Page 1

FEBRUARY 2019 · SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Explaining

‘The Birds & The Bees’

THE BATTLE OF THE TOOTHBRUSH

Spring Break In the NATURAL STATE

SACRE BLEU!

KIDS SHOULD BE LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE, TOO


2

FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

3


FEBRUARY 2019 5 EDITOR’S NOTE

8 ADVENTURE & FUN CALENDAR & MORE!

14 MAMA SAID

NAVIGATING THAT PUNCH TO THE GUT

16 HEALTH & WELLNESS

THE BATTLE OF THE TOOTHBRUSH

20 GOOD EATS

SPREAD THE LOVE (AND CREAM FILLING!)

24 EXPLORE & LEARN

SACRE BLEU! - LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE CAN BE A MAJOR ASSET FOR STUDENTS

26 EXPLAINING 'THE BIRDS & THE BEES'

AGE-APPROPRIATE CONVERSATIONS WITH YOUR CHILDREN

30 SPRING BREAK IN THE NATURAL STATE

GETAWAYS THAT OFFER SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY

38 KID APPROVED BE MY VALENTINE

VCORIE HOLLINGSWORTH

M id A m e r

ic a S c ie n

ce Museu

ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY EMILY GALUSHA.

4

FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

m


Photo by Stacy Kinzler

Love is in the air at SAVVYkids! I’m over here swooning about our cover illustration by Arkansas native Emily Galusha and loving themes of giving, education and appreciation that run throughout this issue. Valentine’s Day isn’t all about whether or not you get flowers at the office or breakfast in bed—it’s about how well you let others know how much they are loved by you … and what a gift that can be! Good Eats on page 20 dives head-first into these themes with some great commentary by Zara Abbasi on the little known universal love language of “chocolate,” along with two sweet recipes that will have the kids helping in the kitchen (and licking all the spoons!). Are you pitching in with the Valentine’s Day class party this year? Check out Kid-Approved on page 38. Professional “room mom” and PTA-extraordinaire Corie Hollingsworth offers creative ideas, crafts, treats and more to make Valentine’s Day with your kids a memorable event. With all this talk about love comes a little parental responsibility. It’s all fun and games until it’s time to talk about “the birds and the bees.” We get some guidance from professionals at Arkansas Families First and Arkansas Children’s Hospital on when and how to talk to your kids about sex, their changing bodies, consent and more. Even if you think your kids are too young to start talking about these things … they’re probably not, so flip to page 27 to find out. We hope your month is filled with decadent desserts, successful class parties, happy and healthy kids, and plenty of time for swooning over your family! XOXO,

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvykids amy@arktimes.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

5


PUBLISHER KATHERINE DANIELS | katherine@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER ART DIRECTOR KATIE HASSELL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES LESA THOMAS JENNIFER CORBITT PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN

Give the Gift of Education It’s never too early to open an Arkansas 529 account to help you save for your child’s education. Starting an account is easy and the new Arkansas 529 App makes it even easier to manage. To learn more, call 501‑682‑1406 or download the Arkansas 529 App today!

6

FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR MIKE SPAIN IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTING LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN

ARKANSAS TIMES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

FIND US ON


contributors

Fire & Rain

THREE INCREDIBLE BALLETS IN ONE PERFORMANCE!

ANGELA E. THOMAS is a proud University of Arkansas at Little Rock graduate and a member of its Alumni Board. For 11 years, she served Central Arkansas as editor for a locally owned magazine. Thomas is founder and owner of the greeting card company GODsent Greetings.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The emptynesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

JILL ROHRBACH has 25 years of experience as a journalist and travel writer. She loves writing about travel destinations and outdoor adventures. She resides with her family in Northwest Arkansas.

Fire & Rain features the beloved Romeo & Juliet Balcony scene, the fiery Don Quixote Act III suite, and a world-premiere James Taylor Tribute that will have you dancing in your seats.

FEBRUARY 14 - 17TH

UA Pulaski Tech CHARTS Theater TICKETS START AT $15 MELISSA TUCKER spends her days working in web marketing. When not at work, you'll probably find her at the gym, on the playground with her kids or checking out too many books from the library. ZARA ABBASI lives in Little Rock with her husband and three children. She is a licensed attorney but you know her better as Little Rock’s friendly pastry chef and custom cake maker. She keeps busy with dessert orders, pop-up dinners, writing articles and doing anything food-related. Follow her on Instagram @Zaramadeit for her newest cake creations and dinner ideas.

BREEZY OSBORNE-WINGFIELD is a mom, wife, yoga teacher, owner of Barefoot Studio, an advocate for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and mental health awareness, and co-creator of the Riley’s Brave Love brand that supports her daughter’s diabetic medical supplies. EMILY GALUSHA was born and raised in Central Arkansas. She attended the University of Oklahoma at Norman before acquiring her Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Now based in Austin, she is a Creative Manager as well as freelance designer. She currently shows work at Canopy in Austin and at M2 Gallery in Little Rock.

Mary Poppins Interactive Children’s Performance!

FEBRUARY 17, 12:00 PM

UA PULASKI TECH CHARTS THEATER TICKETS START AT $10

BALLETARKANSAS.ORG SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

7


February ADVENTURE & FUN

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

2019

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1

National Wear Red Day

3

4

5

6

7 Pajama Night

Saturday

2

Groundhog Day

Heifer Hour 9 8 Heifer Village

Arkansas Arts Center Children's Theatre.

Mömandpöp South on Main Chinese New Year

Super 10 Sunday Free Family Funday!

11

12

13

Arkansas Arts Center

17

18

19

14 Valentine’s Day

20

Ballet Arkansas

National Random Acts of Kindness Day

Wildwood Park Feb. 15-17

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

25 Home School 26 Day

Arkansas State Capitol

African Drumming Circle CALS

FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

William F. Laman Public Library Main Branch

27

Up, Tear It Down

Museum of Discovery

Microchipping Animal Village at Bass Pro Shops

National Love Your Pet Day

Presidents’ Day

Challenge

21 Jurassic 22 Build It 23 Quest State House Convention Center Feb. 22-24

Little Rock 24 Soup Sunday

8

Winter Festival

National Organ Donor Day

Lincoln's Birthday

Mary Poppins

14 Lanterns! 15 Tween 16 Taste Test

28 March 1 Annual Arkansas Flower and Garden Show Arkansas State Fairgrounds March 1-3

2


9 HEIFER HOUR

Bring your littles to learn, grow and create at Heifer Hour, a monthly event at Heifer Village & Urban Farm for children in kindergarten to sixth grade. From 11 a.m. until noon, kids are invited to build a village with cardboard and other recycled materials. heifer.org

9 MÖMANDPÖP 8 PAJAMA NIGHT

Throw on your favorite cozy pajamas to enjoy Pajama Night and a performance of "This Little Piggy Went to Market" at the Arkansas Arts Center Children's Theatre. The show begins at 7 p.m., but stop by the box office before it starts to grab a free sticker if you’re wearing pajamas! arkansasartscenter.org

Treat the kids to a lovely Valentine’s party, brown-bag brunch and kid-friendly concert by mömandpöp at South on Main. In addition to the interactive live performance, kids can enjoy a craft station to create their own Valentine, heart-shaped cinnamon buns. southonmain.com

10 SUPER SUNDAY FREE FAMILY FUNDAY!

Roll up your sleeves and let the creative juices flow from noon until 3 p.m. at the Arkansas Arts Center’s Super Sunday Free Family Funday! This free, monthly art-making event is for the whole family! arkansasartscenter.org

15-17 LANTERNS! WINTER FESTIVAL

Light up the night sky at Lanterns! Winter Festival hosted by Wildwood Park for the Arts. This annual deep-winter festival celebrates the first full moon of the lunar New Year with beautifully lit pathways through Wildwood’s gardens and cultural vistas featuring live entertainment, food, drink, games and more. wildwoodpark.org

16 TWEEN TASTE TEST CHALLENGE

Can your tween tell the difference between generic and name-brand cookies, chips or other snacks? The answer might surprise you (and save money)! Kids ages 9-12 are invited to participate in the Tween Taste Test Challenge at 1 p.m. at William F. Laman Public Library Main Branch. lamanlibrary.org

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

9


17 “MARY POPPINS”

22-24 “JURASSIC QUEST”

Take a walk through prehistoric times at “Jurassic Quest” at the Statehouse Convention Center. This memorable exhibit features more than 80 life-size, interactive dinosaurs, including T-Rex, Spinosaurus, Triceratops and more. In addition to viewing the dinos, kids can dig up fossils, ride on the back of a 24-foot T-Rex, explore inflatable mazes, slides and the Dino Bungee Pull. jurassicquest.com

23 MICROCHIPPING EVENT

Help keep your beloved family pet safe at this microchipping event hosted by Friends of the Animal Village at Bass Pro Shops. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dr. Barron of Shackleford Road Veterinary Clinic will be microchipping pets for only $15. friendsoftheanimalvillage.org

26 HOME SCHOOL DAY

More than 1,000 home school students will fill the halls of the Arkansas State Capitol from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to treat legislators with homemade treats during Home School Day. Home school kids and their family and friends are invited to bring desserts and stay to tour the Capitol for day of giving and education.

10 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Ballet Arkansas brings “Mary Poppins” to life with a production from its popular Children’s Series at UA-Pulaski Tech’s Center for Humanities and Arts on Feb. 17 at noon. This show is highly interactive as children will be invited on stage to participate in songs and dances with Mary Poppins herself! balletarkansas.org

23 BUILD IT UP, TEAR IT DOWN

Engineer and construct structures, towers and more and then tear it all down at Build It Up, Tear It Down hosted by Museum of Discovery from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Included in regular admission. museumofdiscovery.org


March 1-3 ANNUAL ARKANSAS FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW

Discover your gardening potential at the annual Arkansas Flower and Garden Show at the Arkansas State Fairgrounds. It’s a three-day celebration of gardening in the state where visitors can learn about gardening and shop for plants, outdoor décor, handmade goods and more. Kids will have plenty to do with activities organized by Arkansas 4-H, hands-on workshops, a family scavenger hunt and more. argardenshow.org

26 AFRICAN DRUMMING CIRCLE

Celebrate Black History Month with the Central Arkansas Library System at an interactive African drumming circle led by drummer Stephin Booth beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Williams Library branch. cals.org

Spotlight on Nonprofits Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families

What’s It All About? Every child in Arkansas should have a great education, a safe home and not have to worry about necessities like food and health care. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families uses research, data and public policy advocacy to help make this vision a reality. Its mission is to ensure that all children and their families have what they need to lead healthy and productive lives. When Was It Started? Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families was founded in 1977 by a group of prominent Arkansans who believed that children needed an “independent force to provide information and education to parents and citizens about our state’s policies toward children and families.” How Can I Attend? Fill your bowl and help others Feb. 24 at Little Rock Soup Sunday, hosted by Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families at the Statehouse Convention Center. Enjoy an atmosphere that is casual and family friendly as you sample soups from more than 40 restaurants. This year, Jeff Owen of Ciao Baci will be the featured chef. Don’t forget your muffin tin! aradvocates.org. SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

11


ADVENTURE & FUN

Handmade Pillows for Your Love Stuff some love into these no-sew, heart-shaped pillows

You will need:

2 pieces of fleece, ½ yard of each color, red and pink Small amount of Poly-fil Scissors Pen or chalk 2 sheets of paper to draw your heart template (bigger sheets for bigger hearts)

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE...

BALLOONS & CANDY, TOO!

12 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


How to:

1. Draw two hearts on your paper. One the desired size of your finished pillow and the second should be 1 inch larger. Cut out the templates. 2. Stack the two colors of fleece. Trace the larger heart on the fleece with chalk and cut out one from each color at the same time. 3. Trace the smaller heart in the middle of one of the large fleece hearts using a pencil or piece of chalk. 4. With the two large hearts stacked together, begin cutting the fringe around the heart. Cut them in ¼- to ½-inch increments from the edge to the line of the inner heart you traced. 5. Begin tying knots using one fringe from the top heart and one from the bottom. Continue all the way around until there are about 3-4 inches left. 6. Stuff the heart-shaped pillow with Poly-fil, then finish tying the remaining fringe.

ADD A PERSONALIZED MESSAGE

COUPON

RED HEART BALLOONS

99¢ EACH WITH THIS AD REG. $1.99 EACH Expires 2/28/19

11218 PARHAM RD. / LITTLE 1 1218N.N.RODNEY RODNEY PARHAM RD.ROCK / LR 501.223.4929 501.223.4929

4822 N. HILLSN. BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE 4822 HILLS BLVD. / ROCK NLR 501.978.3154 501.978.3154

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

13


Navigating that Punch to the Gut BY BREEZY OSBORNE-WINGFIELD

“Breezy, there aren’t many ways to say this. Riley has Type 1 diabetes and you need to drive to

the emergency room right now to be admitted. This is not your fault. You cannot prevent Type 1.” Aug. 21, 2018, is a day our family will never forget. What we hoped would be a pediatrician visit to chat about extreme bedwetting and excessive thirst turned into the day Riley was diagnosed with an incurable, unpreventable, autoimmune disorder that requires multiple daily insulin shots to live, and eight to twelve daily finger pricks to monitor blood sugar levels. There is a grieving process that is real, for all of us—it’s like a “before and after” feeling. And a part of that process is “mom guilt.” The very first guilty thought that entered my mind was, “I’ve been feeding her too much mac ’n’ cheese.” Nope. Not possible. Type 1 diabetes happens when the immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. But still, no matter how many times I educate myself, I still feel immense guilt. And anger. Why Riley? Why not me? Why anyone? All of this infused with Caregiver Exhaustion (partly from checking blood sugar levels up to five times a night) tends to take a toll on the body emotionally and physically. But wait ... I’m not the Type 1 diabetic. My baby has to live with this unpredictable disease of learning that if we miscalculate an insulin dosage it could kill her, that she always has her medical supply bag nearby, that approaching school or birthday parties is a bit different now, that we can do the same thing every single day and still have different results, or (this one really gets me) knowing that the reason why she has to wear her medical ID bracelet is for if she or we, her parents, are ever unconscious, the medical staff would know she needs insulin to survive.

Something that I’ve had to implement that has been a part of my therapies for anxiety, PTSD and eating disorders is giving myself grace, permission to be, as we are not superhuman yet we place this impossible, unrealistic expectation on ourselves, and also to always find something I am grateful for—both are still hard to navigate. Yet, I found gratitude in unlikely places: gratitude that I grew up with my dad being Type 2 diabetic (totally different from Type 1, but I have experience with needles and insulin); gratitude for Riley’s extreme hyperactivity level and sensory processing issues as they both played a major role in saving her life by literally burning off some of the high sugars pre-diagnosis; and gratitude for the emotional breakdowns we’ve had as caregivers and those of our Type 1 Warrior. These breakdowns allow us to process what exactly each of us needs at that moment. My needs have fallen to the side, so getting creative on what fills my cup is challenging. Understanding Riley’s needs gives us a small glimpse into what she is feeling as we will never be able to put ourselves in her shoes. We don’t sugar coat things (no pun intended) and do speak in a way that lets her know it’s OK to feel all of these things that she is feeling. She is not expected to be anything but herself—something she is rolling with the punches to navigate all while having a great time tumbling at The Little Gym, cheering at school, studying crystals and rocks, making glitter slime, playing with her pups, memorizing every song she dances to and being the greatest Riley that she is. The one book I keep on hand is “Rising Strong” by Brene Brown. No matter what is going on in my life, I can randomly open the book and flip to any page and somehow it magically applies to my life as if I’ve never read the book before—reminding me what courage is really all about... Vulnerability is not winning or losing; It’s having the courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome. Vulnerability is not weakness; It's our greatest measure of courage.—Brene Brown, “Rising Strong”

TRISTAN, RILEY AND BREEZY ARE A TYPE 1 WARRIOR FAMILY!

14 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Photo by Miranda Yelvington

MAMA SAID...


SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

15


HEALTH & WELLNESS HEALTH & WELLNESS

The Battle of the Toothbrush Establishing good brushing routines early with your kids, and a little preventative orthodontic care, can go a long way toward a lasting healthy smile BY MELISSA TUCKER

For parents struggling with daily tooth brushing duties for their children, Keith Jones, a pediatric dentist and

owner of Small Bites Pediatric Dentistry, says good dental health ultimately starts with establishing a routine. “Brushing at night before we go to bed is the most important. Brushing in the morning is for bad breath, but brushing at night is for preventing cavities,” he said. “But I think kids do really well with consistency and having that time set aside.” Even small children need to get in the routine. “The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends their first checkup at 1 year of age,” he said. “Your child may not have a lot of teeth at that time, but it’s to educate the parents early on. The earlier I can educate you on how to take care of your kid’s teeth, the better chance they have of not getting a cavity.” Toothbrushes don’t have to be fancy, although many now play music and have spinning brushes, but Jones does recommend a toothpaste with fluoride. Flossing becomes more important around ages 3, 4 and 5.

16 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Advertisement

BRUSH UP ON YOUR CHILD’S ORAL HEALTH

Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic conditions for children, with 1 in 5 kids having untreated decay. The good news is that tooth decay is preventable! Featured expert, Dr. Keith Jones, shares the most frequently asked questions he receives from parents. At what age should I begin taking my child to the dentist? It is recommended that by a child’s first birthday they begin seeing a dentist regularly. In addition to checking for decay, we’ll discuss healthy habits and the development progress of their incoming teeth. This also allows kids to become comfortable with us.

What is the best thing I can do to care for my child’s teeth? Establish a brushing routine at an early age; baby teeth need just as much care as adult teeth! With toddlers, brush twice a day with a smear of fluoridated toothpaste. And, no bottles or cups in the bed! Around ages 3-4 increase to a pea size amount of toothpaste and introduce flossing. Visiting the dentist every 6 months allows us to treat any issues before they become painful and disruptive for the child.

I’m a little nervous about how my child will respond to the dentist We believe visiting the dentist can be really FUN (yep, that’s right…..FUN)! Our number one goal is to care for your child’s oral health needs in the most efficient and effective way possible, and in a way that makes them excited to return. Our office environment is designed to be kid-friendly, with TVs over every chair, interactive games and a big prize wall – we even have patients that don’t want to leave after their appointment!

“We believe visiting the dentist can be really FUN (yep, that’s right…..FUN)!”

My child has special needs and I’m concerned about their dental visit. A large part of my training was focused on special needs patients. I understand that each child is unique and I strive to work closely with parents to create an experience where they are comfortable. Most importantly, I want to alleviate any pain or discomfort for my patients as quickly as possible.

LITTLE ROCK 501.222.9101

PINE BLUFF 870.535.8600

SMALLBITESPD.COM @SmallBitesPD SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

17


By the Numbers:

In 2010, 64% of children had evidence of current or past cavities

29% had

untreated cavities

27% were in need of routine care

4% needed urgent dental care

27% of the

children screened had sealants, a plastic coating on teeth which blocks the bacteria, compared to 17% of children screened during 2008. Source: The Oral Health Plan (2012-2015), Arkansas Department of Health

18 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

“Another thing I like to tell parents is you don’t need a commercial swirl of toothpaste on your toothbrush. You can use a flouride toothpaste, but you just need a smear. It’s not going to hurt them if they swallow it,” he said. Also, don’t expect perfection. Don’t worry too much if your child loses steam before two minutes. “To me, the act of just brushing and starting at a young age is overly important. I’m all about the two-minute rule, but I would rather us just start to get in the habit of doing it. And then worrying about the time,” he said. When it comes to how young teeth are growing and developing, the American Association of Orthodontics recommends children have a checkup from an orthodontist by age 7. Orthodontists can detect early problems with jaw growth and emerging teeth, even if baby teeth are still present. Early checkups and treatments can correct detrimental oral habits or help guide the teeth into a better position. Though orthodontist treatment to correct teeth alignment frequently means braces, early detection may call for other treatments such as expanders, clear aligners or temporary anchorage devices, which are surgical micro-screws that prevent teeth from moving. Braces are generally used to treat crowded teeth or gapped teeth, correct overbites or underbites, and affect impacted or missing teeth. Parents may be surprised to learn that traditional metal braces now come in ceramic and clear

Brushing at night before we go to bed is the most important


One in five children have an untreated cavity versions as well as lingual versions that can be worn on the back side of the teeth. Clear aligners are custom-sized, removable appliances, which gradually move teeth to the prescribed position. Other children may be prescribed expanders, which sit in the palate and gradually widen the upper jaw. The upper jaw develops as two halves, which don’t fuse together permanently until puberty. This treatment capitalizes on this development and takes the opportunity to add more space. Expanders are typically used to treat crossbite, crowding or impacted teeth. They are metal halves connected in the center with a screw, which is typically turned a little each day with a key. They are generally worn for three to six months. Today’s orthodontists can go beyond conventional dental X-rays to get a 3D picture of teeth as well as the entire jaw and bone structure. In addition, planning software can help doctors create a custom treatment plan for each patient based on their facial structure. Children can also see what their smile will look like after treatment is finished. When it comes to taking care of teeth, consistency and prevention are the best course of action, Jones said. “We see so much tooth decay that it doesn’t spare any social or economic status,” he said. “One in five children have an untreated cavity, so it’s not as baked into the routine for everyone as it should be. I think it’s the simple act of using a toothbrush, and toothpaste with fluoride, and the act of brushing that’s most important to me.”

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

19


20 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Spread the

Love

(and the Cream Filling!)

Dessert is the universal love language BY ZARA ABBASI, PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

Valentine’s Day is almost here!

And, I don’t know about you, but I have always loved this holiday. I loved the school parties, exchanging those hand-picked cartoon valentines and, then, later in life, planning fun little dinners for my husband, and now, for my kids. To be clear, I never thought about Valentine’s Day as a day set aside solely for couples, I’ve always thought it was for EVERYONE, as it should be. So, whether you’ve been married for an eternity, just getting started with a significant other, celebrating Galentine’s Day with your best gals, or are in elementary school just awaiting all the treats, this story is for you, because you are so loved! We are often so worried about relationships and being liked that we forget we are in fact already loved, and by so many! So, let’s return some of the love and make others feel special, too! So, apparently there’s a love language. Did you know that? I only recently learned that there isn’t just one, there are five of them! Here they are in case you were clueless like I was: Words of Affirmation, Gifts, Acts of Service, Quality Time and Physical Touch. Some people respond to one love language better than another. But, lucky you, we are going to hit ALL of them with these desserts, so there will be no way your recipient won’t feel loved. Oh, and they forgot chocolate because that is totally a love language, too. Don’t believe me? Go give someone chocolate for no reason at all and see what happens. Because Valentine’s Day is for everyone, I think these desserts should be for everyone, too! The first one can certainly feed a crowd, but because it’s so rich and decadent, you might not want to share. The No Bake Double Chocolate Cheesecake is a cinch to make. We’ve done enough baking over the holidays, so let's give our ovens a break and let the mixer and fridge do all the heavy lifting here.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

21


No Bake Double Chocolate Cheesecake Crust: 2½ cups of crushed Oreo cookies 6 tablespoons unsalted butter (melted)

Filling: 4 8-ounce packages softened cream cheese 1½ cups powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups heavy cream 10 ounces (5 ounces of each) bittersweet and semisweet chocolate, chopped Ganache: ¾ cup heavy cream 6 ounces milk or dark chocolate, finely chopped 1 teaspoon instant coffee 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1. Finely crush Oreo cookies in either a food processor or hand-crush in a large Ziploc bag. 2. Add melted butter and mix through until combined. 3. Press crumbs into the bottom of a lightly greased 9-inch springform pan. 4. Place the pan in the fridge or freezer to cool while working on the rest of the ingredients. 5. Make the filling: Melt the 10 ounces of chopped chocolate and set aside to cool. 6. In a medium bowl, blend cream cheese and powdered sugar until smooth. 7. In another bowl, beat heavy cream with vanilla until stiff peaks form, be careful not to overmix. 8. Fold the whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture and divide into half by placing half of the mixture into the now-empty whipped cream bowl. 9. In the first half, mix in the melted chocolate, then pour the chocolate filling into the pan on top of the crust. 10. Add the remaining filling on top of the chocolate filling and place in fridge for at least an hour. 11. Make the ganache: While the cheesecake is cooling, stir together the ganache ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat, until fully combined. 12. Pour over cooled cheesecake and serve when desired. Hopefully the cheesecake will keep your loved ones feeling happy and full, but what about those fun school parties I mentioned earlier? Sure, you could send storebought treats and candies and that would be perfectly fine, but what if you happened to have just a smidge of extra time on your hands and wanted to whip up something easy, familiar and fun for the kiddos? Well, this next dessert will be easy to create because chances are you have already made this treat growing up, and with a whimsical little twist, you can reintroduce them to co-workers or a class party.

22 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Heart-Shaped Rice Cereal Treats

I have made these treats more times than I could ever count, and although I obviously didn’t invent these, I make them as if my career depends on them. And, they never last more than a day. For a twist on this treat, I add sprinkles to the mix, dip in chocolate melts and decorate with cute messages or more sprinkles. Kids love when you place these on a popsicle stick because who doesn’t love a handheld treat? 3 tablespoons butter 10 ounces marshmallows 6 cups puffed rice cereal 1 teaspoon vanilla ¼ cup festive sprinkles of your choice Candy melts Piping or Ziploc bags for decorating 1. Lightly butter a rimmed baking sheet or pan and set aside. 2. In a large pot, melt the butter on medium heat until slightly browned. 3. Add in the marshmallows and vanilla, and stir until melted. 4. Add in the cereal and sprinkles and stir until fully coated with marshmallow mixture. 5. Immediately pour mixture into the buttered pan and press to flatted mixture. If the mixture becomes too sticky, rub a little butter on your hands or spatula and continue pressing flat. 6. Once mixture has cooled and hardened slightly, use a heart cookie cutter to cut out shapes and set aside.

. l a . e E R L s i B I e S l S g O g P u s i r Y t S e R h E T V O C d an RE In Arkansas, mental health issues are affecting people of all ages and the suicide rate across all ages is at an all-time high. But there is hope. The BridgeWay provides a continuum of care that is safe, secure and serene. Just as each patient is different, so too are our programs. The BridgeWay is the only psychiatric hospital in Arkansas with distinct programs for seniors 55 and older, adults 18 and older, adolescents, ages 13-17, and children, ages 4-12. Whether it is for mood, thought or substance abuse disorders, we provide separate units for each population.

21 BridgeWay Road, North Little Rock, AR 72113 1-800-BRIDGEWAY | thebridgeway.com SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

23


EXPLORE & LEARN

Sacre Bleu! Learning foreign language can be a major asset for students BY DWAIN HEBDA

There’s only one way to say it: Your kids should be taking foreign language in school. Once reserved for specific applications such as certain career fields or international travel, the ability to speak and understand a foreign language is now an invaluable skill, according to David Nance, foreign language curriculum specialist with the Arkansas Department of Education. “There’s no question that [foreign language has] become more and more important as the world has gotten smaller in a lot of ways,” he said. “It does help you be more open-minded. It gives you a broader world view. It does open up travel opportunities. It gives you a chance to make more friends.” “People always want to know about the side benefits, but language teachers prefer to talk about the benefits of learning a language for the sake of learning the language. It can help you with the ACT or whatever else, but at the end of the day we believe in learning languages for the sake of being able to communicate with people.” There is ample evidence to back up foreign language’s claim as an academic superfood in study after scientific study catalogued by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, some dating back to the 1960s. “There’s definitely a lot of research that shows correlation between second language and cognitive abilities like your working memory or your executive functions,” Nance said. “[Studies] in areas such as increased creativity, increased abstract thinking, problem-solving, lots of different things, going back 50 to 60 years back those claims.” In Arkansas, foreign language is almost exclusively taught at the high school level, as elementary and middle schools are not required to offer such coursework and thus very few do. Public high schools in the state are required to offer two years of foreign language; however, it is not required that students take any such classes in order to graduate.

24 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Nance said that often the value of being bilingual escapes students even as their classrooms and communities become increasingly multicultural. “One of the funny things is, high school teachers constantly face the attitude from students that they don’t need this in real life,” he said. “But when they introduce themselves to adults as a French teacher or especially a Spanish teacher, the very first thing they hear is, ‘Oh my gosh. I wish I spoke Spanish.’ “I think adults tend to recognize a value that’s sometimes harder for students to recognize.” Another challenge schools face is staffing the requisite teaching skillset, especially when one gets beyond Spanish, French or German. For that reason, the state provides several distance learning options to give students access to instruction. “We have an in-house, state-funded distance learning provider called Virtual Arkansas,” he said. “We also have multiple providers that are approved from out-of-state, private providers that have gone through our process to be approved to offer languages.” “That’s a great opportunity for a student who wants to study Japanese, for instance, or Arabic or something like that. Hardly anybody in the state teaches those, so these out-of-state providers are opening new opportunities for kids.” The long-held assertion that the younger the student, the easier it is for them to learn a foreign language is still a matter of scientific debate. But as the many studies catalogued by the ACTFL attest, some involving students as early as first grade, an early start certainly doesn’t hurt. “Language is about time and it’s about exposure to the language,” Nance said. “The younger you are, the more time you have to be exposed to it. So without a doubt getting an earlier start is going to be better for you in that regard.” “What it comes down to is, the best time to start learning a foreign language is now.”


North Little Rock ESL teacher enjoys role

If you couldn’t tell from the playground, one glance at the eighthgrade composite photos lining the hallways at North Little Rock Catholic Academy tells you how dramatically the student body in this small, parochial school has changed in recent years. The past six departing classes have been a checkerboard of ethnicity, and with that diversity has come new challenges. Among these are language barriers, said Denise Troutman, principal. Of NLRCA’s 190 students, she said roughly one-fourth qualify for English as second language tutoring, which the school provides using a program of the North Little Rock School District. Luis Torres, 21, is in his second year as the school’s ESL teacher. Three

“I was able to see the point of view from the American learning style” days a week he’s here, leading students across multiple grade levels through language lessons, providing additional help in other subjects and generally providing a friendly face to students as they work to assimilate in school. “I love helping others,” he said. “I help them with not just the language portion, but every subject they have. I do focus more on the kids that are

struggling with language. I try to help them with reading, writing, which are the main two things for the language.” Torres said contrary to what many people believe, most Hispanic parents are eager for their children to learn English, seeing it as a necessary component of success in America. Torres agrees with this, saying that to understand English is to better understand the American thought process that permeates everything. “Learning-wise, you can see things in two different ways. You have a different aspect, a point of view,” he said. “Learning English and science, knowing a second language helped me a lot. I was able to see the point of view from the American learning style.” At the same time, many families worry that in learning English their children may lose a sense of their native heritage and culture, particularly among their American-born kids. “They want their kids to learn a new language because they believe that it brings them more opportunities, especially in education,” Torres said. “But I’ve also seen some people that their kids are learning English and they don’t want them to forget about their Mexican culture or their language. There are some kids that, especially since they’re born here, they just learn the English through school and they can’t really speak Spanish.” Torres didn’t set out to be a teacher of any kind, but is uniquely suited for this type of work. When his family immigrated to the United States from Mexico 12 years ago, he was in the very same situation as the kids he now tutors. This empathy makes him particularly good at his job. “I wanted to give it a try because I wanted to help people,” he said. “I can see the kids grow and learn more, especially when it comes to the language problem. I can see them getting used to a new environment, a new culture. I’m just really glad that I get to help people the way they helped me.”

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

25


FAMILY & PARENTING

26 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Explaining

‘The Birds & The Bees’ Good news, parents. You do not have to have one big ‘The Talk’ with your children. Bad news: You’ll need to have several age-appropriate conversations with your children, but we’re here to help. BY ANGELA E. THOMAS

We consulted with Dr. Ashley Antipolo,

a pediatrician specializing in adolescent medicine at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, and Dr. Adam Benton, a licensed psychologist with Arkansas Families First, to find out how to best speak with children about sex, sexuality, dating, respect and consent. “First of all, there’s no single sex talk,” Dr. Antipolo said. “It’s important that parents engage with their children, discussing with them their bodies from the time they can speak, and the conversation should evolve as the child matures and the parents’ skills develop.” “Parents should be intentional and look for opportunities to educate their children. Don’t wait for them to ask questions because that’s often too late,” Dr. Benton echoed this sentiment. For instance, he said, a scene in a movie or on TV can lead to a discussion about safety and privacy. “If these are topics of ongoing conversation, it builds open lines of communication and opportunities to teach values, and to guide your children in interpreting what they see and hear from friends and the media,” Benton said. “Start with educating them about their bodies, then discussing privacy and what is acceptable.” Antipolo said, “This starts with using the anatomical names for body parts. Don’t use pet names, and this should start when your child is 2 or even when you’re changing their diapers. [Teach your son to call] his penis a penis; his scrotum, scrotum—just as you do

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

27


with eyes, ears and knees. This is especially important if your child has an injury or medical issue.” This can also help parents prepare for questions from siblings of the opposite sex, while empowering children to feel confident about their bodies and the changes that will take place. Being open and not treating body parts as if they’re taboo will help parents facilitate open conversations about sex in general. “If you wait until your children are tweens or teens, you’re probably too late, as there’s so much exposure in the media, even on TV commercials. Parents often believe that if they acknowledge sex or sexual behavior that they’re condoning sex. But if we maintain open communication about who we are, our bodies, the changes that take place, being attracted to someone and so forth, establishing that this is all normal, this leaves an ‘open door’ between children and their parents. And parents are the biggest influence on how children engage with others.” Dr. Benton stressed that there’s no absolute age for these topics, but discussion around sexuality should evolve as your children mature. Additionally, it’s especially important to talk about boundaries and what is acceptable behavior when children begin to function outside of direct parental supervision. “While your child doesn’t have to know about the act of sex, he or she should know about personal safety, privacy, private parts and who they can talk to if something or someone makes them feel uncomfortable. It’s also important, early on, to teach your child to say ‘no.’ This should begin early in life, before they know a lot about sexuality. Parents should build their confidence and assertiveness skills so they can speak up for themselves appropriately when needed. This discussion should include what to do if someone touches them in ways they are uncomfortable with, non-sexually, like if a friend is playing too rough, in addition to any touching that involves private parts or violations to their personal boundaries.” School-aged children, Antipolo said, should be taught how to say “stop” and “no” and how to respect others when they are told “stop” and “no.” “Additionally, they need to understand how to read nonverbal cues and how to recognize the emotion behind words,” she said. Parents should also respect their child’s right to say “no,” Antipolo added, “even so far as not forcing your child to give intimate contact such as kissing or hugging a family member. A high-five or blowing a kiss are good alternatives. And don’t make a big deal out of it.” She suggests speaking to the family member explaining that you’re teaching your child to respect his and others’ personal space. Benton said it’s very important that parents teach their children to speak up for themselves. Consent is also a topic that should be broached throughout childhood as well. Children should be taught to express their opinions appropriately and to respect others’ opinions and choices. This becomes key as puberty ends, and they become interested in dating and sexuality. “The topic of consent is all over the media right now. As parents, we should stress that it’s your child’s right and responsibility to protect himself/herself and speak up. He/she

28 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

should respect himself/herself and others. Additionally, consider your child’s disposition. If he or she is more passive, aggressive or impulsive, you’ll need to adapt the conversation to address these individual vulnerabilities.” Antipolo suggests role-playing in which you prompt your child: “What would your response be if someone pressures you to have sex? To take drugs? To drink alcohol?” “Act it out and practice saying ‘no,’” she said. “Additionally, set up a ‘no questions asked’ policy with a safe word, so that if your child needs your help—whether at a party, on a date or in a risky or unsafe situation—he or she can call or text that word, and know that you’ll drop everything and come to his or her aid, no questions asked. Preplan.” When talking to your preteen or teen, stress that “yes” means “yes” and anything less than or unclear is a “no.” “Desire, respect, personal space and individual rights should all be a part of conversations about consent,” Benton said. “That conversation should be casual, direct, matter-of-fact in nature and not be stressful.”

Practically Speaking

If you need assistance talking to your child about sex, speak with your pediatrician or primary care physician. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Adolescent Clinic’s doctors, for example, can meet with patients individually to discuss sex and cover topics such as birth control, risky behaviors and more. Additionally, Dr. Ashley Antipolo recommends using the website healthychildren.org as a resource. “Talking to your child about sex can cause anxiety. Remember you don’t need to cover everything in one talk. Just start with the basics. If things are awkward, acknowledge that. “While it’s difficult, as parents, to avoid getting on your soapbox, you want to set an atmosphere of openness. While it’s OK to set your expectations, if a list of ‘don’ts’ is the only way you talk about sex, your children will be less likely to come to you in the future, because they don’t want to disappoint you. Try to strike a balance between giving information and communicating your values.” She also suggests parents avoid teasing their children about their crushes as this can be a very meaningful and emotional relationship for the preteen or teenager. “You want to be there to help him/her navigate those emotions.” And if your child is expressing emotion toward the same sex, you’ll want to be especially sensitive. “Even if your child doesn’t verbalize it, he/she is processing feelings of sexuality, and as a parent it’s vital that you establish and maintain open lines of communication. Children who identify as gay are at a higher risk for depression; sexual assault, rape and violence; drug abuse; and suicide ideation.”


Need Help? If you are struggling with or would like assistance with discussing the topic of sex with your children, check out the Arkansas Families First blog. Log on to arfamiliesfirst.com, and click on “Blog” under the Resources tab. Additionally, Dr. Adam Benton suggests the following books: “My Body Belongs To Me” by Jill Starishevsky;

“It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health” by Robie H. Harris;

“It's Not the Stork!: A Book About Girls, Boys, Babies, Bodies, Families and Friends” by Robie H. Harris; “Amazing You!: Getting Smart About Your Private Parts” by Gail Saltz;

“What’s the Big Secret?: Talking about Sex with Girls and Boys” by Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown.

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

29


SPRING BREAK IN THE NATURAL STATE Looking to plan a spring break getaway that offers something for everyone in the family? These four destinations will make kids and teens forget about playing games on their electronic devices and give the whole family Instaworthy moments to share. BY JILL ROHRBACH

Garvan Woodland Gardens Hot Springs, Arkansas 30 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM


Photos courtesy of Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Eureka Springs This vacation destination is eye candy—ornate Victorian architecture, outdoor art and indoor galleries, merchandise-filled store fronts, parks and unique attractions. Lodging options include bed and breakfasts, guesthouses, name-brand hotels, historic hotels, tree houses, safari cabins, hobbit caves and castles. Restaurants run a wide gamut, but local favorites include Sparky’s Roadhouse Cafe, Local Flavor and Mud Street Cafe. Nestled in the heart of the Ozarks, outdoor opportunities abound.

Highlights Don’t miss the historic downtown full of shopping, dining, springs, parks and entertainment. Take a tour by trolley for insights on all it has to offer. Daytime fun should include a visit to Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge, Thorncrown Chapel, Ozark Mountain Ziplines and the Christ of the Ozarks statue. At night, the whole family is sure to enjoy the Great Passion Play, Intrigue Theater or the haunted ghost tour at the Crescent Hotel. Eureka Springs is also part of the Oz Trails system of Northwest Arkansas and offers a huge variety of trails for mountain bikers of any experience level.

Rock Cott age Garde ns

Bed & Bre

akfast Inn

Extras • Go horseback riding at a guest ranch. • Cast a line for fish in Beaver Lake and the White River. • Visit Pivot Rock and Natural Bridge. • Find the huge Humpty Dumpty sitting on a wall. • Take on a challenge at Escape Room 13. • Tour Blue Spring Heritage Center. • Enjoy a lake cruise on Belle of the Ozarks. • Learn about flight at Aviation Cadet World.

Castle Treehouse

reek Turpentine C

Ozark Mountain Zi

W il dlife Re fu

ge

plines

Bike Trails H u m pt y D

umpty sit

ting on a

wall SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

31


Fairfield Bay

This lakeside resort town is packed with recreational opportunities. Lodging includes condos and luxury residences with resort-style amenities such as fitness centers, swimming pools, tennis courts and golf courses. The Country Club offers casual and formal dining. Cobblestone Inn & Suites, a new 63room, pet-friendly hotel with a spa and restaurant, is set to open spring of 2019. It’s the city’s first hotel.

Highlights Make sure you visit Sugar Loaf Mountain in the middle of Greers Ferry Lake for a two-part adventure. Getting there is half the fun. Take the shuttle from Fairfield Bay Marina or rent a motorboat or kayaks to make your own way over to the island. Once you’re docked, hike through the woods on Arkansas’s first designated National Scenic Trail and up a series of wooden stairs at the southern end to the top of the mountain for amazing vistas. Back on the mainland, Indian Rock House Cave is a fun place to explore and see petroglyphs. Look for three hand-carved totem poles throughout the resort community and for the Indian Thong Tree at Woodland Mead Park.

Extras • Climb aboard The Belle of the Bay at the marina for a scenic cruise. • Take a guided ATV tour. • Fish Greers Ferry Lake, stocked with every type of gamefish native to the state. • Take a glimpse back in time at the Old Log Cabin and Museum. • Pick a park to play shuffleboard, volleyball, basketball, horseshoes or have a picnic. • Feed the huge school of carp splashing around the marina and take a photo with the Fish Feeding Frenzy sign. • Play foot golf, where you kick soccer balls into giant holes on the regular golf course. Miniature golfand disc golf are available too.

Suga r Lo af Mou ntai n

Pa dd lin g Gree rs Fe rr y La ke

G re e rs Fe rr y L a k

I n d i a n Ro

32 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

c k H ou se

C a ve

e


Photos courtesy of visitfairfieldbay.com

LOOKING FOR A UNIQUE WAY TO CELEBRATE VALENTINE’S DAY?

POTTERY MAKING VALENTINE’S DAY WORKSHOP

a B ikin g at F

irf ie ld B a y

Thursday, February 14 | 6:30-8p.m. $50 per couple | 21+ Need a unique way to celebrate Valentine’s Day? Join us in creating a beautiful pair of cups WITH your loved one! You’ll even personalize them with stamps, texture, and color. We’ll “fire” them so they will be enjoyed for years to come. Drinks, snacks and chocolate goodies will be available as you spend your Valentine evening at the Innovation Hub!

REGISTER TODAY! arhub.org

G re e rs Fe

204 E 4th St, NLR 501-907-6570 | arhub.org

rr y L a ke

3 gh march 2

rou on exhibit th

ld B a y G o lf in g at Fa irf ie

museumofdiscovery.org

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

33


Photos courtesy of Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Buffalo National River America’s first national river is tranquility all wrapped up in a cocoon of rippling water, hardwood forests and tall limestone bluffs in earthy hues. The National Park Service oversees 95,730 acres and three designated wilderness areas along this river corridor that flows 135 miles and is one of the few remaining undammed rivers in the lower 48 states. You can easily find canoe, raft and kayak outfitters, campsites, hiking trails and cabin rentals for your family getaway. You’ll be amazed at the good eats you can find: Low Gap Cafe and Ozark Cafe in Jasper, Fergusons Country Store and Restaurant and Big Springs Trading Co. Restaurant & Smoked Meats in St. Joe, and Buffalo Point Restaurant in Buffalo Point.

Highlights

Buffalo N

Canoeing the river is one of the most popular activities, but you also don’t want to miss seeing the elk herds roaming along the upper river corridor. Morning and evening are the best times to watch them, and Boxley Valley is a popular viewing area. Tyler Bend Visitor Center, offering exhibits, books, films and more, is a great place to obtain park information. The NPS also provides ranger-guided tours and activities.

ational Riv er

Extras P ho to b y L is a H yde

• Take your pick from 100 miles of maintained trails for hiking or biking. • Visit historic areas containing preserved pioneer homesteads ranging from the 1840s to the 1930s, including Boxley Valley Historic District, the Parker Hickman Homestead and the Villines Cabin. • Stay in rustic housekeeping cabins constructed in the late 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps at Buffalo Point. • Fish the river for over 60 species, including smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, Ozark bass and goggle-eye. • Skip rocks in the river and marvel at the night sky. • Visit Horseshoe Canyon Ranch for dude ranch fun, plus zip-lining and rock climbing. • Buffalo Outdoor Center also offers zip-lining.

Buffalo National River

Parker Hic k

man Hom e

s te a d

Horseshoe Zip-lining

34 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

ver

Buffalo National Ri

Canyon Ra

nc h


FREE FAMILY OUTDOOR SKILLS CLASSES AT LITTLE ROCK NATURE CENTER Learn a new outdoor skill for free such as fishing, archery and airgun and outdoor cooking at the AGFC Nature Center from our expert staff and earn patches along the way.

Fishing Basics

Sunday, February 10th, 2pm-3:30pm

Fly Tying Basics

Beginner Shooting Range Day Saturday, February 16th, 12pm-2pm

Wild About Dutch Oven Cooking: beyond the basics Sunday, March 10th, 1pm-5pm

FREE

Tuesday, February 26th, 6pm-8pm

REGISTER YOUR KID OR FAMILY TODAY BY CALLING 501-907-0636 OR EMAILING HOLLIE.SANDERS@AGFC.AR.GOV

Learn more at AGFCOutdoorSkills.com

SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

35


Photos courtesy of hotsprings.org

Hot Springs The crown jewel of this city is its array of springs that still supply naturally heated water for thermal baths. Hot Springs National Park, preserving 47 naturally flowing thermal springs on the southwestern slope of Hot Springs Mountain, is located right in the middle of town. Lodging is offered in historic hotels and chain brands as well as resorts and lodges located downtown and lakeside. The area is known for outdoor fun on lakes Catherine, DeGray, Greeson, Hamilton and Ouachita. Great food is easy to find. Try SQZBX for pizza, Taco Mama for casual Mexican or 501 Prime for the finer foods.

Highlights

M id -A m e r

Head to the Mountain Tower and take the elevator up to the observation deck for breathtaking panoramic views of the Ouachita Mountains. To get there, either take the scenic drive up to the parking lot or hike the 1.5-mile trail from Fountain Street. Also walk the paths of the national park, then stroll Central Avenue for family-friendly dining, shopping and entertainment. Make sure to hit Bathhouse Row, a collection of eight architecturally significant bathhouses built in the early 1900s. Two of the structures again now operate as bathhouses while others house an emporium, cultural center, the park visitor center and Superior Bathhouse Brewery. The newly renovated Mid-America Science Museum is a great stop for families. Arkansas’s largest hands-on museum brings science to life and outdoor paths lead to the dinosaur age.

Extras • Dig for quartz crystals. • Experience Maxwell Blade's Theatre of Magic. • Expend some energy at Magic Springs/ Crystal Falls theme and water parks (open seasonally). • Stroll the 210-acre Garvan Woodland Gardens. • Tour the Gangster Museum of America and the Josephine Tussaud Wax Museum. • Zip-line through the trees at Adventureworks Outdoor Adventure Park. • Mountain bike, hike, fish and golf throughout the area. • Shop this renowned arts community’s plethora of galleries.

ic a S c ie n

ce Museu

Mid -Am eric a Sci enc e Mus eum

C r ysta l Fa

ll s

Ga r va n W

B ikin g Hot Spr in gs 36 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

m

o o d la n d G

a rd e n s


KEEP IT LOCAL!

Don’t have time to travel? Get in some quick family fun in Central Arkansas! Adventures in science abound at Little Rock’s Museum of Discovery. Come see more of what has captured the admiration and fascination of many, including Jimmy Fallon, host of “The Tonight Show.” You and your children will enjoy the hands-on activities, rotating exhibits and frequent special events. 501-396-7050 or museumofdiscovery.org.

L VE your Spring Break at the Little Rock Zoo!

Take a walk on the wild side at the Little Rock Zoo. More than 700 animals live there and provide an opportunity for lessons in conservation. Children also learn about agriculture while feeding and grooming animals at the Zoo’s Arkansas Heritage Farm. 501-666-2406 or littlerockzoo.com. No trip to the capital city is complete without a tour of the Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, which is a treat for adults and children alike. Explore from the first floor, where a presidential limo takes center stage, to the top floor, where exhibits highlight the Clintons’ White House years. 501-372-4242 or clintonlibrary. gov.

Join us March 15th – 24th for daily FUN! 11AM – Animal Encounters on the Stage 11AM – 2PM – Party in the Plaza 1:30PM – Arkansas Farm Experience Let the kids roll up their sleeves and get messy at the Innovation Hub’s spring break art camp on March 21. Kids will enjoy an afternoon filled with creative fun at this unique North Little Rock makerspace! Sign up at arhub.org.

Crafts, entertainment and MORE!

littlerockzoo.com SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

37


kid approved Be My

Valentine VALENTINE PARTIES ARE A BIG DEAL IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. IF YOU VOLUNTEER FOR THE CRAFT, TRY THESE VALENTINE ROBOTS!

CORIE HOLLINGSWORTH IS MOM TO CATE, RINN AND SAER AND WIFE TO CHANCE. SHE WORKS AS A MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST AND HAS BEEN AN ACTIVE VOLUNTEER IN THE LITTLE ROCK SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR 15 YEARS, WINNING THE 2018 JANE MENDEL AWARD FOR VOLUNTEERING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS. SHE ALSO SERVES ON THE CHILDREN'S COUNCIL AT PULASKI HEIGHTS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. SHE PROUDLY WEARS THE BADGE OF HONOR FOR BEING "THAT" PTA MOM. SHE LOVES TO VOLUNTEER, AND VOLUNTEERING WITH HER GIRLS MAKES HER HEART HAPPY.

YOUR CHILD WILL PROBABLY NEED A VALENTINE BOX, WHICH IS A FUN WAY TO GET CREATIVE! YOU CAN TURN A SHOEBOX INTO ANYTHING— EVEN A DEMOGORGON—WITH SOME IMAGINATION (AND A LITTLE PAPIER MACHE).

VALENTINE CARDS ARE KEY! FIND PERSONALIZED ONES ON ETSY.COM. YOU CAN EVEN ORDER CARDS WITH YOUR CHILD'S PICTURE ON THEM!

IF YOU WANT TO GO THE NON-CANDY ROUTE, BUBBLES ARE GREAT! FIND THEM IN THE WEDDING SECTION OF MICHAEL’S AND GET YOUR FREE PRINTABLE AT LEAHWITHLOVE.COM.

v DIG OUT YOUR HEART-SHAPED COOKIE CUTTERS AND TREAT YOUR KIDS TO A SWEET VALENTINE'S DAY RED PANCAKE BREAKFAST! 1 box red velvet cake mix ½ cup flour 2 large eggs 2½ cups milk ¼ cup oil

In a large bowl, mix the cake mix, flour, eggs, milk and oil together until combined and smooth. Heat a griddle to medium high heat and spray with cooking spray so the pancakes flip easily. Scoop a ladle of batter onto the pan and cook until the top of the batter starts to bubble. Flip the pancake and cook for another minute on the other side until cooked all the way through. Cut into heart shapes and top with syrup, whipped cream or icing!

38 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

LOOKING YOUR BEST ON VALENTINE'S DAY INCLUDES A PERSONALIZED OUTFIT FROM ETSY.COM!


SAVE TIME. ORDER ONLINE. DELIVERED TO YOUR CAR.

YOUR FIRST THREE ORDERS ARE ON US! Use Promo Code: WELCOME

edwardsfoodgiant.com LITTLE ROCK: 7507 CANTRELL RD 501-614-3477, 10320 STAGECOACH RD 501-455-3475, 20383 ARCH STREET 501-888-8274 BRYANT: 2203 N REYNOLDS RD 501-847-9777 • FORREST CITY: 2307 N. WASHINGTON 870-633-4369 HARRISBURG: 605 N ILLINOIS ST 870-578-2434 • MARIANNA: 460 S ALABAMA 870-295-9311 SAVVYKIDSAR.COM | FEBRUARY 2019

39


40 FEBRUARY 2019 | SAVVYKIDSAR.COM

Profile for Arkansas Times

SAVVYkids | February 2019  

New