriate period of time, it can be helpful to consult with a mental health provider to determine if there are additional or underlying factors contributing to the child’s difficulties,” Petray said. Monitoring the consistency and frequency of unwanted behaviors will also help. “Tantrums one day a week are not consistent with ADD or other mental health disorders, but more days a week, with more frequency of behavior can indicate psychiatric conditions,” Mesman said. “Also, there has to be impairment in their life, and it needs to negatively impact their function at home, in the community, or disrupt relationships. If it’s not doing that, it’s probably not a psychiatric condition.”

M

6601 West 12th Street | Little Rock, AR 72204 | 501.666.8686 Monticello: 870.460.0066 | 888.868.0023| www.cfyf.org Find us online /TheCentersAR SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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Snow Cones & Summertime Cool off and raise money for your favorite charity by hosting a snow cone stand using delicious all-natural syrups! STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY KERRY GUICE

O

n our Summer Bucket List every year we include hosting a lemonade stand. Sometimes we charge 50 cents, and I let the kids save the money. Sometimes we open the stand for donations to our favorite charities and I let the kids experience what it’s like to volunteer their time to help others. I have to say, we usually have more fun giving the money away, and this summer was no exception. This summer, the kids and I wanted to try out something new and host a snow cone stand instead (with lemonade available, too). I’ve been dying to develop some homemade snow cone syrup recipes! It makes my heart so happy watching my kids have fun, work and sweat a little, and then give money to some fantastic nonprofits—all without using nasty artificial flavors or food dyes. The charity we chose is a new favorite of mine, and ties perfectly into using fresh water to make snow cones and lemonade. Charity: Water installs wells in parts of the world with no access to clean water, so the people there can do all the

daily things we take for granted that include clean water. There are too many things to count that I do just from the moment I wake up to walking out the door for the day that I wouldn’t be able to do without clean water. After learning some eye-opening facts on their website, I can’t shake this sinking feeling in my chest imagining how dire the need is for everyone on earth to have access to clean water. The good news? It’s actually an obtainable goal! We have the resources and the technology to make it happen. We just need to get the right people enough money to do so. That’s where Charity: Water comes in. They use donation money solely on the actual well projects. All travel and business expenses are paid for through private corporate donors. I love it. They make it easy to start your own fundraising page, so you don’t have to just host a lemonade stand you can use social media to invite people to give for your fundraising effort. We called ours “Snow Cones and Summertime,” and you can give on my kids’ behalf, using this link: my.charitywater.org/kerry-guice/, or go to their website and donate directly, or start your own fundraiser! We raised almost $137 for Charity: Water with our snow cone stand, and it made the kids and their friends beam with pride (OK, it made me beam with pride, too)! By teaching kids to see that when we use our ability to help others who have it harder than us, we are not only making their lives better, we are making our lives better as well. Where there is gratitude and charity, there is happiness. And adding a yummy lemon lavender snow cone in there sure helps!

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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LEMON LAVENDER SNOW CONE SYRUP ¼ cup dried lavender (food grade—can be purchased at most health food stores) 1 cup boiling water 1 cup sugar ¼ cup whole blueberries (for color) 1 teaspoon natural lemon flavoring (can be found next to the vanilla extract in the baking aisle) Place dried lavender flowers in a medium bowl. Bring 1 cup of water to just boiling, then pour water over dried flowers. Let steep at least 2 hours. Strain flowers out of water using a mesh strainer or cheesecloth, then pour lavender water in a medium saucepan. Add 1 cup sugar and, stirring often, bring to a boil over mediumhigh-heat. Once boiling, add blueberries and reduce heat to a simmer and simmer 10-15 minutes, still stirring often. Remove from heat and carefully remove and discard blueberries. Stir in 1 teaspoon lemon flavoring and let cool completely. When cool, add water in tablespoon increments to desired consistency.

ORANGE CREAMSICLE SNOW CONE SYRUP ½ cup heavy cream 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon natural orange flavoring (found near vanilla extract in baking aisle) 1 cup orange juice ¼ cup sugar Combine cream, vanilla and orange flavoring in a small pot. Bring just to a simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. In another pot over medium heat, combine the orange juice and sugar and bring to a boil, stirring often. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 5 minutes, then remove from heat and carefully whisk in the hot cream mixture. To adjust consistency, either add cream (to thicken), or orange juice (to thin), 1 tablespoon at a time until desired consistency.

(FROM TOP) VIOLET GUICE AND GRACE ULREY DISPLAY THE MENU FOR THEIR LEMONADE STAND. ANNE-KELLEY ROBERTS CAN’T CHOOSE BETWEEN LEMONADE OR A SNOW CONE! COOPER SUTTERER WORKS THE ICE MACHINE. (OPPOSITE PAGE) STEVEN PICKMAN IS READY TO ENJOY HIS ORANGE CREAMCICLE SNOW CONE!

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PIÑA COLADA SNOW CONE SYRUP 2½ cups pineapple juice ½ cup coconut milk ½ cup sweetened condensed milk ½ teaspoon natural coconut flavoring (found near the vanilla extract in the baking aisle) In blender, combine all ingredients and blend until thoroughly combined. To adjust consistency, add more pineapple juice (to thin), or more condensed milk (to thicken).

SUMMER FRUIT SNOW CONE SYRUP 2 cups water 2 cups fresh strawberry halves/chunks ½ cup fresh blueberries 1 cup fresh peach chunks 1-1½ cups honey (preferably local) In saucepan over medium-high heat, bring all ingredients to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and let simmer for 20-30 minutes, stirring often. Strain through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth and let cool completely before using. Add more honey to taste.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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THE WIDE WORLD OF YOUTH SPORTS

Central Arkansas offers so much variety when it comes to youth sports, each varying in levels of intensity, time commitment and cost. Here’s a guide to get your sporty youngster on the field, court, course or mat! BY DWAIN HEBDA PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

(FROM LEFT) KATHARINE BROWE-OLSON, HAYDEN SMITH, GIANA CHAMBERS, AVA SINGLETON AND JONATHAN CARTER AT THE BURNS PARK SOCCER COMPLEX.

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sk any young family what they’re doing on the weekend and chances are you will hear a long list of activities that include youth sports games or tournaments. It just seems to come with the territory. Youth sports aren’t just a cultural phenomenon; they also provide a range of health benefits for young people. But how do you know which is the right sport for your child? Experts say helping kids decide takes time; don’t be surprised if they don’t immediately know what they want to do, and be prepared to try a few things as they figure it out. BASKETBALL Kids’ basketball ranges from the very basic Upward program sponsored by local churches to elite AAU programs beginning as early as fifth grade. Look for a program that meets your youngster’s skill level and interest and most importantly, makes an effort to spread out playing time. “Our rules are modified for the kids’ benefit,” said Andre Bradley, athletic director for Penick Boys & Girls Club. “We have strict rules about playing time and we blend teams to get players of all abilities playing together.” Basketball equipment doesn’t have to cost much; a ball and a pair of shoes are about all the specialized gear you need. When shopping for a basketball, look for a reasonably priced composite model labeled indoor/outdoor in the appropriate size for your youngster. Most leagues provide a T-shirt, but some require money for full uniforms. Rec league basketball follows the general basketball season, which is during the school year, so weigh time commitment carefully. Penick’s program limits games to one to two per week, plus at least one practice. “Our games are pretty much done by 8:30 p.m. on game nights,” Bradley said. “We also have games on Saturday.” Penick Boys & Girls Club 501-666-5494 arclubs.org GOLF Another sport that preaches etiquette is golf, a game with a highly refined code of ethics. In addition to the formal rules of golf, young players are schooled in the rules and practices of respect and conduct that easily translate into success in everyday life. Golf used to be very difficult for kids to break into if they came from outside certain socioeconomic groups. Not so anymore; today organizations exist whose entire mission it is to bring golf to as many young people as possible with a special emphasis on underserved populations. First Tee of Central Arkansas and Full Swing Golf Academy are two great local options. Golf can be a very expensive game between equipment, greens fees or club memberships and group or private lessons. It’s also a big time requirement with a round of 9 holes taking about two hours for average players, longer for youngsters who are just learning. And, because most full-sized courses aren’t going to let kids play unattended, the investment affects parents, too. Full Swing Golf Academy 501-436-9562 fullswinggolfacademy.org First Tee of Central Arkansas 501-562-4653 thefirstteecentralarkansas.org SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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SOCCER Soccer is one of the most popular youth sports and Little Rock offers a number of options to participate, including Arkansas United Soccer Club. The squad caters to both recreational and competitive players, with the latter demanding a higher time commitment, including traveling to tournaments. “We really pride ourselves on providing a program for all players,” said Michelle Cox, executive director. “We start programming with our Little Rockers program for players 3 years old, and then we start into recreational soccer at age 4. That’s where players start learning the basics of soccer.” A membership fee is standard fare; the higher the level of competition the higher the fees to cover the cost of paid coaches and tournament entries. A uniform may or may not be included in fees across all leagues (it is for Arkansas United); be sure to check the fine print. Equipment gets more expensive the more competitive you are, but for recreational players, these expenses are relatively nominal. Especially at the younger levels, a pair of cleats or tennis shoes, shin guards and a ball can all be had for relatively low cost. ARKANSAS UNITED SOCCER 501-603-9880 arkansasunited.com MARTIAL ARTS If everything you know about martial arts has come from watching Jackie Chan movies on Netflix, you’re missing some of the best benefits of participating in the art forms karate and taekwondo. “Parents are usually seeking out martial arts for life skills education, building confidence and self-esteem,” said James Nicholas, owner of Impact Martial Arts. “That’s what martial arts is all about.” Martial arts disciplines are made up of individual skills, which students learn and master sequentially. The color of their belt denotes their relative rank in the program. Athletes progress at their own pace but all complete the same requirements to move from one rank to the next. Nicholas estimated it takes three years or more to meet the requirements and obtain a black belt. A lifelong activity that stresses manners and respect as much as kicking and punching technique, martial arts enhances fitness and reduces stress. The cost to participate varies with the school; potential additional costs include the uniform, equipment for weapons training or competition, testing fees and entry fees for tournaments. Impact Martial Arts 501-224-1222 impactmartialartspba.com

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ABOVE ALL ELSE...

GYMNASTICS Gymnastics is a great activity for boys and girls as young as age 2 to increase poise, coordination and balance. When selecting a gymnastics program, do your homework by watching a class and paying particular attention to the teaching style and organization of the instructor. “You want to see if the program has an upper level; if a program knows how to safely train upper-level kids, chances are they know how to safely train your 3-year-old on a cartwheel,” said Jamie Russenberger, owner of Increased Heights Gymnastics. The frequency (and price) of gymnastics classes varies widely from gym to gym and across different levels. Ask about a trial class for your child to test out before you sign up. There’s little special gear to buy and generally gymnasts don’t need a uniform or other garb unless for a competition. Many female gymnasts wear leotards in practice, which can get pricey, but workout clothes are also acceptable at some gyms, especially for beginners. The gymnastics season runs November to March, so balancing schoolwork with meets is key. And, as with other activities, gymnastics gets more expensive and time-consuming the more competitive an athlete becomes.

The single most important element of any kids’ sport is the kid and their likes and dislikes. Putting your child into a sport to pick up where you left off is a sure recipe for disaster. Also, keep a sense of perspective when your child competes. Too many parents sour their relationship with their children by pushing them too hard or getting carried away over youth games that are supposed to be fun. In teaching your child sportsmanship, don’t forget to take your own advice.

Increased Heights Gymnastics 501-593-1139 ihgymnastics.com BASEBALL Youth baseball is a cornerstone of sports leagues for kids and is available for virtually all ages and skill levels. One of the bestknown in Little Rock is Junior Deputy, which hosts between 800 to 900 players, ages 4 to 15, across various teams and divisions. “Our spring season starts the very end of March and is over the first part of June,” said Jeff Poe, park director. “We have a summer sandlot season, which is a short, one-month, twice-a-week league, and then we have a fall season.” Depending on the league, baseball requires little more than a glove, bat, ball and cleats to participate. It can be one of the most time-consuming sports at the competitive level given select teams’ travel schedules. But in the beginner divisions, seasons are generally manageable with no travel involved. Junior Deputy starts kids at the tee-ball level, then graduates to coach pitch and finally introduces player pitch. Volunteer coaches are crucial to the program and give parents additional opportunities to participate with their child. Junior Deputy Baseball Office 937-553-2255 juniordeputy.com

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CLIMBING A growing sport, and great workout, too, besides is climbing, as evidenced by several climbing centers popping up all over Arkansas. These centers provide ample physical challenge, while at the same time delivering a serious mental workout. “As far as a physical level it’s a full-body workout,” said Daniel Carnahan, operations manager for Little Rock Climbing Center. “At the same time, you’re having to problem-solve on the wall. We can move the holds around and constantly change and test their strategy.” Climbing requires a minimum of equipment; clothes that stretch and allow freedom of movement are a must, but not so baggy as to get hung up on holds or in gear. A chalk bag and chalk improve grip by absorbing moisture on the hands. Most climbing centers provide the necessary harness and ropes used during the session. As the activity has gained in popularity, competition has followed. Climbing competitions are straightforward—fastest time to the top wins. Like all the activities on this list, the more advanced your interest and the more competitions you attend, the more registration and practice fees stack up. Little Rock Climbing Center 501-227-9500 littlerockclimbingcenter.com DANCE Like gymnastics, dance is an activity that provides an excellent cardiovascular workout while promoting grace, discipline and poise. Dance programs start very early in many studios, with 3- and 4-year-old classes not uncommon. “We start kids at 3 years old,” said Allison Stodola Wilson, assistant director of Shuffles & Ballet II. “Some studios do a Mommy and Me, which is younger than that, but a lot of dance is about discipline, learning to sit on your spot, learning the repetition of it all. They tend to do better with that starting around age 3.” Many beginner classes cover a variety of dance styles, although it is also possible to pick one genre (ballet, for instance) and stick with it full time. The requirement for beginning dance is generally one class a week for roughly an hour or so, depending on age. Between ballet slippers, tap shoes, practice leotards and extra studio time, dance can get expensive; be sure you understand these costs up front. Dance recitals are generally held to demonstrate what the class has learned as well as to acclimate youngsters to performing in front of people. One feature to ask about is performance opportunities outside the studio. Shuffles, for instance, has been heavily involved with Ballet Arkansas’s annual Nutcracker ballet and that tie-in has afforded many youngsters the chance to participate in the performance. Shuffles & Ballet II 501-223-9224 shufflesdancestudio.com

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SWIMMING Recreational swim teams abound in Central Arkansas, providing a healthful activity to keep kids occupied during summer break. “Our league goes up through age 18 and most kids get started in our league around 5,” said Hayes Boggan, president of Central Arkansas Swim League and the Maumelle Marlins Swim Team. “We’re a summer league; we’re where everybody comes to try it out and they move up from here.” Not only is swimming one of the few activities on this list that provides a practical skill, it’s also fairly inexpensive, although the racing version swimsuit is considerably more expensive than the garden variety board shorts. CASL member clubs host multiple meets throughout the summer, including a Meet of Champs to close the season in late July. Kids swim to win, but it’s a decidedly more laidback environment than the competitive leagues such as USA Swimming or AAU that some kids opt for later on. Central Arkansas Swim League (CASL) tinyurl.com/yayd4nq6 TRIATHLON Kent Gartin is race director for the Bryant Kids Triathlon, an event he’s been putting on for years, in which time he’s seen a marked increase both in participation for his meet and throughout Arkansas. “The event that we did this year hosted athletes ages 5 to 15, we even had a couple 4-year-olds doing it,” he said. Triathlon combines cycling, running and swimming into a single race. The biggest expense is the bike, although competitive swimwear and a good pair of running shoes can be expensive as well. Training time is generally not overwhelming at the kid level, especially since many youngsters are doing the three components anyway just by being kids. The time commitment for meets, especially among the younger ages, isn’t high either. “It’s actually pretty fast,” Gartin said. “In the 6 and under division, the fastest kid finished the course in about eight minutes, the slowest in about 12.” Bryant Kids Triathlon 501-804-9020 bryantkidstri.com

BRYANT SWIM PROGRAM THRIVES WITH FACILITIES INVESTMENT Bryant Mayor Jill Dabbs remembers what the hometown Saline County Barracudas youth swim team looked like when they were just getting going in the Central Arkansas Swim League (CASL). “When my daughter joined that swim team in 2005, we had about 35 swimmers and we looked like Alfalfa and the gang swim team,” she said. “We didn’t have matching swimsuits, we didn’t have a swimming pool that was large enough for a meet like the other teams did. But my daughter loved swimming.” Dabbs, who was not yet mayor, spearheaded a grassroots effort to recruit more participants and for a new pool. She and some fellow parents envisioned a pool that would serve the entire

community as well as an expanded swim program. “By the next summer we had 125 swimmers and in 2009 we had the pool under construction,” she said. “That little club at its peak had 300 swimmers and the city started an AAU program and hosted the state championship for AAU a few years ago.” Providing for youth activities and public health through swimming is one of the most essential functions of city government, Dabbs said. “Swimming is a great sport to add to the health of the community,” she said. “It’s also a sport where kids who might not be coordinated enough for the ball team or gymnastics, you put them in the water and that’s where they really excel.” SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JULY 2018

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summer camps ed six newly-renovat ery and under gall

your summer of discovery a family membership is only $85!

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Girls On a Mission

Five Central Arkansas teens are on a mission to help others and inspire BY DWAIN HEBDA

Say i n g ‘ Y E S ’ to Vo lu n t e e r i s m Conway trio pitches in to provide housing for homeless

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evada and Diamond Alexander may just be entering ninth and 11th grade, respectively, but the sisters already have a better grip on what’s important in life and the community than people several times their age. “Growing up, I never really did have that much of a role model,” Diamond said. “I’m surrounded by a lot of people younger than me. It makes me want to be at least one tiny positive thing in their life.” “Volunteering has taught me to be prepared for the world and help people that don’t have the experiences that I have,” Nevada said. The young women’s attitude toward others brings their grandmother, Leeretta Winston, to tears. “I’m so proud of them. I see that they have really flourished well from the services that they’re in,” Winston said. “I just see that they’re getting a true understanding of what it is to be a helping neighbor, to lend a hand, to not just want to make money but also do a volunteer service.” Diamond and Nevada have lived with their grandmother for the past two years. The girls’ aunt, Virginia Halcombe, is guardian of a third young woman, Skyler Nobles, who is entering her senior year at Conway High School and rounds out the trio. All three demonstrate the importance of a village in raising good, civic-minded young adults. “[Volunteering] has taught me self-discipline, taking care of my business, handling what I need to do. It teaches you life lessons like what you don’t want to do for a job,” Skyler said. “For instance, if you have a family it’s important to know what you do and don’t want to do so that you can support your family.” All three teens have been active in Habitat for Humanity of Faulkner County, Skyler for five years and Diamond and Nevada for two. The feeling they get from helping families get into their own home makes the time they spend worthwhile. “I got interested in Habitat through friends,” Skyler said. “I had a friend, she lost her house. She had moved from Mayflower to Conway and she was telling me how she had got a house through Habitat. I was like, this sounds good, so I went ahead and got with the people and it started from there.” “Habitat for Humanity is important so we can help out poor families,” Nevada said. “I’m going to be busy going to Habitat for Humanity doing some community service the rest of the summer. I also participate in helping elderly people.” The trio is active in Young Empowered Sisters (YES), a mentor program in Conway targeting African-American girls. The program has provided direction, opportunity and caring adult role models for club members to emulate. “The YES program has taught me how to carry myself in public, especially being a young African-American female,” Skyler said. “It taught me how I need to set examples for children under my age, ask questions if I have questions in the community, and just give a helping hand when I need to.” The trio finds additional ways to help out in Conway, from handing out backpacks full of school supplies to random acts of kindness to the elderly in their neighborhood. The accumulated goodwill and self-worth they have achieved as a result of these activities isn’t lost on Winston. “What gets me is, they were so excited when they came from doing people’s yard work. I mean, ‘Grandma, we did this! We did that!’” she said. “I just see that they’re good girls, all three of them are. We’re just praying for them.”

(FROM TOP) SKYLER NOBLES, DIAMOND ALEXANDER AND NEVADA ALEXANDER.

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L e a d w i t h Yo u r H e a r t

Teen Abigail Davis makes volunteering a way of life

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(FROM TOP) ABIGAIL HOLDING A PICTURE OF HER PAP (GARY DAVIS) WHO INSPIRED HER PASSION FOR HEART HEALTH; THE DAVIS FAMILY (FROM LEFT) MASON, TAMMIE, MARK AND ABIGAIL; AND ABIGAIL AT THE 2018 AHA HEART WALK WITH AIDEN AND ADYSON COLEMAN.

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bigail Davis may not yet be out of high school, but she’s already made a difference in the lives of countless people who have benefited from her community activism. The 17-year-old has a passion for heart health and for families dealing with life-threatening diseases in children. “I have never learned more than by going to volunteer and going to help out my community,” she said. “They have taught me so much by giving back to the people that have given so much to me.” As a sophomore, Davis was an American Heart Association Sweetheart, a service program that educates young women on issues of heart health and heart disease. Little did she know how personal those lessons would become in the form of her grandfather Gary Davis. “He wasn’t really raised up in a home where they taught him how to be heart healthy,” she said. “He had a sedentary lifestyle and he didn’t eat as healthy of foods as he should have. He also smoked. All three of those caused heart disease for him later on and, unfortunately, he died last year.” Davis channeled her energies into making a difference for others. She created HEART, a public awareness campaign that stresses health history, eating right, active lifestyle, reducing stress and transforming habits in support of heart health. She’s delivered her message to schools, seniors groups, even the Oklahoma state legislature and reached even more people through her monthly blog via the American Heart Association in six states. “I always like to tell people that my platform chose me,” she said. “I didn’t choose for heart disease to run in my family, but when people see a young person advocating for something so special to them it really makes them wonder. If I am only 17 years old and I am so passionate about this, then it really does mean something to me and it means I really want to help my community.” “But it also means that they can also get involved and they can do stuff to protect themselves. That’s what makes a big difference.” Davis followed HEART work by getting involved with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Arkansas. While serving an internship there, she conceived the idea for and co-chaired the organizing committee of Silly Sock Shuffle, a benefit walk that raised more than $12,000. “I was the youngest person to be a co-chair for them, which was such an honor,” she said. “We wore our silly socks and, of course, I had to wear mine with crowns on them and they were bedazzled. It was just a fun walk that we’re already planning for next year; it’s going to be an annual thing.” Activism has brought with it recognition for the Little Rock Christian Accademy student. She was named Miss Metro Outstanding Teen, awarded through the Miss America organization. In June, she competed in the Miss Arkansas Outstanding Teen pageant where she was awarded top 15 and recognized with a leadership award and Teens in Action for her volunteerism and work to support her community service platform. All of which is nice, of course, but pales in comparison to what she’d like to inspire in others around getting involved. “My generation is a generation of technology, but I also think that we are really wanting to give back,” she said. “We are eager to get plugged in, but sometimes it’s hard to know where to get plugged in. I know that so many organizations are coming out with new ways of technology to make it easier for teenagers to volunteer with them.” “It’s so important that we focus on organizations that need our help because many organizations in Arkansas are needing volunteers. It’s important to reach out and try and connect with them because it can make a real impact in our community.”


S co r e O n e fo r S p e c i a l O ly m p i c s A r k a n sas

Maumelle teen, Jaden Newman, is committed to equal opportunities to compete for all

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s an athlete, Jaden Newman knows the value of being part of a team. A soccer and volleyball standout, the 15-year-old has seen firsthand the importance of doing one’s part to advance the whole team. She brings that same attitude of teamwork to her volunteerism with Special Olympics of Arkansas. Newman’s brother, Derek Smith, is a Special Olympics athlete in bocce and her entire family is invested in Special Olympics Arkansas. “My father is in law enforcement, so obviously he does the law enforcement torch run to raise money for Special Olympics,” Newman said. “My mom has been the Area Five [Special Olympics] director for I don’t even know how long.” Newman’s own volunteerism started at the tender age of 5. In the years that have followed, she’s been involved in a lot of different capacities. “I go to different types of sports camps for Special Olympics where I volunteer,” she said. “They’ll have a group of kids and I’ll escort, I’ll take them to where they need to be, get them to dinner or lunch, stay with them. And I’ve done little day camps that my mom puts up. I’ll go and help with those. All different kinds of recreational stuff.” Even though Newman may have been around the organization and its athletes for a decade, she said it wasn’t until two or three years ago that she understood the deeper meaning behind what Special Olympics provides. “Special Olympics is about giving people, children and adults with intellectual disabilities a chance to come to a community where they meet other people like themselves,” she said. “Instead of talking about what they can’t do because of their disability, we shed light on what their strong suits, abilities and talents really are with sports and education, with guided training. We give them something to look for and something to do.” Over the past year, Newman opened a new chapter in her participation, lending her athletic talents directly as a member of Arkansas’s Special Olympics Unified soccer team. Unified sports combine athletes with intellectual disabilities and those without on the same competitive squad. Newman’s team is practicing in preparation for the 2018 USA Games in Seattle. “This is my very first year to actually participate in Unified sports,” she said. “I’ve been going to U.S. Games for a few years now, but this is my first to actually be involved hands-on with the athletes.” Newman said she’d like the team’s success and her own volunteerism to bring about better awareness and help other people to better appreciate the talents and possibilities of all people. “People older than me and younger than me fail to understand the depth of people with intellectual disabilities,” she said. “They don’t understand that they have the capacity to have a great personality and the capacity to want to have that same competitiveness in the sport they’re playing. In anything they do, they go at it the same way we would, just slightly differently, more special. That’s why we call it that.” “I just don’t think people my age understand that. It definitely opened my eyes and showed me a new perspective on different types of people and it really broadened my life a little bit more.” In addition to Special Olympics, the Maumelle High School 10th-grader is actively involved in her church. “We go to nursing homes, we go to the different apartment complexes around and see if anybody needs any help with their yardwork or cleaning, any sort of things like that,” Newman said. “I hope to attend some mission trips in the future.”

(FROM TOP) JADEN NEWMAN IS A BIG ADVOCATE FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF ARKANSAS; JADEN PARTICIPATING IN THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS SPORTS CAMP AT JOHN BROWN UNIVERSITY; JADEN AND HER BROTHER, DEREK.

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kid approved

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IS MARKETING DIRECTOR FOR JTJ RESTAURANTS LLC, WHICH INCLUDES PETIT & KEET AND PANINIS & COMPANY IN LITTLE ROCK ALONG WITH SEVEN TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE’S IN ARKANSAS. SHE’S MOM TO TWO ADORABLE BOYS, HOLDEN, 8, AND DASHIELL, 3. SHE AND HER HUSBAND, JAKE, ENJOY TRAVELING WITH THEIR KIDS TO DESTIN, FLA., THREE OR FOUR TIMES A YEAR ALONG WITH OTHER EDUCATIONAL TRIPS. THEY JUST FINISHED A QUICK TRIP TO TEXAS THAT INCLUDED VISITING THE ALAMO, CITY TOURS AND WATCHING GAME SEVEN OF THE NBA WESTERN DIVISION PLAYOFFS IN HOUSTON.

GET THE WHOLE FAMILY INTO A GAME OF TRAVEL BINGO!

PACK SNACKS. I TYPICALLY PACK A BAG OF SNACKS FROM OUR PANTRY IN ORDER TO NOT WASTE FOOD. WE ALSO ALWAYS BRING AN ICE CHEST FULL OF WATERS AND MILK.

THIS COLOR BLAST ART PAD IS LOTS OF FUN WITH NO MESS!

AMAZON SELLS KINDLE FIRE HD 8 FOR $60 AND IF YOU ARE A PRIME MEMBER YOU CAN DOWNLOAD VIDEOS ON TO IT FOR HOURS. A FAVORITE FOR OUR YOUNGEST WOULD BE TEAM UMIZOOMI, BUT WE ALSO INCLUDE MOVIES BOTH KIDS CAN WATCH, LIKE “STAR WARS.”

WE ALWAYS TRAVEL WITH A SOUND MACHINE. IT’S INCREDIBLY HARD TO FALL ASLEEP WITH FOUR PEOPLE IN THE SAME ROOM AND OUTSIDE NOISES COULD MAKE FOR A POOR NIGHT’S SLEEP. IF YOU ARE IN A CONDO AND IN SEPARATE ROOMS, I ALWAYS PUT THE SOUND MACHINE WITH OUR YOUNGEST SO WE CAN STAY UP LATER WITHOUT WAKING HIM. THEY ARE CHEAP, PORTABLE AND MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE.

WE LOVE THE VARIETY OF TOCA BOCA APPS! DOWNLOAD ENGAGING GAMES DESIGNED FROM THE CHILD’S PERSPECTIVE. OUR FAVORITES INCLUDE TOCA DOCTOR, TOCA KITCHEN MONSTERS AND TOCA HAIR SALON.

MAKE SURE TO GET “KIDS” HEADPHONES THAT ACTUALLY FIT. NOTHING IS WORSE THAN ADJUSTING HEADPHONES ON A TODDLER FOR 10 HOURS.

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