__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

3 6

Paxton acquires four more Arkansas newspapers APA Convention registration packet

ARKANSAS

PRESS

Ar kansas

Publisher Weekly

Vol. 14 | No. 23 | Thursday, June 6, 2019

ASSOCIATION

Serving Press and State Since 1873

“Golden 50” honorees to mark milestones at annual APA Honors Banquet Newspaper industry veterans with a combined 200-plus years of experience will be honored by the Arkansas Press Association for careers spanning more than 50 years each at the 2019 APA Convention later this month in Hot Springs.

Arnett is a Brinkley native. She is married to Jeff Arnett has three sons. Arnett said she’s not going anywhere any time soon: “As long as Beth needs me, I’ll be here.”

This year’s “Golden 50” Service Award recipients include a long-time editor at state’s largest newspaper and three others who have each worked for the same newspapers their entire careers. They are: Glenda Arnett of the Monroe County Herald; Danny Cook of the Warren Eagle Democrat; Frank Fellone, an independent journalist who spent most of his career at the Arkansas DemocratGazette, and Larry Miller of the Petit Jean Country Headlight. “Arkansas’s newspapers are thriving because of people dedicated to quality journalism like Glenda Arnett, Danny Cook, Frank Fellone and Larry Miller,” said APA Executive Director Ashley Wimberley. “Each one should be commended for their exemplary service, and they all continue to benefit the communities they serve. I hope all APA members will join us on June 28 as we honor their legacies and their commitment to our industry.” The four “Golden 50” recipients will be honored at an awards banquet during the convention. The banquet is Friday, June 28, at 7 p.m. at the Hotel Hot Springs in Hot Springs. For tickets or for convention registration information, visit ArkansasPress.org or call (501) 374-1500. Here’s more information on each of the four “Golden 50” honorees:

Glenda Arnett with her husband Jessie.

Glenda Arnett was just a few weeks out of high school in the summer of 1967 when she started a full-time job at the local newspaper in Brinkley. Since then, she’s been a linotype operator, photographer and the reporter who called around to community members asking for recaps on the previous weekend’s events. She called those recaps “the locals” and said learning about the goings-on in small Monroe County communities is one of the highlights of her years of service. “I enjoy my work and I really don’t want to stay at home,” Arnett said. “I’ve done this for so long, I guess it’s in my blood. They say newspaper work gets in your blood.”

Danny Cook

The owner of the Warren Eagle-Democrat, Danny Cook started at the newspaper right before his 18th birthday in August 1968 in a role he described as “at the very bottom.” He worked with hot type at the beginning of his career, then became production manager when the newspaper transitioned to offset printing.

Beth Taylor, who operates the newspaper along with her son, Hayden, said Arnett is the publication’s MVP, and she shouldn’t be thinking about retirement.

As he gained responsibilities at the newspaper, he took over day-to-day operations at the newspaper and eventually purchased it from former owner Bob Newton in 1998.

“She is the heart and the sunshine of the newspaper,” Taylor said. “We love her and are so glad she stayed with us. Our retirement plan for her is never.”

Cook suffered some serious health setbacks in 2018 that left him sidelined from work. In an interview late last year, he said his year in and out of hospitals


made him eager to get back to work in his 51st year in the business. “A lot of people say, ‘You can afford to retire,’ and ‘You can still pretty well do everything you want for the rest of your life,’” Cook said in an interview last year. “But the last year, the way I have been in the hospitals and laid up at the house looking at four walls at a time, I know I’m not ready to retire. I’m ready to get out of the house.” Cook met his wife, Pam, at the newspaper where they both work. Pam Cook managed the business while Danny Cook was recuperating last year. Cook also operates a heating and airconditioning business in town. “I’ve kept running both of them all these years,” Cook said, acknowledging that retirement might be a possibility, though. “I’m not going to say that if someone came along right now and offered me anything close to what the newspaper was worth, I wouldn’t sell it.”

serving as the newspaper’s state editor and deputy editor in 2016. He left the newspaper in 2017. His weekly column, “Drivetime Mahatma,” still appears in the Democrat-Gazette. “I’m happy to wax nostalgic about my newspaper career, keeping in mind what nostalgia really is – a remembrance of things as they never were,” Fellone quipped. Fellone, a Connecticut native, grew up reading New York’s legendary sports columnists and he developed an interest in sports writing. “It’s not true that I wrote my first story on a stone tablet,” he said, but he did use an Underwood manual typewriter. When Cuban refugees were being housed at Fort Chaffee near Fort Smith, Democrat editor John Robert Starr dispatched Fellone to cover. The refugees rioted two days later. “The riot wasn’t my fault, but it was an interesting time,” Fellone said. “Gunfire, clubbings, storming the gates, setting buildings on fire, chasing me out a barracks window.” As state editor, Fellone oversaw the newspaper’s coverage of the 1980 Titan II missile silo explosion. He’d later manage political coverage for the newspaper, including the years leading up to thenGov. Clinton’s presidential run. Fellone earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism and master’s degrees in journalism and in health services administration from UALR. He was also an adjunct instructor at UALR for more than 30 years.

Frank Fellone

Frank Fellone’s wife, Kay, has told him she never knew anyone who loved his job more than him. After 50 years in the business covering features, politics, sports, traffic and even a riot and a nuclear missile scare, Fellone is eager to agree. Fellone spent four years in the Air Force as a communications center specialist and cryptographer before starting at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock in 1973. He worked at the campus newspaper, was a part-time sportswriter for the Arkansas Democrat and held full-time jobs at the Jacksonville Daily News and Batesville Guard before returning to the Democrat in 1980. He started reporting again after Arkansas Publisher Weekly

He’s currently the chairman of the Arkansas Newspaper Foundation board and is a past president of the Arkansas Press Association.

If you count the time Larry Miller went doorto-door in Morrilton selling newspaper “prescriptions” for a nickel a week, the Petit Jean Country Headlight editor’s journalism career goes well beyond the 50 years since he officially started working at the Conway County newspaper. He started work there as a photographer, mainly as a way to avoid police after he’d learn about car accidents or fires through his CB radio. “When the hearse went out for wrecks we would follow them,” Miller recalled of himself and other teenagers in Morrilton in the late 1960s. “The sheriff’s department got upset with us and said they’d arrest us. I got hold of the newspaper and asked if they’d like to have some pictures of wrecks, thinking that if the police knew I was working for the newspaper, they couldn’t do anything.’ Known to his classmates as “Flash” Miller, he started full-time as the photographer and dark-room technician two weeks before he graduated from Morrilton High School in 1969. He’s been at the Headlight ever since. During those 50 years, he has worked “just about every position you can have at a weekly newspaper.” He currently serves as editor and his wife, Donna, is the office manager. In addition to serving in almost every capacity in Morrilton, Miller has done some freelance reporting for the Arkansas Gazette, including coverage of the devastating 1982 flood in Clinton. He’s also proud of his coverage of legendary Conway County Sheriff Marlin Hawkins and of the late Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, who lived on Petit Jean Mountain. “You can’t stay with something for 50 years and not have a heart for it,” Miller said. “… The newspaper business is an interesting career. I’ve always been a nosy kind of guy. It’s nice to be nosy and get paid for it.” Miller is also the pastor of Morrilton Christian Center, which he founded and has served for 27 years. He owns a local television station, and he served on the volunteer fire department and as a reserve police officer.

Larry Miller

2

June 6, 2019


Don’t Forget! Paxton acquires four more The deadline to make room reservations in the APA block at the Hotel Hot Springs is tomorrow, June 7. To reserve your room call (877) 623-6697 and mention group code APA2019 to receive the APA convention special room rate.

Register Now! 2019 APA Convention June 26-29 Hotel Hot Springs

Arkansas newspapers Paxton Media Group this week announced it has acquired four Arkansas newspapers from GateHouse Media. Terms of the purchase were not disclosed.

Paxton bought the Log Cabin Democrat in Conway, the Van Buren County Democrat in Clinton, The Sun Times in Heber Springs and the Newport Independent. The Paxton acquisitions bring that company’s total number of newspapers in Arkansas to nine. The Paducah, Kentucky-based media group also owns newspapers in Jonesboro, Paragould, Russellville, Searcy and Batesville. “This business combination creates a strong regional presence for us as it fits in well with our other properties in central and northeast Arkansas,” said Jamie Paxton, the company’s chief financial officer, in the announcement published in Paxton’s Arkansas newspapers. “(Paxton) believes strongly in local journalism and the important role newspapers serve in their communities.” Paxton Media said David Meadows,

the current publisher of The Courier in Russellville, will also serve as publisher of the Conway paper. He will be group publisher overseeing the newspapers in Clinton and Heber Springs as well. “I’m looking forward to this new role at the Log Cabin Democrat,” Meadows was quoted as saying. “It is a great newspaper with an intense commitment to an exciting community. The Courier in Russellville is fortunate to be the contract printer for the Log Cabin, giving us a unique perspective on how the combined strength of both papers might better serve readers and advertisers.” Reece Terry, new publisher of the Jonesboro Sun and group publisher for Paxton’s newspapers in northeast Arkansas, will take over as publisher of the Newport Independent. Paxton reported it had also acquired newspapers previously owned by the Sandusky Newspaper Group. Those newspapers are in Lebanon, Tennessee, Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, Hartsville, Tennessee, and Grand Haven, Michigan.

Arkansas journalists win prizes in Great Plains Journalism contest Arkansas Life photographer Arshia Khan was named magazine photographer of the year in the annual Great Plains Journalism Awards contest. Her colleagues at the magazine and Arkansas DemocratGazette as well a student journalist from the University of Arkansas also claimed honors in the annual contest for journalists in an eight-state region. Both Arkansas Life and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette are published by Little Rock-based WEHCO Media. According to a report in the DemocratGazette, Khan’s win as photographer of the year was based on her strong portfolio, which included the cover of the magazine’s annual food edition.

The Democrat-Gazette’s Eric Besson, Lisa Hammersly, Doug Thompson, Michael Wickline and John Moritz took top honors in general news reporting for their work covering an ongoing federal corruption investigation that has resulted in arrests and convictions of several former state legislators. Besson and the Democrat-Gazette’s Emily Walkenhorst won in the beat reporting category for coverage of a paper mill’s pollution in Crossett. Stephen Steed of the Democrat-Gazette earned the business reporting award for

Arkansas Life’s Nikki Dawes also won for magazine graphics and illustration and Seth Eli Barlow of the publication won for magazine lifestyle writing. Arkansas Publisher Weekly

3

his investigative reporting about the use of the herbicide dicamba. The newspaper’s publisher, Walter Hussman Jr., and editorial page editor David Barham won for editorial writing. In the college newspaper competition, Alex Nicoll of the Arkansas Traveler at the University of Arkansas was named as the Dan Harrison Memorial Student Editor of the Year. The Great Plains Journalism Awards are presented annually by the Tulsa Press Club. The competition is open to journalists in Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma and South Dakota. The 2019 contest received than 600 entries, with winners and finalists named in 71 professional and student categories. June 6, 2019


Jonesboro Sun files FOIA lawsuit against police department In the latest salvo in an ongoing dispute between the Jonesboro Police Department and local journalists about how the department handles police incident reports, the Jonesboro Sun and its editor have filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the City of Jonesboro. The suit in Craighead County Circuit Court contends that the Jonesboro Police Department instituted a policy starting in January 2018 where it refused to provide to The Sun any incident reports it considered “active” or “unapproved.” According to the newspaper, the department only released 705 reports out of 1,261 that were requested from January to November 2018. The Sun argued these reports, which typically provide cursory information and are not investigative in nature, are subject to disclosure under the Arkansas FOI law.

A report in the newspaper said the police department started providing information from some incident reports to

that the publicly releasable information could not be separated, according to the complaint. The Sun maintained that FOIA specifically requires agencies to release information, whether or not it is compiled with exempt information. John Tull and Christoph Keller of Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull are representing the newspaper.

the public through a website. However, some information normally included in those reports has been removed if an investigation is “active” or “unapproved.”

“Under the Arkansas FOIA, the City of Jonesboro is required to either deny the request or to produce the documents,” the lawsuit stated. “It is not a sufficient response to a FOIA request to refer the requester to a Facebook page, and information that is not a complete response to the request.”

Chris Wessel, the newspaper’s editor, was denied access to an incident report on March 28. He was told the report contained information that was investigative and

The newspaper asked the court to determine the city has violated FOIA and require the police department to turn over requested documents.

Quill selects all-time best journalism movies The Society of Professional Journalists is celebrating its 110th anniversary, and to mark the occasion, SPJ’s magazine, Quill, has ranked its top 110 journalismrelated films. According to the magazine, Quill editor Lou Harry and writers for MidwestFilmJournal.com watched, reviewed and rated 110 English-language movies that included a journalism theme. The magazine said the list “will spark discussion, encourage debate, and provide you with some ideas for the next time you can’t find anything interesting in your Netflix queue.” To view the entire list, visit www.quillmag. com. Here’s a quick look at the Top 10: 10) Groundhog Day (1993) 9) Christine (2016) 8) Network (1976) 7) Sweet Smell of Success (1957) 6) Zodiac (2007) 5) Shattered Glass (2003) 4) Citizen Kane (1941) 3) His Girl Friday (1940) 2) All the President’s Men (1976) 1) Spotlight (2015) Arkansas Publisher Weekly

4

June 6, 2019


Guest Column:

Guest Column: Newsprint prices unstable for time being By Tony Smithson It’s a terrifying moment. The email lurks your inbox. It’s from your newsprint supplier, or maybe your printer, and the subject line is “Newsprint Price.” You hesitate to click on it for fear of what it might contain. Is the price going up? Maybe - hopefully - it’s going down? How much? When will it take effect? With a whispered prayer, you click the message. Even with an understanding of the global supply and demand factors that drive newsprint pricing, the specific movement and timing of price changes can be a mystery. Much of the information that goes into the calculations of a price change is available to the public. RISI is a pulp and paper industry analyst that publishes Pulp & Paper Weekly. For the price of a subscription, readers gain access to the minutia of statistical information about the global paper industry. Both buyers and sellers of newsprint look for specific signs within that sea of information that might indicate either upward or downward movement of prices. Indicators of a potential price increase could include high operating rates of 94% and above, order backlogs, late deliveries, and low mill inventories. Mill inventories are the amount of paper that the mill has produced but that has not yet shipped. Each of these statistics points to a situation where demand is outstripping supply, so the time might be right for a price increase. On the other side of the coin, low operating rates, early deliveries, and high mill inventories can indicate a situation that could lead to a price decrease. Newsprint brokers can also provide

Arkansas Publisher Weekly

clues to where pricing might be headed. During 2018, when prices were rising and supply was tight, newsprint brokers were constantly reaching out asking to buy surplus paper. However, in recent months with a softer market, those emails changed to sales offers with aggressive pricing. Despite the incredible amount of statistical information available, newsprint prices aren’t set by computer models. They’re set by people. “Your whole outlook for the year can change with one phone call,” was how one supplier described the process. Newsprint industry veterans all point to the importance of the ongoing dialogue between buyers and sellers in establishing pricing. Another supplier noted that, “It usually starts with a buyer calling up and saying, ‘Hey, I got an offer for this many tons at this price. What do you think?’” “Sometimes it comes down to trust”, a supplier explained. “If a buyer tells me he’s getting offers of a lower price, I have to decide if I believe it’s real. On the other hand, if I want to raise the price and the buyer tells me he’ll take his orders to another mill, I have to weigh that, too.” It is important to note that these conversations are not happening among a group of strangers. Most of the senior executives making pricing decisions have spent decades in the industry, and many have been on the other side of the table at some point in their career. Pricing discussions often happen in person, and are tempered by years-long personal relationships. Industry consolidation, both on the supplier side and the buyer side, was cited

5

by many as an increasingly important factor. Many smaller suppliers noted that they tend to follow the lead of Resolute Forest Products, which now produces approximately 41% of the newsprint in North America. “Us little guys aren’t enough to move the pricing needle, so we really have to pay attention to what’s going on,” noted one supplier. While fewer suppliers means buyers have limited choices, consolidated purchasing by groups like Gannett Supply Corp, Cox Newsprint Supply and PAGE Cooperative means that a small number of buyers wield a disproportionate amount of purchasing power. While this can work to keep prices under control, it is not necessarily all good. “You can end up with some guys who just want to dictate the price they’re going to pay,” noted one supplier. The danger in this type of situation is that a large institutional buyer, thinking of its shortterm financial goals, could insist on a price that is unacceptable to large suppliers, giving an incentive to move production from newsprint into other products. In a newsprint market of approximately 2.5 million metric tons annually, the closure of one newsprint machine making 200,000 tons a year represents nearly 10% of the market. That kind of disruption could lead to pricing volatility that is not in anyone’s best interest, particularly community newspaper publishers. And that’s terrifying. Tony Smithson is the vice president of printing operations for Bliss Communications Inc. Reach him at tsmithson@gazettextra.com

June 6, 2019


BET ON US #ArkansasNewspapers

Arkansas Press Association

CONVENTION

June 26 - June 29, 2019


Convention Schedule Wednesday, June 26

Friday, June 28 (cont’d)

Noon

9:00 am

3:00 pm 6:00 pm

APA Golf Luncheon & Tournament

Hot Springs Country Club

Registration Opens Explore Hot Springs

Dinner on your own

Thursday, June 27 8:00 am 8:30 am Noon 1:30 pm

Registration Opens APA Board of Directors Meeting Roundtable Lunch Session: Increase Sales Performance Now Presenter: Carol Grubbe

3:30 pm

6:00 pm

Presenter: Teri Finneman, Ph.D. University of Kansas

Noon

Luncheon

2:00 pm

Session: News Photography Workshop

3:30 pm

Session: Connecting with Readers

6:00 pm 7:00 pm

Honorees’ Reception APA Honors Banquet

Session: Legal, Libel & FOIA Panel

Panelists: John Tull, Vincent Chadick and Christoph Keller with Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC

Dinner & Behind-the-Scenes Tour Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort

Session: 10 Tips for Increasing Your Social Media Engagement

9:00 pm

Headliner of the Year Louis Cella, Presidents’ Gavel Passing, Golf Awards Presenter: Kevin Pieper Presenter: Jim Pumarlo

Awards Presented: Distinguished Service, Freedom of Information, Golden 50 Service Awards and Journalism Educator

After-Hours Hospitality

Saturday, June 29 8:00 am

Registration Opens

Friday, June 28

8:30 am

7:30 am 8:00 am

Breakfast & APA Member Business Meeting

9:00 am

Session: ABC’s of Editorial Writing

Registration Opens APA Past Presidents’ Breakfast

(Invitation Only)

8:30 am

Trade Show & Silent Auction Opens

8:30 am4:30 pm

APA Kids’ Press Camp

10:30 am

with Continental Breakfast

Noon

Presenter: Jim Pumarlo

Session: Legislative Coverage 101 Panel

Moderator: Rex Nelson Panelists: Wesley Brown, Andrew DeMillo and Michael Wickline

APA Better Newspaper Editorial Awards Presentation

Emcee: Rex Nelson

Hotel Information Hotel Hot Springs

The Hotel Hot Springs & Spa at the Convention Center is Hot Springs’ newest destination hotel. This 14-story structure hosts scenic views of Historic Downtown Hot Springs and the Ouachita Mountains. The hotel is centrally located & perfect for guests looking to experience Historic Bathhouse Row, Oaklawn Racing & Gaming, Magic Springs & Crystal Falls Water and Theme Park plus the galleries and shops in the area. The Hotel Hot Springs & Spa will also live up to its namesake with a luxurious spa that features Hot Springs’ thermal healing water.

To make a room reservation, call 1-877-623-6697 305 Malvern Avenue, Hot Springs AR 71901

Reserve hotel rooms by June 7 | $124 Single and $134 Double Our group code is APA2019

APA Golf Tournament

Hot Springs Country Club

AP The Hot Springs Country Club is nestled in the Ouachita foothills and surrounded by neighboring lakes and national parks. With 36 holes of golf available, the Club offers a wide variety of golfing experiences. The Park course, where our tournament will be held, is a bit more open than the Club’s second course, the Arlington. The Park course was recently renovated by Coore and Crenshaw. It is a little longer than its sister course, and offers Bentgrass greens for year-round playability.


PA

Guest Speakers Carol Grubbe Carol Grubbe has worked in media for more than 25 years. First in radio sales, then in newspaper as a sales person and niche publication/online sales director. She now is the Senior Regional Sales Manager with TownNews.com, a software company for all media companies, providing many digital solutions for her clients. Grubbe has received certification by Personality Insights to teach effective communication through DISC assessments.

Teri Finneman, Ph.D. Teri Finneman is a journalism professor at the University of Kansas. She worked as social media editor for The Brookings Register from 2016-2018 while a professor at South Dakota State. She previously worked as a political reporter and multimedia correspondent for The Fargo Forum and Forum Communications. She works with the North Dakota and South Dakota newspaper associations to conduct oral histories of journalists and serves as executive producer and co-host of the podcast Journalism History. In two years, Finneman grew the Facebook following for a small South Dakota daily by 3,600 and added 1,000 followers each to Instagram and Snapchat accounts started from scratch.

Kevin Pieper Kevin Pieper is a national award-winning professional photographer, writer and speaker with more than 25 years experience. He is also a biologist. His intimate knowledge of the natural world is evident in his stunning nature images, which both inspire and educate. In addition to his environmental work, Pieper produces editorial content on subjects ranging from personality profiles, human interest pieces to trending topics. His work has been published in Reader’s Digest, several National Geographic publications, Mother Earth News, the New York Times, USA Today, as well as dozens of other national publications.

Jim Pumarlo Jim Pumarlo spent 27 years working at small daily newspapers in International Falls and Red Wing, Minn. He served as editor of the Red Wing Republican Eagle for 21 years and is currently director of communications at the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. He is the author of three books, “Bad News and Good Judgment: A Guide to Reporting on Sensitive Issues in a Small-Town Newspaper,” “Votes and Quotes: A Guide to Outstanding Election Campaign Coverage,” and most recently “Journalism Primer: A Guide to Community News Coverage for Beginning and Veteran Journalists.” He has won numerous journalism awards over his career, including the Minnesota Newspaper Association Al McIntosh Distinguished Service to Journalism Award.

Panelists

John Tull Managing Member Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC

Vincent Chadick Of Counsel Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC

Christoph Keller Associate Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC

PA

PA A

Rex Nelson Senior Editor, Arkansas DemocratGazette

Wesley Brown Senior Political & Business Reporter Talk Business & Politics

Andrew DeMillo Capitol Correspondent The Associated Press

Michael Wickline State Capitol Reporter Arkansas DemocratGazette


Dinner & Behind-the-Scenes Tour at Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort THURSDAY, JUNE 27 at 6 PM

(Shuttle to will leave Hotel Hot Springs for Oaklawn at 5:30 pm)

Register to attend this fun event today!

REGISTER TODAY!

APA Annual Trade Show June 28, 2019

O D L SO

T U

Hot Springs, AR | Hotel Hot Springs

Registration Deadline: Friday, June 7, 2019 With limited space this year, booths will sell quickly and will be at a first come first served basis.

Booth Fee Includes: • Draped 6-ft. Table, 2 Chairs • Name Badges • One Free Convention Registration

(includes access to free convention sessions – please register for paid events separately)

• Electricity & Internet Access • Waste Basket

Call the APA office today for more registration information at 501-374-1500. Arkansas Press Association 411 S. Victory, Little Rock, AR, 72201


Golf Tournament

APA’s 38th Annual

Benefitting the Arkansas Newspaper Foundation

Wednesday, June 26 Hot Springs Country Club, Hot Springs Noon Lunch & 1 p.m. Shotgun Start $150 Individual Entry Fee or $500 for a Team of Four Includes Two Mulligans & Lunch Tournament Sponsors: UAMS & AT&T Trophies Awarded to 1st Place Team, Longest Drive & Closest to the Pin.

Golf Tournament Entry Form Signing up as (circle one):

Individual or Team

Name ______________________________________Company ______________________________________ Mailing Address ________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State __________ Zip ___________ Phone _________________________ E-mail ____________________________ Golf Handicap ______________ (or) Average 18-hole Score ______________ Name(s) of those you wish to play with ______________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Return to the Arkansas Press Association by email to ashley@arkansaspress.org 501-374-1500 | Fax 501-374-7509


APA 2019 Convention

Press Camp! FRIDAY, JUNE 28

TH

ONLY $20!

Camp Includes: • A Junior Press Card • Breakfast, lunch & supplies • Sightseeing field trip around Hot Springs Photos will be displayed Friday evening at the Honorees’ Reception.

PRESS CAMP FOR KIDS REGISTRATION FORM Ages 5-12 (adult supervision and camp counselors on hand) Child’s Name

Age

Child’s Name

Age

Child’s Name

Age

Parent(s) Newspaper / Company Total Number of Camp Registrants Please Return with Convention Registration Form to: 411 S. Victory, Little Rock, AR 72201 | Fax: (50) 374-7509

x $20 each =

Sponsored by Arkansas Children’s


casual will be appropriate for the Friday night banquet.

the amount in the square before Grand Total below.

$65 $65 $65

$85 $85 $85

3.

4.

5.

Deadline to Register is June 21st

( ) Bill Us ( ) Amount Enclosed: $ ( ) Credit Card: Visa, MC, AE | Card #

Billing:

or fax to APA at (501) 374-7509 Check #

$65

$85

2.

Column Totals

$65

$85

1.

Expires

Fri. / Sat.

$25

Fri. / Sat.

$25

Fri. / Sat.

$25

Fri. / Sat.

$25

Fri. / Sat.

$25

One Day Only

Free

Free

Free

Free

Free

Children Under 18

(Circle One)

VCN #

$20 Size _____ $20 Size _____ $20 Size _____ $20 Size _____ $20 Size _____

T-Shirt

$15

$15

$15

$15

$15

Round Table Lunch

$25

$25

$25

$25

$25

Adult

$15

$15

$15

$15

$15

Child Under 13

Oaklawn Dinner

Thursday

7. DEADLINE to register is June 21st. 48 hours in advance of event or we expect your payment. NO REFUNDS will be made June 24th.

6.

5.

List children

on this form if you like. Add the page totals from those forms

Spouse

Print or type FIRST & LAST NAME as it will appear on name tag.

Individual Name

fees for that day. For example, Saturday award winners pay PLUS $15 for the lunch. (b) A $10 (dollar) early bird discount can be taken per newspaper/company if June 14th and at least one full c) Thirteen year-olds and younger children may choose a child’s plate for Friday dinner and Saturday lunch.

. NOTE: (a) One may choose to register for ONE DAY

4.

3.

Member or Associate

2.

1. Each person (except for children under 18 years of age)

READ THIS BEFORE YOU BEGIN

June 26 - 29 | Hotel Hot Springs | Hot Springs

$20

$20

$20

$20

$20

Lunch

$40

$40

$40

$40

$40

Adult

$15

$15

$15

$15

$15

Adult

$10

$10

$10

$10

$10

Child Under 13

Editorial Awards Lunch

Saturday

GRAND TOTAL

See Item #5

Add Golf Page Total

$20

$20

$20

$20

$20

Child Under 13

APA Honors Banquet

Friday

Email

Phone

City / State / Zip

Address

Company Name

(

Fee & Meal(s)

Add

TOTALS

)

Profile for Arkansas Press Association

Arkansas Publisher Weekly: June 6, 2019  

The Arkansas Publisher Weekly is the only direct source for late-breaking news regarding Arkansas' newspapers and related industries. Publis...

Arkansas Publisher Weekly: June 6, 2019  

The Arkansas Publisher Weekly is the only direct source for late-breaking news regarding Arkansas' newspapers and related industries. Publis...