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AT SLAUGHTER PEN MEET THE

DRUMMONDS A FAMILY BIKE TEAM

MY RIDE, MY TOWN

SPRINGDALE’S MISTY MURPHY

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2 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2015 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.


PHOTO BY NOVO STUDIO

IN THIS ISSUE

8

FEATURES

IN EVERY ISSUE

32

10

MY RIDE, MY TOWN

51

A day in the life with Bike Arkansas guest editor Misty Murphy

56

Behind the Scenes

From the Guest Editor

14

Braking News

38

24

The Drummond brood has transformed a family hobby into a way of life

FAMILY TIME

Trail Guide

Bike Shop Guide

62

Event Guide

66

Happy Trails

Gear & Components

44 ON THE COVER The Phat Tire team takes a test run at Slaughter Pen. Story on page 44. Photography by Novo Studio.

JAM ON The Phat Tire race team readies for fall’s Slaughter Pen Jam

Provided by Lewis & Clark Outfitters 4 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


DESIGNED AROUND YOU.

The Volvo XC60, Make Life Simple Again. MSRP starting at $36,400.

NORTH POINT VOLVO 1500 N. SHACKLEFORD | 877-526-7175 | LITTLEROCKVOLVO.COM


HIKING

BIKING

CAMPING

CLIMBING

PADDLING

Your Adventure Starts Here

A R K A N S A S A special publication of Arkansas Wild

PUBLISHER REBEKAH HARDIN rebekah@arktimes.com

OzarkOutdoor.com

5514 Kavanaugh Blvd. | Little Rock, AR | 501-664-4832

CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER mandy@arktimes.com EDITORIAL MEL JONES Editor melanie@arktimes.com ART DIRECTOR KEVIN WALTERMIRE kevin@arktimes.com ADVERTISING ELIZABETH HAMAN Advertising Sales Director elizabeth@arktimes.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS lesa@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE RHONDA CRONE rhonda@arktimes.com PRODUCTION WELDON WILSON Production Manager/Controller ROLAND R. GLADDEN Advertising Traffic Manager ERIN HOLLAND Advertising Coordinator GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS MIKE SPAIN SOCIAL MEDIA LAUREN BUCHER lauren@arktimes.com OFFICE STAFF ROBERT CURFMAN IT Director LINDA PHILLIPS Billing/Collections KELLY LYLES Office Manager ANITRA HICKMAN Circulation Director 201 E. MARKHAM ST., SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985 All Contents © 2015 Arkansas Wild

6 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1959! There are many brands of beef, but only one Angus brand exceeds expectations. The Certified Angus Beef brand is a cut above USDA Prime, Choice and Select. Ten quality standards set the brand apart. It's abundantly flavorful, incredibly tender, naturally juicy. 1701 MAIN STREET 501-376-3473

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www.edwardsfoodgiant.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 7


THE MAKING OF BIKE ARKANSAS Check out a few of our favorite behind the scenes snaps from this issue.

On the road with guest editor Misty Murphy.

Wanna be on the cover? Look for our photo booth at the Big Dam Bridge 100 and Slaughter Pen Jam.

8 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

PHOTOS BY PHILIP THOMAS/MEL JONES

This is how photographer Philip Thomas gears up for Bike Arkansas.

In the studio for “My Kit” with Clif Li.


Where Tire Tracks meet

Welcome Mats We are making a place for

Off-Roaders

Cyclists

Hot Springs Village is proudly positioned in the heart of the best trail riding in the Ouachitas and boasts over 30 miles of natural trails of our own, and we are just getting started. Visit BasecampAR.com for more information about our cycling, mountain biking & paddling. Follow the progress as we launch the Ouachita Trail Chain trail network and connect riders to community... and community to riding!

Hot Springs Village is evolving, visualize the change with us:

HSVPlacemaking.com

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 9


I

t’s an exciting time to be a cyclist in Arkansas. Thousands of miles of paved and natural trails criss-cross our state, and groups like the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department and Bike/Walk Arkansas are working to make our roadways safer for cyclists. In northwest Arkansas, where I have the privilege of focusing my energies on trail projects, the commitment to building bike infrastructure is bearing fruit. We have reached the critical mass of cyclists on the roads and trails necessary to birth a burgeoning bike culture. On any given week in northwest Arkansas, there are more than 35 weekly organized bike rides. Add to that the special events like the Square to Square Bike Ride or the Slaughter Pen Jam, and there’s never a day in the region without a reason for cyclists to spin their wheels. Fostering and developing bike culture is very important to achieving our goals for cycling in Arkansas. Businesses geared toward or inclusive of cyclists, events for riders of all ages, and educational institutions that recognize the importance of bikes on campus – all of these are important components of building bike culture and sense of a community. In northwest Arkansas, the bike community is becoming a powerful voice that is running bike-friendly candidates for office, demanding bike infrastructure be considered in local road projects and patronizing businesses that reach out to cyclists. The culture is spreading from northwest and central Arkansas out into the smaller communities around the state. I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to guest edit this issue of Bike Arkansas. We are highlighting some of my favorite parts of Arkansas’ bike culture and the great work that individuals are doing to build a truly inclusive bike community. From Pedal It Forward NWA, a group that provides entry to cycling for those who need it the most, to the Drummond family, who serve as wonderful ambassadors for Arkansas cycling around the country, I hope you enjoy reading about what makes biking in Arkansas great. May it inspire all of us to do what we can to continue building bike culture in our beautiful, natural state.

Misty Murphy Guest Editor, Bike Arkansas

10 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

PHOTO BY NOVO STUDIO

FROM THE GUEST EDITOR


BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 11


Contributors

is the owner and operator of Nova Studio, a photography, video and graphic design company located in northwest Arkansas.

PHILIP THOMAS

BRENT FINDLAY

ROB HEY

is the chief information officer for America’s Car-Mart, Inc. in Bentonville. He also serves as the president of the Northwest Arkansas JDRF Board of Directors. He spends most of his spare time with his family, as well as cycling and volunteering for JDRF.

MATTHEW MARTIN is a photographer based

JOE JACOBS

is the executive director of marketing and communications at Arkansas State University. His creation of compelling content marketing for universities earned regional and national awards at NSU and A-State from CASE, PRSA and NACMA.

is an avid mountain biker. You might find him on the slopes of Wisconsin during the winter months or on one of the many sections of Arkansas singletrack.

Join us at the Big Dam Bridge 100 or right off the river trail at the

ARKANSAS

ALE HOUSE

DIAMOND BEAR HAS BEEN CRAFTING ITS BEER AT HOME IN ARKANSAS SINCE 2000. AND NOW WE’RE DOING IT ALL RIGHT HERE IN DOWNTOWN NORTH LITTLE ROCK. COME TAKE A TOUR OF THE BREWERY OR STOP IN THE ALE HOUSE AFTER YOUR RIDE FOR GREAT FOOD AND AWARD-WINNING BEER.

DIAMOND BEAR BREWING C O. 600 N. Broadway, North Little Rock, AR 501.708.2739 (BREW) • diamondbear.com This ad partially paid for with North Little Rock Convention & Visitors Bureau funds.

12 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

began cycling long distances in the 1970s. After moving to Arkansas 17 years ago, he was inspired to start mountain biking. Joe is a board member of Central Arkansas Trail Alliance. He is currently the marketing and revenue manager for Arkansas State Parks.

in Little Rock. When he’s not behind the camera or on a film set, Matthew spends his time traveling, enjoying the Little Rock music scene and spending time with his dog Deltron.

DR. BILL SMITH


BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 13


GIVING BACK WITH PEDAL IT FORWARD

BY RHONDA CRONE

BY MISTY MURPHY

PHOTO BY BEN MAYS

RIDE THE RAILYARD

Pedal It Forward NWA bike donation to a men’s shelter in Rogers.

Tanner Stolt doing a “tabletop”.

F

S

Cyclists can hit the dirt at The Railyard in early October.

For information, visit their Facebook page, “Pedal It Forward NWA,” go to the website pedalitforwardnwa.com or contact the founders: Cné Breaux, Jim McClendon, Elaine McCool, Kevin Ruehle, David Tovey, Justin Tubb and Gary Vernon.

ive or 10 years ago, northwest Arkansas locals might not have guessed that Rogers would be home to one of the most comprehensive bike parks and trail systems in the country, nor predicted it would be the center of a cycling destination that in fall 2016 would host the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) Summit. But, it is. How did this all come to fruition? The City of Rogers hired Progressive Trail Design (PTD)—the company currently building The Railyard—to develop trails around Lake Atalanta and in the process discovered that a piece of land near the railroad tracks and the edge of downtown was perfect to tie revitalized Downtown Rogers to the trail system. Now from the near-complete dirt jump park The Railyard—with the bonus feature of an old graffiti-covered train car—cyclists can access the 10 miles of singletrack around the lake as well as the paved city trail. PTD owner Nathan Woodruff believes The Railyard ranks in the top five dirt jump parks in the country. “The next closest parks that even compare are Valmont in Boulder or Two Rivers in Nixa, Missouri,” he says. (Two Rivers was also built by PTD). All this is happening right here in northwest Arkansas, with no slowdown in sight—for urban parks or mountain biking. Woodruff foresees unlimited growth. “What northwest Arkansas has done over the last eight years is amazing; going from virtually no trail in any city except Fayetteville to five epic singletrack trail systems stretching from Fayetteville to Bella Vista, all connected by the Razorback Greenway. [PTD are] currently working on designs for another potential 45 miles of singletrack in the area. I can’t say where and when, but I can say that they will be a sweet addition. Northwest Arkansas is becoming a nationally recognized biking destination.”

14 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

even friends harbored the same dream for years— sharing the freedom of cycling with children and adults in need. In November 2014, they stopped dreaming and started collecting, fixing and giving away used bikes. Pedal It Forward NWA was born. Access to bikes resonates with many groups around northwest Arkansas. The Walton Family Foundation supported the group with start-up funds and a facility in Bentonville. Area bike shops collect donated bikes for the group. Boys and Girls Clubs, churches, schools and shelters send requests for members’ transportation needs. These partnerships enable Pedal It Forward NWA to focus on bike repair while leveraging partner networks to distribute bikes to those who need them most. Less than a year old, the group has given away approximately 250 bikes. While its bike shop is teeming with more than 550 bikes, increasing demand has led to a call out for more bikes, helmets, money and volunteers. Instead of keeping old bikes in the garage, cyclists around northwest Arkansas are learning to donate these unused bikes as they upgrade or as little ones outgrow their old wheels. The focus of Pedal It Forward is giving bikes to identified individuals, but future plans include a repair training or mentorship program as children grow out of their bikes or improve their cycling skills. This group continues to think big, making sure that each new expansion in the program or to another location replicates the excellence attained to date.

PHOTO COURTESY PEDAL IT FORWARD NWA

Braking News


Trailblazers

KURT SEARVOGEL is on a quest to break the Highest Annual Mileage Record (HAM’R) by bicycle. The current record is 75,065 miles set in 1939 by Tommy Godwin. As of publication, Kurt has just passed 18,000 miles and is 3,600 miles above record pace. His favorite Arkansas ride is Lake Sylvia in the fall—right as the leaves are in full glory. Cycling has allowed him to push himself harder than he thought possible. He has found that you can fall asleep while riding a bicycle. During the 2012 Race Across America (RAAM), he stopped to sleep 15 minutes or so in order to stave off the “sleep monster.” – By Brent Findlay

Cheap gap: When someone runs through traffic or a red light to get a small lead on the rest of the group In Springdale cycling circles, this is also called a “Hanby.”

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 15


BY BILL SMITH

T

he 24-Hour Bike Across Arkansas for D.A.R.E. is the toughest event you’ve never heard of, and based in the place you’d least expect it. A fundraiser for the Jonesboro Police Department’s youth outreach, the premise is simple: ride the length of the state in a single day. Depending on weather, the event rides south from Missouri or north from Louisiana. The cyclists who achieve the roughly 300-mile task in less than 24 hours earn an engraved brick on Main Street in downtown Jonesboro. This year’s event is set for October 9. Kevin Foust with JPD says the one-day ride evolved from the tourist-paced four-day version held over Memorial Day. “It’s one thing to do it in four days,” Foust says. “One day is a whole other level.” Foust credits the trio of Andy Shatley, Jeff Chastain and Dr. Spencer Guinn with the 24-hour concept. Shatley has made each ride, but remembers the event almost ending the inaugural year of 2012. The six-rider crew was stranded fighting through weather from Missouri to Jonesboro. “We’re in the basement, the sirens are going off,” Shatley recalls. “Everyone is looking at each other and saying, are we really going to do this?” The storm passed, a strong tailwind followed, and the riders restarted for Louisiana, reaching their goal with nine minutes to spare. Contrast it with the next year’s perfect weather

Riders pass through Weiner, AR, in 2013. and a record 18:52 time. “It’s hard, challenging mentally and physically, but it does give you a sense of accomplishment,” Shatley says. “And, if you can raise money for a good cause, promote health and fitness, and educate kids on the dangers of drugs—what better combination is there?” “There are obvious physical challenges,” two-time rider Chastain says. “What you can’t really prepare for is how dark of a place you can find yourself in at 3 a.m., when your body is used to being asleep and you still have hours to go.” Each rider is required to raise a minimum of $500 to participate, but most go above and beyond. For the 2015 event, Chastain is partnering with the local Crimestoppers chapter for a $10,000 goal. “We want more first-time riders and to get more people involved,” Foust says. “This was a record year with 23 in the spring and the 14 we expect this fall.” To learn more, contact Kevin Foust at 870-919-8530 or kfoust@jonesboro.org.

BEING BIKE FRIENDLY IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS, COMMUNITY BY MISTY MURPHY

A

rkansas has not always been at the top of the League of American Bicyclists’ Bicycle Friendly rankings. In fact, 2012 saw the state ranked dead last. But a few years later and 14 spots higher, momentum is growing among the business community to become more bike friendly. The state has 16 businesses ranked “Bicycle Friendly” by the League. (The official website lists 17, but one of these—Bike City in Fayetteville— is no longer operational.) They are clustered primarily in northwest and central Arkansas and cover a variety of professional fields—from engineering firms to bike shops. What does it mean to be a bikefriendly business? Those who receive the 16 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

designation have demonstrated they consider cycling needs in engineering, evaluation and planning, encouragement and education. Dane Eifling, bicycle programs coordinator for the City of Fayetteville, has had success in encouraging local businesses to engage with the program. Six new bike-friendly businesses were designated in Fayetteville just this

year. Eifling says the program helps employers recruit and retain talent, especially in the younger, millennial demographic that is less and less attracted to driving. In addition, research shows bike commuters are happier, more productive employees that have lower healthcare costs. “We are making Fayetteville a more bicycle-friendly community by getting the business community on board,” Eifling says. One of the biggest adds to the state’s Bicycle Friendly Business list this year is Walmart Stores Inc. in Bentonville. The world’s largest retailer was awarded a gold-level designation for its efforts to create a healthy cycling environment for its employees.

PHOTO BY JEFF CHASTAIN

300 MILES, 24 HOURS AND A GREAT CAUSE


FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS for all BIG DAM BRIDGE 100 cyclists Fuel up the night before & join us on the outdoor patio after your ride!

32 Beers and 20 Wines on Tap

AAA: When you need help finishing a big ride, this is the one guy in the group who can pull everybody else back home after a tough ride. Fork plant: What happens when you hit a bump and suddenly realize you forgot to tighten your front skewer (see also: healthcare deductible).

NANCY NOLAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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ARKANSAS’ BIKE FRIENDLY BUSINESSES Fayetteville Crown Barbershop—Gold Garver—Gold Viridian—Gold City of Fayetteville—Bronze Fayetteville Public Library—Bronze Highroller Cyclery—Bronze Maurice Jennings Architects—Bronze Rogers Highroller Cyclery—Bronze Bentonville Walmart Stores Inc.—Gold Conway Kimberly-Clark—Bronze The Ride—Gold Jonesboro Gearhead—Silver

phattirebikeshop.com Bentonville 479.715.6170 Fayetteville 479.966.4308 Fort Smith 479.222.6796

Little Rock Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care—Bronze Bobby’s Bike Hike—Gold Chainwheel Inc.—Bronze North Little Rock Garver—Gold Visit bikeleague.org to learn more about bikefriendly businesses. BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 17


THE JOE MARTIN TAKES ITS PLACE AS A ARKANSAS’ NEW NICA LEAGUE BRINGS NATIONAL ROAD-RACE EVENT OPPORTUNITY TO STUDENT BIKERS

T

he state’s largest pro-cycling road race will embark on its second year as part of the Union Cycliste Internationale’s (UCI) esteemed America Tour when the wheels roll April 21-24 in northwest Arkansas. The Joe Martin Stage Race has been a staple of cycling in the state for almost 40 years and is fast becoming a hot ticket on the national race circuit. UCI sanctioning has been a boon for the Joe Martin. In 2015, the prestigious America Tour included just eight other races apart from the Joe Martin—the triumvirate of the USA Pro Challenge, the Tour of California and the Tour of Utah among them. Last year’s race drew one of the largest women’s fields in the business, says Bruce Dunn, longtime organizer of the Joe Martin Stage Race. Some 96 pro women traveled to Fayetteville for the event—a field as big as many pro men’s races. Overall, about 750 cyclists participated in the stage race, including 350 amateurs and 400 professionals from 23 countries and more than 40 states. The course and organization has long been a favorite with racers. The race hits the highlights of northwest Arkansas’ scenic beauty, combined with great hotels and a robust dining scene in urban downtowns. The 2016 event will start with an uphill time trial at Devil’s Den State Park, include two road-race stages through the grueling Boston Mountains and wrap up with a speedy crit race around the streets of downtown Fayetteville. Dunn is looking forward to a bright future that includes not only a solid event for racers, but a thrilling experience for spectators and amateurs. To that end, the Joe Martin added a Gran Fondo to the lineup this year. That event will return for 2016, allowing weekend road warriors a chance to ride the course and feel like a pro for the day. “That’s a unique selling point for our Gran Fondo. You get to ride the race course,” Dunn says. “That’s an experience you get at the larger races like the Tour de France. We wanted to provide a way to engage the non-racer.” What’s next for this fast-growing race? Live web streaming is on Dunn’s radar as a wish list item for 2016. The Internet provides a built-in audience not just for those at home, but also for the spectators lining the course while waiting on their favorite team. joemartinstagerace.com 18 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Category winners at the Under-19 Mountain Bike Championship in Bentonville.

I

n Arkansas, Friday Night Lights isn’t just a great series to watch on Netflix. It’s a weekly reality, where high school students become stars and pride in community is center stage. The problem is many of the sports that students participate in at the high school level end once the graduation cap flies in the air. Enter NICA, the National Interscholastic Cycling Association. The student mountain bike league provides high school students with an opportunity to engage in competitive cycling while teaming up with friends to represent their hometown. It also provides access to a lifelong sport that students can take with them throughout their lives. Arkansas’ bid for a NICA league was approved by the national group in July, and organizers Alan Ley and Kyla Templeton have been busy laying the groundwork for the first races to start next year in northwest Arkansas. A fundraiser in August drew hundreds of people to the Pedaler’s Pub in Bentonville for good food, drinks and conversation about cycling. National NICA representatives joined in the fun while visiting northwest Arkansas, calling the region a “Never Never Land” for cycling. A kick-off race, the Under 19 Mountain Bike Championship, was held at Slaughter Pen Trails in Bentonville on August 8. The free event offered young mountain bikers the chance to rule the course without any adult riders breathing down their necks. While northwest Arkansas will be the jumping off point for the state league, organizers plan to quickly spread the races and teams around the state. “We want to provide every junior high and high school student opportunities through cycling to improve physically and mentally, and to develop good character,” says Ley, executive director of the Arkansas league. To learn more about NICA or to become involved with the Arkansas league, visit the NICA website at nationalmtb.org or check out the Arkansas league’s Facebook page at facebook.com/arkansasmountainbiking.

PHOTO COURTESY NICA

Friday’s start of the JMSR.

BY MISTY MURPHY

PHOTO BY TOM EWART

BY MISTY MURPHY


Loco Ropes, Ozark Folk Center

Little Red River

YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

Craighead Forest Park, Jonesboro

#VisitArkansas

Blanchard Springs Caverns

You know who’s got four IMBA “Epic” trails and two Ride CentersTM? Arkansas. Surprised? Don’t be. We’ve also got great trout rivers, clear mountain lakes and amazing tour-able caverns. A full-on craft beer scene and home-grown mountain music. Rack the bikes and come see us. ORDER YOUR FREE VACATION PLANNING KIT AT ARKANSAS.COM OR CALL 1-800-NATURAL.

WE DON’T JUST DESIGN TRAILS

WE RIDE THEM Great trail and bicycle network design happens when our planners and engineers combine their professional experience with their personal experience as cyclists.

for more information contact: Dave Roberts, VP of Planning 501.664.3245 dave.roberts@craftontull.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 19


RIDING FOR A CURE Two cyclists partner up to raise funds and awareness for JDRF

Rob Hey & Austin Dixon

A

For first-class facilities, a convenient location on Interstate 40, and a clean and safe community to enjoy away from the trails, Conway, Arkansas is the perfect location for your next ride. With sharrows on major roadways throughout town, as well as numerous trails through the city and its surrounding areas, Conway is working to be one of the most bike friendly cities in the state. For more information about Conway bike trails, contact the Bicycle & Pedestrian Advisory Board at walkbikeconway.com .

CVB@ConwayArkansas.org ConwayArk.com 866.7CONWAY

20 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

ustin Dixon was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D)—a serious autoimmune disease that he has to manage literally every hour of the day—when he was just 10 years old. Through no fault of his own, he woke up one morning and found out that his pancreas decided to give up on him and stop producing insulin. Each day, he has to test his blood glucose, give himself insulin and carefully count the carbohydrates in everything he eats. T1D doesn’t hold Austin back from doing what he wants to do, but it’s a something he can never ignore and a disease I wish nobody else ever had to experience. Austin’s goal in life is to become a professional cyclist and never let T1D stand in his way. I have been on several rides with Austin over the past four years and his determination and commitment to his health and cycling is simply amazing. For the past two years, I’ve been Austin’s partner in the annual Lake Tahoe Ride to Cure Diabetes ride, and when so many people struggle to ride the 75 miles around that mountain, Austin makes it with ease. Austin participates in these JDRF-sponsored rides because he believes that the research funded by JDRF will not only find a cure for T1D, but will continue to deliver better treatments that help him and millions of others live healthier and longer until that cure is found. T1D makes life really hard. Austin is a competitive road cyclist, and he pushes to limits other can only imagine. He

PHOTO COURTESY ROB HEY

BY ROB HEY


A WELCOME SIGHT AFTER A trains hundreds of miles a week, rain or shine, hot or cold. Every single day he rides is another day that he is challenged with managing T1D. Unlike most of us who love to ride, he can never just get on his bike and ride worry free. He has to bring so many supplies with him on each ride just to maintain his health. But he also realizes T1D chose him for a reason and this is to be an advocate for the disease, not only for him but for all those living with T1D and all those who will be diagnosed. Austin spends time talking with local schools, organizes fundraising events and even spoke to Congress this summer about T1D. As Austin says, “I know I am only 16-years-old, but I had to grow up fast and I will not stand around just waiting for a cure while thousands of other kids lose their childhood to this disease.”

ABOUT JDRF TEAM ARKANSAS

JDRF Team Arkansas was formed in 2011 to raise money, through cycling, to fund research to cure type 1 diabetes (T1D). The funds raised by the team’s participation in the national JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes destination rides. Since its formation, JDRF Arkansas has included 49 riders who have traveled to five states, participated in five rides and raised more than $350, 000 for research to deliver life-changing therapies and, one day, a cure for T1D. jdrf.org/greaterarkansas

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ABOUT JDRF

JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. The mission is to accelerate life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat T1D and its complications. To accomplish this, JDRF has invested nearly $2 billion since its inception. JDRF is an organization built on a grassroots model of people connecting in their local communities, collaborating regionally for efficiency and broader fundraising impact, and uniting on a national stage to pool resources, passion and energy. JDRF collaborates with academic institutions, policymakers, and corporate and industry partners to develop and deliver a pipeline of innovative therapies to people living with T1D. The staff and volunteers in JDRF Arkansas Chapter and in more than 100 locations throughout the United States as well as six international affiliates are dedicated to advocacy, community engagement and the vision of a world without T1D. For more information, please visit jdrf.org or follow on Twitter: @JDRF.

We Love what we do! (479) 484-7500 8201 Rogers Ave, Fort Smith CHAMPIONCYCLING.COM

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 21


SOUTH ARKANSAS ON THE MOVE

Camden bike route phase 1.

I

n August of this year, The City of Camden adopted their Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan. Similarly, the City of El Dorado recently started the planning process for bicycle and pedestrian accommodations throughout their town. Both communities chose Crafton Tull to guide these efforts. According to Julie Luther, senior planner and project manager at Crafton Tull, “These plans don’t just focus on recreation; it’s about providing transportation alternatives for pedestrians and cyclists.” Residents want neighborhoods that connect to schools, parks and other destinations in town. When well planned and phased over time, a bicycle and pedestrian network will meet those needs. El Dorado is enthusiastic about the prospect of connecting more with the downtown entertainment district. When patrons can walk or ride to get where

they’re going, parking around the square becomes less an issue. Dave Roberts, Crafton Tull’s vice president of planning, often reminds each community, “We are all pedestrians.” Whether you walk or use a wheelchair, like his daughter Alex, providing access is the key to getting people out and about. Upcoming public meetings in El Dorado will provide citizens the opportunity to express their goals for the plan, while a steering committee will guide the team’s efforts throughout the process. Meanwhile, Camden Connections, a local foundation, is raising money for a rails-to-trails project to link downtown’s old train depot to existing bike lanes two miles away. The funds raised will also go to fund the first phase of the citywide master plan. The depot, which now houses the Chamber of Commerce, is the perfect trail head for visitors who wish to walk or bike the paved trail connecting neighborhoods to all four schools. Once completed, the two-mile multi-use path will include lights, benches and interpretive rest areas. Travis Daniel with Camden Connections adds, “We are fortunate to have motivated citizens who are passionate about walking and biking supported by a progressive mayor and city council committed to enhancing the quality of life in Camden.” To find out more on the future trail visit their website at camdenconnections.org. Bicycling and walking in south Arkansas is alive and well, thanks to innovative municipal leaders and residents taking an active approach to planning. In addition to improved connectivity, the added benefits of staying active and healthy cannot be overstated. Communities that invest in recreational and transformative opportunities for their citizens are taking steps in the right direction.

Trailblazers

ALEX BUMPERS

of Little Rock didn’t get serious about competitive biking until 2010, when he was just 13-years-old. Today, the 18-year-old has six seasons of mountain and road biking under his belt, racing XC mountain bike events all over Arkansas, Missouri, Louisiana and Colorado, and for the past three years, road racing during the summer months in locales ranging from Wisconsin and Canada to Ireland, Belgium (pictured right) and Italy. Bumpers finished 20th over all at the 2014 Junior Tour of Ireland, as well as two top-five finishes in a couple of junior races last summer in Belgium. “This past summer in my last race in Belgium, an Elite/U23 UCI kermesse, I pulled out a top 20 of about 100 riders, and I was the youngest one in the race,” he says. “That was definitely a highlight of my career.” For Bumpers, who will be a freshman at UC Santa Barbara this fall, cycling isn’t just about winning. “Cycling has given me an appreciation for health. I focus on eating better, staying hydrated, getting enough sleep, and various other things that hopefully promote a healthier and happier body and mind,” he says. –Mel Jones 22 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

PHOTO COURTESY OF CRAFTON TULL

BY MEL JONES


WHEN THE GREAT OUTDOORS ARE JUST A BLUR.

WE’RE HERE.

At First Security, we can’t get enough of the Natural State. And we know that one of the best ways to enjoy it is from the seat of a bike. You’ve got places to be. Trails to explore. Wherever they are, First Security is here for you.

O N L Y IN A R K A N S A S

Bank Better. Member FDIC

onlyinark.com | fsbank.com

EVERY PARK IS

EPIC. Start the day ripping through the Greenbrier backwoods on the 9-mile Enders Fault Trail at Woolly Hollow, one of the newest of 23 Arkansas State Parks mountain bike trails. Search online, and browse by difficulty for one that gets your heart pounding and legs pumping at ArkansasStateParks.com/things-todo/trails.

ArkansasStateParks.com My park, your park, our parks Woolly Hollow State Park

#ARStateParks

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 23


MY KIT

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MARTIN

NAME: Addie Teo

OCCUPATION: Occupational therapist

ON THE BIKE: “When I ride, hydration is a must. I usually have at least two water bottles consisting of sports drink. I also carry energy gels and sports bars for nutrition.” “On my road bike and mountain bike, I have a saddle bag or a seat bag that has a bicycle tube, tire inflation kit and multi-tool for possible flat tire or bike mechanicals. I also use a Garmin 520 cyclocomputer to record my ride speed, distance, elevation, heart rate, power output and more.”

WHERE I RIDE: “For road biking, I enjoy riding on the Arkansas River Trail, the Maumelle Lake loop and the Little Italy loop. For mountain biking, I enjoy riding the Vista Trail, the Womble Trail and Iron Mountain Trail.”

WHY I RIDE: “I ride to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors and also to de-stress. To me, riding on the river trail on my road bike or being in the woods on my mountain bike is so good for my soul. I ride to keep healthy and to keep being young at heart. I also enjoy cycling as a way to socialize and to bond with friends and families.”

THE KIT: Vanderkitten jersey, shorts and socks. “The quality of the Vanderkitten cycling kits is always superb, as well as the fit. I am also a brand ambassador for Vanderkitten for the past two years and am looking forward to being one again in 2016.” The helmet is a Giro Atmos, and the cycling shoes are Specialized women’s S-Works road shoes.

THE PLAYLIST: Linkin Park, Thirty Seconds to Mars, Green Day, Rise Against, Sum 41. THE BIKE: Trek Silque SL Di2 women’s specific design road bike.

24 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


Trailblazers

ss of le d r a g e r s t s li c y c ll a o t Catering oad, Mountain, discipline...R and BMX.

3515 J.F.K. Blvd, North Little Rock • (501) 753-4990 angrydavesbicycles.com

JOE MANEIRO

of Little Rock loves bicycles and people. And as president and program director of Recycle Bikes for Kids, which helps provide bikes to both adults and kids who do not have one, he’s able to use both his passion for bikes and for people in order to help others. Maneiro has been riding since he was a kid, but only became an avid cyclist within the past five years “to get physically active and push the limits of my body.” He competes with Little Rock Bike Polo in both in-state and outof-state tournaments on his SE Lager, which is modified to be a polo bike. He was named the 2015 Summer Solstice tournament “Most Improved Player,” and along with teammates the 2015 South In Your Mouth tournament “Dark Horse Team.” Maneiro enjoys road rides to Pinnacle Mountain and back, as well as mountain biking at Burns Park. However, he says, “Bike polo courts ‘til I drop.” Maneiro says of cycling, “It wakes me up and puts a smile on my face, and keeps me active and outdoors. I have met a lot of my friends through the sport. Lastly, it saves me tons of gas money.” –Mel Jones

Stay with us when you Hike, Bike or Run the Lake Ouachita Vista (LOViT) Trail!

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3716 S 87th St.| Fort Smith, AR 479-452-5228 | scottsbikeshop.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 25


MY KIT

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MARTIN

ON THE BIKE: Electra bicycle bell, Bontrager water bottle cages (2), Niterider Lumina headlight and Serfas Thunderbolt taillight (for night rides). WHERE I RIDE: Lake Ouachita Vista (LOViT) Mountain Bike

NAME: Cliff Li

Trails, Upper Buffalo Headwaters Mountain Bike Trails, Slaughter Pen Mountain Bike Trails.

OCCUPATION: Hydrologist, FTN Associates Ltd.

THE BIKE: Orbea Alma THE PLAYLIST: I don’t usually ride with music but if I did, it would be Dream Theater, Linkin Park, Iron Maiden and 80s hair bands.

THE KIT: Louis Garneau jersey, Louis Garneau bib shorts, ExOfficio hiking shorts, Louis Garneau gel gloves, Mavic Razor mountain bike shoes and Louis Garneau helmet, mostly purchased at Spokes Little Rock. 26 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

WHY I RIDE: “Because it fulfills my physical, mental and emotional needs all at the same time. When I’m shredding trail, I’m completely in the moment, sometimes almost zen-like, focused only on that specific instant in time. It’s a great workout, stress-reliever, keeps me in shape, and there’s almost nothing more fun. I ride to be connected to nature and at times, it’s great therapy. Even better, the ride experience is enhanced when experienced with friends.”


Trailblazers

ERNIE LECHUGA won Junior Nationals at the age of 14. A few years later, while representing the Mexican National Team, he won the Mexican National Time Trial Championship. The following year, he earned a spot on the USA National Team. He went on to race for the Mercury Cycling Team, but after racing his first season in Europe, Ernie was diagnosed with testicular cancer. He underwent six months of intensive chemotherapy treatment. A year later, Ernie returned to the bike, posting results and competing with DefeetLemond, Mercury and Jelly Belly Pro Cycling Team. Lechuga retired his pro status in 2004, but his life still revolves around cycling. He currently works at Chainwheel in Little Rock and is actively involved in his wife, Scotti WilborneLechuga’s pro-cycling career. –Brent Findlay

Big gulp: Swallowing an insect whole—usually without chewing.

RON CROSON might be a familiar sight to anyone who spends time in midtown Little Rock, although you might not be aware of it. Croson, 46, is a Little Rock police officer with the Community Oriented Policing unit, and patrols the midtown area daily on his Trek 8.4 DS bike. “I try to be a good ambassador for the sport by showing how bikes can be used to increase the safety of a neighborhood with non-traditional patrol methods,” he says. “Bike patrol allows me to approach more citizens, especially kids, and have an instant connection with them.” Croson, who rode extensively in the 1980s, returned to the sport recently to augment marathon training as well as overall health reasons, and notes that losing 70 pounds in five years is one of his greatest cycling achievements. He counts the Arkansas River Trail as one of his favorite places to ride, and although he doesn’t compete currently, “My daughter has talked me into a triathlon, I just don’t know which one yet,” he says. –Mel Jones

501.305.3915 • thebikelane.cc 2116 W Beebe Capps Expy, Searcy

Trailblazers

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BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 27


Gear & Components

CARBON FIBER TECH BY MEL JONES

L

ittle Rock native Tony Karklin knows a thing or two about the bike industry. After 18 years as an owner/manager of Chainwheel, in 2001 he founded Orbea USA, bringing the much-lauded Spanish brand to the United States. Today, he’s the general manager of San Diego-based BST Bicycles— he commutes to the west coast every other week— which is bringing the production of carbon fiber bikes back to the U.S.

28 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Karklin points out that while there are a lot of good bikes on the market today, most bicycle companies aren’t producing their own bikes anymore. Most brands have outsourced carbon bike production to Asia. “[Parent company] BST Nano Carbon is working to be the first to produce carbon at a volume in the USA. Being so close to production will enable us to build much more advanced products using proprietary materials and processes,” he

PHOTO COURTESY TONY KARKLIN

Carbon Fiber Technology Makes Cycling a Lightweight Affair


says. “We will be able to react to market changes much quicker and ultimately produce higher quality and competitively priced products.” Carbon fiber consists of fibers about five to 10 micrometers in diameter, and composed mostly of carbon. The carbon fibers are mixed with epoxy and turned in sheets called Prepregs. Prepreg sheets are placed around custom tooling and into molds that are cooked un de r extreme pressure and temperature. The end result is a structure that is amazingly lightweight and durable. Karklin notes that carbon fiber is the ultimate bike-building material. “Carbon fiber is optimal for bicycles. In addition to being lightweight and durable, it’s also stiff and shock absorbing,” he says. “Any cyclist who rides regularly should be on a carbon bicycle.” Another significant advantage that BST has is an amazing engineering team that came pri ma r i l y fro m t h e a ero sp a c e sector. “We are using some carbon optimization tools that are more advanced than anything used before in the bike industry,” Karklin says. “This technology is leading our development process and is allowing us to produce some of the most advanced products in the market.” Cyclists interested in taking a carbon fiber bike for a spin won’t be waiting very long. “This September we are relaunching the Ellsworth mountain bike brand,” says Karklin. “Ellsworth is famous for its instant center tracking suspension technology, which makes for the most efficient and best riding fullsuspension bicycles. We offer a range of nine models consisting of hard tail XC, all levels of fullsuspension bikes, a carbon fat bike and even gravel road launching later this fall.” Ellsworth will be sold locally through Spokes’ Kavanaugh location in Little Rock, and will be in stock around October. Karklin recently became a partner at Spokes, and says that they are working hard to expand their mountain bike business. “Arkansas has some of the best trails in the nation, and I hope to see a lot of Ellsworth bicycles riding on them soon.”

Come See Our New Location October 1st!

200 Progress Ave #5 Signature Plaza, Siloam Springs We will be a full concept and lifestyle recumbent dealer featuring a full line-up of all models: Terra Trike • Catrike Bacchettta Recumbents • And More

101 W Tulsa St. • Siloam Springs • 479-524-6605 www.dogwoodjunction.biz BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 29


FUEL UP Follow these basic nutrition guidelines to energize your ride

PHOTO BY NOVO STUDIO

BY MISTY MURPHY

D

ialing in your nutrition while on the bike can be a tricky endeavor. With so many different gels, bars, fruit chews, powders and electrolyte mixes, it can seem almost daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. The best idea would be to start with a solid breakfast. Even if your ride is later on in the day, a solid breakfast can kick start the fueling process and set you up to have better energy throughout your ride. Next, decide how long your ride will take you. If your ride will take you less than an hour and a half, gels or fruit chews will be sufficient. There are plenty of gels to choose from so grab a few different ones from your local bike shop and pick your favorite. If gels just are not your thing, several brands make a solid form of energy chews. These will all accomplish the same goal of providing proper energy throughout your ride. Ideally, one would take a gel/chew every 20 to 30 minutes so as to keep up their calorie intake. If your ride is going to be longer than an hour and a half, then a more solid food choice is recommended in the first hour or two of your ride, as too many gels can upset the stomach. PowerBar, ClifBar and Honey Stinger Bars are the most common and all of them are good choices. Start with half of the bar in the first 30 minutes, then the other half in the next 30 minutes. From that time on, you will be fine with

Plan nutrition choices based on the length of your ride. gels and/or fruit chews for the remainder of the ride, taken every 20 to 30 minutes. If you follow these basic nutrition ideas, you will get through your ride with flying colors. For a more in depth look at cycling training or nutrition, visit GPPFitNWA.com. Enjoy the day and go ride!

Trailblazers

TANDIE BAILEY, 25-year-old Fayettechill athlete and program manager for Waste Management’s Sustainable Solutions Team, got into riding when she was 17, because her brother worked for Progressive Trail Design and helped build Slaughter Pen. “He and his friends would hang out at the dirt jumps and I wanted to be a part of that,” she says. Needless to say, eight years later, riding is a huge part of Bailey’s life. “I plan vacations around races or going to the Rockies or some other rad place I’ve heard has good riding,” she says. “I almost always have my gear and my bike with me at the office so I’m ready to ride when 5 p.m. rolls around.” Bailey also competes in Enduro and Downhill races on her Santa Cruz Bronson, which was the first full-suspension bike she purchased. “I attribute much of my rowdiness on the trails to that bike. It can handle anything and is still light and quick enough to chase the boys down on the trail.” You’ll often find Bailey at Lake Atalanta, her favorite singletrack. “I bet the new bike park will only secure my love for that spot,” she says. –Mel Jones 30 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

Like our ride along the Arkansas River Trail, our memories of Little Rock are filled with wonderful discoveries. The breathtaking views from the top of Pinnacle Mountain. Touring the city’s downtown by Segway, and its neighborhoods, barbecue joints and breweries by bike. Enjoying the charm and convenience of riding the trolley from our hotel to explore the great shops, restaurants and clubs in the River Market, and being mesmerized by the city’s beautiful illuminated bridges. These are the memories of a new Southern style. You can experience it all here. You can experience it all in Little Rock.

WITH A

SOUTHERN ACCENT.

SM

Big Dam Bridge > To see more visit LittleRock.com

MOUNTAIN HARBOR

R E S O RT

&

S PA

O N

L A K E

O U A C H I TA

Stay in the ZONE

When you’re done SHREDDING the trail . . . Our lodge, cottages and condos will provide you with a home base. Located just minutes from the LOViT - an IMBA EPIC Model Trail – one of only 40 in the world.

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870-867-2191 • 800-832-2276 • MountainHarborResort.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 31


My Ride, My Town A day in the life with Bike Arkansas guest editor Misty Murphy PHOTOS BY NOVO STUDIO

Aug. 20 “One of my favorite quotes is from Katharine Hepburn: ‘A city seen from a bicycle is an entirely different city.’ That fits Springdale perfectly.”

32 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Bike Mom

I

t’s 68 degrees in August in Arkansas. Today is a gift from above that comes with strings attached. If the weather if this nice, you have to ride your bike. I live in Springdale, Arkansas. I moved here last year because I fell in love with a house. But now, 11 months later, I have fallen in love with the town. My son, Crey, is a fourth-grade student at Westwood Elementary. It’s a predominantly low-income school where many kids walk or ride their bikes—not because it’s the cool thing to do, but because it’s the only thing to do. Bike infrastructure around my neighborhood is lacking. The Razorback Regional Greenway runs through downtown Springdale, but trails have not yet extended to my neighborhood. However, the streets are wide, and people are friendly and respectful of cyclists. My son and I weave through side streets for most of the half-mile journey to his school before crossing at a crosswalk onto campus. Crey loves riding to school. He feels independent, cool. I love it because it gets his brain going early in the morning. Instead of arriving in a sleepy haze, he is energized and excited about the day. We lock up his bike, he heads into class and I’m off to work.


“Crey loves riding to school. He feels independent, cool. I love it because it gets his brain going early in the morning.�

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 33


Bike Coordinator

One of my favorite quotes is from Katharine Hepburn: “A city seen from a bicycle is an entirely different city.” That fits Springdale perfectly. In a car, I would hop on busy Highway 71 or 412 and feel annoyed as I sat in traffic. By bike, however, I pedal along quiet streets, past the city library and alongside a park where the only honks I hear are from the geese. I’m the regional trail coordinator for the Northwest Arkansas Council, which means I have the privilege of working on projects like the Razorback Regional Greenway and other local trails. Today, I’m looking in on a new office, The Spoke, that I’ll be sharing on the Greenway with other organizations that are energizing our region. The Spoke will initially house the Bicycle Coalition of the Ozarks, Velocity Group—which specializes in downtowns and placemaking—and the Northwest Arkansas Council’s satellite office, all literally within steps of the Razorback Regional Greenway downtown. Springdale’s downtown is in the middle of a cultural and infrastructure shift. Local businesses and investors are taking the initiative to revitalize Springdale while retaining the elements that make it cool. The street-side taqueria downtown with its curved plastic chairs and flash-bulb arrows looks like the best bad idea you could ever make. It’s just across the street from the state’s first cidery, newly opened, with a speakeasy feel. Just a few blocks away is The Steam, serving local food for lunch and dinner in a historic building. Culture, demographics and aesthetics jumble together in downtown Springdale in a beautiful collage that’s evident on even the shortest bike ride. I stop off at one of the mainstays of downtown Springdale, Spring Street Grill, just across the street from The Spoke. The owner installed a bike rack just last month, but still has a sign out front inviting cyclists to bring bikes inside if they want. The food and service are great—a steaming bowl of oatmeal for me and a rich omelet for my traveling partner.

34 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 35


“I stop off at one of the mainstays of downtown Springdale, Spring Street Grill, just across the street from The Spoke. The owner installed a bike rack just last month, but still has a sign out front inviting cyclists to bring bikes inside if they want.”

36 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

We aren’t the only cyclists in the restaurant. Actually, as I look around, I realize the only patrons in the restaurant are cyclists. On our way out, we stop to talk to two men in full bike kits, the clips from their shoes making little clicks on the floor. They’re from Rogers, making a regular trip down the Greenway. Downtown Springdale is the closest spot to a halfway point on the trail and a favorite stopping place to eat, hydrate and take a break. I ride north to check out one of our newly installed Razorback Regional Greenway mile markers. The trail is 36 miles long, extending from south Fayetteville to north Bentonville. The downtown Springdale section northward is one of the most popular parts of the trail —winding along Spring Creek and through areas that have been open only to farm trucks and cows for the last hundred years. There’s a peace here, just minutes from a bustling downtown, that is good for the soul on a sunny August morning. After a trip to Lake Springdale and back, I stop by The Steam for lunch and a tall glass of ice-cold water. My afternoon involves high heels, so I ride back home to change and get my car. My office is very bike friendly and includes shower facilities to make it easier for cyclists. But today’s afternoon is jammed with meetings spread far apart. I spend the afternoon talking bikes and trails before heading back home to end the day like it started—a pedal to Westwood Elementary. My son bounces out of school, hops on his bike, full of stories about the day. We ride home through the side streets and I am reminded of how important it is to provide experiences like this to children. Many of northwest Arkansas’ schools have added bikes to their physical education curriculum, thanks to grants from the Walton Family Foundation. Trails are continuing to expand and criss-cross northwest Arkansas. Cities like Springdale are beginning to recognize the quality of life and economic benefits of trails and cycling. But at its base, it’s the experience— being able to ride your bike safely—that I, and many others around the region, work toward everyday.


“There’s a peace here, just minutes from a bustling downtown, that is good for the soul on a sunny August morning.”

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 37


FAMILY TIME THE DRUMMOND BROOD HAS TRANSFORMED A FAMILY HOBBY INTO A WAY OF LIFE BY M I STY M U R PHY PHOTOS BY BY NOVO NOVO STUDIO STUDIO PHOTOS

38 | BIKE ARKANSAS Issue no. 2


A

nyone who has raced a bike in Arkansas over the past three years is familiar with the Drummond family. If you’re been on a podium in Arkansas, Texas or Oklahoma, chances are a Drummond child or adult was there beside you. There are 13 Drummond siblings, ranging in ages from 2-year-old Katie to 22-year-old Gerald. Not all the kids race but they all participate in what was at its origins an opportunity for the family to grow together. The journey that placed an Arkansan atop the national mountain bike championship podium last year started six years ago with a suggestion from a grandparent, then a trip to Walmart to buy a few of the kids bikes for a Memorial Day outing. “The kids were home schooled and weren’t involved in any extracurricular sports or activities.”, says dad Gerry Drummond. “It’s something we can all do together, where we’re not going in different directions. Those not participating can go and watch,” says mom, Cicely Drummond. “It provides a lot of time spent together.”

Dad Gerry leads the family on a hike on their home-built mountain bike trails.

Annie, 13, lands a jump on a trail behind the family home near Springdale. BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 39


In 2009, Gerry took sons Cooper and Gerald to what was then a new visitors center at Hobbs State Park Conservation Area just across the lake from their home. They had no helmets. No water. And no experience for the notorious climbs along the nine-mile Little Clifty Loop. Hours later, the dehydrated crew finally made it back to the truck to down bottles of Gatorade. Little could they have imagined that in a few years, those climbs would be like a second home to them, a launch pad to leave race competitors shaking their heads in awe. Soon after, the whole family started riding the trails at Hobbs on the weekends. Cooper told sister Emma there was no way she would make it up the climb the first time—that it was okay if she walked. She didn’t walk. The competitive spirit that led Emma to prove her brother wrong is part of the Drummond nature. They don’t quit. “Our kids have always loved to climb,” says Gerry. “That’s when they want to punch it. It’s always a race to the top. That’s when you prove something—on the way up the hill.” The family would load at least a half dozen bikes on a 12-foot trailer and travel in their minivan to trails around the region. Gerald and Cooper would try to outpace one another, racing around the trails, while younger siblings and dad were strung along the trail for miles. The family put hundreds of miles on their Walmart bikes before graduating to buying used bikes on Craigslist and augmenting with parts purchased on eBay. Gerry is a machinist at their family business, G-Pop Shop, which rebuilds turbochargers. The kids, particularly Cooper, are experts at making their parts lighter or even creating parts from scratch in a pinch. They started with just disassembling and assembling their own bikes, which is what Gerald was doing just before their first race at Slaughter Pen Jam in Bentonville. “We didn’t have jerseys or cycling licenses. The kids were on the start line while I was filling out registrations,” Gerry says. “I had no idea what I was putting the organizers through.” 40 | BIKE ARKANSAS Issue no. 2

Siblings Cooper, 22, Annie, 13, Will, 9, Emma, 17, and John, 15, ride on singletrack they built to train on behind their home.


THE FAMILY PUT HUNDREDS OF MILES ON THEIR WALMART BIKES BEFORE GRADUATING TO BUYING USED BIKES ON CRAIGSLIST AND AUGMENTING WITH PARTS PURCHASED ON EBAY.

Will Drummond, 9, in his family’s workshop.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2| 41


COOPER TOLD SISTER EMMA THERE WAS NO WAY SHE WOULD MAKE IT UP THE CLIMB THE FIRST TIME—THAT IT WAS OK IF SHE WALKED. SHE DIDN’T WALK.

Cooper Drummond, 22, airs up the tires on the first new bike he has ever had—purchased just this year.

John Drummond, 15, places a bike on top of the family’s custom-made bike and gear carrier. 42 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Cooper, 22, followed by Annie, 13, and Emma, 17.


Will pops a wheelie in the driveway.

Just a few of the family race numbers and awards.

Emma jumping on the family trail.

At that point, the kids were riding one day a week, usually on Sunday. Cooper won his age group in a sprint finish, despite his handlebar coming off midway through the race. He stood atop the podium in his khaki shorts and hiking boots, beaming. The next year, Cooper and Gerald did all the Arkansas and Oklahoma state races. John joined in with his first mountain bike race, a 30-miler at Spring Hill in Barling. Emma and Mercedes weren’t far behind. And Cooper was on a roll. “He won everything,” John says. All the kids were doing well. Gerald tied for first in the Oklahoma series and was second in Arkansas. Emma won her category at Mellow Johnny’s in Austin, a prolevel race, and became the family celebrity when she was interviewed by an Austin TV station. In 2012, the family decided to try their hand at the national mountain bike championships in Sun Valley, Idaho. They put four bikes on the back of the minivan and three bikes on top. Little Will’s bike was disassembled in the back. The family crowded into the minivan with the “brown bag special,” a collection of snacks in a paper sack to keep their energy up. “Oklahoma was the farthest west we had ever gone, and here we were going to Idaho,” John says. These Arkansans who seemed to be racing in every single category made a splash on the national scene. The Arkansas jokes flew from the race announcer, but their talent was undeniable. Mercedes won her category, and Gerald came in second. Cooper came in 15th in a tough, crowded field. Will, at age 6, was the youngest competitor ever in a national championship. He climbed the ski slope service road on his 20-inch bike every lap, never walked or pushed, but was beaten by riders who were all four years or more older than him. Annie took third place on a heavy bike. After that successful showing, training ramped up for the family. Three-hour rides had to be fit into a full-time work and school schedule. The Drummonds were riding on the Fayetteville bike paths at night. “If it’s raining, if it’s 10 degrees, we would do what’s on that schedule,” Gerry says. As a comparison, in February 2012, the family did six bike rides. In February 2013, they only took two days off. They had new coaches, were using heart monitors and were upgrading parts on their used bikes. A 15-passenger van replaced the minivan, and Gerry invented a bike rack/ travel trailer to hold all their stuff. “The goal for us is not Europe or world-cup racers,” says Cicely. “That would be the opposite of what we have now. We are thankful for the cycling and what it provides for these ‘growing up’ years. It’s something the kids have to work hard for, train for, the discipline is good. The time they are able to spend together, the memories they are sharing, the relationships they have with each other and what they learn from these days, this is what has weight and will last. It’s not all about cycling or the trophy. But if they are going to race, then race to win.” BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 43


THE PHAT TIRE RACE TEAM

BY MISTY MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY BY NOVO STUDIO

READIES FOR FALL’S SLAUGHTER PEN JAM

44 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


Jesus Flores, Category 2 racer, pops a wheelie on the All-American Trail. (facing page) Mike McCutcheon, Category 1 racer, riding the Creek Trail. BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 45


t ather a e. bers g id m r e p m u o gr Team ut on a o g in t set

T

efore

b rdens

on Ga Compt

he weekend of October 2, the trails at Slaughter Pen in Bentonville will be packed with the top mountain bike riders in the state. Teams from around Arkansas, as well as Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri and Texas, will test their skills against one another at the Slaughter Pen Jam on 20plus miles of winding singletrack. But one team has a distinct advantage. For the Phat Tire race team, these trails are their home base. The Phat Tire riders know every root, every climb, every brake-screeching descent from the All-American to Medusa. The riders got together in August for a quick refresher around the trail. They met at Compton Gardens, just across downtown Bentonville from the Phat Tire Bike Shop that sponsors the team.

They’re an impressive group in their red, white and black kits. Mountain bike racing on a team is a unique concept. It’s a highly individual sport. Unlike road racing, teams don’t draft and aren’t able to help one another on the course. But they train together, share knowledge and help one another become better racers, combining points and finish placement to determine the winning team for the Arkansas Mountain Bike Championship Series. At Compton Gardens, the team gathered to admire teammate Lindsay Custer’s new bike before setting out north on the Razorback Regional Greenway toward Slaughter Pen. The All-American Trail is the first section of Slaughter Pen, just up the hill from the Crystal Bridges Museum

MOUNTAIN BIKE RACING ON A TEAM IS A UNIQUE CONCEPT. IT’S A HIGHLY INDIVIDUAL SPORT. UNLIKE ROAD RACING, TEAMS DON’T DRAFT AND AREN’T ABLE TO HELP ONE ANOTHER ON THE COURSE. 46 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


Scott Schroen, general manager for Phat Tir e Bike Shop, rides a wheelie on the south lawn at Crystal Bridges Musem of American Art—just off the Slaughter Pen Trail.

a Category Lindsay Custer, r turn to 2 racer, waits he sh Push. Bu climb the

uster and Lindsay C s, the Nate Field nic, a h c e m team Trail. k e re C ride the

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 47


Creek Trail.

of American Art. The section is mostly flat and beginner friendly, with rocks, logs and skinnies placed along the way to provide challenges for more advanced riders. The team shoots through the section, riding the skinnies, sliding tires around corners and hopping the rollers. A winding downhill dumps riders back out onto the paved Greenway for a little less than half a mile. Nate Fields, the team’s mechanic and a mainstay at the Arkansas Mountain Bike Championship Series, practices his bunny hop where the south lawn of Crystal Bridges meets the Greenway. Scott Schroen, the general manager for Phat Tire, does a wheelie for about 50 yards on a narrow strip of concrete. The group talks and jokes as they wait to take off again. They cross the creek over to Urban Trail and speed toward the mid-level crossing of the Bush Push. The Bush Push is so named, according to local lore, because President George W. Bush attempted to climb this monster hill. He didn’t quite make it, so his secret service agents gave him a push to the top. It’s a daunting climb, one that begs riders to spin out on loose rocks near the bottom and packs a nasty punch as the grade kicks up steeply a few feet from the top.

Nate Fields on the Creek Trail. 48 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


PACKS A NASTY PUNCH AS THE GRADE KICKS UP STEEPLY A FEW FEET FROM THE TOP.

Scott Schroen on the All-American Trail.

The team gathered at the bottom to make a run at it. Most of the riders made it, with a few giving it a couple of tries before continuing north on the Urban Trail. They cross the Razorback Regional Greenway and head toward the Free Ride Park, the start and finish line of the Slaughter Pen Jam. A blur of red and white flashes through the trees as riders make their way down Armadillo’s Last Stand, a fast and flowing lower section. A typical Tuesday night training ride for the team would involve laps around Tatamagouche and Medusa, two of the more challenging trails on Slaughter Pen and a key part of the race course. Instead, they practice a particularly slick creek crossing near the bottom of the downhill trail. Several of the riders were initially reluctant to try the crossing. “I’ve got to go to work tomorrow,” says Mike McCutcheon, a Category 1 rider. But with a healthy dose of peer pressure, they all tried and successfully crossed the creek two times. After a round of congratulations and pats on the back, the team made their way back up the Razorback Regional Greenway to Compton Gardens. Riders can join in the group ride every Tuesday night at 6 p.m. from the Phat Tire Bike Shop in Bentonville. It’s a fast-paced ride that usually covers about 15 to 20 miles.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 49


AVID BIKER?

PULASKI COUNTY HAS YOU COVERED!

BIG DAM BRIDGE AT 4226 FEET THE BIG DAM BRIDGE IS THE LONGEST PEDESTRIAN/BICYCLE BRIDGE IN THE WORLD! TWO RIVERS PARK ALLOWS VISITORS TO EXPLORE AND RELAX WHILE ENJOYING NATURE'S BEAUTY. THE 1000-ACRE PARK, LOCATED JUST SIX MILES OUTSIDE OF DOWNTOWN LITTLE ROCK, HAS MANY AMENITIES TO INCLUDE BIKE TRAILS, WALKING TRAILS, GARDENS, AND ABUNDANCE OF WILDLIFE. JUNCTION BRIDGE PROJECT WILL ADAPT THE JUNCTION RAILROAD BRIDGE FOR PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE USE, LINKING BOTH SIDES OF THE ARKANSAS RIVER. IT WILL BE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE SIX BRIDGES PLAN AND RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT IN BOTH CITIES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.CO.PULASKI.AR.US/PROJECTS

PEDAL IT FORWARD Donate a bike... Repair a bike... Share a bike... Let's get everyone riding! www.pedalitforwardnwa.com

50 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


Get Outside

PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS OUTSIDE AND ARKANSAS PARKS AND TOURISM

Cane Creek Lake Trail/Delta

GO FOR A COLORFUL RIDE BY JOE JACOBS Arkansas is a beautiful state year round, but in the fall the forests take on a fresh dimension of color and vibrance. Many inspiring views of our autumn palette can be enjoyed from scenic roads throughout the state, but to get to some of the more unique spots, you’ll need to get off the road and hit the trail. Many mountain biking trails offer great access to these special places. Remember that all of these trails are also open to hiking; if you feel a trail is too technical for you to ride or you happen to be in the area without your bike, feel free to walk on out.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 51


SYLLAMO MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS

Just north of Mountain View, Arkansas, is the Syllamo Mountain Bike Trail System. This International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) Epic Trail includes over 50 miles of Ozark beauty. One of the best fall views on the trail is on the White River Bluff Trail. From the Green Mountain Road Trailhead, follow the trail just over a mile to a very rocky technical riding section. Here hikers and cyclists will find a rock ledge high above the White River Valley with beautiful views of the colorful hills to the east.

Ouachita Mountains

LAKE OUACHITA VISTA TRAIL

Some of the best views of the Ouachita Mountains can be found along the Lake Ouachita Vista Trail. The Hickory Nut Mountain overlook near the halfway point of this 40+-mile trail gives visitors an unobstructed view of Lake Ouachita, its beautiful islands and a backdrop of the Northern Ouachitas. Not really up to the 20-mile ride to this scenic spot? A much shorter ride is available from the Crystal Springs trailhead or you can drive up about four miles of gravel roads from Highway 270. Pro-tip: take a camera no matter how you get there.

52 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS OUTSIDE AND ARKANSAS PARKS AND TOURISM

Ozark Mountains


Trailblazers

NATHAN “WOODY” WOODRUFF has been

Crowley’s Ridge/Delta

CRAIGHEAD FOREST

On the south side of Jonesboro is Craighead Forest Park. This park offers miles of mountain bike trails on the top of Crowley’s Ridge, a unique landform that rises above the Delta region of the state. The terrain lends itself to a mixed forest including oak, hickory, American beech, sugar maple and yellow poplar, much like the forests of the western Appalachian Mountains. Although there are some technical areas on the trails, much of the park is easily accessible to the beginning mountain biker.

CANE CREEK LAKE TRAIL (image pg. 51)

On the border of the Delta and the Timberlands in Cane Creek State Park, near Star City, the Cane Creek Lake Trail offers surprising terrain for what many would assume is a flat part of the state. This trail is home to mountain bike and trail run races. The trail is well known for its three large suspension bridges and more than 50 smaller bridges throughout the 15-mile length. Bottomland hardwoods contrast with the pine and cypress trees along the trail. Camping is available in the park along with kayak rentals so visitors can take advantage of the kayak trail on the lake.

riding since 1995, and it all began at Devil’s Den State Park. “A buddy introduced me and another friend to mountain biking by taking us down the Butterfield Trail,” he says. “We parked at the top and rode downhill as fast as we could. I was hooked after that, and haven’t looked back since.” Woodruff is the president and founder of Progressive Trail Design (PTD), a highly skilled trail building and bike park development company located in Bentonville and Louisville, Colorado. PTD builds mountain bike trails all over the country, and by extension, Woodruff says, supports bike advocacy in a variety of ways. “We have recently developed a new program we call “The Progressive Playground,” which is aimed at providing bike trails and other amenities to kids,” he says. “We are installing these small bike parks at schools and public parks throughout northwest Arkansas. We have completed five so far, and are working on a master plan for Fayetteville and Bentonville public schools.” Woodruff says that PTD’s long-term vision is to develop a separate nonprofit to get the Progressive Playgrounds in schools throughout Arkansas, and then hopefully the rest of the country. –Mel Jones

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 53


MOUNT NEBO BENCH TRAIL

The Arkansas River Valley is home to many first-rate mountain bike trails, but few offer the views of the Mount Nebo Bench Trail. Located in Mount Nebo State Park, the Bench Trail circles the mountain just below the upper bluffs. The Bench Trail is actually an old roadbed, making it the perfect ride for a beginner mountain biker, families or someone looking for a more casual ride. Take your time on this four-mile ride and enjoy the numerous overlooks. While you’re up on the mountain, enjoy more overlooks at the very top including the Sunrise and Sunset points.

For more trail listings and information, visit arkansaswild.com, arkansasoutside.com or nwatrails.org.

Timberlands

FERN HOLLOW MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL

A little known mountain bike trail in the Arkansas State Park system is the Fern Hollow Mountain Bike Trail at White Oak Lake State Park in Bluff City. A non-technical trail in southwest Arkansas, Fern Hollow offers both four and nine mile options with minimal elevation changes. In a part of the state known for extensive pine forests, this park is an oasis of lowland hardwoods like the park namesake. Enjoy fall camping in the park and ride straight out of the campground on the trail. The park also has several hiking trails.

54 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Granny gear: A very low gear (that even your granny could pedal). Unobtanium: The latest, greatest, most expensive new alloy.

PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS OUTSIDE AND ARKANSAS PARKS AND TOURISM

River Valley


Trailblazers

University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville. Currently serving as interim chancellor, Ferritor has worked most of his adult life at the U of A, both as a professor of sociology and as chancellor from 1986 to 1997. He only recently got back on his bike, having stopped riding in 1996 because road traffic had gotten so bad he didn’t feel safe. But on a Colorado vacation in 2013 he picked up a bike once more at the behest of his doctor, who encouraged Ferritor to lose weight and exercise more. Upon his return home, he got out his old mountain bike and hit the Razorback Greenway trails that were nearing completion, and after a week he was hooked and went out and bought a new bike. Today, Ferritor rides almost exclusively on the Greenway, with several favorite rides between Fayetteville and Bella Vista, as well as side trails off the Greenway. “Northwest Arkansas is beautiful and the trail takes advantage of the wonderful countryside but also takes you through our major communities,” he says. “I can enjoy nature and the next thing you know I am on Dickson Street having coffee at Arsaga’s Depot.” –Mel Jones

Two Convenient Locations Friendly Knowledgeable Staff Serving Arkansas Since 1992

West 315 North Bowman Little Rock, AR 72211 501-221-BIKE (2453)

ARKANSAS CYCLING & FITNESS

DAN FERRITOR is a mainstay on the

If you’re not dirty and sweaty, you’re not playing hard enough

North 3010 East Kiehl Ave Sherwood, AR 72120 501-834-5787

www.arkansascycling.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 55


PHOTO COURTESY SPOKES

BIKE SHOPS

Spokes/Little Rock

Central Arkansas

CONWAY

THE RIDE

2100 Meadowlake Rd., Ste. 2 501-764-4500 www.therideonline.net Bike Brands: Specialized, QR, Raleigh, Niner In-house Specialties: Repair Group Rides: Yes

LITTLE ROCK

ARKANSAS CYCLING & FITNESS 315 N. Bowman, Stes. 6-9 501-221-BIKE (2453) www.arkansascycling.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Giant/Liv, Haro In-House Specialties: Service/repair, 56 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

demo bikes and wheel sets on select models, financing with the Specialized S-Card, Specialized Body Geometry bike fittings. Group Rides: Two-hour Saturday morning shop road ride open to all and family-friendly—route is approximately 35 miles and begins at 7 a.m.

BOBBY’S BIKE HIKE TOURS Little Rock River Market 400 President Clinton Ave. 501-613-7001 www.bobbysbikehike.com/littlerock Bike Brands: Raleigh, KHS, Fuji, Schwinn In-House Specialties: Repairs, rentals, tours Group Rides: Yes

CHAINWHEEL

10300 Rodney Parham Rd. 501-224-7651 www.chainwheel.com Bike Brands: Trek, Kestral, Pinnarello, Salsa, Catrike In-House Specialties: Servicing all major bike brands with a goal of 48-hour turnaround; perform professional fit services; financing available. Group Rides: Saturday “Coffee Ride,” Tuesday road ride and Thursday night mountain bike ride (all rides seasonal).


ORBEA USA

119 Main St. 501-280-9700; 888-466-7232 www.orbea.com/us-en/

SPOKES 109 S. Main St. (Downtown) 501-801-5222 1001 Kavanaugh Blvd. (Hillcrest) 501-664-7765 www.spokesshop.com Bike Brands: Cervelo, Cannondale, Orbea, Felt, Niner, Electra In-House Specialties: Repair, service, financing Group Rides: Yes, differs with the season.

THE COMMUNITY BICYCLIST 7509 Cantrell Rd., 118 501-663-7300 www.thecommunitybicyclist.com/ index.html Bike Brands: Fuji, Breezer, Jamis, Surly, All-City In-House Specialties: Service for all bike shop brands

NORTH LITTLE ROCK

ANGRY DAVE’S BICYCLES 3515 John F. Kennedy Blvd. 501-753-4990 www.angrydavesbicycles.com Bike Brands: Santa Cruz, Scott, Intense, Marin, Ridley, Electra and BMX brands (Redline, SE Racing, FIT, WETHEPEOPLE) In-House Specialties: Service and repair, custom wheel building, custom bike builds, professional fit service; financing through Synchrony Bank, layaway.

NORTH LITTLE ROCK BICYCLE

800 E. Washington Ave. 501-372-2727 www.nlr-bicycles.com Bike Brands: KHS, Sun, Summit, Manhattan In-House Specialties: Sales and service

RUSSELLVILLE

SEARCY

CARR’S CHAIN REACTION

THE BIKE LANE

506 N. Arkansas Ave. 479-890-4950 www.facebook.com/ carrschainreaction Bike Brands: Trek, KHS, Cannondale, Moots, Sun, Surly, Mirraco, Manhattan In-House Specialties: Full service repair shop; Trek financing

SHERWOOD

ARKANSAS CYCLING & FITNESS

3010 E. Kiehl Ave. 501-834-5787 www.arkansascycling.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Giant/Liv, Haro In-House Specialties: service/ repair, demo bikes and wheel sets on select models, financing with the Specialized S-Card, Specialized Body Geometry bike fittings. Group Rides: Two hour Saturday morning shop road ride open to all and family-friendly—route is approximately 35 miles and begins at 7 a.m.

J & P BIKE SHOP

7910 John F. Kennedy Blvd. (Hwy 107) 501-835-4814 www.jandpbikeshop.com Bike Brands: Cannondale, Raleigh, GT, Schwinn, Redline In-House Specialties: Full service repair, tune-ups, check overs, tire and tube replacement, brake and gear work, wheels; financing with no down payment, no interest for 12 months W.A.C. Northeast Arkansas

JONESBORO

GEARHEAD CYCLE HOUSE

231 S. Main St. 870-910-5569 www.gearheadcyclehouse.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Trek In-House Specialties: Full-service bike shop, Shimano Certified Service Center Group Rides: Weekly, Saturday morning rides at 7:30 a.m. from the store; group mountain bike rides Tuesdays at 6 p.m. (until daylight savings time).

2116 W. Beebe Capps Expressway 501-305-3915 www.thebikelane.cc Bike Brands: BH, Cannondale, Devinci, KHS, Pivot, Rocky Mountain, Wilier In-House Specialties: Repairs/service Group Rides: Tuesday and Thursday evenings, Saturday mornings and some holidays. Northwest Arkansas

BENTONVILLE

MOJO CYCLING

2104 S. Walton Blvd., Ste. 1 479-271-7201 www.mojocycling.com Bike Brands: Orbea, GT, KHS, Jamis, Transition, Canfield Brothers, Haro Bikes Group Rides: Shop rides on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings

PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP

125 W. Central Ave. 479-715-6170 www.phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer In-House Specialties: Professional service department works on all levels of bikes, from kid’s bikes, tubeless tire set up, suspension work and the latest electronic shifting technology; bike rental 7 days a week with wide array of rental bike fleet ranging from carbon mountain and road bikes to hybrids, Enve wheels and kid’s trailers.

EUREKA SPRINGS

ADVENTURE MOUNTAIN OUTFITTERS

151 Spring St. 479-253-0900 www.adventuremountainoutfitters.com Bike Brands: Specialized In-House Specialties: Full-service bike shop, certified suspension technician, custom builds, professional fitments, rentals, guide and shuttle service to Eureka Springs and greater Ozark Mountain area trails.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 57


Project12:Layout 1 8/10/15 2:26 PM Page 1

FAYETTEVILLE

GOOD BIKES

3300 W. Martin Luther King Blvd. 479-935-3345 www.argoodbikes.com Bike Brands: BMC, Bianchi, Colnago, Focus, Fuji, GT, Independent Fabrication, Kestrel, Breezer, SE, Redline Chase, Staats, Fly, Police Specialties. In-House Specialties: Consultations, professional fit service, full-service repair shop (with Arkansas’ only licensed professional mechanic), rental, financing; official Mavic support center. Group Rides: Yes

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS (U of A Campus) 640 Garland Ave. 479-695-0202 www.lewisandclarkoutfitters.com

PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP

3761 N. Mall Ave. 479-966-4308 www.phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer In-House Specialties: Professional service department works on all levels of bikes, from kid’s bikes, tubeless tire set up, suspension work and the latest electronic shifting technology; bike rental 7 days a week with wide array of rental bike fleet ranging from carbon mountain and road bikes to hybrids, Enve wheels and kid’s trailers.

THE BIKE ROUTE

3660 N. Front St., Suite 2 479-966-4050 www.facebook.com/thebikeroute Bike Brands: Cannondale, Cervelo, Pinarello, Moots, Niner, Electra In-House Specialties: Full service mechanics/repair, rental of bikes and race wheels Group Rides: Thursday Tempo lunch ride at 12:30 p.m., Thursday evening beginner ride from Owl Creek Elementary at 6 p.m.

THE HANDLE BAR

115 Block Ave. 479-316-8030 www.thehandlebar.org

58 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

Bike Brands: Lynskey, Linus, Redline, Raleigh, Lapierre, Gunnar, Waterford, Retrospec, Lezyne, Bellwether, Profile Design, Continental, Schwalbe In-House Specialties: Repair, bike fit, coaching, service, rental, financing; beer and coffee. Group Rides: Weekly rides

THE HIGHROLLER CYCLERY

322 W. Spring St. 479-442-9311 www.highrollercyclery.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Yeti, Pure Fix, Pure City Cycle, Reid Cycles In-House Specialties: Repairs all types, suspension overhaul services, bike fittings (using the Body Geometry fit system with motion capture software, bike path use rentals, bike financing available through Synchrony Bank. Group Rides: Yes. Road ride Thursday evenings leaving Baum Stadium at 6:15 p.m. late spring/summer; intermediate level ride average 16-18 mph, no drop.

FORT SMITH

CHAMPION CYCLING & FITNESS

8201 Rogers Ave. 479-484-7500 www.championcycling.com Bike Brands: Specialized In-House Specialties: Full service and repair to all brands, 0% financing for 18 months Group Rides: Group and family rides offered

PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP

1700 Rogers Ave. 479-222-6796 www.phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer In-House Specialties: professional service department works on all levels of bikes, from kid’s bikes, tubeless tire set up, suspension work and the latest electronic shifting technology; bike rental 7 days a week with wide array of rental bike fleet ranging from carbon mountain and road bikes to hybrids, Enve wheels and kid’s trailers.


SCOTT’S BIKE SHOP

3716 S. 87th St. 479-452-5228 www.scottsbikeshop.com Bike Brands: Giant, Cannondale In-House Specialties: Service and repair, financing and layaway

HARRISON

BICYCLE OUTFITTER

112 N. Walnut St. 870-741-6833 www.thebicycleoutfitteronline.com Bike Brands: Trek, Diamondback In-House Specialties: Parts, accessories and service on all makes and models of bikes

Full service bike shop and Shimano certified service center.

SILOAM SPRINGS

CROSS COUNTRY CYCLERY

516 E. Main St. 479-228-7359 www.facebook.com/pages/CrossCountry-Cyclery/458699737512500 Bike Brands: Boardman, Masi, Haro Bikes, Foundry, Surly, Del Sol, All City In-House Specialties: Professional repair, custom shock and fork rebuild and tuning, custom bike builds, custom wheel builds. Group Rides: Tuesday night road ride, Thursday night MTB ride, monthly Saturday ride.

DOGWOOD JUNCTION TRIKES & BIKES

101 W. Tulsa St. EXPANDING TO NEW LOCATION 10/01/15 200 Progress Ave., Ste. 5 (Signature Plaza) 479-524-6605 www.dogwoodjunction.biz Bike Brands: Terra Trike, Catrike, KHS, ICE Trikes, Bacchetta recumbent In-House Specialties: Repair, service, sales, limited rentals, financing, layaway, test rides, winter storage Group Rides: Spring and fall.

(870) 910-5569 231 S Main St Jonesboro, AR 72401 www.gearheadcyclehouse.com

North Little Rock -

BIG

on trails! 31.4 miles of multi-surfaced trails.

www.NorthLittleRock.org

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 59


From training wheels to big wheels, we have a ride for you! CANNONDALE | RALEIGH | GT | SCHWINN | REDLINE Tune Ups • Checkovers • Tire & Tube Replacement • Brake & Gear Work • Wheel Work • Lifetime adjustment policy on new bikes Financing Available! No down payment. No interest for 12 months W.A.C.

7910 John F. Kennedy Blvd. (Hwy 107), Sherwood (501) 835-4814

www.jandpbikeshop.com

SPRINGDALE

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS

4915 S. Thompson St. 479-756-1344 www.lewisandclarkoutfitters.com Bike Brands: Giant, Liv, Momentum, Kona, All City In-House Specialties: Full-service bicycle repair, rack install, 6- and 12-month financing Group Rides: Mountain, road, paved trail social ride and women’s only.

ROGERS STAY IN OUR COMFORTABLE CABINS AFTER YOUR DAY... WE’RE RIGHT ON THE LOViT TRAIL.

GPP CYCLING

318 S. 1st St. 479-372-4768 www.gppcycling.com Bike Brands: Felt, Scott, Argon 18, Haro Bikes In-House Specialties: Coaching services, bike fitting, full-service repairs, fitness center. Group Rides: Group rides for all levels of riders and different types of bike rides including road and mountain.

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS

2530 Pinnacle Hills Parkway 479-845-1344 www.lewisandclarkoutfitters.com BOAT & CABIN RENTALS • ONSITE BIKE WASHING STATION • RESTAURANT

ENJOY THE WONDERFUL SCENERY OF LAKE OUACHITA

LOCATED ON THE LOViT TRAIL JUST MINUTES FROM HOT SPRINGS

OZARK BIKE SHOP

Cash Village Shopping Center 400 S. 8th St., Ste. K 479-636-0394

THE HIGHROLLER CYCLERY echocanyonar.com | 2645 Blakely Dam Road | Royal, AR 71968 | 501-767-2997

“Your FULL SERVICE bicycle shop”

PHONE 501.764.4500 FAX 501.764.4502 www.therideonline.net 2100 MEADOWLAKE RD, SUITE 2 CONWAY, AR 72032

60 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

402 S. Metro Parkway 479-254-9800 www.highrollercyclery.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Yeti, Pure Fix, Pure City Cycle, Reid Cycles In-House Bike Specialties: Repairs for all types, suspension overhaul services, bike fittings (using the Body Geometry fit system with motion capture software), bike path use rentals, bike financing available through Synchrony Bank. Group Rides: Road ride Thursday evenings leaving Baum Stadium at 6:15 p.m. late spring/summer; intermediate level ride average 16-18 mph, no drop.


Southeast Arkansas

HOT SPRINGS

PARKSIDE CYCLE

719 Whittington Ave. 501-623-6188 www.parksidecycle.com Bike Brands: Trek, Felt, Salsa In-House Specialties: Full service repair and fitting Group Rides: Yes, call shop for details.

2104 S. Walton Blvd Bentonville, AR 479-271-7201

TEXARKANA (TX)

BERRIDGE BIKES

321 Texas Blvd. 903-794-2453 www.berridgebikes.com Bike Brands: Felt, Giant, Intense, Electra, Sun, Torker, Redline, Phat Cycles In-House Specialties: Service and repairs, custom builds

BICYCLE REPAIR & SERVICE ONLY

MOTIVE BIKE SERVICE

Mobile repair service to the Little Rock Metro Area and beyond 479-366-7926 www.motivebikeservice.com

OZARK BICYCLE SERVICE

W. New Hope Road Northwest Arkansas Area 479-715-1496 www.ozarkbicycleservice.com

Come see the Fuji Transonic at The Community Bicyclist! Dancing on the Pedals: Descriptive of a rider who is a speedy and graceful climber.

Mon-Sat 10am-6pm 7509 Cantrell Rd, Suite 118 • Little Rock

(Tanglewood Shopping Center, located in back)

501.663.7300 www.thecommunitybicyclist.com

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 61


MAY 30

LITTLE ROCK GRAN FONDO

JUNE 05

TOUR DE ROCK

JULY 17-19

FAT TIRE FEST

AUG 01

KOMEN ARKANSAS RIDE FOR THE CURE

EVENTS

SEPT

AUG 19 14-16

www.littlerockgranfondo.com

www.carti.com/events/tour-de-rock

www.fattirefestival.com

www.racesonline.com/events

NWA MOUNTAIN BIKE CHAMPIONSHIPS “THE EUREKAN” MULTISPORT FESTIVAL arkansasstateparks.com/events www.theeurekan.com

SEPT SEPT 19

NWA MOUNTAIN BIKE CHAMPIONSHIPS

SEPT 26

BIG DAM BRIDGE 100

26

BIG DAM BRIDGE 100

www.arkansasstateparks.com/events

Thebigdambridge100.com

www.thebigdambridge100.com

OCT SLAUGHTER PEN JAM slaughterpenjam.com 2-4 SLAUGHTER PEN JAM OCT 2-4

www.slaughterpenjam.com/festival-details

OCT OCT 1717

TOURDELTA DA’ DELTA TOUR DA’

NOV 22 NOV

ATTILA THE HUN

22

tourdadelta.net www.tourdadelta.net

ATTILA THE HUN

www.ambcs.com

ambcs.com

78 | BIKE ARKANSAS ISSUE NO. 1

Community Bakery proudly supports cycling in Arkansas. • Bike Friendly Ride Stop • Plenty of Caffeine & Carbs

• Bike Rack Parking • Outdoor Seating

Join us for Bruce’s Saturday morning Coffee Ride!

SoMa District | 1200 Main St., Little Rock, Arkansas | (501) 375-6418 | communitybakery.com 62 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

PHOTO BY BRUCE DUNN

EVENTS


SEPT 12 BIKE MS: ROCK’N HOT RIDE

main.nationalmssociety.org

EZ BIKE POKER RIDE

equestrianzone.org of “Celebrating our 20th year” - Elizabeth nt is “outdated,” also want the type to lay of the photo - let me know if this doesn’t SQUARE TO SQUARE BIKE RIDE ake out: parks.fayetteville-ar.gov

CELEBRATING OUR 20TH

YEAR!

We ARE your home in Central and Southern Arkansas for all your cycling needs!

like Trek, Felt and Salsa” and instead add SEPTin13Launchpad) wherever they os (attached hat they carry them Move Parkside Cycle HELL ON THE BORDER: ARKANSAS to make room for address/contact inforSTATE like CRITERIUM CHAMPIONSHIPS h they would at the bottom instead, hellontheborder.com ype. Try to stretch it out across the botas you can, probably will be two lines.

SEPT 19 NWA MOUNTAIN BIKE CHAMPIONSHIPS

arkansasstateparks.com/events

WHEEL-A-MENA BICYCLE TOUR

719 Whittington Ave. • Hot Springs, AR Tues - Fri, 11 am - 6 pm • Sat 10 am - 4 pm (501) 623-6188 • www.parksidecycle.com

wheelamena.org

SEPT 26 BIG DAM BRIDGE 100

Thebigdambridge100.com

OCT 2-4 SLAUGHTER PEN JAM

slaughterpenjam.com

Squirrel: The rider who always rides dangerously, unpredictably—never going straight and steady.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 63


2nd Annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander

OCT 3 BIG ROCK MOUNTAIN BIKE FESTIVAL & TAKE A KID MOUNTAIN BIKING DAY

OCT 18 BIKETOBERFEST

OCT 9 OUTBACK IN THE OZARKS

OCT 24 ARKANSAS SUPER-PRESTIGE NIGHT RACE

outbackrunner@gmail.com

trevorseth@gmail.com

OCT 10 2ND ANNUAL ARKANSAS DELTA FLATLANDER

LAKE DEGRAY BICYCLE TOUR

OCT 11 JOE WEBER ARKY 100

dltmultisport.com

arkansasdeltaflatlander.com

jobritt@sbcglobal.net

OCT 17 TOUR DA’ DELTA

tourdadelta.net 64 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

recyclebikesforkids@gmail.com

janicep@comcast.net

OCT-NOV 1 DAWG DAYS MOUNTAIN BIKE FESTIVAL NOV 7 PEDESTAL ROCK 20- & 40-MILE BICYCLE RIDE pedestalrock40ride.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF WEST MEMPHIS TOURISM

EVENTS


COME SEE US FOR ALL YOUR BIKING NEEDS! Located 100 yards from the north end of the Clinton Park Bridge - Right off the Riverfront Trail!

NOV 14 RACE THE BASE

VBicycles

NLR

10am to 6pm Closed on Wed. • Open Sun. 2pm to 6pm • (501) 372-2727 nlr-bicycles.com • 800 E. Washington Ave, Suite B, North Little Rock, Arkansas

arkansasoutside.com

NOV 22 ATTILA THE HUN ambcs.com

NOV 29 TURKEY BURN CYCLOCROSS RACE trevorseth@gmail.com

DEC 7 & 8 CYCLOCROSS @ WESTERN HILLS

vincebooth66@yahoo.com

DECR 12 & 13 DIAMOND STATE GRAND PRIX

depijracing@gmail.com

DEC 20 SPA RUN RIDE

jobritt@sbcglobal.net and for Follow us on more information and events: www.arkansaswild.com

Peleton: The group of riders on any big race/ride.

Pedaling bikes since 1972

New bike sales and full service repair shops staffed by professional bicycle mechanics

FAYETTEVILLE 322 W. Spring Street | 479.442.9311 ROGERS 402 S Metro Parkway | 479.254.9800 BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 65


PHOTO BY RUN BIKE SWIM PHOTOS

HAPPY TRAILS

“Go Bananas!” Kyle Crangle, 2015 Fat Tire Festival, Lake Leatherwood, Eureka Springs, Arkansas

66 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2


$69,988

24.1

Clipper806LS

$7,995

HOME OF THE

Our Warranty Provides Covered Service Nationwide! 8830 Landers Road Sherwood, AR 501-835-4000

With All This Value — Why Would You Buy Anywhere Else!*

5603 Alma Highway Van Buren, AR 479-262-2418

www.mayflowerrv.com *see our website for complete details on the Lifetime Warranty BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2 | 67


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Ride with Team Arkansas at One of Our Stunning Destination Locations

Burlington, VT La Crosse, WI Lake Tahoe, CA Death Valley, CA Greenville, SC Tucson, AZ

Photo by Marvin Winston

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ride.jdrf.org Greater Arkansas: Sue Tull—Executive Director (501) 217-0321 NW Arkansas: Andi Clinton—Branch Director (479) 443-2692

68 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 2

No JDRF contributions were used to purchase this ad. This ad has been paid for by Team Arkansas members to recruit future riders.

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Bike Arkansas Issue No. 2  

Bike Arkansas Issue No. 2