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‘Legal, Libel and FOIA’ topic for convention session

Guest Column:

Social Media is Neither Social Nor Media, People are Learning By Peter Wagner

ARKANSAS

PRESS

Ar kansas

Publisher Weekly

ASSOCIATION

Serving Press and State Since 1873

Vol. 13 | No. 22 | Thursday, May 31, 2018

Rusty Fraser still working on a lifetime newspaper career When Rusty Fraser is asked if he’s been in newspapers his whole life, he says, “Well, not yet.”

The 76-year-old publisher of the Stone County Leader in Mountain View will receive a Golden 50 Service Award at the upcoming Arkansas Press Association (APA) SuperConvention to mark his 50plus years in the newspaper business. He has no plans to retire, although he says he doesn’t work as hard as he used to because of his experienced staff, including four full-time editorial positions at a weekly with 4,200 circulation. Fraser was president of the APA just a couple of years ago and believes APA is more important than ever. “I’ve made lots of good friends, close friends, through APA, and the networking continues to be valuable today. Sharing our problems, keeping up with the changes in the profession and taking advantage of the

excellent training are big reasons why,” he said. During his career he’s seen difficult transitions from hot type to cold type to digital. Though many blame problems in today’s newspaper industry on the Internet, Fraser is not so sure technology is always the culprit. He recalls that in the 1970s he paid about $2,000 each month for film and chemistry for his cold type operation. That cost went away when he moved to digital. Fraser started as a paperboy for the Troy Messenger in Troy, Alabama. When his parents moved to Montgomery, he delivered papers for the afternoon Alabama Journal. During college at the University of Alabama, he worked summers for the Montgomery Advertiser Journal in the dispatch department. He was the liaison between the union composing room and

Fraser with his first place Sweepstakes Award at the 2018 APA Ad Conference awards presentation.

Continued on Page 2

APA election concluded; Three new board members added The 2018 APA election is now in the books as the deadline passed last week for ballots to be returned to the APA office by designated voters at APA member newspapers.

They will join these existing board members who also appeared on the 2018 ballot:

A total of 54 signed ballots were cast in the annual election, which will add three new names to the APA Board of Directors roster.

• Sue Silliman of the Camden News

Kelly Freudensprung of The Saline Courier in Benton, John Robert Schirmer of the Nashville News-Leader and Crystal Costa of the Times Record in Fort Smith are the new additions to the board.

• Ellen Kreth of the Madison County Record in Huntsville • Lori Freeze of the Stone County Leader in Mountain View • Eliza Gaines of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette in Little Rock Under the APA bylaws, board members stand for election each year with the exception of the president, vice president, immediate past president and second vice

president. Those slots are held by:

• President, Tom White of the Advance Monticellonian in Monticello. • Vice President, John Bland of The Times Dispatch in Walnut Ridge • Immediate Past President, Byron Tate of The Sheridan Headlight and • Second Vice President, Rusty Turner of the Northwest Arkansas DemocratGazette in Fayetteville. The new board members will assume their seats on the board at the conclusion of the 2017 APA convention June 27-30.


Rusty Fraser Continued from page 1

the non-union advertising department. He served in the Air National Guard for 11 years, and during that time started his fulltime career with the Advertiser Journal as a classified ad salesman. Fraser believes his biggest break in journalism was working with Harold E. Martin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning publisher of the Advertiser Journal and former ethics professor at the University of Florida. The multi media chain moved Fraser and his wife Neal from Montgomery to the Baxter Bulletin in Mountain Home. There have been many awards in his career, but the one that brings him the most pride is a Sigma Delta Chi (now SPJ) Freedom of Information award marking The Baxter Bulletin’s 5-2 Arkansas Supreme Court decision that allowed him to attend meetings at the county-owned Baxter General Hospital back in the late ‘70s. Though the hospital brought in biggun attorneys, Fraser and The Baxter Bulletin triumphed in acquiring access to meetings of a committee of the county judge-appointed hospital board. “No one thought we could win the case, and it took more than two years. But we won. It was a matter of principle.” Martin, whom Fraser considers a fearless newspaper genius, began working with the Jefferson Pilot Publishing chain in the early ‘80s. He persuaded Fraser to sign on as publisher at the Mineral Wells Index. There the staff uncovered a letter that the mayor of Mineral Wells had written to a private security firm inviting them to open a detention facility for illegal aliens on the property inside the city limits owned by the mayor’s boss at the now-defunct Republic Bank of Texas. “It turned out the plan was for the mayor’s boss to lease the land for $1 million a year,” Fraser said. “We decided to run the letter with a six-column banner headline. You can’t smuggle a prison into town with a flagrant conflict of interest and not expect consequences. The mayor resigned, and a new at-large city council member was elected in a referendum.” When the Index was running in the black after two years, it was sold and Fraser lost his job. But he received a sizable payment that allowed him to buy the Stone County Leader where he’s worked the past 33 years.

Mountain View, with a population of 2,700, has experienced big hits to its economy in the past 15 years, such as plant closings that led to 500 fewer jobs. New companies like Excel Boats and a bustling tourism industry are working to pull the town back to prosperity. When a local grocery store closed, the Leader lost a weekly fourcolor double truck ad. “We lost more than just the ad revenue; there is a loss of readership from the popular grocery ads,” Fraser said. “Rather than cut back on staff when we lost that ad, I decided to hire the general manager of the store as an ad rep.” While many are looking to get rid of classified sections because of competition online, Fraser runs free non-business classified ads for subscribers, a policy that has gained him many subscribers and a robust classified section that boosts reader interest. The Leader operates an online publication protected by a firewall. A few years back, his newspaper won six consecutive APA first place awards for general excellence before moving up to (Above) Fraser receiving the first place Sweepstakes Award for the next size category. the Baxter Bulletin in 1976 from Bill Woods of Hazen. (Below)

“For a county this remote and Rusty at the Baxter Bulletin 1981. sparsely populated, those to buy a local newspaper to get national awards were gratifying,” Fraser said. “I’m and international news you can see on the also very proud of the editorial cartoon Internet or broadcast,” he said. award won by the late Ed Schuh and In counting his larger-than-average this year’s Sweepstakes Award for editorial staff, Fraser decides to count advertising.” himself when he remembers that in Continuing to strive for excellence is addition to taking photos like all his staff second nature to Fraser. He believes that members do, he also has police reporter 100 percent local news is the key to small duty. He continues to work because he town newspapers remaining viable in the loves the newspaper business. future. “That was my philosophy in 1985 “It’s been a fun ride,” Fraser said. And that and it continues today. There is no reason ride is not over yet.

Arkansas Publisher Weekly 2 May 31, 2018


‘Legal, Libel and FOIA’ topic for convention session

“Legal, Libel and the Freedom of Information Act” are on the table for discussion Friday afternoon, June 29, when John Tull makes a return visit to the APA SuperConvention. Vince Chadick will again be joining Tull for this conversation, setting the stage for a repeat of the 2017 convention in Little Rock. Tull’s session always produces high marks on the feedback we get from those attending, including from last year’s convention session. Question and answer will also be a big part of this session. Here’s your chance to get some of those legal questions answered, all included in the price of registration for the convention.

Tull and his team at Quattlebaum, Grooms and Tull law firm in Little Rock, have for years operated the APA’s “FOIA Hotline,” providing legal services and opinions on FOIA questions for APA members. If you have ever called the hotline, you’ve likely talked to John or one of his team. Now is your chance to hear him in person. His session is just one of many at the APA’s annual SuperConvention designed to inform, enlighten and entertain.

John Tull (left) and Vince Chadick from Quattlebaum, Grooms and Tull law firm lead the Legal, Libel & FOI Q&A session at the 2017 APA SuperConvention.

Stephens begins internship with APA APA welcomes Madi Stephens as its summer intern. She recently completed her first year at Emory University, where she is majoring in English and Political Science.

Stephens graduated from Little Rock Central High School in 2017. It was during her freshmen year in an Intro to Journalism course that she first became interested in print media. She recalls reading Madi Stephens the Arkansas DemocratGazette every morning as part of her course work, and it was through her daily reading that she recognized the importance of current events. After graduating from high school, Stephens found herself again drawn to journalism when she began writing op-eds for her college newspaper, the Emory Wheel. During this past year, she wrote opinion pieces on current events such as the importance of flu vaccinations and the role of the Winter Olympics as a

diplomatic tool for North Korea.

“In my high school Intro to Journalism class we discussed the idea that you must first understand an event or topic before forming your opinion, and I think it is the role of the press to provide the information necessary to develop that understanding” said Stephens. In addition to writing opinion pieces, Stephens is being trained as an editor for the university’s paper. She describes editing as her favorite part of the publication process as it is like a game to find the best, most descriptive words to express ideas. “A unique struggle of working on a college newspaper is finding ways to engage busy students who typically receive most of their news on their phones. I have found the best way to do this is to relate things that are happening on a national level to what is happening on the local college campus. Students and people in general are most drawn to stories that apply to them and their individual experiences,” Stephens added. She believes this is a job that only local community newspapers can accomplish, as they have the ability to identify and discuss things happening in their communities. She tasks media with the role of informing the public and identifies this interaction as a prerequisite to effective civic engagement.

Don’t forget about items for ANF auction APA members and associates are encouraged to donate items to be auctioned at the Arkansas Newspaper Foundation’s annual silent auction at the annual convention June 27-30 at the Inn of the Ozarks in Eureka Springs. The auction raises funds for the Foundation, which provides internships and scholarships among other projects. Items for the auction can be anything from lodging packages to dinner gift certificates to arts and

crafts, and from event tickets to goodie baskets and autographed items. A wide variety of items are featured in the event each year. Email ANF Executive Director Karen Brown if you or your newspaper would like to donate an auction item. Items will be listed in social media, convention materials and news releases leading up to the event. Brown can be reached at arknewspaperfoundation@ gmail.com.

Arkansas Publisher Weekly 3 May 31, 2018


Mark Your Calendar June 15:

Hotel Reservation Deadline

June 22:

APA SuperConvention Registration Deadline

June 27 - 30:

APA SuperConvention, Inn of the Ozarks, Eureka Springs

Industry Quote of the Week “There are already papers that show that there are political consequences, or political outcomes, when local newspapers close. But that’s not really a direct impact on local residents. We wanted to show that, if you look at the municipal bond market, you can actually see the financial consequences that have to be borne by local citizens as a result of newspaper closures.” – Chang Lee, assistant professor of finance at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Let Us Know We want to know about your new hires, retires and promotions! Send your staffing changes to info@arkansaspress.org to be updated online and included in our weekly bulletin and monthly newsletter.

Let’s Get Social

Follow Us on Facebook & Twitter

@ArkansasPressAssociation @ARPressAssoc

News-Times reporter wins company’s highest honor Tia Lyons named 2017 Employee of the Year Reprinted from the El Dorado News-Times

Tia Lyons, city reporter for the El Dorado News-Times, was honored Tuesday as the 2017 Walter E. Hussman Employee of the Year for WEHCO Media’s Palmer Newspapers Division. Lyons has worked for the News-Times since 1999. She was named the NewsTimes Employee of the Quarter for the fourth quarter of 2017 and the News-Times Employee of the Year for 2017, which put her in the running for the divisionwide honor.

contributions to making the newsroom a more pleasant place to work, noting “it’s not uncommon to see a flow of bubbles arise from Tia’s cubicle as she seeks to provide a moment of whimsy for stressed reporters as she combs through emails and voicemails and prepares her daily story.”

The Palmer Division includes six companies: El Dorado NewsTimes; Texarkana Gazette, Texarkana; Sentinel Record, Hot (From left) El Dorado News-Times Managing Editor Madeleine Leroux; of WEHCO newspapers Mark Lane; El Dorado News-Times City Springs; Camden President Reporter Tia Lyons; Vice President of Audience Development for WEHCO News, Camden; Media Eliza Gaines, and CEO of WEHCO Media Nat Lea. Magnolia Banner News, Magnolia; and Central Missouri When asked how it feels to win, Lyons said Newspapers (News Tribune, Jefferson she was still processing the award, which City, Missouri; Fulton Sun, Fulton, was presented to her Tuesday morning by Missouri; California Democrat, California, WEHCO officials. Missouri; and The Lake Today, Lake “I think the thing that really strikes me Ozark, Missouri). the most is that my (News-Times) co“We are thrilled to honor Tia Lyons as workers — and former co-workers — our 2017 Walter E. Hussman Employee thought enough of me to set the wheels in of the Year for the Palmer Newspapers,” motion by selecting me as (Employee of said Mark Lane, president of WEHCO the Quarter) and 2017 (Employee of the newspapers. “Tia has served the El Year),” Lyons said. “Considering all the Dorado News-Times and our readers with changes we’ve had to adapt and adjust excellence since 1999.” to over the past three years, and with In her nomination for the division-wide everyone working so hard, that they would award, Managing Editor Madeleine consider me worthy of such an honor Leroux wrote on behalf of the newsroom means a lot. We all deserve an award.” staff that “Tia consistently turns stories Lyons, who came to the News-Times containing quality journalism and with no previous journalism experience, information readers want and need. And said she joined the newspaper waiting that example helps set a tone for the for someone to “realize that I had no clue younger, newer reporters on staff, who what I was doing.” look to Tia as a role model and mentor.” “I guess I did something right because it’s The nomination also cited Lyons’ nearly 19 years later, and I’m still here,” willingness to lend a hand and her Lyons said.

Arkansas Publisher Weekly 4 May 31, 2018


Guest Column: Social Media is Neither Social Nor Media, People are Learning By Peter Wagner, Founder/publisher of The N’West Iowa REVIEW Many community newspapers are reporting that numerous business owners are saying “I don’t need to buy newspaper advertising. I promote my business for free on social media.” If pressed, most will tell you they use Facebook to reach their needed buyers. But social media is really not social. Nor is it a form of media. I regularly work with a number of college fraternity chapters and attend their weekly meetings. I’m amazed at the members’ lack of attention. While one of the members stands and speaks to the group the others are all busy texting their girlfriends or one of their brothers sitting across the room. Somehow, we’ve lost common respect for others, the ability to have verbal face-to-face conversations and the sense of community. I remember spending summers on the family farm in South Dakota. Every Saturday night the entire family would head into town to pick up groceries, machinery parts and whatever else might be desired. But shopping was the least important part of the evening. My mother, Aunt Anne and female cousins would use the evening to visit with neighbors met in the stores to catch up on the latest rumors, revelations and romances. The men were doing the same thing in the hardware store and implement shop. No one went home until all the juicy details were totally shared. Now that was true social media. My wife, who is in extensive rehab with a badly broken leg, sent me out shopping last Saturday. Finding the few simple items was easy. Checking out was hard. The huge discount store had only two of its 11 checkout lanes going. Worst, both lanes had long lines of early-morning buyers wanting to check out overflowing carts of groceries, electronic gadgets, clothing, health and beauty products and more. Waiting in line I found myself turning to the woman behind me to show off the oversized valentine I’d bought for our dog to give his mistress. “I just have to show you this card,” I told the woman. “I couldn’t resist it,” I said. It was large enough to fill the corner of my wife’s hospital room and it only cost $3. Best of all, the picture of the dog on the front was the spitting image of Duffer, our puppy. It was the beginning of a beautiful 10-minute friendship. I learned she lived in a town not far to the north, taught grade school, had two children, a boy and a girl, was married to a grain farmer, went to the Methodist church and was in town for a postseason girls basketball tournament.

Now that’s what I call getting social.

from their systems to interested buyers.

I believe there’s a place for Facebook in individual business marketing even though I’ve tried more than once to cancel my account. I find my day interrupted almost hourly by the same Facebook “friend” who seems sure I really care about what he had for lunch or dinner and the television shows he is planning to watch that night.

That means favored customers on your list can eventually appear on the e-mail and “friends” lists of national department and specialty stores, Amazon and all sorts of online discounters.

One of Facebook’s biggest problems is not everyone wants to be lambasted with meaningless information sent by someone they hardly know. Many find it intrusive. But that problem aside, there are some serious reasons why no business should depend exclusively on Facebook especially and social media in general. Most also apply to Twitter and the many other internet information sharing platforms. 1. Not all “friends” on a Facebook friends list receive the notice of a special sale or even a noncommercial message. With over 2 billion users, Facebook users would be overwhelmed if every message copied to them was delivered. Therefore, only about 20 percent of those on a “friends” list actually get any message. The users are determined by their interaction with the sender. Those who most often open, respond to or create messages to the business are the ones Facebook pre-selects to get the latest posting. 2. The average local business has between 300 and 700 followers on their contact list. When Facebook edits the list to their acceptable 20 percent level only 60 participants on the list of 300 get the message and just 140 of the larger list of 700. 3. Facebook is not really free. It is possible to send sales and promotional postings to a larger group of followers, but Facebook charges handsomely for that privilege. The result is the nation’s larger, better capitalized online retailers and discounters — who are willing and able to pay the fee — connect more often with your customers than you do. 4. Creating and depending on a Facebook account creates an additional cost problem. “Friends” only look at Facebook postings when they find interesting, fresh material to read and share. Keeping the site up-to-date requires the time and talent of a committed employee or an expensive outside content source. 5. Facebook, Twitter and web server providers such as Google and Yahoo regularly sell the names, interests and e-mail addresses gleaned

6. Recent studies have revealed that many of those “wonderful” responses on Facebook or other internet sites have come from a single individual paid to make the service look good. More recent national articles have stated increasing numbers of those comments have been created by robots, usually referred to as “bots,” with no human interest in the product or the service. 7. A large number of Facebook or other digital service users live a great distance from the posting business. Rather than buy long distance, they prefer to find a local business offering the same brands where they can touch, try on or otherwise experience the merchandise. 8. Finally, Facebook and other digital services are consistently changing the rules. There have been three major announcements regarding that problem this month alone. In one a retired top-level manager said, “Facebook is creating division” in our country. In another a different current top-level manager said he was “worried Facebook was destroying democracy.” Most recently, Facebook announced it was reducing the importing of news on the system since users really only wanted happy talk. So much for the internet being media. The newspaper still reaches the greatest number of local, dedicated buyers. In most cases those are buyers with both the money to make significant purchases and the interest in keeping the community strong and vital. So, the message is clear. Social media has a place in local marketing and may grow more important in the years to come. But community newspapers will prevail and are necessary to guarantee creditability, create continuity and maintain local consensus. Newspapers have survived the advent of radio, the coming of television, the appearance of cable television news channels and the arrival of internet messaging. The reason is simple. Print is the only media that reaches the entire community. It exists to serve the people of the community and is the best way to share all credible news, original thoughts, creative ideas or unique opportunities and events with those enlightened readers. Peter W. Wagner lives in Sibley. He is the founder/ publisher of The N’West Iowa REVIEW and may be reached at pww@iowainformation.com.

Arkansas Publisher Weekly 5 May 31, 2018


Convention Schedule Wednesday, June 27

Friday, June 29 (cont’d)

Noon

APA Golf Tournament Holiday Island Country Club, Eureka Springs

Noon

6:00 p.m.

Early Bird Event Poolside Luau, Dinner & Games

Lunch • Gubernatorial Candidate Debate • President’s Gavel Passing • Golf Awards Presentation

2:30 p.m.

Session: Newspaper Legal Issues Presented by John Tull & Vincent Chadick Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull Law Firm

4:00 p.m.

Session: News & Fake News Presented by Rex Nelson

6:00 p.m.

Honorees’ Reception

7:00 p.m.

APA Honor’s Banquet Golden 50, Journalism Educator, Distinguished Service, FOI and Headliner of the Year Awards

9:00 p.m.

After-Hours Hospitality

Thursday, June 28 Noon

Opening Round Table Luncheon

1:30 p.m.

Session: Update on Newspaper Tariffs, Presented by Paul Boyle

3:00 p.m.

ANF Slient Auction Opens

3:30 p.m.

Session: Gaining Digital Subscribers Presented by Barry Arthur

7:00 p.m.

Dinner & The Great Passion Play

Friday, June 29 8:00 a.m.

Past Presidents’ Breakfast Invitation Only

8:30 a.m.

Trade Show Opens Press Camp (Kids 6-12)

9:00 a.m.

Session: Adobe Workflow Presented by Lisa Griffin

Hotel Information Inn of the Ozarks

Saturday, June 30 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast APA Member Business Meeting

9:00 a.m.

Session: FOI Workshop Presented by Brenda Blagg

10:30 a.m.

FOI Panel Discussion

12:00 p.m.

APA Better Newspaper Editorial Awards Lunch & Presentation

APA Golf Tournament Holiday Island Country Club

Located on 30 wooded acres, relax in spacious rooms and suites with plush top beds, dream maker pillows and balconies. Enjoy home-style cooking at Myrtie Mae’s Café. Take a dip in the outdoor pool, play mini golf or play on the game court which includes basketball, volleyball, and tennis, and enjoy poolside movies as well as a business center and free Wi-Fi.

To make a room reservation, call (479) 253-9768 207 West Van Buren, Eureka Springs, AR 72632

Reserve hotel rooms by June 15 | $109 Single/Double Be sure to mention the Arkansas Press Association group name when reserving your room.

Holiday Island’s Golf courses are strategic courses. They offer 27 holes of golf at Holiday Island; an 18-hole championship course and a 9-hole executive course. Choosing the correct club and playing correct shots will challenge golfers at all levels. The views and the quiet are unmatched and will allow you a peaceful round of golf along with breathtaking scenery of the Ozark Mountains.


2018 APA Convention Registration Form June 27 - 30 | Inn of the Ozarks | Eureka Springs

Company Name

READ THIS BEFORE YOU BEGIN

1. Each person (except for children under 18 years of age) attending the convention must pay a registration fee in addition to meals or special events. Registration pays speaker & program expenses, continental breakfasts, breaks,etc. See specific meal prices due, in addition to the registration fee. 2. Circle the appropriate registration fee for each attendee, as well as the chosen reservations for each function each will attend. NOTE: (a) One may choose to register for ONE DAY only, prorating the registration fee, paying $25, plus any meal fees for that day. For example, Saturday award winners pay $25 registration fee PLUS $15 for the lunch. (b) A $10 (dollar) early bird discount can be taken per newspaper/company if we receive your registration form before June 15th and at least one full registration is listed. (c) Thirteen year-olds and younger children may choose a child’s plate for Friday dinner and Saturday lunch.

Address

4. Golfers and Press Camp Kids must fill out that activity’s registration form (separate page) but may pay with one check on this form if you like. Add the page totals from those forms after the convention fees on this form.

City / State / Zip

5. You may also wish to donate to the AR Newspaper Foundation if you are unable to attend or participate in the auction. Add the amount in the square before Grand Total below.

Member or Associate

Spouse

1.

$85

$65

2.

$85

$65

3.

$85

$65

4.

$85

$65

5.

$85

$65

Phone

6. Dress will be summer casual for most activities. Business casual will be appropriate for the Friday night banquet.

Registration Authorized By

7. DEADLINE to register is June 22nd. All convention cancellations must be made 48 hours in advance of event or we expect your payment. NO REFUNDS will be made after June 25th.

Registration Fee (Circle One)

Individual Name Print or type FIRST & LAST NAME as it will appear on name tag.

3. Copy this form for additional attendees if needed. List children and one-day-only people after those paying full registration.

Kids Press Camp

Wednesday Poolside Luau

One Day Only

Children Under 18

$25

Free

$20

$20

$25

Free

$20

$25

Free

$25 $25

Fri. / Sat. Fri. / Sat. Fri. / Sat. Fri. / Sat. Fri. / Sat.

Email

Thursday Round Table Lunch

Friday

Passion Play & Dinner Adult

Child Under 13

$15

$30

$20

$20

$15

$30

$20

$20

$15

Free

$20

$20

Free

$20

$20

Lunch

Saturday

APA Honors Banquet

Editorial Awards Lunch

Adult

Child Under 13

Adult

Child Under 13

$20

$40

$20

$15

$10

$20

$20

$40

$20

$15

$10

$30

$20

$20

$40

$20

$15

$10

$15

$30

$20

$20

$40

$20

$15

$10

$15

$30

$20

$20

$40

$20

$15

$10

TOTALS Add Registration Fee & Meals(s)

Column Totals IF ONE FULL REGISTRATION IS PAID, registrations received at APA office by June 15th may take a $10 discount per company

Send Convention Registration to:

Arkansas Press Association | 411 South Victory, Little Rock, AR 72201 or fax to APA at (501) 374-7509

Billing:

( ) Bill Us ( ) Amount Enclosed: $ ( ) Credit Card: Visa, MC, AE | Card #

Deadline to Register is June 22nd

Check #

(

)

Add Golf Page Total Arkansas Newspaper Foundation Donation See Item #5

Expires

VCN #

GRAND TOTAL

Register Online at: www.ArkansasPress.org/Event/2018SuperConvention


Guest Speakers Paul Boyle, Senior Vice President/Public Policy, News Media Alliance

Paul J. Boyle is Senior Vice President/Public Policy for the News Media Alliance, a trade organization representing nearly 2,000 diverse news organizations. From the largest news groups to local newspapers to digital-only operations, the Alliance represents all news media content creators. Boyle is the chief lobbyist and manages the legislative and regulatory affairs operation of the association. Under Boyle’s leadership, the industry has preserved the current tax treatment of advertising expenses; resisted government efforts to reclassify independent contractors; reduced postal rates impacting newspapers’ advertising products; preserved recruitment advertising in printed newspapers and obtained structural reforms to the Freedom of Information Act. He is currently managing the effort to beat back tariffs on newsprint imports from Canada. Boyle is a member of the American Society of Association Executives. He is a graduate of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Lisa Griffin, Publishing Specialist, Boone Newspapers, Inc.

Lisa Tackett Griffin is a popular trainer at Macintosh training events around the United States. She is recognized as a pioneer in the areas of computer pagination, PDF technology, and remote printing methods for newspapers. Lisa is a staff member at the University of Tennessee/Tennessee Press Association Institute for Newspaper Technology and has conducted group training for press associations and newspapers on topics such as Newspaper Technology, Mac Troubleshooting, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe PhotoShop, Quark Xpress, Pagination, PDF file creation and digital communications. Since 1983, Lisa has provided consultation, training and support to newspapers as well as other markets. Advances in technology over the past 20 years for the newspaper industry have been both exciting and sometimes challenging. Bringing this information through training sessions directly to people in the production process continues to be a priority. Attendees will find the material to be interesting, informative and applicable to their everyday workload.

Rex Nelson

Senior Editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Brenda Blagg

Freelance Writer & Syndicated Columnist

Member of the Arkansas FOI Coalition

John Tull

Managing Member Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC

Barry Arthur

Asst. Managing Editor Photo/ Electronic Media, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Vincent Chadick

Of Counsel Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC


Ea r ly bird Po o lsid e Lu au Wed n esd ay, J un e 2 7 at 6 p m Inn of the Ozarks Po ol Area - $20/person

join us for food, drinks & a Baggo Tournament! Th u rs d ay, Ju n e 2 8

Join us for dinner, music & backstage tours at the newly renovated

The Great

Passion Play Dinner at 7 | Show at 8:30


Golf Tournament

APA’s 37th Annual

Benefitting the Arkansas Newspaper Foundation

Wednesday, June 27 Holiday Island Country Club, Eureka Springs Noon Lunch & 1 p.m. Shotgun Start $100 Entry Fee Includes Two Mulligans & Hamburger Lunch Tournament Sponsors: UAMS & AT&T t Tournament Chairman: Bob Moore Trophies Awarded to 1st Place Team, Longest Drive & Closest to the Pin.

Golf Tournament Entry Form Name _____________________________________ Company __________________________________ Mailing Address ________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State __________ Zip ___________ Phone _________________________ E-mail ____________________________ Golf Handicap ______________ (or) Average 18-hole Score ______________ Name(s) of those you wish to play with ______________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Return to the Arkansas Press Association: 411 South Victory, Little Rock, AR 72201 | 501-374-1500 | Fax 501-374-7509


APA 2018 SuperConvention

Press Camp! FRIDAY, JUNE 29

TH

ONLY $20!

Camp Includes: • A Junior Press Card • Breakfast, lunch & supplies • Sightseeing field trip around Eureka Springs Photos will be displayed Friday evening at the Honorees’ Reception.

PRESS CAMP FOR KIDS REGISTRATION FORM Ages 6-12 (adult supervision and camp counselors on hand) Child’s Name

Age

Child’s Name

Age

Child’s Name

Age

Parent(s) Newspaper / Company Total Number of Camp Registrants

x $20 each =

Please Return with SuperConvention Registration Form to: 411 S. Victory, Little Rock, AR 72201 | Fax: (50) 374-7509


Journalism education needs your help! Contribute items to the Arkansas Newspaper Foundation silent auction & give something back to your industry. Here are some thought-starters: • Box or basket of gift items from your city or county • Case of wine, food, etc. made in your city or area • Unique product – handmade quilt gift basket/box, original jewelry • Dinner for four with a celebrity (or at a special place)

• Autographed item from a celebrity • Box seats at a sporting event – Cowboys, Travelers, Naturals, etc. • Weekend mini-vacation for two – lodging, food & attractions • Guided fishing, hunting trip or similar event

Auction Schedule:

Thursday, June 28 - Friday, June 29, 2018 want to help fund journalism education and internships. Count on us to contribute YES! We the following: Description of item(s), including brand names. Use additional page if necessary.

1.

$

2.

$

3.

$

4.

$

Authorized by

Title

Company

Phone

Address

City/State/Zip Will bring item(s) to convention

Will deliver item(s) to APA by June 22

Please return to Arkansas Press Association by Friday, June 22, 2018 411 South Victory, Little Rock, AR 72201 | Fax to: 501.374.7509

Profile for Arkansas Press Association

Arkansas Publisher Weekly: May 31, 2018  

The Arkansas Publisher Weekly is the only direct source for late breaking news regarding Arkansas' newspapers and related industries. Publis...

Arkansas Publisher Weekly: May 31, 2018  

The Arkansas Publisher Weekly is the only direct source for late breaking news regarding Arkansas' newspapers and related industries. Publis...