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Celebrating 10 Years

JANUARY 2019 · SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

SPARRING

DISCIPLINE & CONFIDENCE AT HOME

p lus HEED THE SIGNS

SPECIAL NEEDS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING RESOURCES


LITTLE ROCK WATER RECLAMATION AUTHORITY

OUR NEW WEBSITE WORKS BETTER FOR YOU. A year ago, we reintroduced ourselves as Little Rock Water Reclamation Authority now we’re introducing our new website. Our new website makes it easier to request customer service, explore our helpful programs and learn how we continue to protect our One Water, One Future. See for yourself by visiting lrwra.com today.

Follow us on social media to keep up with our latest reminders, tips and events.

�\ Little Rock Water Reclamation Authority � @LRWRA  @l.r.w.r.a

11 CLEARWATER DR. LITTLE ROCK, AR 72204

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LRWRA.COM

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501. 376. 2903


See highlighted events throughout the system in our

Winter Program Guide.

Get one at your local branch or visit

CALS.org.

Behavioral Indicators • • • • •

Aggressive behavior Low concentration Changes in appetite Drop in school Hyperactivity

For a complete list, visit familiesinc.net/services

• • • •

Withdrawal Depression Anxiety Fatigue

Toll-free: 870.335.9483 • familiesinc.net

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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JANUARY 2019 5 EDITOR’S NOTE

8 ADVENTURE & FUN CALENDAR & MORE!

12 ASK YOUR DAD

NEW PARENT PLANS VS. REALITY

14 HEALTH & WELLNESS

TESTS AS PREVENTATIVE MEASURES FOR DISEASE.

16 HEED THE SIGNS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING

AN AGE-OLD CRIME CONTINUES TODAY, EVEN IN ARKANSAS.

20 GOOD EATS

RING IN A HEALTHY MENU

23 KARATE MOM

IN-SPARRING DISCIPLINE AND CONFIDENCE AT HOME

26 HOW TO GET YOUR SPECIAL NEEDS MET

ARKANSAS PROVIDES MULTIPLE RESOURCES FOR SPECIAL NEEDS FAMILIES

26 KID APPROVED - SNOW DAY FUN KELLY B. PITTMAN

ON THE COVER LAURIE AND ISAAC PRUD'HOMME AT UNITY MARTIAL ARTS PHOTO BY BRIAN CHILSON

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Photo by Stacy Kinzler

Growing, Changing, Revamping Savvy has grown and changed so much over its lifetime. This year, we’re celebrating a big birthday—we’re 10 years old! The magazine has undergone changes, revamps and facelifts over the years. We’ve shifted from parenting, to predominately mom-lifestyle and back to parenting again, all the while keeping the focus on family. We’ve welcomed the words and advice from excellent parent writers, spotlighted parents and kids who are doing great things in the state, and balanced out the uplifting feel-good piece with heavier topics that we as parents just can’t turn a blind eye to. In this issue of Savvy, you’ll find some eye-opening words concerning human trafficking and its ties to Arkansas on page 16. Parents of special needs kids will want to flip to page 26 for a crash course on what’s available to help your family regarding health care, education, federal and state programs and much more. If you have a kid who might benefit from a sport that inspires discipline, confidence and fun, learn about the power of martial arts on page 23, and meet Laurie Prud’homme, who became a lifelong practitioner after taking her then 6-year-old son to his first martial arts convention. In addition to helping keep your kids safe and motivated, we also love to provide ways to keep them (and you) healthy! Zara Abbasi dazzles us, yet again, with some fresh ideas on healthy dinnertime recipes to keep your New Year’s resolutions on track and make the whole family happy at mealtime. Turn to page 20 to find delicious, easy and family-friendly recipes. Another change you’ll notice in the pages of Savvy is a more inclusive lineup of columnists. Yep, we’re offering up some fatherly voices in our column “Ask Your Dad.” Guy Choate, a talented writer and director of the Argenta Reading Series, offers up his brand-new-dad guidance to all the other struggling first-time parents on page 12. Look for a changing cast of contributors in 2019! We hope everyone had a restful holiday and is as ready to get the New Year going as we are! We can’t wait to keep growing, changing and revamping for the better for our readers.

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvy Kids amy@arktimes.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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Savvy December Issue Job# 201810085.pdf

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11/12/18

4:57 PM

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PUBLISHER KATHERINE DANIELS | katherine@arktimes.com

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EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER ART DIRECTOR KATIE HASSELL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES LESA THOMAS JENNIFER CORBITT PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN ADVERTISING COORDINATOR LARISSA GUDINO

Thank You for SHARING THE

ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR MIKE SPAIN IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTING LINDA PHILLIPS

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JANUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


contributors ANGELA E. THOMAS is a proud University of Arkansas at Little Rock graduate and a member of its Alumni Board. For 11 years, she served Central Arkansas as editor for a locally owned magazine. Thomas is founder and owner of the greeting card company GODsent Greetings.

Free interactive, hands-on class for healthy living on a budget Where: North Little Rock's Laman Library  When: 1 - 2 p.m. for a 9-week session running January 23 - March 20 Call today to join! (501) 758-1720 or register online at lamanlibrary.org RECIPES, AND TIPS FOR BECOMING MORE ACTIVE, WHILE SAVING MONEY

HEIFER INTERNATIONAL CAMPUS

Downtown Little Rock, AR

Come learn about Heifer’s work around the world and experience hands-on, interactive exhibits. Then, mosey over to our Urban Farm to meet our animal friends.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

FREE ADMISSION Monday–Saturday | 9 a.m.–5 p.m. KATIE CHILDS is a wedding, lifestyle and commercial photographer based in North Little Rock. When she’s not behind the camera, Katie and her husband, Jon, can be found rock climbing with their two pups in Northwest Arkansas and listening to embarrassing rap music.

Savvy Jan Ad.indd 1

12/20/18 1:30 PM

MELISSA TUCKER spends her days working in web marketing. When not at work, you'll probably find her at the gym, on the playground with her kids or checking out too many books from the library.

ZARA ABBASI lives in Little Rock with her husband and three children. She is a licensed attorney but you know her better as Little Rock’s friendly pastry chef and custom cake maker. She keeps busy with dessert orders, pop-up dinners, writing articles and doing anything food-related. Follow her on Instagram @Zaramadeit for her newest cake creations and dinner ideas. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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January Sunday

Monday

ADVENTURE & FUN

2019

Tuesday New Year's Day

Wednesday

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2

Thursday

Friday Saturday The Percy The Percy Jackson Jackson Musical Musical

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4

National Spaghetti Day

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Shen Yun

Bath 8 7 Bubble Day

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in a 11 10 Step Puddle and Houseplant Appreciation Day

Dress Up 14 National 15 13 Your Pet Day Hat Day

20 Martin 21 Luther King Jr.

National Cheese Lover Day

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Birthday

Splash Your Friend's Day

Justin 16 17 Timberlake

Appreciate a Dragon Day

National Pie Day

5

Shen Yun

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18 Harlem 19 Globetrotters

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24 Opposite 25 Day

30

31

Buried Lives Wild Kratts Winter Wine Taste

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Squirrel Appreciation Day Chocolate Cake Day

National 28 Kids' 27 29 Kazoo Day Kitchen Time

National Puzzle Day

Fill up your activity calendar all year long with memberships to family-friendly venues around Central Arkansas. If you take a family of four to some of these spots more than twice, it may be worth your while (and your money!) to look into a membership. Here are the details on a few of our favorites! ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER - Family Membership, $85 Includes for two members: free admission to ticketed exhibitions, members-only preview parties, lectures and special programs; member benefits for children 17 years and under; discounts on Children’s Theatre tickets, Museum School tuition, the Museum Shop, Watercolor in the Park; and more.

MID-AMERICA SCIENCE MUSEUM Family Membership, $85 Includes for a family of up to five: unlimited free admission; invitations to members-only programs and special exhibit previews; advance notice for events, workshops and lectures; and discounts in the Museum Store.

LITTLE ROCK ZOO - Family Membership, $89 Includes for two adult members and all children of the household under the age of 18: free admission all year; use of express members-only entrance; invitations to members-only events; free parking; discounts at the Safari Trader Gift Shop, CafĂŠ Africa, education programs and birthday parties; and more.

MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY Family Membership, $85 Includes for up to five people: unlimited free general admission, $25 off birthday parties and select summer camps, reciprocal admission to participating ASTC Passport Program Members Museums, access to Mid-America Science Museum for $5 and more.

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4-5 THE PERCY JACKSON MUSICAL

Northwest Arkansas audiences will be the first to see “The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical” at Baum Walker Hall at Walton Arts Center after sold-out shows in New York City. The whole family will love this show adapted from the best-selling novel by Rick Riordan. Tickets start at $25. waltonartscenter.org

17 JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

Moms love him, kids love him. Don’t miss Justin Timberlake’s The Man of the Woods Tour at Verizon Arena. The show promises an intimate performance with a catwalk that stretches the length of the floor decorated with trees and holographic grass. verizonarena.com

5-6 SHEN YUN

Travel back to the magical world of ancient China with Shen Yun, a theater experience like no other at Robinson Performance Hall. Experience a lost culture through the art of classical Chinese dance, colorful costuming, high-tech backdrops and live orchestra. ticketmaster.com or 501-244-8800

19 THE ORIGINAL HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS

19 BURIED LIVES

Award-winning Arkansas author Carla Killough McClafferty will discuss her new book, “Buried Lives: The Enslaved People of George Washington’s Mount Vernon,” at the Main Library Youth Services section from 3-4 p.m. All ages will enjoy this illuminating look at the complex relationships between George Washington and the enslaved people of Mount Vernon, and the history still being uncovered there. cals.org

Be dazzled by the amazing feats of The Original Harlem Globetrotters at 2 p.m. at Verizon Arena. The show is known for astounding basketball skills and humor. The Globetrotters will engage with the fans on the all-new Fan Powered World Tour, offering more than 20 occasions before, during and after the game where fans have the opportunity to directly interact with Globetrotters stars. verizonarena.com

19 THE KRATT BROTHERS

The Kratt Brothers are performing at Robinson Performance Hall at 1 and 3 p.m. to dazzle young audiences with an all-new stage adventure, “Wild Kratts LIVE 2.0 - Activate Creature Power!” The show is based on the Emmy-nominated hit PBS KIDS series, and will bring audiences along on a “wild” ride with a dynamic mix of live-action and animation. 501-244-8800

19 WINTER WINE TASTE Enjoy live music, food, wine tasting and ballet as Ballet Arkansas presents the 2nd annual Winter Wine Taste at the Little Rock Marriott ballroom. Tickets $50 in advance, $60 at the door. balletarkansas.org

29 KIDS’ KITCHEN TIME

Read a story and make a snack during Kids’ Kitchen Time at North Little Rock’s Argenta Branch Library. Stop by at 10:30 a.m. or 3:30 p.m. for stories and tasty snacks. The library also hosts regular Preschool Storytime every Thursday morning at 10:30. lamanlibrary.org SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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ADVENTURE & FUN

Easy Peasy Silly Putty

Squeeze it. Stretch it. Bounce it. Homemade silly putty in just five minutes!

You will need:

4-ounce bottle school glue 1 teaspoon Borax 1 cup of warm water separated into ½ cups 2 bowls for mixing Food coloring Spoon or spatula Latex gloves (optional)

How to:

1. Pour the bottle of glue into the bowl and mix ½ cup of warm water until completely combined. 2. Add 2-3 drops of food coloring to the glue and combine. 3. In a separate bowl dissolve 1 teaspoon Borax into ½ cup warm water. 4. Pour the borax/water mixture into the glue mixture and stir together. Mix the two until the glue starts to turn into putty. 5. Remove the putty and knead together by hand until well combined. 6. Enjoy! Don’t forget to store your putty in a resealable container.

Big Game

The Party Headquarters

INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES • INVITATIONS •

10 JANUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Spotlight on Nonprofits

In celebration of Savvy's 10-year anniversary we are putting the spotlight on some local superheroes who are doing good things for kids and families in Arkansas.

Who’s Leading? Paul Leopoulos is the executive director of the Thea Foundation, which is named in honor of his late daughter, Thea Kay Leopoulos.

What’s It All About? Thea Foundation programs are designed to help kids in grades K through 12 to find confidence and perspective through creative expression. The organization runs in-school and extra-curricular programs statewide to promote the arts, help teachers get the creative supplies they need and provide scholarships for students. Where Can I Find It? Thea Foundation operates out of an office/newly renovated gallery space in the Argenta neighborhood of North Little Rock.

Paul Leopoulos, executive director

When Can I Attend? In addition to student programming, Thea Foundation offers opportunities for the community to appreciate the arts by hosting shows and events featuring

local artists, musicians and chefs. Catch Joelle Storet’s work exhibited in the gallery space through February with a reception Feb. 1 from 6:30-9 p.m. Why Is It Important? The Thea Foundation scholarship program has awarded more than $2.25 million to Arkansas high school seniors. How Can I Help? Donating to Thea Foundation helps keep the arts alive in public schools and fund art programming to reach students who may otherwise not receive exposure. The organization is focusing on a fundraising drive to re-stock Thea’s Art Closet, which gets much needed art supplies to hundreds of underfunded schools across the state. theafoundation.org

FOUNDATION

11218PARHAM N. RODNEYRD. PARHAM RD. /ROCK LITTLE ROCK 4822 4822 HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK 11218 N. RODNEY / LITTLE N.N.HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK 501.223.4929 501.978.3154 501.223.4929 501.978.3154

• DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES • INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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ASK YOUR DAD...

New Parent Plans Vs. Reality

W

hen my wife, Liz, was pregnant we routinely took evening walks with our dog Suki through our neighborhood, past the local elementary school, and we tried to imagine how our unborn son would one day be in attendance there. We discussed how smart he would be. How we would require him to play at least one sport and one musical instrument. But we wouldn’t let such staunch requirements turn us into those weird “parenty” parents who did insane things like trying to pass off Geoffrey Chaucer to their kids as a preferred alternative to Sandra Boynton. (Of course, at the time, I had no idea who Boynton was. Now, at any given point in time, I’m two strong beers away from requesting “Barnyard Dance” at karaoke.) We didn’t have a defined strategy for protecting ourselves from such dangers, but we had a strong faith in our checks and balances, as a couple, to maintain a certain amount of chill. “We should teach him a second language,” one of us said. “Or sign language.” “Both, probably,” the other responded. “For sure.” We had such great ideas. When our son, Gus, was born, neither Liz nor I had ever changed a diaper, which I tell you now as evidence that we weren’t the kind of people who exude a natural maternal/ paternal vibe. Some people gravitate toward children. We did not. (I don’t think we do now, either. But I did find myself joyously making unrequited wild animal noises in the direction of a toddler sitting across the aisle from me on a plane recently.) While there seems to be a general understanding that young parents have no idea what they’re doing, and there’s also a societal forgiveness we eagerly bestow upon those young parents, I’m not sure I’m still eligible for such forgiveness, given that I was in my mid-30s when Gus was born. I have a stable job with fantastic health insurance and we have a strong family support system. Liz was able to stay home with Gus for the first year of his life. We have every reasonable parenting resource available to us, but I’m still surprised we have kept a baby human being alive for 18 months. This magazine is dedicated to parenting. This column was previously called Mama Said and written exclusively by mothers who are juggling multiple children better than they’re letting on,

I’m sure of it. If I’m qualified to be here, writing these words— in theory, providing some guidance or reassurance to the rest of you parents out there that you are not alone—it’s on a technicality. Writing about the same topic, I feel more apt to publish this column in a magazine dedicated to surviving the dangers of the natural world—perhaps a sidebar to an article featuring a cyclist who fought off a mountain lion with a water bottle and an Allen wrench. It’s January and I wanted to write a quirky article about my New Year’s resolutions, or maybe something profound about how the New Year brings rebirth, but what came out is the above cry for help. I can offer you no guidance as a parent, but perhaps I can offer some reassurance. Even though Liz and I have not executed our plan to enroll our kid in a Spanish immersion class, or taught him the importance of a solid embouchure, he did come home from daycare the other day and repeatedly, confidently employed the hand sign for “more.” When we asked his teachers about it, they said they thought we had taught him, but of course that’s well beyond our current capabilities. After some investigating, we discovered there is a girl in his class who uses sign language (because her parents are ridiculous and should be publishing their own parenting magazine). Apparently Gus saw the girl get more food when she signed for it, so he decided to sign, too. For him to be smart enough to pick up even that one word in American Sign Language on his own, despite the shortcomings of his parents, makes Liz and me so proud. And it tells us that as lost as we are, we must’ve done something right, even if we have no idea what it is.

PARENTING—NOT AS EASY AS IT LOOKS!

Guy Choate lives in North Little Rock where he manages the Communications Team at Garver by day, and directs the Argenta Reading Series by night. He and his wife, Liz, are responsible for the well-being of their son, Gus, and a rescue dog named Suki. You can find more of his writing online at guychoate.com.

12 JANUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


WHERE PURPOSE COMES ALIVE Serving 25 schools plus adult education, the Pulaski County Special School District is one of the largest school districts in the state of Arkansas. Every student has a purpose in life and we strive to help each student discover their full potential. The Pulaski County Special School District is where purpose comes alive and everyday we’re:

Preparing students for life The Pulaski County Special School District works diligently with every child to ensure he or she is prepared for life beyond the classroom. PCSSD has nearly 1,000 certified teachers including more than 75 nationally board-certified teachers who help every student learn in a comfortable, safe environment.

Cultivating future leaders Every student possesses the potential to become a great leader. Every school within the Pulaski County Special School District executes the promise to guide each student on a path of success. Whether it’s finding his or her niche in the classroom, on the basketball court, in choir or any other program we offer, PCSSD supports students in the pursuit of their passion.

Strengthening public schools In order to become one, cohesive educational institution for our feature leaders, it is necessary to strengthen the public school system in central Arkansas. The Pulaski County Special District employs strong teachers and rigorous curriculum to improve the learning environment at every school, cultivating a sense of equity and excellence.

Strengthening our communities By strengthening our public schools, our communities are impacted as well. A strong community centers around a sense of equity, inclusion and support that stems from each school within the Pulaski County Special School District.

Driving innovation in the classroom The Pulaski County Special School District understands the future of education. Every school of PCSSD strongly supports the drive for innovation. Whether it’s WiFi on school buses or virtual classrooms, PCSSD is giving our students access to the technologies that are shaping our world.

purpose.pcssd.org

501.234.2000 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Tests as Preventative Measures?

As the medical field advances, so do our opportunities to screen, detect and prevent disease. BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

G

enetic testing has become hugely popular. You can now easily find out about your ancestors, determine if your unborn child has any abnormalities, and undergo testing to find out if you’re at risk for some diseases. Take, for instance, genetic testing as a preventative measure, such as testing for the BRAC gene. As you read this, you most likely think of actor Angelina Jolie, who famously underwent a mastectomy as a preventative measure against breast cancer. So, is genetic testing for everyone? Generally speaking, genetic testing is used to: diagnose a disease; to determine the cause and treatment options for a disease; to determine the risk of getting a disease and the risk of passing a disease on to your children; and to screen an unborn child or baby. Jill Kelsey is a degreed medical geneticist and a certified genetic counselor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Kelsey works with individuals and families looking for explanations for instances of cancer. “Genetic testing plays a role in looking at rare cancers, cancers that occur at an uncommon age and cancers that

14 JANUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

occur in a way that you’d not expect them to. We can test for a hereditary predisposition for a disease, especially if there’s a family history of instances occurring in younger women,” she said. “Some individuals come in because their families know that there’s ‘something’ going on in their family history. Others hear about our facility via word of mouth or contact us because of a news story or because a doctor has referred them to us based on a family history. “For instance, ovarian cancer is more likely to be hereditary, so we may test a woman whose family has a history of ovarian cancer.” They have also performed genetic testing for pancreatic cancer and other rare cancers. As you may expect, many women have become interested in being tested for the BRAC1 and BRAC2 gene, which is the testing Jolie underwent. However, Kelsey noted that their center does not, generally speaking, test for this as breast cancer is fairly common: 1 in 8 women develop breast cancer in their lifetimes. “Her diagnosis and the act of sharing her story were certainly important in the effort to raise awareness of the


disease,” she added of Jolie. It’s important to note that genetic testing isn’t available for every disease, though the tests are improving with time and research. There are still a many unknowns when it comes to genes, Kelsey said. When should a person consider genetic testing? “When the tests can make a difference. For instance, testing children for the BRAC gene is not beneficial. They’re too young. On the other hand, if a person knows a disease is prevalent in his family history, screening could help. An example of this would be testing for the BRAC gene, which we most often associate with breast cancer; however, it’s also associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer,” Kelsey said. “So, if a family has many instances of breast cancer, determining if the BRAC gene is prevalent may help determine if there’s an increased risk for ovarian cancer and could help the women become more diligent with their reproductive health.” So, we wondered, are there any other tests we should have done for preventative measures, such as testing for vitamin deficiencies? Not really, according to Dr. Lauren Gibson, who practices family medicine at UAMS. “Most healthy adults can get all the vitamins need from consuming a well-balanced diet.” However, there are a few populations in which the medical community recommends vitamin supplements: women of childbearing age and older, independent-living adults. “We recommend any woman of child-bearing age take 400 to 800 micrograms of folic acid or folate daily. We know that a lack of folic acid during pregnancy can contribute to birth defects such as spina bifida and more. We also know that adults 65 and older have an increased risk of falls, so we recommend they take 400 to 1,000 international units of vitamin D daily; this varies based on their dietary intake of vitamin D and their exposure to the sun,” Gibson said. Is there a recommendation for hormone testing? Not unless a patient is experiencing symptoms. This does not include testing hormone levels for menopause. “Every woman will go through menopause at some point, however, it’s usually determined through a clinical diagnosis [versus testing],” Gibson said. “We, as a medical community, do have a set of recommendations for testing. It’s based on those from the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force and they are specific and based on age and gender. It includes things like mammograms for women, ages 40 and older; colonoscopies or colon cancer screening for adults 50 and older … these are blanket recommendations that your primary care physician will usually make.” She added that if you are experiencing illness or symptoms, you should, of course, speak with your primary care physician. So, the adage about an ounce of prevention bears out. Eat a well-balanced diet; get 75 minutes of rigorous exercise or 150 minutes of moderate exercise weekly; don’t smoke; don’t use illicit drugs; and limit your alcohol intake. “It would be great if there were some magic pill we could take to prevent disease, but prevention really boils down to diet, exercise and making good choices,” Gibson said.

Expecting?

ARE YOU: Less than 12 weeks pregnant 18 years of age or older BMI over 30 Not exercising Healthy

CONTACT US! 501-364-3309 ACNCstudies@archildrens.org Diapers and monetary compensation may be provided for your participation

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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FAMILY & PARENTING

*WARNING: THIS

STORY CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGERY THAT MAY BE HARD TO READ FOR SOME.

Heed the Signs of Human Trafficking

An age-old crime continues today, even in Arkansas. As January is its awareness month, we hope to shine a light on what to look for and how to keep your kids safe, or get help should you ever need it. BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

Forced servitude. Coerced sex trafficking. Modern-day slavery. Human trafficking. This crime

by any other name is still the same: “exploiting a person through force, fraud or coercion.” And its victims are from every walk of life: rich or poor; people who live in cities, towns and rural areas; young, old; Caucasian, African American, Latinx, Asian; male, female, transgender, gay, straight, … anyone and everyone can be a victim. The victims of human trafficking may be forced to perform sex acts for money—that they do not receive—or forced into labor in factories, on farms, in construction or to work as domestic servants, in jobs such as nannies, maids and other domestic roles and receive little pay for their services. They are usually manipulated into these roles and/or threatened with deportation and physical harm.

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Many victims are groomed to enter a lifestyle in the sex trade at an early age. This is alarming, and officials find it difficult to gather statistics for the number of people who are subject to human trafficking in the United States because it’s a “hidden crime.” “Statistics are hard to come by because the traffickers threaten victims. They also use manipulative tactics to make the victim think it’s their fault,” said Louise Allison, executive director for Partners Against Trafficking Humans (PATH). PATH advocates for those exploited by the sex industry by providing a safe environment for their healing through therapy and a number of classes and training. “It’s difficult to get victims to understand that [what has taken place in their lives] is not their fault. They have been, as you can imagine, traumatized by the sexual abuse and rape that they’ve been subjected to,” Allison said. “A 20-year-old woman knows it’s wrong, but when you’re working with a 12-year-old child who has been groomed, it is a different story.” For instance, they worked with a 40-year-old woman who had been sold since she was 7. “It was her norm.” The vast majority of adult victims do not report their victimization—in the case of minors the law prevails, but Allison said when PATH works with adults, they have to wait until he or she is well enough. If you think human trafficking and sex trafficking doesn’t happen in Arkansas, think again. Melissa Dawson with Centers for Youth and Families echoed this. “Human trafficking can happen anywhere and to anyone. It covers all socioeconomic classes and all races. It’s not just an international problem, it’s happening here in Arkansas.” “The majority of the women—85 percent—of the women we work with are born, raised and sold in Arkansas. The traffickers move their victims to and from Tennessee, Missouri and Texas and move back and forth frequently across state borders because traffickers want ‘fresh meat.’ They sometimes travel up and down Interstate 40, which runs right through our state.” Many victims are groomed to enter a lifestyle in the sex

What You Should Know: Traffickers are very cunning. Their greatest tool: the internet. They look for posts that express vulnerability and low self-esteem. They are anywhere and everywhere that has people, money and things to be sold. While we use the term human trafficking, it’s just a new name for an age-old problem. It’s still slavery, child abuse and sexual abuse. Be aware of your surroundings. Keep your head up at all times. Be watchful and always act as if you’re in control. You do not want to appear vulnerable, IRL (in real life) or online. Protect your children. Make sure they understand: If you don’t know an individual, don’t talk to him, even and especially online, due to the anonymity of the internet. Parents, monitor your children’s activities, especially online. “It’s your God-given responsibility to spy on your children,” Allison said. “I’d much rather have my children alive and angry with me than they become victims.” Know your children’s friends, and be a good listener. Listen to their conversations, and talk to your children about their friends. If you suspect something, say something. “There have been many rescues and lives saved by people who saw red flags and called law enforcement,” she said. If you’d like to receive formal Human Trafficking Awareness Training, log on to pathsaves.org, and click on the education tab. There you’ll find the dates and times for upcoming courses during which you’ll learn vital information such as how to recognize a “pimp,” how victims are trapped and how you can help. If you’d like to report suspected human trafficking, call the Department of Homeland Security at 866-347-2423, or to get help because you’ve been a victim of human trafficking, call 888-373-7888.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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PATH clients are as young as and as old as 44

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trade at an early age. Allison presented this scenario: An older man will flirt with a young girl, asks her out and talk her into having sex. He’ll compliment her, telling her she’s beautiful and that he doesn’t deserve her, saying something like he’s “in such bad shape,” wouldn’t she like to be with someone better like his “friend.” Later, when—if—she expresses hesitation or guilt, he’ll tell her that “we” have to make money or they won’t make it. And when grooming a young girl, a 5- or 6-year-old, the trafficker will begin by telling her over and over again that she’s so pretty and take pictures of her, having her remove her clothing, little by little. “It’s a slow mind manipulation,” Allison said. These skilled manipulators can cause life-long damage. The average age a trafficking victim enters the sex trade is 12 to 14, but there are younger victims. “We’ve treated a women in her 40s who said she’d been raping her father since she was 6 years old. She’d actually believed, her whole life, that she was dirty because she’d raped her father.” “They suffer deep trauma, guilt and shame.” Until a little more than a year ago, PATH only worked with adults. Now they began to serve children as well. Their clients are as young as 4 and as old as 44 and come to the organization: by calling the 24-hour hotline; as parents who call seeking help for their children, most often their daughters; as part of a post-trafficking situation (sometimes from hospitals where they’ve undergone a sexual assault exam or rape kit exam); or because they’ve attempted suicide. Youth may also receive help through the Centers for Youth and Families (CFYF). This organization has addressed the needs of children who’ve been trafficked, along with assisting their families, for four years. They offer group and family therapy as well as a structured, safe environment where families can reconnect. “We use a holistic approach, which begins with a safe place to live. While in our care, victims benefit from traumafocused therapies, quality medical care, peer support, substance-abuse treatment; and social and life skills training that address symptoms of complex trauma,” said Lindsey Cooper, grants writer with The Centers. “We do this while providing consistent residential care, supervision and healing influences that strive to meet each of their physical, emotional, social and educational needs.”

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Warning signs that an individual is being trafficked: • Signs of physical abuse such as burn marks, bruises or cuts • Unexplained absences from class • Less appropriately dressed than before • Sexualized behavior • Overly tired in class • Withdrawn, depressed, distracted or checked out • Brags about making or having lots of money • Displays expensive clothes, accessories or shoes • New tattoo (tattoos are often used by pimps as a way to brand victims. Tattoos of a name, symbol of money or barcode could indicate trafficking) • Older boyfriend or new friends with a different lifestyle • Talks about wild parties or invites other students to attend parties • Shows signs of gang affiliation (a preference for specific colors, notebook doodles of gang symbols, etc.) Courtesy of The Centers for Youth and Families


Human trafficking comprises the fastest growing criminal industry in the world. What is Human Trafficking? Human trafficking is the practice of recruiting, harboring and transporting people for the purpose of sexual exploitation or labor. Every year, traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits at the expense of boys and girls around the world. Sex trafficking—which is the commercial sexual exploitation through buying, selling or trading their sexual services—is happening everywhere, even close to your home. Forms of sex trafficking include prostitution, pornography, stripping and other sexual acts. As a result, these victims experience extreme trauma that has a life-long effect on their social and emotional health and safety.

Over the last several years, The Centers has worked with state representatives, law enforcement, community organizations and local schools to improve awareness of human trafficking and provide services for victims. The Centers provides an extensive continuum of care for victims of human trafficking. The Centers works with advocacy centers, judicial offices, law enforcement (federal and local), hospitals, schools and community volunteer organizations.

A key to successful healing is building trusting and healthy relationships and support systems. The Centers staff stays connected to the survivor and their family after they leave care. The Centers assists survivors with successfully transitioning back into their community.

The Centers for Youth and Families is a national treatment center for victims of human trafficking. Through trauma-informed specialized treatment, The Centers provides programs and services for trafficking victims. The Centers treatment includes outpatient services, residential services, day treatment, therapeutic foster homes and parenting education. Survivors benefit from individual, group and family therapy by specially trained trauma therapists.

The Centers has helped close to 30 trafficking victims just this year.

Trafficking victims are frequently unable to speak up for themselves; they are in denial about their situation. They have been manipulated to think they chose a path of human trafficking. Upon completion of the treatment program, survivors are more confident, have improved self-esteem and self-compassion, and know what a trusting, healthy relationship looks like. They have found their voice and emotional freedom from the ties of trauma and are on a pathway to success.

For more information or to make a difference, visit cfyf.org SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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Ring In a

Healthy Menu

We all want to eat better in the New Year, and it’s easy to incorporate healthy recipes into your weekly rotation. Ease into better eating habits with us in 2019! BY ZARA ABBASI, PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATIE CHILDS

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Wait, what? It’s 2019?!?

Remember when we all thought 1990 was 10 years ago? Well we’re inching toward 30 years on that. Remember when we said we were going to work out, eat better and finally make amazing life choices? Yeah, that seems equally a distant memory, too. Time is seriously whizzing by and I have tried every black magic on the internet to get it to stand still so I can hug on my kids a bit more, so I can finally complete that project, so I can finally shop better, eat better, live better and finally be who I wanted to be when I grew up. Well, the sad fact is that time is acting like one of my children and not listening to a dang thing I have to say. It’s going whether I have my life together or not. It reminds me that I keep putting things aside that I should do today. But when, dear friends? WHEN? How do we find the time to fulfill all those well meaning yet empty promises we made to ourselves when we have deadlines and jobs and families and friends and Netflix? WHEN?! Today. We start today. We start small. But we start today. The best revenge truly is to live in the now and make changes today so we stand proud in our tomorrows. One great thing you can do today to help better your tomorrow is to incorporate healthier recipes into your meal prep rotation. The

good thing is, you’re not alone in trying to eat healthier. That means there are a ton of recipes out there and you could read up on them all day. But that’s overwhelming. So, a simple way to take charge is to swap out one recipe at a time so you’re not overwhelmed and relapse into poor eating choices. Discover your eating personality. Do you gravitate toward fried foods, comfort foods, carb-heavy things, all of the above? Then find one thing to substitute so you don’t feel like you’re just in a phase. Switch out unhealthy oils for more heart-healthy oils, or just learn to reduce the amount you use. Reduce the sugars you add to your food if switching to an alternative seems daunting. If carbs seem to be your nemesis, then eat what you usually do, but take out a serving or two weekly until you’ve weaned yourself from the foods that cause you to make unhealthy choices. The recipes I’m providing here are a great way to add something new, yet healthy, into your weekly rotation without sacrificing taste or familiarity. Further, they’re adventurous enough to keep things interesting and still have a flavor profile that even my kids enjoy. Hope you’ll give these a try as you pursue a healthier and happier 2019.

Happy New Year, friends!

Salmon with Cilantro ‘Pesto’ and Couscous Pilaf

This recipe really and truly is a staple in our home. It comes together quickly and has so many fresh flavors that it’s hard to turn it down as a healthy dinner option. It feels light and doesn’t weigh you down while still filling you up, and all three of my children love it, including our 18-month-old, who can have at least half my portion without batting an eye. If you’re not a fan of cilantro, then this can easily be varied to substitute flat leaf parsley for the cilantro. Further, the couscous can also be substituted for quinoa or brown rice. For the salmon: 1 fillet of salmon ½ bunch fresh cilantro 2 small cloves garlic ¼ cup good olive oil ½ lemon (juice and zest) 2 teaspoons cumin powder or seeds Salt and pepper to taste 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional) 4 tablespoons olive oil for sautéing *Can replace cilantro with flat leaf parsley 1. In a blender or food processor, blend all the ingredients EXCEPT the salmon and the oil for cooking. 2. Spread the cilantro mixture all over the salmon. 3. Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil for cooking to a pan and heat on medium high until oil is hot. Add salmon, marinade side down and cook for approximately two minutes until browned, then flip over, turn heat to medium and cook skin side down for 5-7 minutes. Keep coating both sides as you flip with the remaining marinade. 4. Keep checking the fish to make sure it doesn't burn. Cooking times will vary depending on the size and thickness of the fish. I really wish I could tell you to cook for "X" amount of minutes, but you honestly have to watch it and make sure not to overcook it. For fish, the best rule is: If in doubt, under cook. Why? Because there is residual cooking heat even after taking off the stove; and you can always cook a little more but can never un-cook.

For the couscous: 1 cup couscous 2 cups broth, either chicken or vegetable (I use vegetable) 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup onion, chopped 2 Roma tomatoes, chopped ½ bunch cilantro, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced ½ lemon (zest and juice) 1. Heat a large pot or saucepan with the olive oil, add red onion and sauté until golden and translucent. 2. Add garlic and cook for barely a minute. Add dry couscous and stir to make sure it is well mixed with oil, onions and garlic. 3. Add broth and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and cover with lid for at least five minutes. The couscous will continue to cook with the steam in the pot. After five minutes, remove the lid, add tomatoes, lemon juice, zest, cilantro and a drizzle of olive oil. Stir well to combine and cover again until ready for use. 4. Serve immediately with seared salmon.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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Butternut Squash Mac ‘n’ Cheese

I had to give a comfort food recipe considering all the hardships we will endure while trying to keep our New Year’s resolutions. It’s going to be a sad few weeks without doughnuts and bread, so the least I can do is give you something that feels comfortable and familiar without derailing all the hard work you’re going to be doing! This recipe is obviously no match for the real thing, but it’s a variant and still really delicious. It’s also great to load this up with veggies for little kids, and because the butternut squash is a lovely cheesy color, you can convince them that they’re eating that blue box specialty. OK, maybe not, because if you have kids, you know that they can sniff out a fraud a mile away, so I never really trick them. I tell them exactly what they’re eating and why it’s important that they do so. I don’t know how much longer this truth-telling will work, but it hasn’t let me down yet and they really do love this dish even though they know exactly what’s in it.

1 whole butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into bite-size chunks 3 cloves garlic ½ teaspoon onion powder ¼ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika Salt and pepper to taste ¾ cup vegetable broth ½ cup cream, milk or coconut milk ½ cup shredded cheddar or gouda ½ red onion, cut into thin slices 2½ cups broccoli florets or green peas ¾ pound chickpeas or whole wheat pasta 2 teaspoons dried sage Olive oil

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1. Pre heat the oven to 400 degrees. On a large sheet pan, add the cubed squash and garlic cloves. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast squash for 30-40 minutes, until tender and browned, flipping occasionally. Let cool. 2. Add roasted butternut squash, vegetable broth, onion powder, nutmeg, thyme, salt, pepper and smoked paprika to a blender and blend until a smooth sauce forms. 3. Heat a large pan over medium heat and coat the bottom with olive oil. Throw in red onion slices, season with salt and pepper and cook for about 10 minutes, until onions soften and begin to brown. 4. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add pasta. Cook pasta according to package directions. When pasta is two minutes from being finished, throw in the broccoli or peas. Drain pasta and vegetables and add to a large bowl. Add the onions, the butternut squash sauce, cream or milk of choice, cheese and sage and mix until combined. Season with salt if necessary.


Karate Mom In-Sparring Discipline and Confidence at Home BY MELISSA TUCKER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

W

hen Laurie Smith Prud’homme’s 6-year-old son began taking classes at Unity Martial Arts, his classes were a mix of games and exercise. She saw improvements in his behavior and his confidence not long

after. “In the first years, Isaac learned focus, concentration and determination as he progressed through the curriculum,” but he also made friends and learned respect for adults and his peers, she said. Almost five years ago, the two of them attended the annual international Cuong Nhu training camp, and she was inspired to pursue her own training in martial arts. “I was able to watch incredibly strong and graceful women and men of all ages who had practiced and taught Cuong Nhu for decades,” she said. “Until then, I had only watched the classes for kids. I began training as soon as we got back to Little Rock.” Today, she and her son, now 15, train together in the adult and teenager classes at Unity. “I have learned so much from him, and it has added a new dimension to our relationship,” she said. At age 52, Prud’homme intends to continue her training indefinitely. “I have been amazed at how good I feel after several years of training. I was never an athlete, so it took awhile to build up my strength and endurance,” she said. “But everyone is so encouraging, and I intend to train for the rest of my

According to Simmons Market Research, 13 percent of children under the age of 11 participated in martial arts in the past year. In addition, one in four teens have taken a martial arts class in the past 12 months. For adults, 63 percent of adults in martial arts are between the ages of 18 and 34. Adults ages 50 and over make up 11 percent of those in martial arts.

Laurie Prud'homme and Isaac Prud'homme share a love for martial arts and have practiced for 10 years.

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life. Classes are more than just workouts; we are connecting with friends and celebrating our progress together.” According to Simmons Market Research, 13 percent of children under the age of 11 participated in martial arts in the past year. In addition, one in four teens have taken a martial arts class in the past 12 months. For adults, 63 percent of adults in martial arts are between the ages of 18 and 34. Adults ages 50 and over make up 11 percent of those in martial arts. Unity Martial Arts is one place in Little Rock where kids and parents can exercise together, and now that it has a new location with space, Unity plans to offer classes for parents that coincide with the martial arts classes for kids. They’ll also have a strength training area as well as yoga and other non-martial arts classes that may appeal to adults. The classes start for very young kids and go up to adults. Some children want to progress in the ranks and some just want to have fun. Unity’s owner, Tanner Critz, hopes to accommodate both. “For the average kid, the main goal is to play,” he said. “They may love the idea of martial arts, but traditional martial arts is focused on the idea that you’re going to get your 10,000 reps of this thing to get good at it, and most kids are not down for that. They want to play, every moment is an exciting new moment, and we have to master the art of learning through play.” Unity has curriculum classes, which allow students to progress through the ranks, and focus classes, which are based in fitness. “Two classes a week is a good baseline for development,” he said. “One curriculum class and one focus class is a great place to start.”


Unity has family plans that allow for three levels of membership based on your commitment and the number of people in your family. But after the third person joins, the rest in the family are free. “We have several families where you have two kids who are taking classes, and one other family member joins, and then all of the family members can go,” he said. Critz has also created a fun, game-based program called Adventure Quest for kids in third to ninth grade, which will build physical and mental prowess as they progress. “The kids feel like they’re playing through an adventure story. They are time travelers, and the way they do well in the story is by increasing in metrics like pushups, multiplication and division problems and things like that,” he said. “So, you’re watching them get stronger and faster, and we’ve been able to stimulate some of the kids we might have otherwise lost to the paradigm of martial arts.” These different classes and styles allow kids to phase in and out of martial arts. Sometimes their passion for it wanes, but Critz hopes to keep them engaged in fitness and the martial arts community. “You realize over time that people are not one thing all the time. If you have a kid in second grade and karate is their favorite thing, they’ll go up in rank quickly, but in fifth grade they may not love it anymore,” he said. “One of the things we’ve hit on is by building a community we can create some stability for them. They might change again, but by having this community of your friends here, there’s other activities going on, they’ll hold on longer until they come to the next shift, and maybe it’s back to being excited about martial arts again.”

If you’re looking for martial arts classes in the Central Arkansas area, several options are available. Some also have classes for kids.

2 Two Training Halls

You can take classes with your child!

or...

Take your own class while they’re taking theirs!

Two sign up for the price of one in January and Feruary!

Come try a free class at 1524 Garreld Dr. Little Rock, AR

(Near the intersection of University and 12th)

501 664-0604 www.unitymartialarts.com

All-Star Martial Arts Seven locations in central Arkansas Karate for kids ages 12 and under, and self-defense classes for adults and teens 13 and up. Danny Dring’s Living Defense Martial Arts Martial arts classes for kids and adults; kickboxing fitness for adults 308 Kiehl Ave., Sherwood 501-834-3537 Impact Martial Arts Adult self-defense classes; martial arts classes for kids and teens Locations in Little Rock and Beebe 501-224-1222 Unity Martial Arts Self-defense classes for adults; tai chi, yoga; martial arts classes for kids and teens 1524 Garfield, Little Rock 501-664-0604 Westside Mixed Martial Arts Jiu-jitsu and kickboxing classes for kids and adults 1021 Jessie Road, Little Rock 501-663-3850 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

How to Get Your Special Needs Met

Arkansas provides multiple resources for special needs families, and navigating the system can be overwhelming. Here are a few organizations, programs and scholarship opportunities that are here to help. BY DWAIN HEBDA

B

eing a parent can be one of the most rewarding and challenging roles a person can play in their lifetime. When children have special needs, the joys and stressors are multiplied many times over. In Arkansas, about 0.8 percent of children under 5 and a mean average of 7.3 percent of individuals age 5 to 17 have some sort of disability, according to the 2017 Annual Report of the Institute of Disability at the University of New Hampshire. To help serve this population, the federal government and the state of Arkansas have developed a network of programs and resources to assist parents. These programs are augmented by a vast myriad of organizations and resources within the wider community. The following is by no means an exhaustive list of these programs but provides a sample of the kinds of resources available to parents as they carry out the sacred and sometimes-overwhelming job of raising a special needs child.

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FEDERAL ENTITIES

The U.S. Social Security Administration provides two types of disability coverage. They include Supplemental Security Income (SSI), which provides financial benefits to individuals with disabilities, and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), which may be available to a disabled person after age 22. SSI medical definitions are often used to determine whether a person is disabled and therefore entitled to other benefits as well. Medicaid is a federal program designed to pay for or defray the cost of medical care among the nation’s low-income populations and the disabled. While still a federal program funded by federal dollars, states have a lot of autonomy when it comes to managing Medicaid programs. Qualifying for Medicaid, a prerequisite for some state and federal programs, generally boils down to income, although there are several waiver programs that look past that. Another important threshold is the Federal Poverty Guideline, which is used to calculate eligibility for various programs. In 2018, the FPG was $25,100 annually for a family of four.


Little Rock Professional Advises Parents to Seek Early Intervention My child is almost two years old. How much should she be talking? Though children develop at their own pace and the range of what’s considered “normal” development is quite broad, there are some standard guidelines you can use to know if your child is meeting certain developmental milestones. By two years of age, your child should use and understand at least fifty words, use two-word phrases without imitating or repeating, and use speech to communicate more than immediate needs.

What does it mean if my toddler isn’t using words to communicate? Every child develops differently, but some differences may simply indicate a slight delay while others may be a cause for greater concern. A moderate to severe speech or language delay can be an indicator of an underlying delay or disability. There are a wide variety of reasons a child may experience a delay in language development, including language or learning disabilities, difficulty controlling the muscles used for speech, hearing loss, or autism spectrum disorders.

“Vocabulary at age three is the number one indicator of academic success by the end of second grade.”

What should I do if I suspect my child may not be talking as much as he should? Vocabulary at age three is the number one indicator of academic success by the end of second grade. If you think that your child is not talking at the same pace or in the same way as most children his or her age, talk first to your child’s pediatrician. Local evaluation centers such as the ACCESS Evaluation and Resource Center in Little Rock can also help determine or rule out the possibility of a language or learning disability or a developmental delay. Detecting delays early and getting needed intervention is so important and ensures that your child is on track to reach his or her fullest potential.

ACCESS Stella Boyle Smith Early Childhood Campus 10618 Breckenridge Drive Little Rock, AR 72211 ACCESS Evaluation and Resource Center, ACCESS Academy and Young Adult Campus 1500 N. Mississippi Street Little Rock, AR 72207

Rachel Biedron, ACCESS Speech-Language Pathologist, works with children to develop age-appropriate language skills. Featured Expert: Kimberly Newton, Licensed Psychological Examiner, ACCESS Evaluation and Resource Center Director, President of the Learning Disabilities Association of Arkansas

501-217-8600 ACCESSGROUPINC.ORG @accessgroupinc SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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DIAGNOSTIC & ADVOCACY RESOURCES

The Arkansas Department of Human Services supports a staff of registered nurses, social workers and clerical support under the heading of Title V Children With Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). This staff exists to help families understand and navigate the many programs that are available to Arkansans with disabilities. Services are provided throughout 16 DHS offices around the state and provide case management for children from birth to 21 years of age. To learn more, visit https:// humanservices.arkansas.gov/about-dhs/ddds/childrens-servicesinformation/title-v-children-with-special-health-care-needs-cshcn. Arkansans with disabilities have rights protected under the law regarding access to employment, education, community integration and self-advocacy/training. Parents are often unaware of these rights or what they mean. Disability Rights Arkansas is an organization that vigorously defends the rights of the disabled in the community on matters ranging from voting to vocational rehabilitation services. If you feel your child’s rights have been violated, or to learn more, visit disabilityrightsar.org.

HEALTH CARE RESOURCES

Research shows the earlier a child is diagnosed, the better the long-term outcome of treatment. First Connections is a state program providing early-childhood intervention to evaluate children from birth through age 3 to determine if developmental disabilities are present. Other than private insurance, all services are paid for through multiple external funding sources. To learn more, visit dhs.arkansas.gov/dds/firstconnectionsweb/#fc-home. The Dennis Development Center of Arkansas Children’s Hospital provides a full range of diagnostic services. The center serves families with children up to 12 years of age to rule out or identify certain developmental delays. It also provides behavior therapies for patients diagnosed with cognitive or physical development issues. Visit www.archildrens.org/programsservices/a-to-z-services-list/dennis-developmental-center/dennisdevelopmental-center for more information.

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TEFRA a category of Medicaid that provides care to children in their homes rather than in institutions. Children younger than 19 whose income is below the Long Term Care Medicaid Limit and who do not have accountable resources exceeding $2,000 may qualify for TEFRA benefits. This is provided the child meets the definition of disabled according to the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) criteria and meets the medical-necessity requirement for institutional care. Children in families whose household income fluctuates may receive TEFRA benefits in the months when income is within guidelines. TEFRA premiums are determined according to income in households that bring in 150 percent of FPL annually. Cost may be adjusted in the event of a substantial change in income. For more information, please visit medicaid.mmis. arkansas.gov/general/Programs/Tefra/Tefra.aspx. Family to Family Health Information Center is a nonprofit family-run organization under the umbrella group Arkansas Disability Coalition. It provides assistance to families of children and youth with special care needs by helping them navigate the maze of health care programs and regulations within the state. Visit www.adcpti.org/content/Programs/Family_2_Family.asp to find out how to access this community resource.

EDUCATION RESOURCES

Before discussing alternative education options and programs, it is important that parents understand what they are guaranteed through the public school system under the law. All children, regardless of developmental ability, have the right to a free appropriate public education (FAPE) that has been tailored to


Savvy January Half Page Vert.pdf

their individual needs. You must be included in the creation of your child’s curriculum, called an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Transition services are also required of all public schools to help prepare your child for further education, employment and independent living. Transition education must begin for your child no later than age 16. Visit www.arkansased. gov/divisions/learning-services/special-education to learn more. An organization with the mission to craft such accessibility in education is the Center for Exceptional Families, based in Jonesboro. The Center works with families of students with disabilities and local school districts to create innovative special education services. See www.thecenterforexceptionalfamilies.org/ for more information. Parents wishing to place their child in private school should look into the Succeed Scholarship provided through the state department of education. The scholarship enables public school students with disabilities who have an individualized education program a means to attend eligible private schools. Application for the Succeed Scholarship program is required for the limited slots available. To learn more, please visit www.arkansased.gov/ divisions/learning-services/special-education/policy-regulations/ succeed-scholarship.

TRANSITION RESOURCES

As children reach young adulthood, parents may begin to wonder what their child’s future looks like as far the ability to find meaningful employment and earn a fair wage. Project Search, an ACCESS® Initiative in partnership with Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, helps provide those opportunities through innovative job training complete with a nine-month internship program and follow-up assistance in seeking employment. Partner companies make this program available in multiple areas of the state. To learn more, visit projectsearcharkansas.org.

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TIPS FOR CARING

FOR LITTLE SMILES C

Children should visit the dentist by their 1st birthday!

As soon as baby teeth appear, begin gently brushing.

Brush 2x a day, especially at night before sleep. No bottles or cups in the bed!

Until the age of 3, a small smear of toothpaste is all you need. After that, a pea size is plenty.

We believe visiting the dentist can be FUN for all kids, that’s why our bright and colorful office has TVs over every chair, interactive games and a prize wall.

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Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

If your child has special needs, oral health may be a challenge or concern for your family. Our specialized Pediatric Dentists have received additional training in this area. At Small Bites, our goal is to provide your child with the best possible care in a comfortable environment!

LITTLE ROCK

PINE BLUFF

smallbitespd.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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kid approved KELLY B. PITTMAN RESIDES IN HER STOMPING GROUNDS OF

NORTH LITTLE ROCK. HER HUSBAND, BEN, IS A CHIROPRACTOR AND OWNER OF BACK TO LIFE CHIROPRACTIC IN SHERWOOD. THEY SHARE TWO KIDS, AUSTYN, 8, AND BENNETT, 3. KELLY IS A CERTIFIED SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST FOR KIDSOURCE THERAPY. SPENDING THE MAJORITY OF HER TIME WITH STUDENTS OR HER OWN CHILDREN, SHE ALWAYS APPRECIATES FINDING QUIET TIME TO PRACTICE YOGA OR CASUALLY BLOG AS NATURALST8MOM.

v

Day Fun

I LIKE TO HAVE SOMETHING WARM AND COMFORTING PREPPED FOR DINNER. ONE OF OUR FAVORITES IS MY MOM’S “CAMPFIRE BEANS.” IT’S A SWEET AND SAVORY ALTERNATIVE TO CHILI THAT IS WONDERFULLY KID-APPROVED.

MY KIDS LOVE BUILDING FORTS. EVERY OUNCE OF SILLINESS IS MULTIPLIED SOMEHOW WHEN HANGING UNDER A BLANKET FORT.

PEPPERMINT OIL HOT CHOCOLATE RECIPE 1 SERVING:

MAKE SNOWMAN GRAHAMS! I LEARNED ABOUT THESE WHILE WORKING ALONGSIDE ANOTHER THERAPIST LAST WINTER. SO EASY AND THE KIDS ENJOY MAKING AND DEVOURING THEIR CREATIONS.

BOIL ONE CUP MILK OF YOUR CHOICE (WE USE ALMOND MILK) ADD THE FOLLOWING: 2 TABLESPOONS SUGAR (WE USE STEVIA OR XYLITOL) 2 TABLESPOONS COCOA POWDER NATURAL AND UNSWEETENED A DASH OF SALT AND CINNAMON ¼ TEASPOON VANILLA EXTRACT PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL (DIP A TOOTHPICK INTO A THERAPEUTIC GRADE PEPPERMINT OIL LIKE YOUNG LIVING VITALITY AND STIR YOUR COCOA WITH THE TOOTHPICK FOR A SUBTLE AND COOL FLAVOR)

“JINGLE” THE INTERACTIVE HUSKY PUP AND HIS FRIENDS HAVE BEEN ENTERTAINING US FOR MANY WINTERS NOW.

OF COURSE, MAKING SNOW ANGELS AND SNOWMEN ARE SNOW DAY BUCKET LIST ITEMS, BUT IN THIS HOUSE AUSTYN AND I ALWAYS MAKE A SNOW-WOMAN. SOME POPULAR PLACES FOR SLEDDING AROUND CENTRAL ARKANSAS INCLUDE: CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER NORTH SHORE RIVERWALK PARK CHENAL VALLEY

WARDROBE MUST-HAVES ALSO INCLUDE: THICK WOOL SOCKS WITH RAIN BOOTS OR SNOW BOOTS. A SNOW SUIT OR COVERALLS, WARM BEANIES AND SHADES! SUNGLASSES ARE A BONUS WHEN PLAYING IN THE SNOW.

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WARM CLOTHES ARE A MUST! USING LATEX GLOVES UNDER THE KNIT GLOVES WILL KEEP THE HANDS DRY AND LET PLAYTIME LAST LONGER. BECAUSE NOTHING SPOILS SLEDDING AND SNOWMAN CREATING LIKE COLD HANDS!


Tips for Treating Cold/ Cough at Home

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oung children get lots of colds before they turn 2 years old, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Furthermore, colds tend to be more common in fall and winter when children are indoors and in closer contact with each other. It may even seem like your child has one cold after another all winter long. The common cold is caused by a viral infection. Coughing can last up to 3 weeks. It may also be caused by allergic rhinitis or an infection, such as a lung infection. An acute cough usually goes away on its own within 3 to 4 weeks.

With a normal cold, your child could have any of the following symptoms: • Fever or chills • Sneezing • A dry or sore throat • A stuffy nose or chest congestion • Headache • A dry cough or a cough that brings up mucus • Muscle aches or joint pain • Feeling tired or weak • Loss of appetite • Managing the Symptoms at Home Most colds and coughs do not require a doctor’s visit or a trip to the emergency room. Here are some tips for keeping your child comfortable while the cold runs its course. • Give your child plenty of liquids. Liquids will help thin and loosen mucus so your child can cough it up. Liquids will also keep your child hydrated. • Have your child rest for at least 2 days. Rest will help your child heal. • Use a cool mist humidifier in your child’s room. Cool mist can help thin mucus and make it easier for your child to breathe. • Clear mucus from your child’s nose. Use a bulb syringe and saline drops to remove mucus from a baby’s nose. Saline helps to thin nasal secretions and aids in removal. • Soothe your child’s throat. If your child is 8 years or older, have him or her gargle with salt water. Make salt water by adding ¼ teaspoon salt to 1 cup warm water. You can give honey to children older than 1 year. Give ½ teaspoon of honey to children 1 to 5 years. Give 1 teaspoon of honey to children 6 to 11 years. Give 2 teaspoons of honey to children 12 or older. • Do not give over-the-counter cough or cold medicines to children under 6 years. Do not give aspirin to children under 18 years of age. These medicines can cause side effects that may harm your child. • Hand washing is the number one way to prevent infection and the spread of germs

You should seek emergency care for your child if you notice any of these: • Trouble breathing, faster than usual breathing, or chest pain • Lips or nails turn blue • Coughs up blood • Nostrils flare when he or she takes a breath • The skin above or below your child’s ribs are sucked in with each breath • You see pinpoint or large reddish-purple dots on your child’s skin • Is urinating less than 3 times in a 24 hour period • Your baby’s soft spot on his or her head is bulging outward or sunken inward • Has a severe headache or stiff neck

archildrens.org The emergency rooms at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock and Arkansas Children’s Northwest in Springdale are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for life’s little … and big … emergencies.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | JANUARY 2019

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32 JANUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

SAVVY | January 2019  
SAVVY | January 2019