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ARKANSAS ADVENTURE GUIDE

Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism 1 Capitol Mall • Little Rock, AR 72201 Arkansas.com

•Campgrounds •RV Listings •Hiking & Backpacking •Floaters’ Guide •Outfitters’ Directory •Backcountry Drives •Multi-use Trails


STATE PARKS FACILITIES

Helpful Contact Information (Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. MST)

• Website: http://store.usgs.gov/pass/index.html

ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS & TOURISM • Information .......501-682-7777 (TDD) • State Parks....... 501-682-1191 (TDD) 888-AT-PARKS (888-287-2757)

(See parks section for individual parks) • Trails Information ....... 501-682-1301 • Vacation Planning Kit ....800-NATURAL • Websites ..............www.Arkansas.com www.ArkansasStateParks.com • E-mail..................info@Arkansas.com info@ArkansasStateParks.com

ARKANSAS FORESTRY COMMISSION .............501-296-1940 ARKANSAS GAME & FISH COMMISSION .............501-223-6300 ARKANSAS GEOLOGICAL COMMISSION .............501-296-1877 ARKANSAS STATE POLICE • Information ................ 501-618-8000 • Emergency ................. 501-618-8100 • Road Conditions ......... 501-618-8136

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER • Main Office (General Information & River Levels).............. 870-365-2700 • Buffalo Point (Ranger) .................... 870-449-4311 • Pruitt (Ranger) ........... 870-446-5373 • Tyler Bend (Visitor’s Center) ....... 870-439-2502 HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK • Main Office ................ 501-620-6715 NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE .....501-834-0308 U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (Resident Engineers are listed inside)

• General Information .... 501-324-5551 • Lake Report ................ 501-324-6235 • National Recreation Reservation System .... 877-444-6777 • River Report ............... 501-324-5150 USDA NATIONAL FOREST SERVICE • Campground Reservations ............ 877-444-6777 (10 days notice required) • Ouachita (Hot Springs) ............. 479-394-2382 • Ozark (Russellville) ............. 479-964-7200 • St. Francis (Marianna) ................ 479-964-7200

NOTE: We have endeavored to make the Arkansas Adventure Guide as complete as possible. However a comprehensive listing of all the outdoor resources available in The Natural State is not possible due to space limitations of this booklet. If your favorite land or water recreation destination is not included, and you think it should be, please let us hear from you. Send your suggestions to: Arkansas Adventure Guide, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201; PHONE: 501-682-7602; FAX: 501-682-2523; E-MAIL: communications@Arkansas.com The Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin,

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Other Interpretive Facilities Programs

Trails

Other Activities

Water

Camping Cabins Lodge Group Lodging Restaurant Pavilion Visitor Center/ Store Interpretive Programs Historic Site Museum Hiking/ Backpacking Equestrian ATV Mountain Biking Paved/ADA Lake River/ Stream Boat Rental Boat Ramp Pool Beach Marina Tennis Golf Playground

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL • Senior Pass & Access Pass...... 888-ASK-USGS ext. 3

Camping & Lodging

Ark. Museum of Natural Resources Arkansas Post Museum Bull Shoals-White River Cane Creek Conway Cemetery Cossatot River Crater of Diamonds Crowley's Ridge Daisy Davidsonville DeGray Lake Resort Delta Heritage Trail Devil's Den Hampson Archeological Museum Herman Davis Historic Washington Hobbs Jacksonport Jenkins Ferry Battleground Lake Catherine Lake Charles Lake Chicot Lake Dardanelle Lake Fort Smith Lake Frierson Lake Ouachita Lake Poinsett Logoly Louisiana Purchase Lower White River Museum Mammoth Spring Marks' Mills Battleground Millwood Mississippi River Moro Bay Mount Magazine Mount Nebo Ozark Folk Center Parkin Petit Jean Pinnacle Mountain Plantation Agriculture Museum Poison Springs Battleground Powhatan Prairie Grove Battlefield Queen Wilhelmina South Arkansas Arboretum Toltec Mounds Village Creek White Oak Lake Withrow Springs Woolly Hollow

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ⓦ REOPENS LATE SPRING 2015

NOTE: All state parks remain open year-round; however, some facilities close on certain days of the week or seasonally. Unless demand dictates, bathhouses are closed December-February. Contact the individual state park for details.

sex, religion, age or disability in employment or the provision of services.

COVER PHOTOS FRONT: Kayaking on Horner’s Neck Lake, St. Francis National Forest BACK: Biking on Lake Ouachita Vista Trail

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How to Use This Guide… The Arkansas Adventure Guide is divided into several different sections as listed below. No attempt is made to rate the quality of the facilities reported. Highway map coordinates are referenced throughout this guide to help locate the general area of the site, stream or trail listed. A barrier-free icon () is used to designate appropriate sites or trails that are either entirely or partially accessible to persons with disabilities. An alphabetical index for this booklet begins on page 249.

PUBLIC CAMPGROUNDS

Important Note

guide Information for this rtpa De e th to d ide is prov urism in ment of Parks & To forts ef s ou er m writing. Nu are concy ra cu ac re su to en tion. ca bli pu firmed before are ils ta de y an m r, Howeve , ge an ch to always subject e ag ur co en gly on and we str al loc e th you to check with rify any contacts listed to ve p. tri plans prior to your

Pages 9-48

This section includes most publicly-owned campgrounds, which are listed alphabetically by state parks, national parks, national forests and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lake/river recreation areas. Note that reservations can be made for some of the campsites listed. Note also that some Corps sites no longer provide overnight camping and may be designated for day use or open boat ramps only. Check the current status before you go. All other sites are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. These pages also list U.S. Fish & Wildlife Refuge areas—some of which permit primitive camping. Abbreviations used throughout this section are: W = water hook-up. E = electrical hook-up. S = sewer.

PRIVATE & MUNICIPAL CAMPGROUNDS

Pages 49-55

This non-comprehensive list is arranged alphabetically by town and includes contact information and the number of sites available.

OUTDOORS UPDATE

Pages 56-67

This section provides general weather information, suggested trail guides and tips for enjoying the outdoors. The popular and fast-growing hobby of geocaching in The Natural State is also described. A map with grid coordinates corresponding to the official highway map is provided on pages 64-65.

ARKANSAS FLOAT STREAMS

Pages 68-123

Eighteen of the state’s most popular floating rivers are profiled in this section. Detailed information such as general characteristics, the seasons when the river is most canoeable, major access points, scenery along the trip, fishing, services available and other information is included.

OUTFITTERS’ DIRECTORY

Pages 124-131

This section lists outfitters who mainly provide services on the float streams depicted in this guide. They are listed in alphabetical order by river, then by company name, along with contact information. This is an extensive list, but not an all-encompassing one.

ARKANSAS WATER TRAILS

Pages 132-139

The Arkansas Water Trails program is organized by the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission (AGFC) to promote prime flat-water paddling territory. A long-term goal is to create a statewide system of water trails marked by white

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How to Use This Guide (continued)… and blue markers. This section highlights nine waterways currently recognized in the trails program.

ARKANSAS HIKING TRAILS

Pages 140-192

This section is sorted alphabetically by the managing entity—Arkansas Game & Fish, state parks, national parks, national forests and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The listing is further divided into two sub-sections: (1) “Hiking Trails—One Day or Less,” and (2) “Backpacking & Wilderness Hiking Trails,” including trails that generally require more skills, time and equipment. An equipment checklist is also provided.

ARKANSAS MULTI-USE TRAILS

Pages 193-231

This section offers a diverse sampling of designated trails for horseback, mountain bike and ATV enthusiasts, as well as skilled hikers and backpackers. Various trail descriptions, facilities, general reference maps and other details are similarly arranged by the managing entity. The Arkansas River Trail System in central Arkansas is highlighted. A statewide selection of private/municipal off-road parks is also featured.

ARKANSAS BACKCOUNTRY DRIVES

Pages 232-243

This portion includes selected maps depicting some of the national forest lands in Arkansas. Helpful grids list amenities available.

ARKANSAS AERIAL ADVENTURES

Pages 244-248

These pages present a brief overview of popular destination opportunities to experience airborne adventures in Arkansas, from ballooning to zip lines and rope challenge courses.

Want to Take Your Pet? Pets are permitted in many areas, but are restricted or banned in others by specific regulations. Each management authority has their own policy regarding pets. For information, consult the appropriate agency for the campground/trail of your interest. Contacts are provided for each listing or responsible district.

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Table of Contents Mount Nebo Petit Jean Queen Wilhelmina Village Creek White Oak Lake HELPFUL CONTACT INFORMATION...........Inside Withrow Springs Front Cover Woolly Hollow

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE......................1 Editorial Policy and Publication Notes.............. 1 Want to Take Your Pet?...... 2

FOREWORD......................8 Getting Close To Nature..... 8

ARKANSAS PUBLIC CAMPGROUNDS................9

ARKANSAS STATE PARKS CAMPGROUNDS....9 Bull Shoals-White River Cane Creek Cossatot River Crater of Diamonds Crowley’s Ridge Daisy Davidsonville DeGray Lake Resort Delta Heritage Trail Devil’s Den Jacksonport Lake Catherine Lake Charles Lake Chicot Lake Dardanelle Lake Fort Smith Lake Frierson Lake Ouachita Lake Poinsett Logoly Millwood Mississippi River Moro Bay Mount Magazine

Blanchard Springs Rec. Area Brock Creek Cove Lake Gunner Pool Haw Creek Falls Horsehead Lake Lake Wedington Long Pool Moccasin Gap Horse Camp Mount Magazine Ozone Redding NATIONAL Richland Creek PARK SERVICE Shores Lake CAMPGROUNDS.............. 16 Sorghum Hollow Horse Camp Buffalo National River.....16 Spring Lake Buffalo Point White Rock Mountain Carver Wolf Pen Erbie St. Francis Kyles Landing National Forest................26 Lost Valley Storm Creek Lake Maumee South Ozark Rush Spring Creek Steel Creek Tyler Bend U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE Woolum SERVICE REFUGES ......... 27 Hot Springs Bald Knob National National Park..................18 Wildlife Refuge...............27 Gulpha Gorge Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge...............27 Cache River National Wildlife Refuge...............27 Dale Bumpers White River National USDA FOREST SERVICE CAMPGROUNDS.............. 19 Wildlife Refuge ..............27 Felsenthal National Ouachita National Forest................19 Wildlife Refuge...............27 Albert Pike Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge...............28 Bard Springs Big Brushy Overflow National Camp Clearfork Wildlife Refuge...............28 Charlton Pond Creek National Crystal Wildlife Refuge...............28 Dragover Float Camp Wapanocca National Fourche Mtn. Wildlife Refuge...............28 Fulton Branch Float Camp Iron Springs Jack Creek Knoppers Ford Lake Sylvia Little Pines River Bluff Float Camp Rocky Shoals Float Camp Shady Lake Shirley Creek Float Camp South Fourche Ozark National Forest......22 Barkshed Bayou Bluff

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS CAMPGROUNDS ............. 29 Arkansas River Between Ark. Post & Pine Bluff.......................29 Huff’s Island * Jardis Point * Merrisach Lake Moore Bayou * Notrebes Bend Pendleton Bend Wilbur D. Mills Arkansas River Between Pine Bluff & Little Rock......................30 D.D. Terry Dam Site Six West * Rising Star Tar Camp Willow Beach Arkansas River Between Little Rock & Dardanelle .....................30 Cherokee Cypress Creek * Maumelle Point Remove * Sweeden Island * Toad Suck Ferry Arkansas River Between Dardanelle & Ozark.........32 Arkansas River Between Ozark & Fort Smith..........32 Beaver Lake Area ...........32 Dam Site Lake Dam Site River Hickory Creek Horseshoe Bend Indian Creek Lost Bridge North Lost Bridge South Prairie Creek Rocky Branch Starkey War Eagle

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Table of Contents Blue Mountain Lake Area.......................33 Ashley Creek Hise Hill Lick Creek Outlet Area Waveland Park Bull Shoals Lake Area ......................34 Buck Creek Dam Site * Highway 125 Lakeview Lead Hill Oakland Tucker Hollow DeGray Lake Area ..........35 Alpine Ridge Arlie Moore Caddo Drive Edgewood Iron Mountain Lenox Marcus Oak Bower Ozan Point Point Cedar Shouse Ford De Queen Lake Area .......37 Bellah Mine Oak Grove Pine Ridge Dierks Lake Area ............37 Blue Ridge Horseshoe Bend Jefferson Ridge Gillham Lake Area..........38 Big Coon Creek Cossatot Reefs Little Coon Creek Greers Ferry Lake Area ......................38 Cherokee * Choctaw Cove Creek Dam Site Devils Fork Heber Springs Hill Creek John F. Kennedy Mill Creek * Narrows Old Highway 25 Shiloh Sugar Loaf Lake Dardanelle Area ..............................40 Old Post Road Park Piney Bay Riverview Shoal Bay Spadra

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Lake Greeson Area .........41 Arrowhead Point Bear Creek Buckhorn Cowhide Cove Dam Area Kirby Landing Laurel Creek Narrows Dam Site Parker Creek Pikeville Self Creek Star of the West Lake Ouachita Area .......43 Big Fir Brady Mountain Buckville Crystal Springs Denby Point (Ouachita Shores) Irons Fork Joplin (Mountain Harbor) Lena Landing (North Shores Resort) Little Fir Spillway Stephens Park Tompkins Bend (Shangri La) Twin Creek Millwood Lake Area .......45 Beard’s Bluff Beard’s Lake Cottonshed Landing Millwood Overlook * Paraloma Landing River Run East River Run West Saratoga Landing White Cliffs Wilton Landing * Nimrod Lake Area ..........46 Carden Point * Carter Cove Quarry Cove River Road Sunlight Bay Norfork Lake Area ..........47 Bidwell Point Cranfield Dam Quarry Gamaliel Henderson Panther Bay Robinson Point Ozark Lake Area.............48 Aux Arc Citadel Bluff * Clear Creek Springhill Table Rock Lake Area......48 Cricket Creek

Horseshoe Bend Hot Springs Huntsville Huttig Jacksonville Jasper Jessieville ___________________________ Jonesboro * No camping. Boat ramp open. Judsonia Check for current status. Lakeview Lake Village Little Rock Lockesburg Magnolia PRIVATE & MUNICIPAL Mammoth Spring CAMPGROUNDS.............. 49 Marion Alma Mena Altus Morrilton Arkadelphia Mount Ida Atkins Mountain Home Bald Knob Mountain View Batesvillle Murfreesboro Beaver New Blaine Bee Branch Norfork Benton North Little Rock Blytheville Oakland Boles Ozark Booneville Paris Bull Shoals Pea Ridge Calico Rock Pencil Bluff Cave Springs Perryville Charleston Ponca Clarendon Protem Clarksville Ravenden Clinton Rogers Conway Russellville Cotter Sheridan Crossett Shirley Dover Siloam Springs Edgemont Springdale El Dorado Stamps Elizabeth St. Charles Eureka Springs St. Joe Fairfield Bay Story Fayetteville Texarkana Flippin Van Buren Forrest City Vilonia Fort Smith Waldron Gamaliel Walnut Ridge Gentry West Memphis Gilbert Wiederkehr Village Glenwood Winslow Greenbrier “Y” City Hagarville Yellville Hardy Harrison Hatfield Hazen Heber Springs OUTDOORS Heth UPDATE.......................... 56 Holly Grove Hope There’s History In These Hills.................. 56

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Table of Contents Arkansas Weather Will Make Your Stay!...................... 57 Preserve Our Plant And Animal Heritage...... 59 Trail Guides Can Show You The Way......... 60 Advice To The Wary While In The Wild...........61 Keep Arkansas Beautiful!....................... 63 Volunteers Are Vital........ 63 Arkansas Roadmap......... 64 Arkansas Welcome Center Locations ............ 65 GPS Technologies Create Fun Cache-and-Seek Pastimes in The Natural State!..................66

ARKANSAS FLOAT STREAMS............ 68 Find Fresh-water Adventures on One of Many Year-round Float Streams.....................68 Glass and Water Don’t Mix….......................69 Important Reminders...... 69 How to Get There............ 69 Degree of Difficulty Class Ratings I-VI.............70 Additional Information....70 Rivers and Their Future....71 Big Piney Creek...............72 Buffalo River ..................74 Caddo River....................78 Cadron Creek..................80 Cossatot River.................83 Crooked Creek.................86 Eleven Point River...........89 Illinois Bayou..................91 Kings River.....................95 Little Missouri River...............................97 Little Red River............. 100 Mulberry River.............. 103 Ouachita River.............. 106 Richland Creek.............. 109 Saline River.................. 112 Spring River.................. 114 Strawberry River........... 117 White River................... 119

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Arkansas River..............135 Crooked Creek...............136 Cut-off Creek.................136 Dagmar WMA...............137 Bayou DeView .................138 Robe Bayou .....................138 Grassy Lake...................138 Little Maumelle.............138 OUTFITTERS’ DIRECTORY.................. 124 Wattensaw Bayou..........139 Big Piney Creek Buffalo River (Lower) Buffalo River (Middle) Buffalo River (Upper) Caddo River ARKANSAS Cadron Creek HIKING TRAILS............. 140 Crooked Creek The Time Is Always Illinois Bayou Right to Take a Hike!.... 140 Kings River Arkansas Trails/ Little Red River Wilderness Areas Mississippi River Location Map & Physiographic Regions....141 Mulberry River Ouachita River HIKING TRAILS— Saline River ONE DAY OR LESS......... 142 Spring River War Eagle Creek White River & North Fork White River (Upper) Statewide Outfitters ARKANSAS GAME & FISH Float Streams Outfitters’ ....................124 COMMISSION TRAIL..... 143 Bell Slough Area............143 Find Extra Adventure Bell Slough Watchable on Additional Arkansas Waterways................... 127 Wildlife Trail Lake Outfitters..............127 Bull Shoals Lake Greers Ferry Lake Statewide Outfitters.......127 Outfitters’ Services........128 Outfitters’ Facilities Chart ARKANSAS STATE PARKS TRAILS.............. 144 Bull Shoals-White River State Park............144 Big Bluff Trail Gaston Wildflower Garden Trail ARKANSAS WATER TRAILS............ 132 Heritage + Habitat Trail Lakeside Trail Arkansas Water Trails System Promotes Paddling Oakridge Mountain Bike Trail Cane Creek The Natural State’s Waterways................... 132 State Park ....................145 Be Well-prepared........... 133 Cane Creek Kayak Trail Expect The Unexpected... 133 Cane Creek Lake Trail Beware of The Hunter... 133 Delta View Trail Plan to Go Fishing........ 133 Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area.........145 Enjoy The Views........... 133 Brushy Creek Nature Trail Play By The Rules......... 133 Harris Creek Trail Reminders for River Corridor Trail Paddlers....................... 133 Waterleaf ADA Nature Trail Arkansas Post ..............134 Arkansas Game & Fish Commission Regulates Official State Guidelines For Canoes, Kayaks And Inner Tubes........... 123

Crater of Diamonds State Park ....................146 Little Missouri River Trail Crowley’s Ridge State Park ....................146 Dancing Rabbit Trail Lake Ponder Trail Spider Creek Trail Walcott Lake Trail Daisy State Park............147 Daisy Creek Trail Davidsonville Historic State Park........147 Black River Trail Historic Townsite Trail Scott Cemetery Trail Trappers Lake Trail DeGray Lake Resort State Park ..........148 Green Heron Trail Island Trail Delta Heritage Trail State Park ....................148 Delta Heritage Trail Devil’s Den State Park ...148 Butterfield Trail Cross Country Mountain Biking Trail Devil’s Den Self-Guided Trail Woody Plant Trail Hobbs State ParkConservation Area.........149 Hidden Diversity Trail Historic Van Winkle Trail Ozark Plateau Trail Pigeon Roost Trail Shaddox Hollow Nature Trail Sinking Stream Trail Jacksonport State Park..................... 150 The Tunstall Riverwalk Trail Lake Catherine State Park .................... 151 Dam Mountain Trail Falls Branch Trail Horseshoe Mountain Trail Lake Charles State Park..................... 151 Butterflies & Blooms Trail Cedar Trail Mockernut Trail White Oak Lake Trail Lake Chicot State Park...152 Delta Woodlands Trail Lake Dardanelle State Park.....................152 Meadow Brook Self-Guided Trail Lake Fort Smith State Park ....................153 Ozark Highlands Trail

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Table of Contents Lake Ouachita State Park ....................153 Caddo Bend Trail Logoly State Park .........153 Crane Fly Trail Spring Branch Trail Louisiana Purchase State Park.....................154 Louisiana Purchase Boardwalk Mammoth Spring State Park ....................154 Spring Lake Trail Millwood State Park .....154 Waterfowl Way Trail Wildlife Lane Trail Mississippi River State Park.....................155 Bear Creek Nature Trail Trotting Fox Trail Moro Bay State Park .....155 Deer Run Trail Low Water Trail Mount Magazine State Park ....................156 Bear Hollow Trail Huckleberry Mountain Horse Trail North Rim Trail Mount Nebo State Park ...156 Summit Park Trail Bench Trail Petit Jean State Park.....157 Cedar Creek Trail Cedar Falls Trail Seven Hollows Trail Pinnacle Mountain State Park.....................157 Arkansas Trail Base Trail East Summit Trail Jackfork Mountain Biking Trail Kingfisher Trail Rabbit Ridge Mountain Biking Trail Rocky Valley Trail West Summit Trail Ouachita Trail Queen Wilhelmina State Park.....................158 Lovers’ Leap Trail Ouachita Trail Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park.....................159 Knapp Trail Village Creek State Park.....................159 Big Ben Nature Trail Lake Dunn Trail Military Road Trail

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White Oak Lake State Park.....................159 Beech Ridge Trail Coastal Plain Trail Fern Hollow Trail Spring Branch Trail Withrow Springs State Park.....................160 War Eagle Trail Woolly Hollow State Park.....................160 Huckleberry Trail

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE TRAILS ...........161 Arkansas Post National Memorial........ 161 Post Bayou Nature Trail Buffalo National River... 161 Buffalo River Trail Erbie Trails Indian Rock House Self-Guided Nature Trail Lost Valley Trail Morning Star Mine Interpretive Trail and Rush Mountain Trail Hot Springs National Park................163 The Grande Promenade The Sunset Trail

Friendship Trail Hunt’s Loop Trail Little Blakely Trails Lake Sylvia Recreation Area............167 Trees of the Forest Trail Wildlife Trail Little Missouri Falls Recreation Area............168 Little Missouri Trail Shady Lake Recreation Area............168 A Valuable Forest Trail Tall Peak Trail Ozark/St. Francis National Forests............168 Alum Cove Recreation Area............169 Alum Cove Natural Bridge Trail Bear Creek Lake Area....169 Bear Creek Nature Trail Blanchard Springs Caverns........... 1695 Discovery Trail Dripstone Trail Cove Lake Recreation Area............ 170 Cove Lake Trail Lake Wedington Recreation Area............ 170 Lake Wedington Trail Mount Magazine Recreation Area............ 170 Mount Magazine Hiking Trails Pedestal Rocks Area...... 171 King’s Bluff Loop Trail Pedestal Rock Loop Trail White Rock Mountain Recreation Area............ 171 White Rock Rim Loop Trail

DeGray Lake Area.........174 Arlie Moore Interpretive Trail Iron Mountain Trail System Lower Lake Recreational Area Greers Ferry Lake Area...175 Mossy Bluff/Buckeye Trail Sugar Loaf Mountain Nature Trail Lake Dardanelle Area....176 Bona Dea Trails Bridge Rock Trail Merrisach Lake Area.....176 Merrisach Lake Trail Norfork Lake Area.........176 David’s Trail Norfork Trail Pigeon Creek Trail Robinson Point Trail Toad Suck Ferry (Cadron Settlement) Area.............................177 Tollantusky Trail

BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS............. 178 Backpacking Preparations................. 179 Rent-A-Backpack ...........180 Backcountry & Wilderness Guidelines ...181 Backpacking Trails........182 Buckeye Mountain Trail Buffalo River Trail USDA FOREST Butterfield Hiking Trail SERVICE TRAILS........... 164 Caney Creek Trail Ouachita Eagle Rock Loop Trail National Forest.............. 164 Lake Wedington Trail Little Missouri Trail Albert Pike Mount Magazine Hiking Trails Recreation Area............165 North Sylamore Creek Athens-Big Fork Trail Hiking Trail Little Missouri Trail U.S. ARMY CORPS Ouachita Trail Winding Stairs Trail OF ENGINEERS Big Brushy TRAILS......................... 172 Ozark Highlands Trail Recreation Area............165 Beaver Lake Area.......... 172 Pigeon Roost Trail Shores Lake/White Rock Brushy Creek Trail Bench Rock Nature Trail Loop Trail Charlton Dogwood Overlook Trail Womble Trail Recreation Area............166 Fishtrap Nature Trail WILDERNESS Prayer of the Woods Trail Lost Bridge Trail AREAS.......................... 188 Crystal Recreation Area..166 Pine Ridge Trail Rim Rock Trail Crystal Mountain Scenic Silver Beaver Trail Area Trail Tranquil Timbers Trail Crystal Recreation Area Trail Bull Shoals Lake Area...174 Jessieville Dogwood Trail Buffalo National River Visitor Information Wilderness Areas..........189 Center Area...................166

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Table of Contents Mount Magazine S.P. Huckleberry Mtn. Horse Trail Mount Nebo S.P. Mount Nebo Bench Trail Pinnacle Mountain S.P. Jackfork Mountain Biking Trail Rabbit Ridge Mountain Biking Trail Village Creek S.P. USDA Forest Service Wilderness Areas..........189 Village Cr. S.P. Multi-use Trails White Oak Lake S.P. Ouachita National Forest .............189 Fern Hollow Trail Black Fork Mountain Wilderness Caney Creek Wilderness Dry Creek Wilderness Flatside Wilderness Poteau Mountain Wilderness National Parks Ozark National Forest ...190 Multi-use Trails.............199 East Fork Wilderness Lower Buffalo Horse Trails Hurricane Creek Wilderness Middle Buffalo Horse Trails— Leatherwood Wilderness Buffalo River Trail, Richland Creek Wilderness Woolum to Gilbert Upper Buffalo Wilderness (South) Middle Buffalo Horse Trails— Equipment Point Peter Branch, Richland Checklist.......................192 Valley Loop Trail Pea Ridge Trails Upper Buffalo Horse Trails— Old River Trail Lower Buffalo Wilderness Ponca Wilderness Upper Buffalo Wilderness (North)

U.S. Army Corps of National Forest Engineers Multi-use Trails............................225 Maps Legend.................234 Ouachita National Bear Creek Cycle Trail Forest Drives.................235 Facilities Chart Road Map Ozark National Forest Drives.................240 Central Arkansas Facilities Chart Multi-use Trails.............227 Road Map Central Arkansas Multi-use Trails Combine City Conveniences for Dedicated Runners And Riders Alike .......... 227 Arkansas River Trail & AERIAL Big Dam Bridge ADVENTURES............... 244 Camp Robinson Mountain Airborne Pursuits Add Bike Trail Sky-high Vistas And Excitement for Outdoor Enthusiasts...... 244 Fill-UP on Hot Air!........ 244 Hang With The Gliders!.................. 244 Private/Municipal Off-road Parks...............230 Scale New “Peeks”!........ 245 Test Your Exposure!....... 245 Custom Off-road Parks Know Before You Go...... 245 MULTI-USE TRAILS....... 193 Provide Private/Municipal Capture Your Own Trail Users with Multi-fun Arkansas Multi-use Pastimes on Wheels........230 High-flying Action!........ 246 Trails Take Diverse Batesville Paths for Exploring Zip Line Attractions.......246 USDA Forest Blevins The Natural State......... 193 Service Multi-use Bentonville Branch Trails............................203 Arkansas Multi-use Combs Dover Trails Location Map & Eureka Springs Ouachita Physiographic Hot Springs National Forest Hardy Regions......................... 194 Multi-use Trails.............203 North Little Rock Hot Springs Mena Bear Creek Horse Trail Jasper Old Joe Earthquake Ridge Trail Malvern Ozark Fourche Mountain Trail Mountain View Pineville Lake Ouachita Vista Trail Okolona Sherwood Little Blakely Trail System Ozark Vandervoort Possum Kingdom Bike Trail Ponca Arkansas State Parks Sugar Creek Multi-use Trail Multi-use Trails.............195 Viles Branch Trail Bull Shoals-White River S.P. Wildcat Mountain Trail Oakridge Mountain Bike Trail Wolf Pen Gap Trails Womble Trail Cane Creek S.P. BACKCOUNTRY INDEX.......................... 249 Cane Creek Lake Trail Ozark/St. Francis DRIVES......................... 232 National Forests Delta View Trail Multi-use Trails............. 215 Drive Your SUV to New Delta Heritage Trail S.P. Discoveries on Scenic Huckleberry Mountain Delta Heritage Trail Backcountry Roads........ 232 Horse Trails Devil’s Den S.P. A Special Note Mill Creek ATV Trail About Our Creeks.......... 233 Cross Country Mtn. Biking Trail Moccasin Gap Multi-use Trail Devil’s Den S.P. Horse Trails Need More ARKANSAS STATE Sylamore Horse Trail Directions?.................... 233 PARKS FACILITIES Hobbs State ParkSyllamo Mountain Bike Trail Backcountry CHART.......................Inside Conservation Area Drive Guidelines........... 233 Back Cover Hidden Diversity Trail

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Getting Close to Nature Arkansas is a natural for this kind of vacation. With two magnificent mountain ranges, millions of acres in three national forests, 600,000 acres of lakes and 9,700 miles of streams and rivers—few states in mid-America can equal her great outdoors. Long famous for unparalleled hunting and fishing opportunities, Arkansas is reknowned as a great place to get back to nature. There are over 200 public-owned campgrounds in Arkansas, offering nearly 9,400 campsites. You’ll find U.S. Army Corps of Engineers campgrounds that are generally oriented to water sports activities. They’re open, park-like areas with fresh water and central restrooms. Almost all Corps sites provide boat launching ramps. The national forest campgrounds are usually more rustic and emphasize privacy with individual campsites divided by green areas. These sites are often developed around geographic attractions with care taken to blend into the surrounding terrain. Restroom facilities are more primitive in the national forests. At some sites, it is necessary to bring your own water. Arkansas’s state parks are located in every area of the state and feature a complete range of scenic destinations. Many sites offer full-comfort conveniences to campers such as bathhouses with hot water showers. Most state park campsites range from tent to RV accommodations with water, electric and sewer hookups. Also found at many locations are restaurants or snack bars, numerous trails of different types, and interesting interpretive programs and tours available throughout the year. Several state parks feature such amenities as lodges, cabins, swimming pools or beaches, tennis courts, pavilions, playgrounds, marinas and boat ramps. With a great selection of white-water rapids, gently flowing streams and charted water trails, there’s an abundant choice of floating options for everyone—from the beginning canoeist to the most experienced kayaker. These sparkling avenues are typically surrounded by some of the state’s most breathtaking beauty. Arkansas has over 250 hiking trails totaling over 1,500 miles. Enjoy a day-hike or an overnight backpacking adventure any time of the year. Every season offers something unique as well as memorable birding and wildlife watching opportunities. For the more rugged or traditional experience, dozens of backpacking trails and wilderness areas provide serenity and freedom from congestion. Plenty of horseback riding paths are available, and many multi-use courses challenge mountain bike, ATV or other off-road enthusiasts of different skill levels. Designated forest service roads beckon many adventuresome SUV owners. For off-road enthusiasts, various policies govern activities on national forest lands. Call the local USDA Forest Service office concerning any restrictions. Recreational attractions also include the growing popularity of adrenalinepumping, extreme adventures, and the universal challenges of geocaching have captured the interests of many outdoor enthusiasts as well. Thrill seekers are discovering Arkansas resources to develop their skills in ballooning, hang gliding, rock climbing, rappelling, zip lines, rope challenge courses, and more. Enjoy yourself, but always protect the environment and help preserve The Natural State!

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Cane Creek State Park

Index Link for Public Campgrounds—START Arkansas State Parks Campgrounds

Thirty-one Arkansas state parks provide campgrounds. Campsite choices range from primitive hike-in tent sites to those with water, electric and sewer hookups. Located throughout the state, the parks showcase the diversity of Arkansas’s geography and scenery. Campsites are available by reservation or on a firstcome basis. Reservations can be made in person and by telephone at each park, or booked online at www. ArkansasStateParks.com. A non-refundable reservation fee is required to confirm campsite reservation. A nightly fee is charged per site. It is necessary to register at the park visitor center before occupying a campsite. Pets are allowed in campgrounds but must remain on leash. For a free copy of the Arkansas State Parks guidebook call toll-free 888-AT-PARKS (TDD), or visit www. ArkansasStateParks.com for details, fees, color photographs, videos and park maps. Arkansas State Parks staff offer over 50,000 programs, tours and events for the education and enjoyment of park visitors. While the state parks are open throughout the year, some facilities close on certain days of the week or during certain seasons. Check with the individual parks for details. Unless demand dictates, campground bathhouses are closed December-February.

BULL SHOALS-WHITE RIVER (A-5) 34 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 49 RV/Tent with W/E; 20 RV/Tent with no hookups ........................................................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-445-3629 • E-MAIL: bullshoalswhiteriver@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Mountain Home on Hwy. 5, then 8 miles west on Hwy. 178. (Bull Shoals, AR 72619) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ozark Mountains on the White River above and below Bull Shoals Dam, this park features riverside campsites. The White River is one of mid-America’s most renowned trout streams. Bull Shoals Lake is popular for lunker bass, bream, crappie and catfish fishing and all water sports. • FACILITIES: Restrooms; hot showers; dump station; marina/store; boat ramp; boat, motor, canoe and kayak rentals; Rent-A-Camp; Rent-An-RV; visitor center with gift shop, exhibits, multi-media meeting rooms; hiking trails; mountain bike trails; picnic sites; pavilions; playgrounds. CANE CREEK (G-6) 29 RV/Tent with W/E.....................................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-628-4714 • E-MAIL: canecreek@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 5 miles east of Star City on Hwy. 293. (Star City, AR 71667) • ATTRACTIONS: On 1,675-acre Cane Creek Lake, a fishing, kayaking, hiking, mountain biking and birdwatching “hot spot” in southeast Arkansas, this peaceful park of rolling woodlands offers a wonderful setting for nature lovers. Here, the terrain of the West Gulf Coastal Plain and the alluvial lands of east Arkansas meet. • FACILITIES: Picnic sites, pavilions (including a climate-controlled pavilion), restrooms, hot showers, dump station, Rent-An-RV, visitor center with gift shop and exhibits, hiking and multi-use trails, kayak trail, playground, fishing piers, and access to Cane Creek Lake. The park offers fishing boat and motor, kayak, bicycle (not mountain bike), bait shop, backpacking shelters and tent rentals. * NOTE: All park buildings offer barrier free access except Rent-An-RV.

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PAGE 10

State Parks Campgrounds

COSSATOT RIVER (F-2) 22 Tent with no hookups • PHONE: 870-385-2201 • E-MAIL: cossatotriver@arkansas.com • LOCATION: South of Mena. Tent sites are at Cossatot Falls, Sandbar, Ed Banks, and U.S. 278 areas. The park’s Brushy Creek Recreation Area offers day use facilities at the Hwy. 246 bridge between Vandervoort and Athens. A 15,000-square-foot visitor center, is located at the U.S. 278 bridge between Wickes and Umpire. (Wickes, AR 71973) • ATTRACTIONS: Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area extends for 12 miles along the wild and scenic Cossatot River. The river forms Cossatot Falls, a rugged, rocky canyon that challenges experienced canoeists and kayakers with Class IV and V rapids during high water seasons. Outdoor enthusiasts can also enjoy hiking, swimming and fishing. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, picnic sites hiking trails, visitor center with exhibits, a wildlife observation room, meeting, classroom/lab rooms, gift shop. * NOTE: Because flow levels are dependent upon rainfall, no floater services are available on the Cossatot River. CRATER OF DIAMONDS (G-3) 36 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 11 RV with W/E/S; 5 Walk-in Tent .......................  • PHONE: 870-285-3113 • E-MAIL: craterofdiamonds@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.craterofdiamondsstatepark.com • LOCATION: From North Washington Ave. in downtown Murfreesboro, go 2 miles southeast on Hwy. 301. (Murfreesboro, AR 71958) • ATTRACTIONS: Crater of Diamonds offers a one-of-a-kind park experience: the chance to find and keep real diamonds and other gems. A gem-hunting admission fee is charged. Mining tools can be rented or purchased at the Diamond Discovery Center. Park staff provide free identification and certification of diamonds. • FACILITIES: Visitor Center with exhibits, Diamond Discovery Center with exhibits, interpretive programs, cafe (open seasonally), picnic sites, bathhouse with restrooms, hot showers, dump station, enclosed pavilion with air-conditioning, laundry, hiking trails, amphitheater, playground, wildlife observation blind. Diamond Springs aquatic playground is open seasonally. CROWLEY’S RIDGE (B-8) 18 RV/Tent with W/E; 8 Tent ..............................................................................  • PHONE: 870-573-6751 • E-MAIL: crowleysridge@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 15 miles north of Jonesboro on Hwy. 141 or 9 miles west of Paragould on U.S. 412, then 2 miles south on Hwy. 168. (Paragould, AR 72450) • ATTRACTIONS: Atop the unique landform of forested hills in eastern Arkansas called Crowley’s Ridge, this park offers a swimming lake, fishing lake and hiking trails. • FACILITIES: Cabins, visitor center with gift shop, interpretive programs, amphitheater, historic structures, group lodging facility, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilions, hiking trails, snack bar, swimming area, fishing boat, kayak and pedal boat rentals (electric motors only on fishing lake), barrier free fishing pier and trail, playground. DAISY (F-3) 82 RV/Tent with W/E; 21 Tent ..................................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-398-4487 • E-MAIL: daisy@arkansas.com • LOCATION: .25 mile south of Daisy off U.S. 70. (Kirby, AR 71950-9061) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ouachita Mountain foothills on clear 7,000-acre Lake Greeson, this park offers water sports and good fishing for bass, crappie, bluegill, catfish and striper. Nearby float streams offer spring and early summer trout fishing. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, dump station, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, hiking trails, motorcycle/ mountain bike/ATV trail, visitor center with gift sales, playground. DAVIDSONVILLE (B-8) 24 RV/Tent with W/E; 15 Tent .................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-892-4708 • E-MAIL: davidsonville@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 2 miles west of Pocahontas on U.S. 62, then 9 miles south on Hwy. 166. Or from U.S. 63 at Black Rock, take Hwy. 361 and travel 6 miles north. (Pocahontas, AR 72455) • ATTRACTIONS: On the Black River, this park features excellent fishing and boating. This is site of the first courthouse, post office and land office in Arkansas. Visitor center includes exhibits of local artifacts and a gift shop. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilions, boat ramp, boat rentals, playground, hiking trails, and historic townsite.

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 11

Jacksonport State Park

DEGRAY LAKE RESORT (F-4) 113 RV/Tent with W/E...................................................................................  • PHONE: 501-865-5810 • E-MAIL: degraylakeresort@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.degray.com • LOCATION: Exit No. 78 off I-30 at Caddo Valley/Arkadelphia, 7 miles north on Hwy. 7. (Bismarck, AR 71929-8194) • ATTRACTIONS: On 13,800-acre DeGray Lake in the Ouachita Mountain foothills, Arkansas’s resort state park offers all water sports and year-round fishing for bass, hybrid bass, crappie, bream and catfish. Wildlife viewing opportunities include wintering bald eagles. • FACILITIES: 94-room lodge with restaurant and conference center on scenic island; 18-hole public golf course, driving range, and practice green; tennis/basketball courts, 18-hole disc golf course; visitor center with gift shop; laundry and ice; Rent-A-Yurt; restrooms; hot showers; dump station; picnic sites; playgrounds; pavilions; swimming beaches; full-service marina; trails; boat ramps; boat rentals; guided horseback trail rides; and amphitheater. Park interpreters offer programs throughout the year. Call 501-865-5850 (TDD) for lodge reservations. DELTA HERITAGE TRAIL (E-8) 5 Primitive Tent (no hookups/water nearby) • PHONE: 870-572-2352 • E-MAIL: deltaheritagetrail@arkansas.com • LOCATION: Adjacent to trailhead at Walnut Corner off U.S. 49 (West Helena, AR 72390) • ATTRACTIONS: This rails-to-trails conversion is being developed in phases along the former Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way stretching from Lexa to Rohwer, and extending via the Mississippi River levee to Arkansas City. The first 21 miles of trail have been completed from Helena Junction to Elaine. Trailheads are located at Helena Junction near Lexa, Walnut Corner at the U.S. 49 overpass, Lick Creek (Hwy. 85 just south of Barton), Lake View and Elaine. • FACILITIES: Visitor center located on Hwy. 49 at Barton featuring gift shop, picnic sites, and restrooms. * NOTE: No bathhouse is available. DEVIL’S DEN (C-2) 44 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 12 RV/Tent with W/E; 6 RV/Tent with E; 24 Tent; 42 Horse Campsites with W/E; Group Area (7 RV/Tent with W/E-75 persons max.); 8 Hike-in Tent ..........  • PHONE: 479-761-3325 • E-MAIL: devilsden@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 8 miles south of Fayetteville on I-49 (Exit 53) to West Fork, then 17 miles southwest on Hwy. 170 or from I-49 (Exit 45) at Winslow, 7 miles west on Hwy. 74. (West Fork, AR 72774) • ATTRACTIONS: Nestled in a picturesque Ozark Mountain valley, this park features an 8-acre fishing lake; bridle, nature and mountain bike trails; and 15-mile backpacking trail. • FACILITIES: Cabins, restaurant (seasonal), pool, picnic sites, pavilion, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, laundry, grocery, ice, hiking trails, visitor center with gift shop and exhibits, playground. The park offers canoe, kayak, pedal boat and backpacking equipment rentals. Gasoline not available. * NOTE: Trailers longer than 26 feet should not use Hwy. 74 due to mountainous road. JACKSONPORT (C-7) 20 RV/Tent with W/E ..................................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-523-2143 • E-MAIL: jacksonport@arkansas.com • LOCATION: From Newport, 3 miles north on Hwy. 69. (Newport, AR 72112) • ATTRACTIONS: The park offers an interpretive museum experience that explores the 1800s river port of Jacksonport and steamboating on the White River. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, dump station, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, swimming beach on White River, playground, 1/2-mile walking trail, courthouse museum.

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PAGE 12

State Parks Campgrounds

LAKE CATHERINE (F-4) 47 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 23 RV/Tent with W/E; 6 Primitive Tent .........................  • PHONE: 501-844-4176 • E-MAIL: lakecatherine@arkansas.com • LOCATION: I-30 Exit 97 (at Malvern), then 12 miles north on Hwy. 171. (Hot Springs, AR 71913) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ouachita Mountains on 1,940-acre Lake Catherine, this park features all water sports, hiking and a waterfall on Falls Creek. Hot Springs National Park is nearby. • FACILITIES: Cabins, gift shop, store, marina, swimming beach, hiking trails, guided horseback trail rides, boat rentals, Rent-A-Camp, Rent-A-Yurt, picnic sites, playground, pavilion, restrooms, hot showers, dump station and laundry. Nature center open in summer. LAKE CHARLES (B-8) 24 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 37 RV/Tent with W/E.........................................................  • PHONE: 870-878-6595 • E-MAIL: lakecharles@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 8 miles northwest of Hoxie on U.S. 63, then 6 miles south on Hwy. 25. (Powhatan, AR 72458) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains on Lake Charles, a 645-acre fishing and swimming lake. Anglers will find good fishing for crappie, bass, bream and catfish throughout the seasons. • FACILITIES: Swimming beach, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, Rent-An-RV, picnic sites, pavilion, boat ramp, nature center (open seasonally), playground and four hiking trails. Park interpretive programs include lake tours and guided kayak adventures. LAKE CHICOT (H-8) 42 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 78 RV/Tent with W/E ...........................................................  • PHONE: 870-265-5480 • E-MAIL: lakechicot@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 8 miles northeast of Lake Village on Hwy. 144. (Lake Village, AR 71653) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is in eastern Arkansas’s Mississippi Delta on Lake Chicot, a 20-mile long oxbow lake noted for its crappie, bream, catfish and bass. The park also offers outstanding birdwatching opportunities because of its location in the Mississippi Flyway, and water sports on its main channel. • FACILITIES: Cabins, picnic sites, pavilions, store, marina, pool, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, laundry, boat and motor rentals, fish cleaning station, visitor center with exhibits, playground. LAKE DARDANELLE (D-4) 30 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 44 RV/Tent with W/E..................................................  • PHONE: 479-967-5516 • E-MAIL: lakedardanelle@arkansas.com • LOCATION: This park is divided into two areas on opposite sides of Lake Dardanelle. 1) Russellville Area—Exit #81 (Hwy. 7 South) off I-40 at Russellville. Turn south, then immediately turn west on Hwy. 326 and go 5 miles. 2) Dardanelle Area—4 miles west of Dardanelle on Hwy. 22. (Russellville, AR 72802) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is on a large lake impounded on the Arkansas River offering 34,300 acres for anglers, skiers and other water sports enthusiasts. The lake is a bass fishing tournament hot spot. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, barrier-free fishing pier, dump station, fishing tournament weigh-in pavilion and visitor center with exhibits in Russellville area. Both locations offer restrooms, pavilions, picnic sites, playgrounds, launch ramps and privately owned marinas and boat docks. LAKE FORT SMITH (C-2) 20 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 10 RV/Tent with W/E • PHONE: 479-369-2469 • E-MAIL: lakefortsmith@arkansas.com • LOCATION: Take I-49 Exit #29 at Mountainburg and go east on Hwy. 282 for 1.8 miles to U.S. 71. Go north 7.5 miles to Hwy. 400 (Shepherd Springs Road), then go east on Hwy. 400 two miles. (Mountainburg, AR 72946) • ATTRACTIONS: This state park was relocated from its former site to its current location on the western side of the enlarged 1,490-acre Lake Fort Smith. Your gateway to outdoor adventure in the Boston Mountain Range of the Ozark Mountains, the park is a scenic setting for fishing, kayaking, hiking including backpacking adventure, a new four-mile mountain bike trail, sightseeing, wildlife viewing and swimming. The park serves as the western terminus of the 165-mile Ozark Highlands Trail. • FACILITIES: The park offers 10 cabins, two group lodges with kitchenettes and a nearby dining hall, picnic sites, a pavilion, playground, swimming pool, marina with boat rentals, and a visitor center with exhibits. LAKE FRIERSON (B-8) 4 RV/Tent with W/E; 3 Tent with no hookups • PHONE: 870-932-2615 • E-MAIL: lakefrierson@arkansas.com • LOCATION: From Jonesboro, 10 miles north on Hwy. 141. (Jonesboro, AR 72401) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is atop Crowley’s Ridge on the eastern shores of Lake Frierson, a 335-acre fishing lake. The lake offers good fishing for saugeye, bass, bream, channel catfish and crappie. In springtime the park

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

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Mount Magazine State Park

is ablaze with flowering wild dogwoods. • FACILITIES: Visitor center; restrooms; launch ramp; boat rentals; barrier-free fishing pier; picnic sites; enclosed climate-controlled pavilion; hiking trails; playground; fishing boat, kayak and pedal boat rentals. LAKE OUACHITA (E-4) 26 RV/Tent with W/E; 40 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 23 Tent with no hookups 12 Walk-in Tent with no hookups.................................................................................................................  • PHONE: 501-767-9366 • E-MAIL: lakeouachita@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 3 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270, then 12 miles north on Hwy. 227. (Mountain Pine, AR 71956) • ATTRACTIONS: On 40,000-acre Lake Ouachita, Arkansas’s largest lake located entirely within the state, and one of the cleanest lakes in the nation, this park features all water sports and “Three Sisters Springs.” The resort city of Hot Springs is nearby. • FACILITIES: Cabins, full-service marina, swimming beach, ice, groceries, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, playground. LAKE POINSETT (C-8) 26 RV/Tent with W/E; 3 Tent ...................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-578-2064 • E-MAIL: lakepoinsett@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 1 mile east of Harrisburg on Hwy. 14, then 3 miles south on Hwy. 163. (Harrisburg, AR 72432) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is on Lake Poinsett, a 640-acre fishing lake atop Crowley’s Ridge in northeast Arkansas. • FACILITIES: Visitor center with gift shop, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilion, hiking trails, playground. Boat, canoe and kayak rentals. LOGOLY (H-4) 6 Group Campsites—Tents Only • PHONE: 870-695-3561 • E-MAIL: logoly@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Magnolia on County Road 47 (Logoly Road) just off U.S. 79 near McNeil highway junction. (McNeil, AR 71752) • ATTRACTIONS: Located in forested hills of the West Gulf Coastal Plain, Logoly is Arkansas’s first environmental education park. A state natural area, Logoly offers unique outdoor opportunities for recreation and nature study. • FACILITIES: Visitor center, picnic sites, pavilion, hiking trails, group tent camping area with bathhouse, and playground. New visitor center under construction will have exhibits and gift sales. * NOTE: Organized groups participating in environmental education programs have preference and must make reservations. Individuals may use campsites on first-come basis, but must vacate for scheduled groups. MILLWOOD (G-2) 113 RV/Tent with W/E; 3 Primitive .................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-898-2800 (office); 898-5334 (marina) • E-MAIL: millwood@arkansas.com • LOCATION: From I-30 at Texarkana go 19 miles north on U.S. 71, then 9 miles east on Hwy. 32. (Ashdown, AR 71822) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is on 29,260-acre Millwood Lake where fishing for bass, crappie and catfish is excellent. Bald eagles and a variety of waterfowl and shore birds are year-round residents of Millwood Lake. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilion, hiking trails, marina, store, playgrounds.

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State Parks Campgrounds

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STATE PARK (E-9) 14 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 3 Walk-in Tent Sites at Beech Point Campground; 14 Primitive RV/Tent Sites (no hookups) at Lone Pine Campground.................  • PHONE: 870-295-4040 • E-MAIL: mississippiriver@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.ArkansasStateParks.com/MississippiRiver • LOCATION: Six miles southeast of Marianna on Hwy. 44. [Marianna, AR 72360] • ATTRACTIONS: Mississippi River State Park is operated by Arkansas State Parks within the St. Francis National Forest. A joint agency visitor center offers exhibits and a variety of interpretive programs. Beech Point Campground is accessed from Hwy. 44. Atop Crowley’s Ridge on a wooded peninsula in 625-acre Bear Creek Lake Recreation Area, these campsites feature lake views. Two courtesy docks provide additional lake access. • FACILITIES: Visitor center with exhibits, restrooms, hot showers, swimming beach, barrier-free fishing, picnic sites, boat ramp (10 hp limit), nature trail, group use camping area. Bathhouse at Beech Point Campground. * NOTE: State Park operates under special use permit from USDA Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis National Forests. MORO BAY (H-5) 20 RV/Tent with W/E ......................................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-463-8555 • E-MAIL: morobay@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 29 miles southwest of Warren on U.S. 63 or 23 miles northeast of El Dorado on U.S. 63. (Jersey, AR 71651) • ATTRACTIONS: On the Ouachita River, Moro Bay State Park features water sports and fishing where Moro Bay and Raymond Lake join the river. • FACILITIES: Cabins; restrooms; hot showers; dump station; picnic sites; pavilion; indoor meeting room; marina; gas pump on marina for boats; boat ramp; fishing boat, kayak and pedal boat rentals; store; dry dock; Moro Bay Ferry exhibit; playground; walking trail. MOUNT MAGAZINE (D-3) 18 RV/Tent with W/E/S .....................................................................................  • PHONE: 479-963-8502 • E-MAIL: mountmagazine@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.mountmagazinestatepark.com • LOCATION: 1 mile south of Paris on Hwy. 109, then southeast on Hwy. 309 for 17 miles; or 10 miles north of Havana on Hwy. 309. (Paris, AR 72855) • ATTRACTIONS: Mount Magazine, the highest point in Arkansas at 2,753 feet, features eight scenic overlooks and such activities as hang gliding, horseback riding, hiking, mountain biking, ATV guide service, camping, rock climbing, rappelling and interpretive programs. The mountain is also known for its butterfly population, boasting 94 of 134 species in Arkansas. • FACILITIES: Scenic overlooks, trails, picnic sites, bathhouse, restrooms, picnic pavilion, visitor center with exhibit gallery, gift shop and 60-room mountain resort lodge with restaurant, conference center, indoor heated pool and 13 cabins. Call 479-963-5100 (TDD) for lodge or cabin reservations. * NOTE: State park operates under special use permit from USDA Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis National Forests. MOUNT NEBO (D-3) 24 RV/Tent with W/E; 10 Hike-in Tent • PHONE: 479-229-3655 • E-MAIL: mountnebo@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 7 miles west of Dardanelle on Hwy. 155. (Dardanelle, AR 72834) • ATTRACTIONS: A mountaintop park with sweeping views of the Arkansas River Valley, Mount Nebo features rustic-style facilities, interesting rock formations and outstanding hiking trails. • FACILITIES: Cabins, gift shop, restrooms, hot showers, picnic sites, pavilions, tennis courts, pool, playground. * NOTE: Trailers and motor homes over 24 feet not recommended due to mountainous road to park. PETIT JEAN (D-4) 35 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 90 RV/Tent with W/E; 5 Fly-in Tent .......................................  • PHONE: 501-727-5441 • E-MAIL: petitjean@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.petitjeanstatepark.com • LOCATION: I-40 Exit 108 (Morrilton) 9 miles south on Hwy. 9, then 12 miles west on Hwy. 154—or take I-40 Exit 81 (Russellville) and go 10 miles south on Hwy. 7, then 16 miles east on Hwy. 154. (Morrilton, AR 72110) • ATTRACTIONS: This park on Petit Jean Mountain 1,100 feet above the Arkansas River Valley offers natural attractions including rock shelters, hiking trails, waterfalls, a fishing lake and scenic overlooks. • FACILITIES: Historic 24-room lodge with restaurant, cabins, gift shop, fishing and pedal boat rentals, RentA-Yurt, rally-style area, fly-in campground, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, pool, tennis courts, picnic sites, pavilions, snack bar, playgrounds, airport. Call 501-727-5431 (TDD) for lodge or cabin reservations. Call 501-727-5441 for campsite reservations.

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Woolly Hollow State Park

QUEEN WILHELMINA (E-1) 35 RV/Tent with W/E; 5 Tent with W; 1 Hike-in Tent .....................................  • PHONE: 479-394-2863 (TDD) • E-MAIL: queenwilhelmina@arkansas.com • WEBSITE: www.queenwilhelmina.com • LOCATION: 13 miles west of Mena on Hwy. 88 or go 6 miles north of Mena on U.S. 71, then 9 miles west on U.S. 270, then 2 miles south on Hwy. 272 then 0.5 mile west of Hwy. 88. (Mena, AR 71953) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ouachita Mountains atop 2,681-foot Rich Mountain, Arkansas’s second highest mountain, this park featuring breathtaking, panoramic views is situated on the Talimena National Scenic Byway. The park is home to minature train rides at Mountain Glory Station (open seasonally). • FACILITIES: 40-room lodge with gift shop and full service restaurant, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, hiking trails, nature programs, playground. Call 479-394-2863 (TDD) for lodge reservations. * NOTE: The park lodge and restaurant are closed until late spring 2015 while undergoing renovation. VILLAGE CREEK (D-8) 24 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 5 RV/Tent with W/E; 67 RV/Tent/Horse with W/E ..........  • PHONE: 870-238-9406 • E-MAIL: villagecreek@arkansas.com • LOCATION: I-40 Exit 242 (Forrest City), then 13 miles north on Hwy. 284. (Wynne, AR 72396) • ATTRACTIONS: On Crowley’s Ridge in eastern Arkansas, this 6,909-acre park offers a diversity of outdoor recreational opportunities including lakes, fishing, swimming, hiking, mountain biking, equestrian trails, golf and tennis in a unique natural environment. • FACILITIES: Visitor center with store and exhibits, restrooms, hot showers, dump stations, cabins, boat rentals, hiking trails, multi-use trail, tennis courts, picnic sites, pavilion, swimming beach, playgrounds and 27-hole public golf course. WHITE OAK LAKE (G-4) 41 RV/Tent with W/E; 4 Tent .................................................................................  • PHONE: 870-685-2748 or 685-2132 • E-MAIL: whiteoaklake@arkansas.com • LOCATION: I-30 Prescott exit, 20 miles east on Hwy. 24, then 2 miles southeast on Hwy. 387. (Bluff City, AR 71722) • ATTRACTIONS: This park is in the forested hills of the West Gulf Coastal Plain on the northern shore of 2,765-acre White Oak Lake. Enjoy wildlife viewing opportunities, hiking and mountain biking trails. • FACILITIES: Store; restrooms; hot showers; dump station; picnic sites; pavilion; playground; marina and boat rentals. WITHROW SPRINGS (B-3) 30 RV/Tent with W/E/S.......................................................................................  • PHONE: 479-559-2593 • E-MAIL: withrowsprings@arkansas.com • LOCATION: 5 miles north of Huntsville on Hwy. 23 or 20 miles south of Eureka Springs on Hwy. 23. Or 3 miles north of U.S. 412 bypass. (Huntsville, AR 72740) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ozark Mountains, this park features an ever flowing spring that gushes from a small cave and a creek that meanders through the park. Only .5 mile to the War Eagle Creek for fishing and canoeing. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilion, pool, snack bar, canoe rentals, tennis courts, baseball fields, playground. WOOLLY HOLLOW (D-5) 30 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 10 no hookups/nearby water ........................................  • PHONE: 501-679-2098 • E-MAIL: woollyhollow@arkansas.com • LOCATION: I-40 Exit 125 (Conway), 12 miles north on U.S. 65, then 6 miles east on Hwy. 285. (Greenbrier, AR 72058) • ATTRACTIONS: In the Ozark foothills of central Arkansas, Woolly Hollow offers a scenic 40-acre swimming and fishing lake. Boating here is limited to electric motors. Park trails include a new nine-mile mountain bike trail. • FACILITIES: Swimming beach, change house, snack bar, gift shop, restrooms, hot showers, dump station, picnic sites, pavilion, historic cabin, playground. Pedal boats, canoes, kayaks and fishing boats are available for rent.

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Buffalo National River

National Park Service Campgrounds

The National Park Service administers seven areas within Arkansas: Hot Springs National Park, Buffalo National River, Pea Ridge National Military Park, Fort Smith National Historic Site, Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, Clinton 1st Home Museum National Historic Site and Arkansas Post National Memorial. All are of interest to the vacationer, historian, or recreationist, and each offers its own uniquely significant attractions. However, only the first two mentioned, Hot Springs and Buffalo River, presently provide camping facilities for the visitor.

Buffalo National River

All campgrounds except Lost Valley are directly adjacent to the Buffalo River. The 135-mile national river is lined with bluffs as high as 440 feet. Riverside stands of willow, sycamore, river birch and cottonwood blend into the predominately oak-hickory upland forest. The Buffalo offers smallmouth bass, goggle-eye and other game fish along with swimming and canoe trips on this free-flowing river. Swimming is permitted in the Buffalo River but requires special caution. Diving or jumping into the river from rocks or bluffs is extremely dangerous due to the likelihood of striking submerged rocks. Limestone and sandstone bluffs are crumbly and slippery when wet and should be completely avoided. Arkansas state licenses required for fishing, hunting. All children under age 13 must wear a personal floatation device. Canoe rentals nearby. FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut, Ste.136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-365-2700; WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff; E-MAIL: buff_information@nps.gov FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS: See the Backpacking & Wilderness Hiking Trails section, Wilderness Areas, Buffalo National River.

BUFFALO POINT (B-5) 83 RV with W/E; 18 Walk-in Tent; 5 Group Tent.....................................................  • LOCATION: 14 miles south of Yellville on Hwy. 14, then 3 miles east on Hwy. 268. • ATTRACTIONS: Rugged mountain scenery and nature trails to hidden springs and caves, overlook. Swimming and fishing, naturalist programs in season. • FACILITIES: Modern and rustic cabins (Call 870-449-6206), restaurant (May 15-Labor Day), flush toilets, warm showers, water, picnic sites with nearby grills, 3 pavilions (may be reserved for groups), amphitheater (programs in season), river access. User’s fee charged. (Electric and water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.). Camping reservations: 877-444-6777 or www.recreation.gov. A reservation fee is charged. Ranger Station/Visitor Center: 870-449-4311.

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CARVER (B-4) Day-use only • LOCATION: 10 miles east of Jasper on Hwy. 74, then 2.5 miles north on Hwy. 123 to bridge. • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming, fishing, scenic valley. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, drinking water, picnic tables, fire grates, river access. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). A reservation fee is charged. ERBIE (B-4) Day-use only.............................................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 4 miles north of Jasper on Hwy. 7, then 6.5 miles west on dirt road past Henry Koen Experimental Forest. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, vault toilets, drinking water, picnic sites and fire grates, river access, boat launch. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). KYLES LANDING (B-3) 33 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles west of Jasper on Hwy. 74, then 3 miles down rough, steep, winding gravel road. • ATTRACTIONS: Trailhead for wilderness area hiking, including Hemmed-in-Hollow and Indian Creek. • FACILITIES: Drinking water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.), flush toilets, fire grates, picnic tables, river access. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). * NOTE: Not recommended for large trailers, buses and RVs due to rough, steep and winding road. LOST VALLEY (B-3) Day-use only • LOCATION: 15 miles west of Jasper on Hwy. 74, then 1 mile south on Hwy. 43. • ATTRACTIONS: 2.1-mile round-trip hiking trail to Eden Falls and Cob Cave. • FACILITIES: Drinking water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.), flush toilets, picnic tables, pavilion (by reservation only) and fire grates. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). MAUMEE SOUTH (B-5) Open Camping • LOCATION: 6 miles east of Marshall on Hwy. 27, then 6 miles of paved and dirt road from Morning Star. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, river access. (Open year-round). OZARK (B-4) 31 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles north of Jasper on Hwy. 7, then 2 miles down dirt road. • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming and fishing. Scenic bluff. Trailhead for 2-mile (one way) Ozark-Pruitt trail. • FACILITIES: Drinking water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.), fire grates, picnic tables, flush toilets, pavilion (may be reserved for groups), amphitheater (programs in season), river access. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). RUSH (B-5) 13 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 11 miles south of Yellville on Hwy. 14, then 4.5 miles on paved and gravel road 6035. • ATTRACTIONS: Mining ghost town. Trailhead for wilderness area hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, fire grates, drinking water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.), river access. User’s fee charged mid Mar.mid-Nov. (Open year-round). SPRING CREEK (B-5) 14 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 19 miles south of Yellville; then three miles down dirt road. • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming, fishing, hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, fire grates, river access. No user fees. No drinking water. STEEL CREEK (B-3) 26 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 13 miles west of Jasper on Hwy. 74, then 2 miles down steep, winding gravel road. • ATTRACTIONS: Scenic bluffs. Trailhead for wilderness area hiking, featuring Hemmed-in-Hollow. • FACILITIES: Drinking water (mid-Mar. to mid-Nov.), flush toilets, fire grates, picnic tables, river access, 14 equestrian campsites and horse trails. User’s fee charged mid Mar.-mid-Nov. (Open year-round). * NOTE: Not recommended for large trailers, buses and RVs due to steep, winding road. TYLER BEND (B-4) 28 RV/Tent with no hookups; 10 Tent; 5 Group.............................................................  • LOCATION: 32 miles south of Harrison on U.S. 65, then 3 miles off U.S. 65 on paved road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, National Park Visitor’s Center, drinking water, warm showers, picnic sites, pavilion (by reservation only), river access, amphitheater (programs in season), hiking trails and horse trails nearby. User’s

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PAGE 18

National Park Service Campgrounds

fee charged. Large inventory of Natonal Geographic maps and books for sale at Visitor Center: 870-439-2502. WOOLUM (B-4) Open Camping • LOCATION: 17 miles south of Harrison, then 8.5 miles of dirt road from Pindall; or 26 miles south of Harrison and 7 miles from St. Joe. • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming, fishing. Trail connection with Ozark Highlands Trail (seasonal). • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, river access, equestrian campsites and horse trails. (Open year-round).

Hot Springs National Park

In 1832, 40 years before the creation of Yellowstone National Park, Congress established Hot Springs Reservation to protect hot springs flowing from Hot Springs Mountain. And in 1921, Hot Springs became the 18th national park in the National Park Service. Today the park encompasses 5,500 acres and protects eight historic bathhouses with the former luxurious Fordyce Bathhouse housing the park visitor center. The entire “Bathhouse Row” area is a National Historic Landmark District that contains the grandest collection of bathhouses of its kind in North America. FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Hot Springs National Park, Visitor Center, 101 Reserve St., Hot Springs, AR 71901. PHONE: 501-620-6715; TDD 501-624-2308; WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/hosp/; E-MAIL: hosp_interpretation@nps.gov

Gulpha Gorge Campground, Hot Springs National Park

GULPHA GORGE (F-4) 24 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 12 Tent with no hookups...................................................  • LOCATION: .5 mile northeast of Hot Springs off Hwy. 7 Spur. Exit off U.S. 70 on east side of town. • ATTRACTIONS: The National Park is noted for its thermal springs and bathhouses, hiking trails through forested mountain terrain, and summer interpretive programs. The visitor center is located in the former Fordyce Bathhouse on Bathhouse Row. It is open for self-guided tours, exhibits, an introductory movie and a movie showing the traditional bath routine. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, pedestal grills, tables, water, and trailer dump station (for registered campers only). Camping limit: 14 days per year. No reservations accepted. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged for camping. Senior and Access Passports apply.

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Shores Lake

USDA Forest Service Campgrounds

More than 3.1 million acres of forestland are included within the three national forests in Arkansas. The U.S. Forest Service has developed campgrounds at scenic points in these woodlands. Most of these campgrounds are located in ruggedly beautiful mountainous terrain, and are designed to blend into the landscape to preserve the forest atmosphere.

Ouachita National Forest

FOR INFORMATION: Forest Supervisor, Ouachita National Forest, P.O. Box 1270, Hot Springs, AR 71902. PHONE: 501-321-5202; WEBSITE: www.fs.usda.gov/ouachita, or contact the Ranger District for each campground. The Ranger District listed for each recreation area should be contacted for off-season availability. Also call ahead for specific pet policy guidelines. Several sites allow pets if kept on a leash. FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS: See the Backpacking & Wilderness Hiking Trails section, Wilderness Areas, Ouachita National Forest.

ALBERT PIKE (F-2) Day-use only until further notice • LOCATION: 5 miles southwest of Glenwood on U.S. 70, then west 13 miles on Hwy. 84 to Langley, then right on Hwy. 369 for 6.1 miles. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Natural pool in Little Missouri River, swimming, fishing, mountain biking and hiking trails. • FACILITIES: 20 picnic sites. Day-use season mid-Mar.-Oct. 15. BARD SPRINGS (F-2) 17 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 19 miles west of Norman on Hwy. 8 to Big Fork, then 10 miles south on gravel Forest Road 38, then east one mile on gravel Forest Road 106. (Caddo Ranger District, Glenwood, AR 71943. PHONE: 870-356-4186) • ATTRACTIONS: Small swimming area, hiking trails, fishing. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic shelter, showers. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. BIG BRUSHY (E-2) Currently closed. Call for status. • LOCATION: 16 miles west of Mt. Ida on U.S. 270. (Mena Ranger District, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382) • ATTRACTIONS: Hiking, biking and fishing. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic shelter, playground, volleyball court. (Open year-round). (Six accessible sites.) CAMP CLEARFORK (E-3) Group Use Area • LOCATION: 20 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming, fishing, hiking, canoeing and field sports. • FACILITIES: 76 person total capacity; 4 cabins; 6 bunkhouses. Showers available.

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USDA Forest Service Campgrounds

Lake Sylvia, Ouachita National Forest

CHARLTON (F-3) 57 RV/Tent; 10 with W/E/S; 20 with W/E • LOCATION: 20 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 501-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Located near Lake Ouachita. Swimming, mountain streams, tree identification interpretive trail. Mountain bike and hiking trail to Lake Ouachita. Outdoor programs in season. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, showers, water, picnic sites/trailer dump station, group picnic shelter and camp area, playground. Room for large RVs/campers (Open May-Oct.) User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Some facilities are accessible to the physically challenged. CRYSTAL (F-3) 9 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1 mile north of Norman on Hwy. 27, then turn east for 3 miles on gravel Forest Road 177. (Caddo Ranger District, Glenwood, AR 71943. PHONE: 870-356-4186) • ATTRACTIONS: Swimming, hiking trail, scenic drives. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic shelter. Room for small RVs/campers (Open year-round). DRAGOVER FLOAT CAMP (E-3) Day-use only • LOCATION: 4 miles east of Sims on Hwy. 88, then south on gravel CR97 for 2 miles. (Mena Ranger District, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382) • ATTRACTIONS: Float fishing on Ouachita River, swimming, hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, canoe access. (Open year-round) (Some facilities are accessible to the physically challenged.) FOURCHE MTN. (E-3) 5 RV/Picnic sites with no hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles south of Rover on Hwy. 27 (Fourche Ranger District, Danville, AR 72833. PHONE: 479-495-2844) • ATTRACTION: Hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites. (Open year-round). FULTON BRANCH FLOAT CAMP (E-3) Day-use only • LOCATION: U.S. 270 northwest from Mount Ida for 4.5 miles to Hwy. 298; turn north for 0.5 mile to Forest Service Road 568; turn east for 1.5 miles to Forest Service Road 1437. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Float fishing on Ouachita River, swimming, hiking, canoeing. Womble Trail connects to Ouachita National Recreation Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, canoe access. (Open year-round). IRON SPRINGS (E-4) Day use area • LOCATION: 26 miles north of Hot Springs on Arkansas Scenic 7 Byway. (Jessieville Ranger District, Jessieville, AR 71949. PHONE: 501-984-5313) • ATTRACTIONS: Hiking trails and small wading area. Hunts Loop Trail connects to Ouachita National Recreation Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, historic picnic shelters, walkway to springs. (Open year-round. Area is partially accessible for the physically challenged.)

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Shady Lake, Ouachita National Forest

JACK CREEK (D-2) 5 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 2 miles south of Booneville on Hwy. 23; then east for 1 mile on Hwy. 116; then south 4 miles on paved County Road; then south 1 mile on Forest Road 19: then east 1 mile on paved Forest Road 141. (Cold Springs Ranger District, Booneville, AR 72927. PHONE: 479-675-3233 or 479-637-4174) • ATTRACTIONS: Scenic bluffs, natural pool in creek, swimming, fishing, hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic area with a group shelter. Vault toilets are accessible to the physically challenged. (Open May-Sep.) KNOPPERS FORD (D-2) 12 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 2 miles south of Booneville on Hwy. 23, then east 1 mile on Hwy. 116, then south at sign for 4 miles on paved County Road, then 3 miles south on gravel Forest Road 19. (Cold Springs Ranger District, Booneville, AR 72927. PHONE: 479-675-3233 or 479-637-4174) • ATTRACTIONS: Natural pool in creek, swimming, fishing, nearby multi-use hiking trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged for camp area. LAKE SYLVIA (E-4) 19 RV with W/E; 8 Tent with no hookups; Group camping facility • LOCATION: 9 miles south of Perryville on Hwy. 9, then west on Hwy. 324 for 4 miles. (Winona Ranger District, Perryville, AR 72126. PHONE: 501-889-5176) • ATTRACTIONS: 18-acre lake, swimming beach, picnic sites, boating (no gas motors), fishing, hiking. Wildlife interpretive trail, and tree identification interpretive trail for the physically challenged. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, water, showers, trailer dump station. User’s fee charged. (Some facilities are accessible to the physically challenged.) LITTLE PINES (E-2) 9 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 11.5 miles west of Waldron on Hwy. 248. (Poteau Ranger District, Waldron, AR 72958. PHONE: 479-637-4174) • ATTRACTIONS: 1000-acre Lake Hinkle, swimming, hiking, fishing, hunting, boating. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, water, hot showers, boat launch, boat docks for campers, group shelter. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. (All facilities except swimming area are accessible to the physically challenged.) RIVER BLUFF FLOAT CAMP (E-3) Day-use only • LOCATION: North from Mount Ida on Hwy. 27 for 0.5 mile; then northwest on Co. Rd. 59 for 3.5 miles to Forest Service Road 138; then north for 2.5 miles. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Float fishing on Ouachita River, swimming, hiking, canoeing. Womble Trail connects to Ouachita National Recreation Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, canoe access. (Open year-round).

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PAGE 22

USDA Forest Service Campgrounds

ROCKY SHOALS FLOAT CAMP (E-3) Day-use only • LOCATION: 2 miles southeast of Pencil Bluff on U.S. 270. (Womble Ranger District, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101) • ATTRACTIONS: Base camp for float fishing on Ouachita River, swimming, hiking. Womble Trail connects to Ouachita National Recreation Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, canoe access. Room for small RVs/campers (Open year-round). SHADY LAKE (F-2) 44 RV/Tent with no hookups; 21 RV/Tent with W/E; Picnic Shelter (by reservation); 1 RV with full hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles southwest of Glenwood on U.S. 70; west 23 miles on Hwy. 84 to Athens, then 2 miles west on Hwy. 246. Then north at sign for 3 miles on Forest Road 38. (Mena Ranger District, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382) • ATTRACTIONS: 25-acre lake, swimming beach, fishing, playground, and hiking. Outdoor programs in season, interpretive trail. • FACILITIES: Drinking water, flush toilets, hot showers, trailer dump station, day use picnic areas, boat dock (electric motors only). (Partially open year-round). User’s fee charged. SHIRLEY CREEK FLOAT CAMP (E-2) Day-use only • LOCATION: 2 miles west of Oden on Hwy. 88, then south on gravel road 7991 one mile. (Mena Ranger District, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 870-326-4322) • ATTRACTIONS: Float fishing on the Ouachita River, swimming, fishing, 2 miles from Oden Rifle Range. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites, canoe access. (Open year-round). SOUTH FOURCHE (E-4) 7 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1 mile south of Hollis on Arkansas Scenic 7 Byway. (Jessieville Ranger District, Jessieville, AR 71949. PHONE: 501-984-5313) • ATTRACTION: Fishing, canoe access. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, water, picnic sites. (Open year-round. Camping fee charged.)

Ozark National Forest

FOR INFORMATION: Forest Supervisor, Ozark National Forest, 605 W. Main, Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 870-964-7200; WEBSITE: www.fs.fed.us/oonf/ozark, or contact the Ranger District for each campground. (The Ranger District listed for each recreation area should be contacted for off-season availability.) FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS: See the Backpacking & Wilderness Hiking Trails section, Wilderness Areas, Ozark National Forest.

Barkshed Recreation Area

BARKSHED (B-5) 4 Picnic/Tent sites with no hookups • LOCATION: 17.3 miles west of Mountain View on Hwy. 14, then north on Forest Road 1115 (gravel) for 2.1 miles, then right on Forest Road 1112 for 1.4 miles. Road negotiable by small camping trailer rigs. (User’s fee charged for camp area.) (Sylamore Ranger District, Mountain View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-269-3228)

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• ATTRACTIONS: Clear mountain stream, hiking trail, fishing, hunting. • FACILITIES: 5 picnic sites (or primitive campsites) and pavilion, vault toilets. Not recommended for RVs (Open year-round). BAYOU BLUFF (C-4) 7 RV/Tent with no hookups; 7 Family Campsites (3 with historic old rock shelters) • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Hector on Hwy. 27. (Big Piney Ranger District, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150) • ATTRACTIONS: Illinois Bayou, picturesque bluffs, fishing, interpretive loop hiking trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, water, picnic shelters, group shelter (reservations taken for pavillion only). (Open March-December.) User’s fee charged for camp area. BLANCHARD SPRINGS RECREATION AREA (B-6) 32 RV/Tent with no hookups; 2 Group Sites (Reservation Only) • LOCATION: 7 miles north of Mountain View on Hwy. 9; then 6 miles west on Hwy. 14; then 3 miles on Forest Service Road 1110. Negotiable by camping trailer rigs. (Sylamore Ranger District, Mtn. View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-269-3228) • ATTRACTIONS: Crystal clear streams, large flowing spring (7,000 gallons per minute), caves, small lake, scenic trails, picturesque bluffs, swimming, fishing, hunting, mountain biking. Daily tours through Blanchard Springs Caverns, outdoor programs in season. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, water, trailer dump station, bathhouse with hot showers, picnic sites, 2 pavilions, accessible fishing pier. Room for RVs up to 30 ft. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. • VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER/BLANCHARD SPRINGS CAVERNS: Open 7 days a week Apr.–Oct. Open Wed. –Sun., Nov.–Mar. Center open 9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Cavern tours offered 10:00 a.m.-4:15 p.m. An audiovisual program in the auditorium presents the geological history of the Caverns. Also available for viewing is an exhibit room where displays depict the intriguing story of life in the underground world. Tours of the Dripstone and the Discovery Trails begin at the Visitor Information Center. Discovery Trail is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Dripstone Trail is open for an extended period in the off-season that varies each year. Cave tour reservations available at recreation.gov or 877-446-6777. For other caverns information and school group scheduling call 870-757-2211. NOTES: Wild Cave Tour by reservation only. Special group rates available by reservation only. No pets or animals other than seeing-eye dogs allowed in Visitor Information Center, exhibit room, audiovisual room, and cave. BROCK CREEK (C-4) 6 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles north of Jerusalem on Forest Development Road 1305, then east on Forest Road 1309 for .1 mile, then left on Forest Road 1331 for 1 mile (Big Piney Ranger District, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150) • ATTRACTIONS: 35-acre lake, fishing. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, primitive boat ramp (10 hp motor limit for boats), picnic tables at family camping sites. No fee charged. COVE LAKE (D-3) 36 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1 mile south of Paris on Hwy. 109, then 9 miles southeast on Hwy. 309. Negotiable by camping trailer rigs. (Magazine Ranger District, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-3076) • ATTRACTIONS: Mount Magazine Scenic Byway; Mount Magazine State Park and Lodge, 160-acre lake. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, vault toilets, water, bathhouse, picnic sites, swimming beach, group shelter w/ electricity (can be reserved), boat ramp (“no wake“ restriction; 10 hp maximum boat motor), fishing, hiking trail. Concession services include boat rentals and food services Memorial Day to Labor Day. (Open year-round. Limited services from Oct. 31-Apr. 1). Reservations available at www.recreation.gov, or 877-446-6777. User’s fee charged. GUNNER POOL (B-5) 27 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 14.2 miles west of Mountain View on Hwy. 14; then right on Forest Road 1102 for 3 miles. Not recommended for large trailers or RVs. (Sylamore Ranger District, Mtn. View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-269-3228) • ATTRACTIONS: Clear mountain stream, small lake, high picturesque bluffs, fishing, hiking. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, drinking water. Not recommended for RVs. (Open March-November). User’s fee charged. HAW CREEK FALLS (C-3) 9 RV/Tent with no hookups; 9 Family Campsites with picnic tables • LOCATION: 14 miles north from Hagarville on Hwy. 123, or 12 miles west from Pelsor on Hwy. 123. Negotiable by camping trailers. (Big Piney Ranger District, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150)

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USDA Forest Service Campgrounds

Lake Wedington

• ATTRACTIONS: Small mountain stream with picturesque falls, rocks and bluffs; canoeing on Big Piney Creek nearby, fishing. Access to Ozark Highlands Trail, accessible trail to Haw Creek Falls. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnic sites. User’s fee charged. No drinking water available. HORSEHEAD LAKE (C-3) 10 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 8 miles northwest of Clarksville on Hwy. 103, then west on Hwy. 164 for 4 miles; then right on paved Forest Road 1408, 3 miles. Negotiable by camping trailers. (Pleasant Hill Ranger District, Clarksville, AR 72830. PHONE: 479-754-2864) • ATTRACTION: 98-acre mountain lake, fishing, swimming, camping, picnicking, boating. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, vault toilets, water, boat ramp operated by Arkansas Game & Fish Commission (10 hp motor limit for boats), 12 picnic sites, swim beach, bathhouse, hot showers and playground. User’s fee charged. LAKE WEDINGTON (B-1) 18 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 13 miles west of Fayetteville on Hwy. 16. (Boston Mtn. Ranger District, Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-442-3527) • ATTRACTIONS: 102-acre lake, hiking, swimming, fishing, canoeing. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, bathhouse and showers, water, group shelter (reservations taken), trailer dump station, 19 picnic sites, boat ramp (10 hp motor limit). Concessionaire-operated camp store and canoes/ bikes, water floats and outdoor equipment rentals available. Reservations available at www.recreation.gov or 877-446-6777. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Six refurbished WPA cabins available; swimming, playgrounds, vollleyball courts and horseshoes during summer. Group Lodge available. LONG POOL (C-4) 20 RV/Tent with W/E; 20 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Dover on Hwy. 7; then west on Hwy. 164 for 3 miles; then northeast on County Road 15 for 3 miles; then northwest on paved Forest Road 1804 for 2 miles. (Big Piney Ranger District, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150) • ATTRACTIONS: Large natural pool in Big Piney Creek (National Scenic River), high picturesque bluffs, fishing, hiking, swimming, canoeing. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, vault toilets, showers, water, 9 picnic sites, pavilion, canoe launch site. (Open yearround). User’s fee charged. Reservations taken for pavillion only. MOCCASIN GAP HORSE CAMP (C-4) Temporarily closed. Day-use & trails open. Call for status • LOCATION: 14 miles north of Dover on Hwy. 7, 2 miles past Mack’s Pines Cabins; trail is located on the west side of highway. (Big Piney Ranger District, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150) • ATTRACTIONS: Rugged mountain scenery located on 28 miles of horse, ATV, hiking and mountain bike trails including four different loops w/varying degrees of difficulty. Scenic views, waterfalls, bluff lines, pine and hardwood forests. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, drinking water, pavilon, 17 parking spurs for day use. (11 overnight camping spots temporarily closed). Two large day-use parking areas under renovation. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

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White Rock Mountain

MOUNT MAGAZINE (D-3) See “Mount Magazine State Park,” Arkansas State Park Campgrounds. OZONE (C-3) 8 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 18 miles north of Clarksville on Hwy. 21. (Pleasant Hill Ranger District, Clarksville, AR 72830. PHONE: 479-754-2864) • ATTRACTIONS: Situated in tall pine timber, site of old Ozone CCC Camp. Access to Ozark Highlands Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, picnicking. Group shelter (reservations taken). Drinking water available at pavillion only. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. REDDING (C-3) 25 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 18 miles north of Ozark on Hwy. 23, take Hwy. 215 off of Hwy. 23, then east on paved Forest Road 1003, 3 miles. (Pleasant Hill Ranger District, Clarksville, AR 72803. PHONE: 479-754-2864) • ATTRACTIONS: Canoeing on Mulberry River. Trailhead parking for Ozark Highlands Trail, camping, fishing, hiking, river canoe access. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, drinking water, showers. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. RICHLAND CREEK (B-4) 14 RV/Tent with no hookups. • LOCATION: 10 miles east of Ben Hur on Hwy. 16; then north on Forest Road 1205 for 9 miles. (Big Piney Ranger District, Jasper, AR 72641. PHONE: 870-446-5122) • ATTRACTIONS: Clear mountain stream with waterfalls, bluffs; adjacent Richland Creek Wilderness Area (Richland Creek Wild & Scenic River), fishing, swimming, hiking, picnicking, access to the Ozark Highlands Trail. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, drinking water. (Open year-round). SHORES LAKE (C-2) 22 RV/Tent; 10 with E • LOCATION: 19 miles north of Mulberry on Hwy. 215, then .5 mile on paved Forest Road 1505. (Boston Mtn. Ranger District, Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-667-2191) • ATTRACTIONS: 82-acre lake in mountain setting, swimming, fishing, hiking, picnicking, boating. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, 28 picnic sites, group pavilion (reservations taken), boat ramp (10 hp motor limit). User’s fee charged. No camp reservations accepted. SORGHUM HOLLOW HORSE CAMP (D-3) 15 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 10 miles east of Paris on Hwy. 22; then turn south on Sorghum Hollow Road (FDR 1614); follow gravel road 4.7 miles to trailhead/horse camp. (Mt. Magazine Ranger District, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-3076) • ATTRACTIONS: 34 miles of scenic horseback riding on Huckleberry Mtn. Horse Trail, hiking, OHV and mountain biking opportunities in the Ozark National Forest. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, pond for watering horses, day use parking, primitive overnight group camping. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

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U.S.D.A. Forest Service Campgrounds

SPRING LAKE (D-3) 13 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 9 miles southwest from Dardanelle on Hwy. 27, turn west on Hwy. 307 for 3 miles. Take gravel Forest Road 1602 for 4 miles. Or take Hwy. 307 north from Belleville 4 miles to gravel Forest Road 1602, continue on Forest Road 1602 for 3 miles. Negotiable by camping trailers. (Magazine Ranger District, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-3076) • ATTRACTIONS: 82-acre lake in mountain setting, hiking, swimming, fishing. • FACILITIES: Central flush toilets, water, 19 picnic sites, bathhouse, showers, 2 pavilions, boat ramp (10 hp motor limit). (Open Memorial Day-Labor Day). User’s fee charged. * NOTE: No wake law—no skiing at any time. WHITE ROCK MOUNTAIN (C-2) 8 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: Take Hwy. 215 north from Mulberry for 15 miles. Follow F.S. Rd. 1505 (mostly gravel) for 8 miles. Turn left (west) on F.S. Rd. 1003 (gravel) for 2.5 miles. Then turn right on F.S. Rd. 1535. (Boston Mtn. Ranger District, Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-667-2191) • ATTRACTIONS: Rugged mountain scenery, spectacular bluffs encircling mountain rim trails with panoramic views. Access to Ozark Highlands Trail. Three restored CCC-era cabins and lodge (capacity 30 persons) are available; both are accessible to the physically challenged. Contact: 479-369-4128. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, water, 8 picnic sites. Reservations accepted. User’s fee charged. WOLF PEN (C-3) 6 Primitive Tent • LOCATION: 18 miles north of Ozark on Hwy. 23, then east on Hwy. 215, 13 miles; or 22 miles north of Clarksville on Hwy. 103, then west on Hwy. 215, 2 miles. (Pleasant Hill Ranger District, Clarksville, AR 72803. PHONE: 479-754-2864) • ATTRACTIONS: Canoeing on Mulberry River (National Scenic River), scenic rock bluffs, fishing, river canoe access. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, primitive sites. No water. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

St. Francis National Forest

FOR INFORMATION: St. Francis National Forest, 2955 Hwy. 44, Marianna, AR 72360. PHONE: 870-295-5278.

Storm Creek Lake, St. Francis National Forest

STORM CREEK LAKE (E-9) 14 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1 mile northwest of Helena-West Helena on Hwy. 242; then east 3 miles on Forest Road 1900, or 7.5 miles southeast of Marianna on Hwy. 44, then south on gravel Forest Road 1900, 10 miles. • ATTRACTIONS: 420-acre lake atop Crowley’s Ridge, swimming, fishing. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, bathhouse, barrier-free fishing pier, water, swim beach, group pavilion boat ramp (10 hp motor limit). (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

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Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Refuges

Nine public National Wildlife Refuges are located in Arkansas, providing all outdoor enthusiasts a wide domain of recreational opportunities. The tenth (Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern Arkansas) is closed to public access. All others offer an abundance of natural resources for fishing, hunting, photography and wildlife observation. Some refuges also include exhibits, educational and interpretive programs. Three refuges (Felsenthal, Pond Creek and White River) allow primitive camping; brief descriptions are provided below. For the remainder of refuges, only driving directions are listed due to limited space available. Contact the refuge headquarters or visit any of the respective Websites for more information.

Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge (D-7) —No Camping

LOCATION: From Hwy. 367 in Bald Knob, go south on Hickory St., which becomes Coal Chute Rd. at city limits, then go approximately 1.5 miles. 3 miles total. FOR INFORMATION: Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge, 1439 Coal Chute Rd., Bald Knob, AR 72010. PHONE: 501-724-2458; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/baldknob/

Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge (B-9) —No Camping

LOCATION: From Blytheville, take Hwy. 18 west approximately 15 miles. FOR INFORMATION: Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 67, Manila, AR 72442. PHONE: 870-564-2429; E-MAIL: biglake@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/biglake/

Cache River National Wildlife Refuge (D-7; E-7; F-7; G-8) —No Camping

LOCATION: From Augusta on U.S. 64, take Hwy. 33 south approx.16 miles to headquarters. FOR INFORMATION: Cache River National Wildlife Refuge, 26320 Hwy. 33 South, Augusta, AR 72006. PHONE: 870-347-2614; E-MAIL: cacheriver@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/cacheriver

Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge (E-7/8; F-7/8; G-7; G-8)

Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge is the nation’s largest contiguous block of bottomland hardwood forest under single ownership. Lying within Mississippi River’s alluvial plain in southeast Arkansas, the refuge is nearly 160,000 acres in size. Recreational opportunities include camping, fishing, hunting,

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U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Campgrounds

environmental education, interpretation, and wildlife observation and photography. The refuge visitor center contains wildlife and ecology exhibits and is located at 57 South CC Camp Road (off Hwy. 1) at St. Charles. There are approximately 24 primitive campsites (no facilities) scattered about the White River refuge. There is no camping fee or reservation system. Stays are limited to less than 14 days and the sites must be occupied daily. Camping at some sites is limited to March-December. Call for road conditions/closings. FOR INFORMATION: Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge, P.O. Box 205, 57 South CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140-0205. PHONE: 870-282-8200. E-MAIL: whiteriver@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/whiteriver/

Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge (H-5)

Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge was created from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ouachita and Black Rivers Navigation Project. Geographically, the 65,000-acre refuge is located in what is known as the Felsenthal Basin, an extensive natural depression that is laced with a vast complex of sloughs, bayous and lakes. The region’s two major rivers, the Saline and Ouachita, flow through the refuge. These wetland areas in combination with the refuge’s diverse ecosystem of bottomland hardwoods, pine forests and uplands support a wide variety of wildlife and provide excellent fishing, hunting, boating, wildlife observation opportunities and environmental education opportunities. A visitor center located 5 miles west of Crossett on U.S. 82 contains numerous wildlife exhibits. Open Monday-Friday,7 a.m.-3:30p.m. FOR INFORMATION: Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, 5531 Hwy. 82 West, Crossett, AR 71635. PHONE: 870-364-3167. WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/felsenthal/

Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge (D-4) —No Camping

LOCATION: From Dardanelle, take Hwy. 7 south 6 miles to Hwy. 155, then east about 4 miles. FOR INFORMATION: Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, 10448 Holla Bend Rd., Dardanelle, AR 72834. PHONE: 479-229-4300; E-MAIL: hollabend@fws.gov; WEBSITES: www.fws.gov/southeast/HollaBend/; www.facebook.com/HollaBendNationalWildlifeRefuge.

Overflow National Wildlife Refuge (J-7) —No Camping

LOCATION: Off Hwy. 8 approx. 15 miles east of Hamburg, and 5 miles west of Parkdale. FOR INFORMATION: Overflow National Wildlife Refuge, 3858 Hwy. 8 East, Parkdale, AR 71661. PHONE: 870-473-2869; E-MAIL: felsenthal@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/felsenthal/Overflow/

Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge (G-1)

Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge is located primarily in the floodplain between the Cossatot and Little rivers in southwest Arkansas. A bottomland, wetland ecosystem, it is managed primarily for the benefit of migratory and resident waterfowl, neo-tropical migratory birds, wading birds and other wetland-dependent wildlife. The refuge lies between Ashdown and De Queen north of Little River between U.S. 71 and Hwy. 41. Recreational opportunities include camping, fishing, hunting and wildlife observation and photography. There are six primitive campsites (no facilities) scattered about Pond Creek refuge. FOR INFORMATION: Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge, 1958 Central Rd., Lockesburg, AR 71846. PHONE: 870-289-2126; E-MAIL: felsenthal@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/felsenthal/pondcreek/

Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge (D-9) —No Camping

Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge centers on Wapanocca Lake, a former bend in the Mississippi River. The refuge contains extensive virgin cypress swamp, mature bottomland hardwood forest, reforested uplands, and grasslands. Wapanocca NWR hosts wintering waterfowl, serves as a migratory stopover point for neotropical birds, and provides breeding habitat for forest songbirds. Recreational opportunities include wildlife observation, fishing, hunting, canoeing, photography, and environmental education. The refuge visitor center is located at 178 Hammond Avenue in Turrell. LOCATION: From I-55, take Hwy. 42 exit 21 and travel 1.5 miles east to stop sign. Continue east for 0.2 mile, through the railroad underpass, to reach the refuge visitor center. FOR INFORMATION: Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge, 178 Hammond Avenue, Turrell, AR 72384. PHONE: 870-343-2595 E-MAIL: bill_peterson@fws.gov; WEBSITE: www.fws.gov/wapanocca

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Maumelle Park Campsite

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Sixteen large lakes and the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System are under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. These campgrounds provide the camper who is also a water sports enthusiast the opportunity to pursue both sports. Many Corps of Engineers campgrounds charge user’s fees during the recreation season. Pets are permitted in some campgrouinds but restrictions vary. Every attempt is made to ensure accuracy of the campsite information and park facility descriptions before publication. However water-oriented parks in some areas are especially susceptible to seasonal flooding issues or other unforeseen circumstances which can indefinitely impact substantial changes in certain site availabilities. To make the most of your recreational time, it is strongly recommended to contact the Corps office in advance to confirm all matters of interest about your visit. For information on any Arkansas Corps lake, go to this Web link: http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/.

Arkansas River Between Arkansas Post and Pine Bluff (G-7, F-7 and F-6)

FOR INFORMATION: Natural Resource Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 35 Wild Goose Lane, Tichnor, AR 72166. PHONE: 870-548-2291. WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/ArkansasRiver/ArkansasPost.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

HUFFS ISLAND (F-7) Day Use Only • LOCATION: North of Grady on Hwy. 11, 7.5 miles. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, 4 picnic sites. river bank access March-September. No boat ramp. JARDIS POINT PARK (F-7) Day Use Only • LOCATION: Below Dam No. 2; 10 miles south of Gillett on U.S. 165, then 3 miles east on Hwy. 212. • FACILITIES: Restroom, picnic tables, basketball court, bank fishing. MERRISACH LAKE (G-7) 69 RV/Tent with E; 9 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 8 miles south of Tichnor on paved County Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, pavilions, dump station, playground. User’s fee charged. MOORE BAYOU (G-7) Day-use only • LOCATION: 5 miles south of Gillett on U.S. 165, then 1 mile east on Hwy. 169. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, 2 picnic sites, Arkansas Post Water Trail, boat ramp.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

NOTREBES BEND (G-7) 30 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 35 miles south of DeWitt. Take U.S. 165 to Hwy. 44, then south 14 miles on county road from Tichnor. Adjacent to Wilbur D. Mills Dam. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat ramp, picnic sites, dump station. User’s fee charged. PENDLETON BEND (G-7) 31 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 10 miles south of Gillett on U.S. 165 or 11 miles north of Dumas on U.S. 165, then 1 mile east on Hwy. 212. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, dump station, playground. User’s fee charged. WILBUR D. MILLS (G-7) 21 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 10 miles south of Gillett on U.S. 165 or 11 miles north of Dumas on U.S. 165, then 3 miles east on Hwy. 212. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station. User’s fee charged.

Arkansas River Between Pine Bluff and Little Rock (F-6 and E-6)

FOR INFORMATION: Natural Resource Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, P.O. Box 7835, Pine Bluff, AR 71611. PHONE: 870-534-0451. WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/ArkansasRiver/PineBluffArea.aspx. FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

D.D. TERRY DAM SITE WEST (E-6) Day Use Only • LOCATION: 3.2 miles south of Little Rock Port on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, boat ramp, picnic sites. RISING STAR (F-7) 24 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 20 miles southeast of Pine Bluff off U.S. 65. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, dump station. User’s fee charged. TAR CAMP (F-6) 45 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 5 miles east of Redfield off I-530. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, pavilion, dump station, picnic sites, playground, accessible fishing area, nature trail. User’s fee charged. WILLOW BEACH (E-6) 21 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 2 miles southwest of Baucum off U.S. 165, then .5 mile west on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, pavilions, picnic sites, playground, dump station, fishing pier. User’s fee charged.

Arkansas River Between Little Rock and Dardanelle (E-5 and D-5)

Arkansas River

FOR INFORMATION: Operations Manager, 1598 Lock and Dam Rd., Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 479-968-5008. WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/ArkansasRiver/Dardanelle.aspx

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FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

CHEROKEE (D-5) 33 RV/Tent with W...........................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 3 miles south of Morrilton off Cherokee Street. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, dump station, picnic sites, group pavilion, playground. User’s fee charged. CYPRESS CREEK (D-5) No Camping • LOCATION: 2 miles north of Houston on Hwy. 113. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. Check for status. MAUMELLE (E-5) 144 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 3 miles off Hwy. 10 on Pinnacle Valley Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilions, fishing pier, playgrounds. User’s fee charged. POINT REMOVE (D-5) Day Use Only • LOCATION: 1.4 miles south of Morrilton off Cherokee Street. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp. SWEEDEN ISLAND (D-4) No Camping • LOCATION: 8 miles south of Atkins on Hwy. 105. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. Check for status. TOAD SUCK FERRY (D-5) 48 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: Exit 129 off I-40 at Conway, go 6 miles west on Hwy. 60. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, group pavilion, playground. User’s fee charged.

Arkansas River Between Dardanelle and Ozark (D-3 And D-4)

See U.S. Army Corps of Engineers camgrounds, Lake Dardanelle Area.

Arkansas River Between Ozark and Fort Smith (C-1 And C-2)

Lake Maumelle

See U.S. Army Corps of Engineers camgrounds, Ozark Lake Area.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Beaver Lake Area (A-2 and B-2)

Located in the Ozark highlands of Northwest Arkansas on the headwaters of the White River. The surrounding area is known for its tourist attractions ranging from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville and the Pea Ridge National Military Park near Rogers, to the unique “stairstep town” of Eureka Springs. The upper White River tributaries have always been famous for their smallmouth bass fishing. Deer hunting is also good throughout the area during season. FOR INFORMATION: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Beaver Project Office, 2260 North 2nd Street, Rogers, AR 72756. PHONE: 479-636-1210; E-MAIL: Ceswl-bv@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/BeaverLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov. Campground reservations are available from Apr. 1-Oct. 31. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has instituted a Recreation Day User Fee Program. Annual passes are available.

Beaver Lake Dam

DAM SITE (A-2) 48 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 9 miles west of Eureka Springs on U.S. 62, then 2.5 miles south on paved access road Hwy. 187 to dam. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, showers, trailer dump station, overlook, pavilion, swimming. Day user fee charged. DAM SITE RIVER (A-2) 47 RV/Tent with E; 12 RV/Tent with E/W • LOCATION: 9 miles west of Eureka Springs on U.S. 62, then 2.5 miles south on paved access road Hwy. 187 to dam. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, showers, trailer dump station, playground. HICKORY CREEK (A-2) 61 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 1 mile north of Springdale on U.S. 71, then 7 miles east on Hwy. 264, then 1 mile north on Benton County Rd. 602. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat dock and ramp, trailer and marine dump stations, picnic area, swimming, playground, pavilions, volleyball court, multi-purpose field. Day user fee charged. HORSESHOE BEND (A-2) 160 RV/Tent with E; 25 RV/Tent with E/W; 3 Tent sites • LOCATION: 8 miles east of Rogers on Hwy. 94. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, playgrounds, boat dock and ramp, pavilions, picnic area, trailer dump station, swimming, volleyball court. Day user fee charged.

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INDIAN CREEK (A-2) 33 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 1.5 miles east of Gateway on U.S. 62; then 5 miles south on Indian Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat ramp, swimming, hiking trail, playground, picnic area, volleyball court. Day user fee charged. LOST BRIDGE NORTH (A-2) 48 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 5 miles southeast of Garfield on Hwy. 127. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat dock and ramp, trailer dump station, youth group camp area, playground, hiking trails. Day user fee charged. LOST BRIDGE SOUTH (A-2) 14 RV/Tent with E; 22 RV/Tent with E/W • LOCATION: 14 miles southeast of Garfield on Hwy. 127. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, trailer dump station, playground, swim beach. Day user fee charged. PRAIRIE CREEK (A-2) 103 RV/Tent with E; 9 RV/Tent with E/W • LOCATION: 4 miles east of Rogers on Hwy. 12, then 1 mile on Park Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat dock and ramp, trailer and marine dump stations, swimming, picnic area, pavilions, playground, hiking trail. Day user fee charged. ROCKY BRANCH (A-2) 44 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 11 miles east of Rogers on Hwy. 12, then 4.5 miles northeast on Hwy. 303. • FACILITIES: Vault and flush toilets, water, showers, boat dock and ramp, trailer and marine dump stations, pavilion, playground. Day user fee charged. STARKEY (A-2) 16 RV/Tent with E; 7 RV/Tent with W/E/S • LOCATION: 4 miles west of Eureka Springs on U.S. 62, then 4 miles southwest on Hwy. 187, then 4 miles southwest on County Road 2176 (also called Mundell Rd.). • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, showers, water, boat dock and ramp, marine dump station, pavilion, playground. Day user fee charged. WAR EAGLE (A-2) 26 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 10 miles east of Springdale on U.S. 412, then 3 miles north on County Road 95. • FACILITIES: Vault and flush toilets, water, showers, boat dock and ramp, trailer dump station, overlook, pavilion, playground, swimming. Day user fee charged.

Blue Mountain Lake Area (D-2)

Blue Mountain Lake

Located on the Petit Jean River in west central Arkansas. The lake is rather small—50 miles of shoreline. Nearby Mount Magazine is home to a full-service state park with lodge, cabins, restaurant and conference center. Excellent birding and wildlife opportunities are available. FOR INFORMATION: Park Manager, 10152 Outlet Park Road, Havana, AR 72842 PHONE: 479-947-2372; E-MAIL: ceswl-nb-bm@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/BlueMountainLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at http://www.recreation.gov.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

ASHLEY CREEK (D-3) 10 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1.5 miles south of Blue Mountain on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Pit toilets, drinking water, boat ramp, group shelter, dump station. HISE HILL (D-3) 9 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 11 miles southeast of Booneville on Hwy. 217. • FACILITIES: Pit toilets, drinking water, boat ramp, group shelter. LICK CREEK (D-3) 7 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles southwest of Waveland on Hwy. 309. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp. OUTLET AREA (D-3) 41 RV/Tent with E/W • LOCATION: 3 mile south of Waveland on paved road; then west on Waveland Park Road for 1 mile. Turn left on Outlet Park Road. Located below the dam on Petit Jean River. • FACILITIES: Two restrooms with showers, dump station, overlook, playground, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged. WAVELAND PARK (D-3) 51 RV/Tent with E/W • LOCATION: 2 miles southwest of Waveland on paved road. • FACILITIES: Two restrooms with showers, boat ramps, dump station, group shelter, playground, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged.

Bull Shoals Lake Area (A-4 and A-5)

Located in the Ozarks in north central Arkansas and southeastern Missouri, Bull Shoals Lake has received national recognition from fishermen and outdoor writers as home of “lunker bass.” Hardwood and pineclad hills around the lake provide scenic beauty and a haven for hikers and nature lovers, while over 1,000 miles of shoreline provide hidden coves and inlets popular with fishermen and water sportsmen. FOR INFORMATION: Park Manager, 324 W. 7th, Mountain Home, AR 72653. PHONE: 870-425-2700. E-MAIL: ceswl-mh@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/BullShoalsLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

Iron Mountain, DeGray Lake Area

BUCK CREEK (A-4) 36 RV/Tent with E; 2 RV/Tent with no hookups............................................................  • LOCATION: 5.5 miles south of Protem, MO, on Arkansas Hwy. 125. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, group pavilion, swim beach, playground, boat ramp, trailer dump station. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted.

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DAM SITE (A-5) No Camping • LOCATION: 1 mile southwest of town of Bull Shoals on Hwy. 178. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. Check for status. HIGHWAY 125 (A-4) 38 RV/Tent with E ........................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 14 miles northwest of Yellville on Hwy. 14, then north on Hwy. 125 for 13 miles. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, playground, group pavilion, swim beach. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. LAKEVIEW (A-5) 17 RV/Tent with W/E; 72 RV/Tent with E.........................................................................  • LOCATION: North of Lakeview on Hwy. 178. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, swim beach, playground, boat ramp, marina, amphitheater, group pavilion, hiking trail. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. LEAD HILL (A-4) 75 RV/Tent with E.............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 4 miles north of Lead Hill on Hwy. 7. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, trailer and marine dump stations, boat ramp, marina, swim beach, group pavilions, playground. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. OAKLAND (A-5) 32 RV/Tent with E...............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 8 miles north of Midway on Hwy. 5, then 10 miles west on Hwy. 202. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, trailer dump station, marina, group pavilion, swim beach, playground. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. TUCKER HOLLOW (A-4) 30 RV/Tent with E..................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 7 miles northwest of Lead Hill on Hwy. 14, then 3 miles north on Hwy. 281. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, marina, trailer dump station, pavilion, playground. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted.

DeGray Lake Area (F-4)

A 13,800-acre U.S. Army Corps of Engineers multi-purpose project is located on the Caddo River in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains of south central Arkansas. DeGray Lake is located eight miles north of Arkadelphia (Exit 78 off I-30 at Caddo Valley/Arkadelphia) on National Scenic 7 Byway. DeGray Lake offers diverse recreational opportunities. Visitors enjoy boating, fishing, swimming, scuba diving, sailing, hunting, sightseeing, geological interest, camping and much more. FOR INFORMATION: Corps of Engineers Park Manager, 729 Channel Road, Arkadelphia, AR 71923. PHONE: 870-246-5501 ext. 4005. E-MAIL: degray.lake@mvk02.usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.mvk.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/DeGrayLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

* NOTE: Check respective lake websites or contact the phone numbers provided for current campsite availability. ALPINE RIDGE (F-4) 49 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: Hwy. 8 to Alpine community, then turn east on Fendley Rd. for 8.5 miles. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, trailer dump station, registration booth, day use area, picnic sites, swim beach, playground. User’s fee charged. ARLIE MOORE (F-4) 39 RV/Tent with E; 28 RV with E; 20 Tent with E • LOCATION: 2 miles south of Bismark on Hwy. 7, then 2 miles west on Arlie Moore Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, dump station, showers, playground, swim beach, day use area, registration booth, nature trail, amphitheater, picnic sites. User’s fee charged. Reservable covered picnic pavilion. CADDO DRIVE (F-4) 30 RV/Tent with E; 15 RV with E; 27 Tent with E • LOCATION: 6 miles north of I-30 on Hwy. 7, turn west at DeGray One Stop, then 3 miles west on Edgewood Drive. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, playground, swimming beach, registration booth, day use area, picnic sites. User’s fee charged. Reservable covered picnic pavilion.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Greers Ferry Lake

EDGEWOOD (F-4) 33 RV/Tent with E; 12 RV with E; 4 Tent with E • LOCATION: 6 miles north of I-30 on Hwy. 7, then left at DeGray One Stop, and 2.7 miles west on Edgewood Dr. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, registration booth, playground, swim beach, dump station. User’s fee charged. IRON MOUNTAIN (F-4) 27 RV/Tent with E; 37 RV with E; 5 Tent with E • LOCATION: Turn west off Hwy. 7 on Skyline Dr., 1 mile west of DeGray Dam. Entry points located on Skyline Drive, Channel Road and Corps Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, playground, registration booth. User’s fee charged. LENOX MARCUS (F-4) Free Camping • LOCATION: 3 miles south of Lambert off Hwy. 84. • FACILITIES: 200 acres of remote camping. Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, picnic sites. OAK BOWER (F-4) Group Use Only • LOCATION: Turn south on Chestnut Drive from Hwy. 84 at Lambert, then 2 miles south. • FACILITIES: 8 air-conditioned cabins, kitchen and dining hall; showers, flush toilets, playground, electricity, group fire ring. Accommodations for up to 50 people. User’s fee charged. OZAN POINT (F-4) 50 Tent with no E • LOCATION: Hwy. 8 to Alpine community, then turn east on Fendley Road for 12 miles. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, picnic sites. User’s fee charged. POINT CEDAR (F-4) 58 RV/Tent with no E; 4 Tent • LOCATION: 10.5 miles west of Bismarck on Hwy. 84, turn south at Pt. Cedar Bait Shop on Shouse Ford Rd., 4 miles. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, playground, boat ramp, picnic sites, registration booth. User’s fee charged. SHOUSE FORD (F-4) 82 RV/Tent with E; 18 RV with E.................................................................................  • LOCATION: 10.5 miles from Bismarck on Hwy. 84, turn south at Point Cedar Bait Shop on Shouse Ford Road, then 4 miles south. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, registration booth, playground, picnic sites, swim beaches, amphitheater. User’s fee charged.

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De Queen Lake Area (G-1)

De Queen Lake is located on the Rolling Fork River in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. The lake covers 1,680 surface acres and has 35 miles of shoreline. The lake is a fine fishing resource with deep open water and flooded standing timber. Major fish species include black bass, crappie, bream and catfish. Other recreational activities include camping, boating, water skiing, swimming, picnicking, and hunting. Major game species include deer, rabbit, turkey, quail and ducks. FOR INFORMATION: De Queen Field Office, 706 De Queen Lake Road, De Queen, AR 71832. PHONE: 870-584-4161. E-MAIL: ceswl-mw-dq@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/DeQueenLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

BELLAH MINE (G-1) 24 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 7 miles north of De Queen on U.S. 71, then 5 miles west on Bellah Mine Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramp, trailer dump station, trails, covered picnic area, reservable pavilion. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. OAK GROVE (G-1) 36 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 3 miles north of De Queen on U.S. 71; then 5 miles west on De Queen Lake Road; then 0.25 mile north on County Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramp, playground, dump station, swimming beach, picnic shelter, picnic sites, two reservable pavilions. User’s fee charged. PINE RIDGE (G-1) 17 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 3 miles north of De Queen on U.S. 71 and 5 miles west on De Queen Lake Road; then 2 miles north on County Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, boat ramp, showers, playground, reservable pavilion. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

Dierks Lake Area (F-2)

Surrounded by beautiful hardwood and pine forests, Dierks Lake offers recreational opportunities to boaters and non-boaters alike. There are many coves, inlets, and flooded timber to fish for largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish and several species of sunfish. The main area of the 1,360-acre lake offers ample room for water skiers and recreational boaters. Below the lake at Horseshoe Bend, canoeists and kayakers enjoy exciting sport when sufficient water is being released. The natural beauty of the steep ridges, dense forests, and abundant wildlife make this area a favorite for the hunter. Located on the Saline River about 5 miles northwest of the town of Dierks. Dierks Lake has easy access off U.S. 70. FOR INFORMATION: Park Ranger, Dierks Lake, P.O. Box 8, Dierks, AR 71833. PHONE: 870-286-2346. E-MAIL: ceswl-mw-dl@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/DierksLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

BLUE RIDGE (F-2) 22 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 3 miles north of Dierks on U.S. 70; 4 miles northwest on Hwy. 278; 3 miles west on paved County Rd. • FACILITIES: Toilets, showers, restrooms, electricity, boat ramp, playground. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. HORSESHOE BEND (F-2) 11 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 2 miles west of Dierks on U.S. 70, then 4 miles northwest on Lake Road and project access road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, showers, water, change shelter, bank fishing access, pavilion, playground, outdoor fitness station, whitewater canoe/kayak area. Users fee charged. (Open year-round). JEFFERSON RIDGE (F-2) 84 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 5 miles west of Dierks on U.S. 70, then 7 miles northwest on Greens Chapel County Road. • FACILITIES: Water, boat ramps, showers, restrooms, electricity, pavilion, two swim beaches, two playgrounds. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Gillham Lake Area (F-2)

“The Bright Spot on the Cossatot,” Gillham Lake, is located on the Cossatot River, one of the most challenging white-water streams in Arkansas. The lake lies in Howard and Polk Counties about 16 miles north of the town of De Queen and 6 miles northeast of Gillham. The lake is surrounded by mountains and beautiful forests. It consists of 1,370 surface acres of water and offers a variety of recreational activities: fishing, hunting, boating, canoeing, skiing, sightseeing, camping and picnicking. The species of fish most actively sought are smallmouth, largemouth, and spotted bass, crappie, channel and flathead catfish and various species of sunfish. In addition, white bass and saugeye have been introduced. Gate attendants and park rangers are available for assistance and information. Fifteen miles below the dam on the Cossatot River is a good area for floating. Maps are available. Caution should be taken, because the Cossatot is Arkansas’s wildest stream and should be attempted by only the most experienced canoeists and kayakers. FOR INFORMATION:De Queen Field Office, 706 De Queen Lake Road, De Queen, AR 71832. PHONE: 870-584-4161. E-MAIL: ceswl-mw-dq@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/GillhamLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov

BIG COON CREEK (F-2) 31 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 6 miles northeast of Gillham via County Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, showers, water, boat ramp, swimming beach, two playgrounds, fish cleaning stations, trails. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. COSSATOT REEFS (F-2) 28 RV/Tent with W/E; 2 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 6 miles northeast of Gillham via County Road, close to the dam. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramp, swim area, covered picnic shelter, playground, trail, reservable pavilion. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. LITTLE COON CREEK (F-2) 10 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 6 miles northeast of Gillham via County Rd., and approx. 3 miles north via Public Use and County Rd. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp, bathhouse, showers, playground, reservable pavilion. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

Greers Ferry Lake Area (C-5 and C-6)

Greers Ferry Dam, completed in December 1962, spans the Little Red River north of Heber Springs. The dam and lake are nestled in the foothills of the scenic north central Arkansas Ozark Mountains. This clean, clear lake has been stocked with almost every known game fish native to the state by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service operates a trout hatchery below the dam and stocks the river with rainbow, brook and cut throat trout. The Sugar Loaf Mountain Nature Trail provides an exciting two-hour island hike with panoramic views of the surrounding lake and countryside from the summit, 540 feet above the water. The Mossy Bluff Nature Trail, downstream of the dam, meanders along a bluff overlooking the Little Red River and fish hatchery, and provides an excellent view of the dam and lake from the overlook shelter. The Buckeye Trail is located adjacent to Mossy Bluff Trail and features a paved trail surface for persons unable to negotiate the rougher areas (see Day Hiking Trails section, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Trails, Greers Ferry Lake Area). The Josh Park Memorial Cross Country Trail, located adjacent to Dam Site Park, meanders through a pine plantation and features a parking lot, restroom, drinking water and fitness station at the trailhead. A visitors center, located north of the dam on Hwy. 25, explains the role of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the exploration and development of the Little Red River area through interpretive exhibits and an audiovisual presentation entitled “The Saga of the Little Red, a Tale of Two Centuries.” Advance reservations are required for picnic shelters by calling the project office. Fee dates are approximate. Contact project office. FOR INFORMATION: Operations Project Manager, P.O. Box 1088, Heber Springs, AR 72543. PHONE: 501-362-2416. E-MAIL: ceswl-gf@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/GreersFerryLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

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CHEROKEE (C-6) No Camping • LOCATION: 7 miles west of Drasco on Hwy. 92, then 3 miles south on Brownsville Road. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. Check for status. CHOCTAW (C-5) 91 RV/Tent with E; 55 RV/Tent with no hookups...............................................................  • LOCATION: 5 miles south of Clinton on U.S. 65, then 3.5 miles east on Hwy. 330. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramp and marina, dump station, swim beach, picnic shelter, playground, picnic sites. COVE CREEK (C-6) 31 RV/Tent with E; 34 RV/Tent with no hookups...........................................................  • LOCATION: 8 miles southwest of Heber Springs on Hwy. 25, then 3 miles northwest on Hwy. 16, then 1.25 miles northeast on Cove Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, dump station, boat ramps, picnic sites, group picnic shelter, swimming beach. DAM SITE (C-6) 141 RV/Tent—see note below *...........................................................................................  • LOCATION: .5 mile northeast of Heber Springs on Hwy. 25 B. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, dump station, boat ramps and marina, picnic sites, two swim beaches, two playgrounds, three picnic shelters, hiking trails. * NOTE: Access to some sites has been discontinued. Check in advance for details. DEVILS FORK (C-6) 55 RV/Tent with E.........................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 0.25 mile north of Greers Ferry on Hwy. 16. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, showers, water, three boat ramps, dump station, two swim beaches, playground, picnic shelter. HEBER SPRINGS (C-6) 96 RV/Tent *.............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 2 miles west of Heber Springs on Hwy. 110, then .5 mile north on Park Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, boat ramp, marina, showers, swim beach, playground, picnic sites, picnic shelter, dump station. * NOTE: Access to some sites has been discontinued. Check in advance for details. HILL CREEK (C-6) 30 RV/Tent with E; 10 RV/Tent with no hookups............................................................  • LOCATION: 12 miles west of Drasco on Hwy. 92, then 3 miles northwest on Hwy. 225; then 2 miles south on Hill Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, two boat ramps, marina, showers, beach, picnic shelter, dump station. JOHN F. KENNEDY (C-6) 13 RV/Tent with W/E; 61 RV/Tent with E..............................................................  • LOCATION: Hwy. 25 north of Heber Springs for 2 miles; then 1 mile east on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, playground, picnic shelter, showers, dump station, boat ramp, picnic sites. User’s fee charged all year. MILL CREEK (C-6) No Camping • LOCATION: 14 miles northeast of Bee Branch on Hwy. 92; then 2 miles north on Mill Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. Check for status. NARROWS (C-6) 59 RV/Tent with E..............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 0.5 mile southwest of Greers Ferry on Hwy. 16. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, two boat ramps, marina, dump station, picnic shelters, picnic sites. OLD HIGHWAY 25 (C-6) 83 RV/Tent with E; 36 RV/Tent with no hookups...................................................  • LOCATION: 6.25 miles north of Heber Springs on Hwy. 25, then 3 miles west on Hwy. 25 Spur. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramps, dump station, swim beach, playground, picnic shelter, group camp area, picnic sites. User’s fee charged all year. SHILOH (C-6) 98 RV/Tent (See note below) *...............................................................................................  • LOCATION: 3.5 miles southwest of Greers Ferry on Hwy. 110. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, three boat ramps, marina, trailer and marine dump stations, picnic shelter, group camp area, picnic sites, playground, swim beach. * NOTE: Access to some sites has been discontinued. Check in advance for details.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

SUGAR LOAF (C-5) 57 RV/Tent with E; 20 RV/Tent with no hookups—see note below *.............................  • LOCATION: 12 miles northeast of Bee Branch on Hwy. 92, then 1.5 miles west on Hwy. 337. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, two boat ramps, marina, dump station, swim beach, picnic shelter, playground, 3 picnic sites. Sugar Loaf Mountain Nature Trail is located on nearby Sugar Loaf Mountain Island (see Day Hiking Trails section, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Trails, Greers Ferry Lake Area) * NOTE: Access to some sites has been discontinued. Check in advance for details.

Lake Dardanelle Area (D-3 And D-4)

Located on the Arkansas River in the west-central part of the state, this lake is a major unit of the Arkansas River Navigation Project. The lake stretches 50 miles up the Arkansas River Valley from Dardanelle Lock and Dam to Ozark-Jeta Taylor Lock and Dam. About 315 miles of shoreline give the visitor ample fishing and camping opportunities. A visitor’s center, located 1.5 miles west of Hwy. 7 at the Old Post Road Park, has exhibits that explain the development of the Arkansas River Valley from the days of the Indians to the present through interpretive exhibits entitled “Renaissance of a River.” FOR INFORMATION: Operations Manager, 1598 Lock and Dam Rd., Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 479-968-5008. E-MAIL: ceswl-rv@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/ArkansasRiver/Dardanelle.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

Lake Dardanelle

OLD POST ROAD PARK (D-4) 40 RV/Tent with W/E.....................................................................................  • LOCATION: 1.3 miles west of Hwy. 7 on paved road to lock and dam. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, tennis courts, basketball court, playground, sand volleyball, mountain bike trails, baseball field, soccer-football field, 18-hole disc golf course, pavilions. Arkansas River Visitor Center open weekends during summer, open Mon.-Fri. rest of year. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. PINEY BAY (D-3) 90 RV/Tent with W/E.........................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 3 miles west of London on U.S. 64, then 3.5 miles north on Hwy. 359. • FACILITIES: Boat ramps, water, showers, restrooms, dump station, picnic sites, amphitheater, pavilion, playground, swim beach. Restricted Season (Open Mar.1-Oct. 31 only). User’s fee charged. RIVERVIEW (D-4) 18 RV/Tent with W/E......................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 0.75 mile north of Dardanelle on paved road to dam. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, water, pavilion. User’s fee charged.

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SHOAL BAY (D-3) 82 RV/Tent with W/E.......................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 2 miles north of New Blaine on Hwy. 197. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat dock and ramp, trailer dump station, group pavilions, swim beach, playground, Bridge Rock Nature Trail, amphitheater. Restricted Season (Open Mar.1-Oct. 31 only) User’s fee charged.. SPADRA (D-3) 30 RV/Tent with E and shared water.....................................................................................  • LOCATION: 2 miles south of Clarksville on Hwy. 103 to Jamestown, then 1 mile on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, marina, restaurant, boat dock and ramp, pavilion, trailer dump station. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged.

Lake Greeson Area (F-3)

Located on the Little Missouri River in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains of southwest Arkansas, this crystal clear lake is popular with scuba divers. Many coves and inlets around the lake provide excellent fishing and protected areas for water skiing. Bare rock outcroppings contrast with the tall pines along the shores to provide interesting areas for hikers and nature lovers. FOR INFORMATION: Resource Mgr., Lake Greeson, 155 Dynamite Hill Rd., Murfreesboro, AR 71958-9720. PHONE: 870-285-2151. E-MAIL: lakegreeson@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.mvk.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/LakeGreeson.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

Lake Greeson

* NOTE: Check respective lake websites or contact the phone numbers provided for current campsite availability. ARROWHEAD POINT (F-3) 23 RV/Tent with no hookups; 1 RV/Tent with full hookups • LOCATION: 5 miles east of Newhope on U.S. 70, then .25 mile south on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, potable water (mid-Mar.-Nov.) boat ramp, swimming area (closed mid-Nov.-Feb.). User’s fee charged Mar. 1-Oct. 1. BEAR CREEK (F-3) 19 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: .5 mile south of Kirby on Hwy. 27, then 1.75 miles west on access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, cycle trails, potable water (closed mid-Nov.-Feb.). User’s fee charged Mar. 1-Oct. 31. BUCKHORN (F-3) 9 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 19, 3 miles northwest of dam, then 2 miles east on gravel access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets. User’s fee charged.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Lake Ouachita

COWHIDE COVE (F-3) 46 RV/Tent with E; 2 RV/Tent with full hookups; 2 Tent with no hookups..............  • LOCATION: 6 miles south of Kirby on Hwy. 27, then 2 miles west on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, boat ramp, dump station, amphitheater, picnic sites. User’s fee charged. DAM AREA (F-3) 16 RV/Tent with E; 2 RV/Tent with full hookups; 6 RV/Tent with no hookups.................  • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 19. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, hot and color showers year-round, dump station, marina and ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, swimming area, boat rental. User’s fee charged. KIRBY LANDING (F-3) 104 RV/Tent with W/E; 82 RV/Tent with W/E; 10 RV/Tent with full hookups; 2 RV/Tent Group Sites with W/E...................................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 2.5 miles west of Kirby on U.S. 70, then 1.25 miles south on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, hot and cold showers, dump station, boat ramp, nature trail, amphitheater, cycle trails, picnic sites, swim beach. User’s fee charged. LAUREL CREEK (F-3) 24 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5.25 miles south of Kirby on Hwy. 27, then 4 miles west on gravel access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, boat ramp, nature trails, cycle trails. (Open Mar.-Nov.) User’s fee charged. NARROWS DAM SITE (F-3) 18 RV/Tent with E; 6 RV/Tent with no hookups................................................  • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 19. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, dump station, marina and ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, swimming area. User’s fee charged. PARKER CREEK (F-3) 47 RV/Tent with E; 2 RV/Tent with full hookups; 8 RV/Tent with no hookups; 3 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 19, then 3 miles northwest of dam on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, hot and cold showers (Mar.-Nov.), dump station, boat ramp, swim area, playground, nature trail. User’s fee charged. PIKEVILLE (F-3) 12 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 6 miles north of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 19, 2 miles northwest of dam, then 2 miles east on gravel access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, nature trail. (Open Mar.-Nov.) User’s fee charged. SELF CREEK (F-3) 40 RV/Tent with E; 1 RV/Tent with full hookups; 31 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 1 mile west of Daisy on U.S. 70. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, hot and cold showers, dump station, marina and ramp, picnic sites, swim beach, pavilion, playground, boat rental. (Open Mar.-Nov.) User’s fee charged. STAR OF THE WEST (F-3) 21 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 2.75 miles east of Newhope on U.S. 70. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, potable water, picnic sites. Open Year-round. User’s Fee charged Mar.-Nov.

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Lake Ouachita Area (E-3 And E-4)

Located on the Ouachita River in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, the lake is surrounded by the Ouachita National Forest and private timberlands. Unsurpassed scenic beauty, excellent fishing, water sports of all kinds and a prolific area for rockhounds are just a few of the natural attractions of this area. Most camping areas are just a few miles from all the tourist attractions of Hot Springs National Park. FOR INFORMATION: Lake Ouachita Field Office, 1424 Blakely Dam Rd., Royal, AR 71968-9493. PHONE: 501-767-2101. E-MAIL: cemvk-pa@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.mvk.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/LakeOuachita.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS (Brady Mtn., Crystal Springs, Denby Point, Joplin, Tompkins Bend only): Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

* NOTE: Check respective lake websites or contact the phone numbers provided for current campsite availability. BIG FIR (E-3) 17 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 4.7 miles northeast of Mt. Ida on Hwy. 27, 6 miles east on Hwy. 188, then 4 miles southeast on Housely Point Road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, boat ramp. Camping by permit. BRADY MOUNTAIN (E-4) 57 RV/Tent with E; 17 Tent....................................................................................  • LOCATION: 13 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270, then 6.1 miles north on Brady Mtn. Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, nature trail, playground, scenic overlook, pavilion, day use swim beach, amphitheater, fish cleaning station. One accessible site. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby Brady Mountain Resort (www.bradymtnresort.com) offers a full service marina, restaurant, lodge, cabins, horseback riding, scuba shop and boat rental. BUCKVILLE (E-3) 5 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 18 miles west of Blue Springs on Hwy. 298, then 7 miles south on Buckville Rd. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, boat ramp, swimming beach. Camping by permit. CRYSTAL SPRINGS (E-3) 63 RV/Tent with W/E; 11 Tent; Group camping area.............................................  • LOCATION: 16.8 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270, then 1.5 miles north on Crystal Springs Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, picnic area, pavilions, day use swim beaches with change house and playground, amphitheater, hiking trail, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby Crystal Springs Resort (www.crystalspringsresort.com) offers a full service marina, boat rental and restaurant. DENBY POINT (OUACHITA SHORES) (E-3) 58 RV/Tent with W/E; 9 Tent • LOCATION: 9.5 miles east of Mt. Ida on U.S. 270, then .3 mile north on Denby Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, picnic sites, playground, amphitheater, nature trails, 2 group camping areas, swim beach, boat ramp, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby Lake Ouachita Shores Resort has a full service marina, lodge, motel, bungalows, boat rental. IRONS FORK (E-3) 5 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 8 miles east of Story on Hwy. 298, then 1.2 miles south on access road. • FACILITIES: Vault toilet, boat ramp. Camping by permit. JOPLIN (MOUNTAIN HARBOR) (E-3) 57 RV/Tent with E; 2 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 11 miles east of Mt. Ida on U.S. 270, then 2 miles north on Mtn. Harbor Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramps, dump station, picnic sites, swim beach, scenic overlook, fish cleaning station, trails. User’s fee charged. * NOTES: Campsites not recommended for large RVs, large trailers or units with ”slide outs.” Alcohol is prohibited in day use/group camp areas. Nearby Mountain Harbor Resort (www.mountainharborresort.com) offers a full service marina, boat rental, restaurant, lodge, condominiums, cabins, camping, meeting facility, Turtle Cove Spa and horseback riding. LENA LANDING (NORTH SHORES RESORT) (E-4) 10 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 12 miles west of Blue Springs on Hwy. 298, 1 mile south on Navy Landing Road.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

• FACILITIES: Flush toilets, boat ramp, trailer dump station. Camping by permit. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby North Shores Resort (www.northshoresresort.com) offers a full service marina, boat rental, cabin rental, restaurant and camping. LITTLE FIR (E-3) 29 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 4.7 miles northeast of Mt. Ida on Hwy. 27, then 8 miles east on Hwy. 188. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, group camping area, boat ramp, trailer dump station, fish cleaning station. Camping by permit. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby Little Fir Landing (www.littlefirlanding.com) includes a full service marina and RV campground. SPILLWAY (E-4) Group camping (Tent only—reservations accepted) • LOCATION: 3.5 miles from Blakely Mtn. Dam on Blakely Dam Road. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp, swim beach, pavilion, picnic sites, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged. NOTES: Alcohol prohibited in day use/group camp areas. Nearby Echo Canyon resort and marina (www.echocanyonar.com) offers a full service marina, cabin rentals, boat rentals, and restaurant. STEPHENS PARK (E-4) 9 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: At Blakely Mountain Dam, 1 mile west of Mtn. Pine on Blakely Dam Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, bathhouse, showers, water, pavilion, picnic sites, playground. User’s fee charged. TOMPKINS BEND (SHANGRI LA) (E-3)69 RV/Tent with W/E; 2 Tent with W; 12 Tent • LOCATION: 10.7 miles east of Mt. Ida on U.S. 270, then 2.1 miles north on Shangri-La Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, amphitheater, fish cleaning station, trails. User’s fee charged. * NOTE: Nearby Shangri-La Resort (www.shangrilaresortar.com) offers a full service marina, boat rental, restaurant, cabins and motel. TWIN CREEK (E-3) 15 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 8.8 miles east of Mt. Ida on U.S. 270, then 1 mile north on Twin Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, swim beach. Camping by permit. User’s fee charged.

Millwood Lake Area (G-2)

Millwood State Park

Millwood Lake is located on Hwy. 32, 9 miles east of Ashdown, in the lowlands of southwestern Arkansas. Of the 29,500 acres inundated by the lake, approximately 6,000 acres are cleared. On the remaining 23,500 acres, the dense growth of timber and brush was left standing, providing an excellent habitat for the wide variety of fish native to this area. Cleared boat lanes, old roads and creek and river channels provide access to the favorite fishing places on the lake. FOR INFORMATION: Resident Manager, 1528 Highway 32 East, Ashdown, AR 71822-9716. PHONE: 870-898-3343. E-MAIL: ceswl-mw@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/MillwoodLake.aspx

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Nimrod Lake

BEARD’S BLUFF (G-2) 25 RV/Tent with W/E; 2 RV/Tent with W/E/S; 1 RV/Tent with no hookups............  • LOCATION: 13 miles east of Ashdown on Hwy. 32. Recreation area is upstream of the east embankment of the dam. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, boat ramp, fishing dock, overlook. User’s fee charged. Gate attendants. BEARD’S LAKE (G-2) 5 RV/Tent with W/E; 3 Tent with no hookups............................................................  • LOCATION: 13 miles east of Ashdown on Hwy. 32; then 0.5 miles southwest of East Spillway access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toliets, boat ramp, fishing dock, picnic sites, playground, watchable wildlife trail, access to Beard’s Bluff facilities. User’s fee charged. COTTONSHED LANDING (G-2) 45 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 8 miles southwest of Mineral Springs and Tollette. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, fish cleaning station, pavilion, boat ramp, playground, fishing pier. User’s fee charged. Gate attendants. MILLWOOD OVERLOOK (G-2) Day Use Only • LOCATION: 13 miles east of Ashdown on Hwy. 32. • FACILITIES: Barrier-free pavilion with up to 60-persons capacity (Reservations required); flush toilet, cooker grills, playground. Reservation fee charged. PARALOMA LANDING (G-2) 33 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 1.5 miles south of Paraloma on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat ramp, dump station, rock fishing pier, playground. User’s fee charged. RIVER RUN EAST (G-2) 7 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: Below Millwood Dam on Hwy. 32; 12 miles east of Ashdown. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, spillway fishing steps, boat ramp. User’s fee charged. RIVER RUN WEST (G-2) 4 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: Below Millwood Dam on Hwy. 32; 10 miles east of Ashdown. SARATOGA LANDING (G-2) 17 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 1 mile south of Saratoga; then 1 mile west on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, boat ramp, pavilion, rock fishing pier, picnic area, playground. courtesy dock. User’s fee charged. WHITE CLIFFS (G-2) 25 RV/Tent with W/E; 1 Buddy site with W/E • LOCATION: 6 miles south of Cowlingsville. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, boat ramp, playground, hiking trail. User’s fee charged. WILTON LANDING (G-2) Day Use Only Location: 8 miles north of Ashdown on U.S. 71 • Facilities: 2 picnic sites, 2 vault toilets, launch ramp. User’s fee charged.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Nimrod Lake Area (E-4)

Located on the Fourche LaFave River in the Ouachita highlands of west central Arkansas, this lake has long been known for its crappie fishing. Hiking and hunting are excellent in season. FOR INFORMATION: Project Manager, 3 Hwy. 7 South, Plainview, AR 72857. PHONE: 479-272-4324. E-MAIL: ceswl-nb@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/NimrodLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at http://www.recreation.gov.

CARDEN POINT (E-4) Day Use Only • LOCATION: 6.5 miles east of Plainview on Hwy. 60. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, picnic sites, pavilion, playground, swim beach. User’s fee charged. CARTER COVE (E-4) 34 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 3.5 miles east of Plainview on Hwy. 60, then 0.5 mile south on access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilet, showers, boat ramp, dump station, swim beach, pavilion, playground, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged. QUARRY COVE (E-4) 31 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 8 miles east of Plainview on Hwy. 60. • FACILITIES: Marina nearby. RIVER ROAD (E-4) 15 RV/Tent with W/E; 6 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 9 miles southeast of Ola on Hwy. 7 to access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, pavilion, playground. User’s fee charged. SUNLIGHT BAY (E-4) 29 RV/Tent with W/E • LOCATION: 0.1 mile west of Plainview on Hwy. 28; then 3.5 miles southwest on paved access road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, showers, water, boat ramp, dump station, pavilion, playground, fish cleaning station. User’s fee charged.

Norfork Lake Area (A-5)

Norfork Lake Campsite

Located on the North Fork River in the Ozark Highlands of north-central Arkansas and southern Missouri, this crystal clear lake is a favorite of scuba divers. The wooded hills surrounding the lake abound in deer and turkey and other small game. Hiking, all types of water sports, and hunting in season are featured attractions. FOR INFORMATION: Park Manager, 324 W. 7th, Mtn. Home, AR 72653. PHONE: 870-425-2700. E-MAIL: ceswl-mh@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/NorforkLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at http://www.recreation.gov.

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Ozark Lake Campsite

BIDWELL POINT (A-5) 48 RV/Tent; 46 with E...............................................................................................  • LOCATION: 9 miles northeast of Mtn. Home on U.S. 62, then 2 miles north on Hwy. 101; cross bridge and take first access road to the right. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, swim beach, pavilion, playground, boat ramp. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. CRANFIELD (A-5) 67 RV/Tent with E............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 5.5 miles northeast of Mtn. Home on U.S. 62, then 2 miles north on Baxter County Road 34. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, swim beach, marina, playground, amphitheater, boat ramp. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. DAM QUARRY (A-5) 68 RV/Tent with E........................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 3 miles northeast of Norfork on Hwy. 5, then 2 miles east on Hwy. 177. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump stations, marina, boat ramp, playground, swim beach, pavilion. User’s fee charged. GAMALIEL (A-5) 64 RV/Tent with E..............................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 9 miles northeast of Mtn. Home on U.S. 62, then 4.5 miles north on Hwy. 101, then 3 miles southeast on Baxter County Road 42. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, swim beach, group pavilion, playground, marina. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted. HENDERSON (A-5) 38 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 10 miles east of Mtn. Home on U.S. 62, cross bridge and turn left. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, dump station, pavilion, marina. User’s fee charged. Reservations not accepted. PANTHER BAY (A-5) 15 RV/Tent with E • LOCATION: 9 miles east of Mountain Home on U.S. 62, then 1 mile north on Hwy. 101. • FACILITIES: Vault toilets, water, boat ramp, marina, dump station, swim beach, playground. User’s fee charged. Reservations not accepted. ROBINSON POINT (A-5) 102 RV/Tent with E..................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 9 miles east of Mtn. Home on U.S. 62, then 2.5 miles south on Baxter County Road 279. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, dump station, swim beach, pavilion, hiking trail, playground. boat ramp. User’s fee charged. Reservations accepted.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds

Ozark Lake Area (C-2)

As the Arkansas River flows through the state, it reaches its northernmost point in a sweeping bend. Now a part of Ozark Lake, this big bend was called “Aux Arc” by the French and it is from the French that the lake and the nearby city of Ozark received their names. Fishing, camping, and other recreational opportunities may be found within and around the lake’s 173 miles of shoreline. FOR INFORMATION:Russellville Project Office, 1598 Lock and Dam Road, Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 479-968-5008. E-MAIL: ceswl-rv@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/ArkansasRiver/Ozark.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

AUX ARC (pronounced Ozark) (C-2) 64 RV/Tent with W • LOCATION: 1.3 miles south of Ozark on Hwy. 23, then left 1 mile on Hwy. 309, and then left on Aux Arc Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, boat ramp, dump station, showers, pavilions, playground. 50-amp service at select sites. (Open year-round). User’s fee charged. CITADEL BLUFF (C-2) No Camping • LOCATION: 1.6 miles north of Cecil on Hwy. 41, turn right on Citadel Bluff Road. • FACILITIES: Boat ramp open. All other facilities closed. CLEAR CREEK (C-2) 25 RV/Tent with E; 11 RV/Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: 5.2 miles south of Alma on Hwy. 162, then left 3.6 miles on Clear Creek Road. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, dump station, pavilion. User’s fee charged. SPRINGHILL (C-2) 10 RV/Tent with E; 32 RV/Tent with W/E; 3 Tent with no hookups • LOCATION: Exit 3 off I-49, then 7.3 miles south on Hwy. 59. Park entrance located immediately south of the Hwy. 59 Arkansas River bridge. • FACILITIES: Flush toilets, water, showers, boat ramp, hiking trail, mountain bike trail, pavilions. 50 amp service at select sites. User’s fee charged.

Table Rock Lake Area (A-3 and A-4)

Although the main body of Table Rock lies in the Ozarks of southwest Missouri, a segment dips into northwest Arkansas where Boone and Carroll Counties meet. Like Beaver and Bull Shoals, Table Rock is another White River Reservoir serving water enthusiasts and anglers from throughout mid-America. FOR INFORMATION: Recreation Manager, 4600 State Hwy. 165, Branson, MO 65616. PHONE: 417-334-4101. E-MAIL: ceswl-tr@usace.army.mil WEBSITE: www.swl.usace.army.mil/missions/recreation/lakes/TableRockLake.aspx FOR RESERVATIONS: Contact the National Recreation Reservation System toll free at 877-444-6777 or on the Web at www.recreation.gov.

Highway 23 Bridge, Ozark

CRICKET CREEK (A-3)36 RV/Tent with W/E................................................................................................  • LOCATION: 6 miles southwest of Ridgedale, MO on Hwy. 14. • FACILITIES: Restrooms, water, showers, boat ramp, trailer and marine dump stations, swim beach, boat and motor rental. User’s fee charged.

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Private & Municipal Campgrounds

North Little Rock RV Park

Campground owners who would like to be listed in the Arkansas Adventure Guide should mail campground name, address, phone number, e-mail address and number of campsites to the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, Communications Section, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201. Phone: 501-682-7602, or E-mail: info@arkansas.com.

ALMA

BALD KNOB

BENTON

Crabtree RV Park.......................... 37 sites Barnes RV I-30 RV Park............................... 130 sites (I-40 Exit 13 on 71 N to Collum Ln. to Park.............. 9 pull-thrus, 75 RV only sites (7 miles west of Little Rock on I-30) Heather Ln. behind Cracker Barrel) (Exit 55, south on U.S. 67-167, then 1.5 miles 19719 I-30, Benton, AR 72015 400 Heather Lane, Alma, AR 72921 on Hwy. 367 S) Phone: 501-778-1244; 501-315-8555 Phone: 479-632-0909; 888-577-7394 1520 Hwy, 367N; and 1601 Hwy. 367 N; E-mail: info@i30rvpark.com Website: www.crabtreerv.com Bald Knob, AR 72010 JB’s RV Park/Campground.............. 45 sites Phone: 501-724-5026; Fax: 501-724-2053 KOA-Fort Smith/Alma..................... 70 sites (I-30, Exit 106) E-mail: fredbarnes@centurylink.net (3 miles north of Alma on Hwy. 71) 8601 J.B. Baxley Rd., Benton, AR 72015 3539 Hwy. 71 N, Alma, AR 72921-8096 Freppon RV Park........................... 47 sites Phone: 501-778-6050 Phone: 479-632-2704 (Exit 55 north off U.S. 67/167) Website: www.jbsrvpark.com Website: www.koa.com Hwy. 167 N, E-mail: jlhaddox@aol.com Bald Knob, AR 72010 Oaks Corner Campground: See Van Buren BLYTHEVILLE Phone: 501-724-6476 ALTUS Blytheville RV Park .......................... 18 RV BATESVILLE (Exit 67 off I-55) Chateau aux Arc RV Park ..........11 RV sites Speedway RV Park ...............33RV; 10 Tent 104 South Porter Street, Blytheville, AR (Exit 41 off I-40, then 1.1 mile south on 72315 1005 Heber Springs Rd. Hwy. 186) Phone: 870-763-1241; 870-763-6696 Batesville, AR 72501 8045 Hwy. 186, Altus, AR 72821 Phone: 870-251-1008 Phone: 479-468-4400; 800-558-WINE Shearin’s RV Park ......................... 52 sites Website: www.speedwayrvpark.com (So. Hwy. 61; 1.9 mi. so. of I-55, Exit 63) ARKADELPHIA E-mail: speedwayrvpark@yahoo.com 2953 N. U.S. 61, Blytheville, AR 72315 Arkadelphia Campground & Phone: 870-763-4858 BEAVER RV Park ...................................56 RV sites BOLES Beaver RV Park (Exit 78, Jct. of I-30 & Hwy. 7 North; go 0.3 & Campground...................... 10 tent, 33 RV “Y” City Mountain Inn & Campground: mi.; turn right on Frost Road) (7 miles north of Eureka Springs on Hwy. 221 Frost Road, Caddo Valley, AR 71923 See “Y” City 187 N at Beaver on Table Rock Lake and Phone: 866-245-1771; 870-246-4922 White River) BOONEVILLE Website: www.arkadelphiacampground.com P.O. Box 25, E-mail: arcampground@iocc.com Holiday Capri Motel......... 12 sites, RV only Beaver, AR 72613 630 West Main St., Booneville, AR 72927 Brushy Creek ............................... 73 sites Phone: 479-253-5469; 479-981-6520 Phone: 479-675-2203 (Exit 78, Jct. of I-30 & Hwy. 7 North to Website: www.beavertownarkansas.com Skyline Dr., go West to Brushy Rd., go North E-mail: park@beavertownarkansas.com BULL SHOALS to Brushy Landing Rd.) Bull Shoals Lake Boat Dock ............. 6 sites BEE BRANCH P.O. Box 763, Arkadelphia. AR 71923 (Middle of town of Bull Shoals on Hwy. 178) Phone: 870-342-5148 Toad’s Mean Green P.O. Box 748, Bull Shoals, AR 72619 E-mail: greglathem@yahoo.com RV Park .............................. 22 RV, 13 tent Phone: 870-445-4424; 870-445-4166 10714 Hwy. 92 East ATKINS Website: www.bullshoalslakeboatdock.com Bee Branch, AR 72013 E-mail: boatdock@bullshoals.net Bulldogz Campground ....................70 tent Phone: 501-654-8844 (Exit 94 off I-40, Hwy. 105 North 4 mi.) Copper John’s Resort: See Lakeview Website: tmgrv.com Hwy. 105 North, Atkins, AR 72823 E-mail: tmgrv@windstream.net Gung-La Trout Dock: See Lakeview Phone: 479-692-9562

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Private/Municipal Campgrounds

Point Return ................................ 22 sites Forest Lake Estates ..................33 RV sites (Northeast of town of Bull Shoals off 1001 McNutt Road #1000 Brown’s Beach Rd.) Conway, AR 72034 City of Bull Shoals, P.O. Box 390 Phone: 501-329-2240 Bull Shoals, AR 72619 Website: www.forestlakemhc.com Phone: 870-445-4775 Email: forestlake@towermgmt.com E-mail: bullshoalscityhall@sudden COTTER linkmail.com Cotter Trout Dock CALICO ROCK ..................Primitive camping on an island Cedar Ridge RV Park..................... 15 sites 321 Big Spring Parkway, (Jct. of Hwy. 56 & 5; Calico Street) Cotter, AR 72626 Box 236, Calico Rock, AR 72519 Phone: 870-435-6525; 800-447-7538 Phone: 870-297-4282; 870-291-0071 Website: www.cottertroutdock.com Website: www.calicorock.us E-mail: ctd@southshore.com E-mail: lockie001@centurytel.net Denton Ferry RV Park ......44 sites (RV only) Lindsey Trout Dock and Campground (10 miles west of Mountain Home (3 miles west of Calico Rock on Chessmond Road Access)

1168 Chessmond Ferry Rd Calico Rock, AR 72519 Phone: 870-297-4543 Website: lindseytroutdock.tripod.com CAVE SPRINGS

Creeks RV Resort & Golf Course .... 60 sites (take Hwy. 264 West off I-540, then Hwy. 112 South 2 miles)

1499 South Main South, Cave Springs, AR 72718 Phone: 479-248-1000 Website: www.nwarvresort.com E-mail: reservations@nwarvresort.com CHARLESTON

Charleston Lake Park ........ 4 sites, RV only (Take South School Street south off Hwy. 22 to Charleston Lake)

South School St., Charleston, AR 72933 Phone: 479-965-2269 E-mail: tonyasneed@centurytel.net CLARENDON

Riverfront RV Park ........................ 12 sites (Banks of the White River)

270 Madison, Clarendon, AR 72029 Phone: 870-747-5414; 870-747-3802 E-mail: clarendoncityhall@centurytel.net

on U.S. 62)

(Hwy. 16, between Greers Ferry & Fairfield Bay)

10645 Edgemont Rd., Edgemont, AR 72044 Phone: 501-723-4999 Website: www.bluecloudsresort.com EL DORADO

Country Living RV Park.................. 40 sites (2 miles south of Hwy. 82 Bypass on U.S. 167)

100 Country Living-Office El Dorado, AR 71730 Phone: 870-863-6565 Mayhaw Orchard RV Park....... .....2 RV sites 279 Nick Springs Rd., El Dorado, AR 71730 Phone: 870-862-1931

740 Denton Ferry Rd., Cotter, AR 72626 ELIZABETH Phone: 870-435-7275; 800-275-5611 Hand Cove Resort & RV Park.......... 21 sites Website: www.dentonrv.com 8885 Hand Cove Road, Elizabeth, AR 72531 E-Mail: bill@dentonrv.com His Place Resort.............. 4 sites, Tent only Phone: 870-488-5367 Website: www.handcoveresort. com (on Denton Ferry Rd., 0.75 mile E-mail: greg@handcoveresort.com from U.S. 62) 89 Chamberlain Lane, Cotter, AR 72626 EUREKA SPRINGS Phone: 870-435-6535; 866-435-6535 Beaver Dam Cottages & Website: www.hisplaceresort.net RV Park....................... 3 cottages, 12 sites E-mail: info@hisplaceresort.net (7 miles west of Eureka Springs on U.S. 62, Rainbow Drive Resort & then 1 mile south on Hwy. 187) Campground....... 3 RV, 3 tent, 2 cabin sites 8172 Hwy. 187 South 669 Rainbow Landing Dr., Eureka Springs, AR 72631 Cotter, AR 72626 Phone: 479-253-6196 Phone: 870-430-5217 Website: www.beaverdamcottage.com Website: www.rainbowdriveresort.com E-mail: beaverdam2@basicISP.net E-mail: rainbow@mtnhome.com Green Tree Lodge & RV Park.......... 24 sites (1.5 miles west of historic dist. on U.S. 62 W) White River Campground & Cottages................ 95 sites 560 W. Van Buren, Eureka Springs, AR 72632 (U.S. 62 B, west of Cotter) Phone: 479-253-8807 P.O. Box 99, Cotter, AR 72626 Website: www.greentreelodge.com Phone: 870-453-2299 E-mail: Greentre@ipa.net Website: www.campthewhite.com Iron Horse Stables: See Berryville CROSSETT

Crossett Harbor RV Park.............. 119 sites (Felsenthal Nat’l Wildlife Refuge; 5 miles west of Crossett on U.S. 82)

Highway 82, Crossett, AR 71635 Phone: 870-364-6136 Spadra Waterfront Marina................ 6 sites Website: http://www.campingandcamp grounds.com/ar_08.html (2.5 miles off of I-40 in Clarksville) Email: crossett.rvpark@yahoo.com 700 Marina Drive, Clarksville, AR 72830 Phone: 479-754-5021 DOVER Website: www.spadramarina.com Mack’s Pines E-mail: spadramarina@yahoo.com .....................24 RV, 8 cabin, 2 home sites CLARKSVILLE

CLINTON

EDGEMONT

Blue Clouds Resort........................ 50 sites

(13 miles north of Dover on Hwy. 7)

Kettle Campground & RV Park........ 65 sites (U.S. 62 E, 1/4 mile east of Passion Play Road)

4119 E. Van Buren Eureka Springs, AR 72632 Phone: 479-253-9100; 800-899-CAMP (2267) Website: www.kettlecampground.net E-mail: kettleinfo@cox.net Kings River Outfitters.................... 30 sites (Hwy. 221 Bridge at Trigger Gap)

P.O. Box 483, Eureka Springs, AR 72632 Phone: 479-253-8954 Website: www.kingsriveroutfitters.com E-mail: ernie@kingsriveroutfitters.com KOA-Eureka Springs...................... 82 sites

Whispering Pines Camping Park.... 37 sites 22816 SR 7 N Hwy. 7, Dover, AR 72837 (7.5 miles north on U.S. 65) Phone: 479-331-3261 8575 Hwy. 65 N, Clinton, AR 72031 (4 miles west of Eureka Springs on U.S. 62, Website: www.macks-pines.com Phone: 501-745-4291 then 1 mile south on Hwy. 187) E-mail:mackspines@yahoo.com CONWAY 15020 Hwy.187 South Moore Outdoors................ 1 cabin,10 sites Eureka Springs, AR 72631 KOA-Morrilton/Conway: See Morrilton (Twin Bridges on Big Piney Creek) Phone: 479-253-8036; 800-562-0536 Brannon RV Park .......................... 20 sites 3827 SR 164 W, Dover, AR 72837 Website: www.koa.com/campgrounds/ 31 Brannon Landing Rd., Conway, AR 72032 Phone: 479-331-3606 eureka-springs Website: www.mooreoutdoors.com Phone: 501-470-0331 E-mail: koa4fun@gmail.com E-mail: mooreoutdoors@hughes.net

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Ozark Cabins & RV.................. 6 RV, 6 tent Heart O’ The Ozarks (10 miles west of Eureka Springs on Hwy. Campground ................................ 26 sites 187 South)

423 CR 136, Eureka Springs, AR 72631 Phone: 479-253-2018 Website: www.eurekasprings vacations.com E-mail: ozarkcab@ipa.net Spider Creek Resort.............1 site, RV only (Beaver Dam Access Road)

(4.1 miles north of Flippin on Ark. 178, turn left on 8064, 1.2 miles)

76 MC 8119, Flippin, AR 72634 Phone: 870-453-8643; 315-436-2884 Website: www.heartotheozarks.com E-mail: mike@heartotheozarks.com HAGARVILLE White Hole Resort .......................... 2 sites Haw Creek RV Park ...................... 13 sites 4971 MC 7001, Flippin, AR 72634 (16 miles north of Hagarville on Hwy. 123 Phone: 870-453-2913; 866-781-6056 or 12 miles south of Hwy. 7 & Hwy. 123 Jct.) Website: www.WhiteHoleResort.com HC 63 Box 285, Hagarville, AR 72839 Phone: 479-292-3606 FORREST CITY

8179 Hwy. 187, Eureka Springs, AR 72631 Phone: 479-253-9241; 800-272-6034 Website: www.spidercreek.com E-mail: info@spidercreek.com Delta Ridge RV Park, Inc. .............. 18 sites Turpentine Creek Wildlife Exit 241-A off Confederate Drive beRefuge RV Park............................... 7 sites (I-40 hind Best Western. 1 block west of Hwy. 1. (7 miles south of Eureka Springs on Hwy. 23) Check-in @ Ole Sawmill Cafe 6 am - 9 pm) 239 Turpentine Creek Lane 2405 N. Washington, Eureka Springs, AR 72632 Forrest City, AR 72335 Phone: 479-253-5841 Phone: 870-270-9445 Website: www.turpentinecreek.org Email: deltaridgerv5@gmail.com E-mail: tigers@turpentinecreek.org FORT SMITH Wanderlust RV Park, Inc................ 90 sites Fort Chaffee RV Park ....................... 20 RV (U.S. 62 E to Passion Play Rd.) (enter Ft. Chaffee main gate; go south to 468 Passion Play Rd. Ft. Smith Blvd., turn right; register at BilletEureka Springs, AR 72632 ing; go west to 4th Ave., turn left; go south Phone: 479-253-7385 to just short of 23rd St. to park) Website: www.wanderlustrvpark.com 11601 Darby Ave. FAIRFIELD BAY Fort Smith, Arkansas 72916 Fairfield Bay Campground ............. 50 sites Phone: 479-484-2252, 479-484-2917 4350 Hwy 330 S., KOA-Fort Smith: See Alma Fairfield Bay, AR 72088 GAMALIEL Phone: 501-884-6500 E-mail: ffbrt@artelco.com 101 North Resort... 40 RV, full-service sites 4975 Hwy. 101, FAYETTEVILLE Gamaliel, AR 72537 Southgate RV Park.................. ......50 sites Phone: 870-467-5500 (U.S. 71B South) Website: www.101-resort.com 2331 South School, Fayetteville, AR 72701 Email: 101northresort@gmail.com Phone: 479-442-2021 GENTRY Website: www.southgatervpark.com E-mail: southgatervpark@gmail.com Wilderness Hills Park & Winn Creek RV Park ..................... 24 sites Campground................................. 27 sites (Exit 53 off I-49 at West Fork, 13.5 miles south of Fayetteville; follow signs 4 miles)

16126 Winn Creek Rd., Winslow, AR 72959 Phone: 479-839-4322 Website: www.winncreekrvpark.com E-mail: winncreekrvpark@wildblue.net

GREENBRIER

Cadron Creek Outfitters...... 5 sites, RV only 54 Cargile Lane, Greenbrier, AR 72058 Phone: 501-993-1651 Website: www.cadroncreekoutfitters.com

(Hwy. 43 N from Siloam Springs follow signs)

13776 Taylor Orchard Rd. Gentry, AR 72734 Phone: 479-524-4955

GILBERT

HARDY

Hardy Camper Park....................... 50 sites (Downtown on Spring River)

3 Wilburn Bros. Blvd., Hardy, AR 72542 Phone: 870-856-2356 Website: www.visithardyarkansas.com HARRISON

Harrison Village Campground & RV Park................. 76 sites (1 mile south of Harrison on U.S. 65)

2364 U.S. 65 South, Harrison, AR 72601 Phone: 870-743-3388 Website: www.harrisonvillagervpark.com E-mail: harrisonvillage@yahoo.com Parker’s RV Park Inc...................... 42 sites (1 mile south of Jct. U.S. 412/65; next to Arkansas Welcome Center)

3629 U.S. 65N, Harrison, AR 72601 Phone: 888-590-2267 Website: www.parkersrvinc.com E-mail: ParkersRV@eritter.net Parkway Travel Park...................... 24 sites (7 miles south of Harrison on Hwy. 7; 2 miles north of Marble Falls)

8835 Hwy. 7 South, Harrison, AR 72601 Phone: 870-743-2198 E-mail: parkwaytravel@windstream.net Shady Oaks Campground RV Park & Cabins........................ 50+ sites (7 mi. south of Harrison; 1 mi. east off Hwy. 7; or 8 mi. west on Hwy. 206 off U.S. 65)

Hwy. 206E, Buffalo Camping & Canoeing......... 26 sites 960 Harrison, AR 72601 (30 miles south of Harrison on U.S. 65, then Phone: 870-743-2343 Angels Retreat .................................1 site 3 miles on Hwy. 333 east to Gilbert—inside Website: www.camptheoaks.com Gilbert General Store) 160 Riverside Dr., Flippin, AR 72634 E-mail: shadyoaks@cox.net 1 Frost Street, Gilbert, AR 72636 Phone: 870-321-0987 Phone: 870-439-2888; 870-439-2386 Dogwood Springs RV Park/Campgrounds: Website: www.whiteriverangelsretreat.mobi Website: www.gilbertstore.com See Jasper E-mail: whiteriverangel@gmail.com Email:riverfun_gilbert@live.com HATFIELD Blue Heron Campground & Resort.........28 sites FLIPPIN

(Turn onto Bridge View Road on west end of U.S. 62/412 White River bridge.)

150 Blue Heron Drive P.O. Box 1253, Flippin, AR 72634 Phone: 870-453-4678 Website: www.blueheroncampground.com E-mail: blueheron@ozarkmountains.com

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GLENWOOD

Caddo River Camping & Canoe Rental................................ 30 sites (Jct. U.S. 70 & Hwy. 8, 35 miles west of Hot Springs)

26 Hwy. 8 East, Glenwood, AR 71943 Phone: 870-356-5336; 888-300-8452 Website: www.caddoriver.com Email: float@caddoriver.com

Iron Mountain RV & Camping: See Mena HAZEN

T. Ricks RV Park............................ 26 sites (I-40 Exit 193 behind Citgo)

4350 Hwy. 63 N, Hazen, AR 72064 Phone: 870-255-4914

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Private/Municipal Campgrounds

HEBER SPRINGS Catherine’s Landing ..................2 cottages, Lindsey’s Resort............................ 20 sites ......................... 8 yurts, 119 RV only sites (Hwy. 25 N to Rainbow Rd. at Greers Ferry 1700 Shady Grove Road Hot Springs, AR 71907 Dam; then 2 miles to Rainbow Loop; Phone: 501-262-2550 follow signs) 350 Rainbow Loop, Heber Springs, AR 72543 Website: www.catherineslanding.rv coutdoors.com Phone: 501-362-3139; 800-305-8790 E-mail: Catherineslanding@rvcoutdoors.com Website: www.lindseysresort.com Red River Trout Dock........ 16 sites, RV only Cloud Nine RV Park ............4 tent, 45 sites (Hwy. 110 and 210 E) (5200 block of E. Grand; 1 mile east of rest 285 Ferguson Rd., Heber Springs, AR 72543 area, U.S. 70) Phone: 501-362-2197 136 Cloud Nine Dr., Hot Springs, AR 71901 Website: www.redrivertroutdock.com Phone: 501-262-1996; 501-262-0578 Email: fish@redrivertroutdock.com Website: www.cloudninerv.com Wagon Circle RV Park................... 65 sites E-mail: cloudninervpark@aol.com

(Hwy. 337)

4009 Libby Route, Heber Springs, AR 72543 Phone: 501-362-8070; 877-362-8070

Crystal Ridge RV Park: See Jessieville

HUTTIG

Grand Marais RV Campground ...... 57 sites (4 miles north of Huttig off Hwy. 129)

150 New Lock 6 Rd., Huttig, AR 71747 Phone: 870-943-2930

JACKSONVILLE

Tall Pines RV Park......................... 28 sites 3102 John Harding Drive, #16 Jacksonville, AR 72076 Phone: 501-982-0090 JASPER

Dogwood Springs Campground Resort.........9 cabins, 50 sites (1 mile north on Hwy. 7; 18 miles south of

Harrison; 2 miles to river access) Hot Springs Nat’l Park KOA.......... 112 sites P.O. Box 157, (On U.S. 70 B, Exit 4) Jasper, AR 72641 HETH 838 McClendon Rd., Hot Springs, AR 71901 Phone: 870-446-2163 Shell-Lake Campground............................ Phone: 501-624-5912; 800-562-5903 Website: www.jasperdogwoodcabins ........ 25 pull-thrus w/full hookups, 35 sites Website: www.hotspringskoa.com andrv.com E-mail: hotspringskoa@att.net (I-40 at Hwy. 149, Exit 260) Email: dogwoodspringscampground@ 453 Hwy. 149 North, Heth, AR 72346 J & J RV Park............................... 46 sites yahoo.com Phone: 870-657-2100; 870-657-2101 (5 minutes from downtown) Shady Oaks Campground & Cabins: See 2000 E. Grand, Hot Springs, AR 71901 HOLLY GROVE Harrison Phone: 501-321-9852 Maddox Bay Landing .................... 10 sites Website: www.jjrvpark.com JESSIEVILLE (Right off Hwy. 17 S. 140 West) E-mail: janice@jjrvpark.com Ron Coleman Mining: See Crystal Ridge 499 Resort Road, Holly Grove, AR 72069 Lake Village Resort....................... 48 sites RV Park Phone: 870-462-8317, 870-842-0533 (Located on Treasure Isle Road; U.S. 270 Crystal Ridge RV Park ................... 24 sites HOPE west of Hot Springs on Lake Hamilton.) (15 miles north of Hot Springs; 2 miles past 173 Barbary Rd., Hot Springs, AR 71913 Hope Fair Park RV Park................ 200 sites Hot Springs Village on Hwy. 7; left on “Little (Exit 30 off I-30, south on Hwy. 278 to U.S. 67, Phone: 501-767-0707; Fax: 501-767-0757 Blakely Creed Rd.;” go 1.5 miles; turn right) Website: www.lakevillagevacation.com west 3 blocks, south 5 blocks on Hwy. 174, 211 Crystal Ridge Lane, E-mail: lakevillageresort@live.com west on Park Dr.; follow signs) Jessieville, AR 71949 P.O. Box 596, Hope, AR 71802-0596 Mill Pond Village RV Park.............. 21 sites Phone: 501-984-5396; 501-984-5397; Phone: 870-777-7500; 800-223-4673 (Hwy. 7 S, 5 miles from Hot Springs Mall) 800-291-4484 Website: www.hopearkansas.net 1 Preakness Dr., Hot Springs, AR 71913 Website: www.colemanquartz.com E-mail: tourism@hopearkansas.net Phone: 501-525-3959 Email: colemanquartz@gmail.com Hope Village Inn & RV Park .............. 32 RV E-mail: millpond5@att.net JONESBORO 2611 North Hazel Street, Hope, AR 71801 Timbercrest RV & Mobile Craighead Forest Park Phone: 870-777-4665 Home Park ...................... 54 sites, RV only Campground................................. 28 sites 3921 Central Ave., HORSESHOE BEND (Approximately 3.5 miles south on Hot Springs, AR 71913 U.S. 63, right on Culberhouse Road) Box Hound Marina, Resort & Phone: 501-525-8361 4910 S. Culberhouse, RV Park.......................................... 6 sites Treasure Isle RV Park.................... 60 sites Jonesboro, AR 72401 1313 Tri Lakes Dr. (U.S. 270 W on Lake Hamilton at the Phone: 870-933-4604 Horseshoe Bend, AR 72512 Ouachita River Bridge) Website: www.jonesboro.org/parks/parks/ Phone: 870-670-4496 205 Treasure Isle Rd., craighead.html Website: www.boxhoundmarina.com Hot Springs, AR 71913 E-mail: boxhound@centurytel.net JUDSONIA Phone: 501-767-6852 HOT SPRINGS Website: www.treasureislerv.com Red River RV Park ........................ 48 sites E-mail: TreasureIsleRV@gmail.com (Exit 48, east side of Hwy. 67/167) Bartee Meadow RV Parking & Camping ........... 1 cabin, 4 sites Young’s Lakeshore RV Resort.......... 44 sites 416 C.W. Road, (U.S. 70 East, 4 miles east of Magic Springs/ (U.S. 70/270, Martin Luther King Express­­way, Judsonia, AR 72081 Phone: 501-729-5107 Crystal Falls) McLeod Exit 3, on Lake Hamilton) 3222 E. Grand, Hot Springs, AR 71901 1601 Lakeshore Dr., LAKEVIEW Phone: 501-262-9100 Hot Springs, AR 71913 Copper John’s Website: www.barteemeadow.com Phone: 501-767-7946; 800-470-7875 Resort............. 10 camper cabins; 25 sites Email: barteemeadow@yahoo.com Website: www.rvhotsprings.com

Camp Lake Hamilton..................... 40 sites (Hwy. 7 S)

6191 Central Ave., Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-525-8204 E-mail: 72LHBC@cablelynx.com

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(0.4 mile  past Bull Shoals S.P. on River Rd.)

469 River Road, Hwy. 23 Camper Park & Store ........10 sites Lakeview, AR 72642 Phone: 870-431-4454 37928 Hwy. 23 North, Website: www.copperjohnsresort.com Huntsville, AR 72740 E-mail: libby@copperjohnsresort.com Phone: 479-559-2179 HUNTSVILLE

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PAGE 53 MENA

Chicot County Park........................98 Sites Iron Mountain RV & Camping (Across Lake Chicot from Lake Village) .....................100 RV sites; 200 campsites 819 Lake Hall Road, Lake Village, AR 71653 106 Iron Mouintain Lane, Mena, AR 71953 Phone: 870-265-3500 Phone: 870-389-6196 Pecan Grove RV Park................... 119 sites Website: www.cmausa.org/iron-mountain/ E-mail: Chris@cmausa.org (3 miles south of U.S. 82 & 65 Jct.) 3768 Hwy. 65/82, Lake Village, AR 71653 Ouachita Renegade Ranch............... 5 sites Phone: 870-265-3005 3680 Hwy. 88 E, Mena, AR 71953 Website: www.pecangrove.net Phone: 479-394-3848; 479-216-0155 E-mail: Info@PecanGrove.net Website: www.ouachitarenegaderanch.com Email: renegaderanch@gmail.com LITTLE ROCK KOA-North Little Rock: See North Little Rock Rich Mountain Country Store Cafe & RV Park............................. 10 sites LOCKESBURG

Pell’s RV Park............ 6 pull-thrus, 18 sites (U.S. 71 S City Limits – West Spruce)

(14 miles west of Mena, 2 miles from Queen Wilhelmina State Park, jct. of U.S. 59/270 & Hwy. 272)

1933 U.S. 270, Mena, AR 71953 Phone: 479-394-5300 E-mail: rmcountrystore@aol.com MAGNOLIA Shadow Mountain Lake Columbia Campground.......... 20 sites RV Park & Cabins.......................... 65 sites P.O. Box 116, Lockesburg, AR 71846 Phone: 870-289-3151

(South side of Lake Columbia; take Hwy. 344 to County Road 53)

1260 CR 53, Waldo, AR 71770 P.O. Box 821, Magnolia, AR 71753 Phone: 870-234-0857

(5 miles south of Mena on U.S. 71 & Hwy. 59)

Two Spirits Ltd. Campground Cabins and Canoes .............8 camp shelters w/AC, 8 tent sites (5 miles west of Mt. Ida on Hwy. 270 W; right on Hwy 298; .25 mi., then right on Puckett Bend Rd., follow power lines untill you see green canoes and white arrows)

1167 Pucket Bend Road Mount Ida, AR 71957 Phone: 870-867-5028; 800-841-3632 Website: www.twospiritsltd.com E-mail: fsklein@windstream.net MOUNTAIN HOME

Rim Shoals Resort 153 Rim Shoals Camp Mountain Home, AR 72653 Phone: 870-435-6144 Website: www.rimshoals.com Email: info@rimshoals.com White Buffalo Resort..................... 34 sites (14 miles southwest of Mt. Home on Hwy. 126 S at Buffalo City)

418 White Buffalo Tr. Mountain Home, AR 72653-7719 Phone: 870-425-8555 Website: www.whitebuffaloresort.com E-mail: Wbuffalo@mtnhome.com

3708 U.S. 71 S, Mena, AR 71953 Phone: 479-394-6099 Website: www.shadowmountaincamp ground.com Wilderness Point Camping Resort: See MAMMOTH SPRING E-mail: ronanddarline@localnet.com Henderson Mammoth Spring MOUNTAIN VIEW RV Park ...........................9 sites, 4 cabins Wolf Pen ATV Campground, Inc...... 27 sites 559 Polk 61, Mena, AR 71953 (U.S. 63 S on the Spring River) Blue Sky RV Park ......................... 29 sites Phone: 479-394-0404 P.O. Box 372, Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 (3 miles north of Mtn. View Website: www.wolfpenatv.com Phone: 870-625-7393 on Hwy. 5, 9, & 14) E-mail: wolfpenresv@yahoo.com 20843 Hwy. 5, Mountain View, AR 72560 Many Islands Camp & MORRILTON Phone: 870-269-8132 Canoe Rental.............................. 150 sites 2988 Many Islands Rd. Morrilton RV Park.......................... 60 sites Website: blueskyrvpark.net E-mail: BlueskyRVPark@yahoo.com Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 (Exit 107 off I-40) Phone: 870-856-3451 30 Kamper Ln., Morrilton, AR 72110 Court Square Website: www.manyislands.com Phone: 501-354-8262; Fax: 501-354-8262 RV Park ................ 55 RV, full-service sites Website: www.morriltonrvpark.com 320 Oak Ave., Riverside Resort, Mountain View, AR 72560 Camp & Canoe Rental................ 186 sites, E-mail: jj@morriltonrvpark.com Phone: 870-214-1781 6 full cabins, 10 camper cabins The Lutheran Camp on (11.2 miles north of Hardy, off Hwy. 63) Petit Jean Mountain...................... 15 sites Website: www.courtsquarervpark.com Email: info@courtsquarervpark.com P.O. Box 494, Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 110 Montgomery Trace Phone: 870-625-7501 Morrilton, AR 72110 Holiday Mountain Resort............. 113 sites Website: www.ArkansasCanoe.com Phone: 501-727-5656; Fax: 501-727-5656 (5 miles north of Mtn. View on Hwy. 14) Website: www.lutherancamp.org 473 Swinging Bridge Rd. Southfork Resort...........11 cabins, 25 sites E-mail: director@lutherancamp.org Mountain View, AR 72560 (12 miles south of Mammoth Spring. and Phone: 800-395-7108; 870-585-2231 9 miles north of Ash Flat) MOUNT IDA Website: www.holidaymtnresort.com 7230 Hwy. 289 N Little Fir Landing.......................25 RV sites E-mail: holidaymountain@mvtel.net Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 3304 Hwy. 188 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957 Phone: 870-895-2803 Hooks RV & Trout Resort................ 19 sites Phone: 870-867-3335; 870-867-7079 Website: www.southforkresort.com (NW corner of Jct. 5, 9 & 14; 5 miles north E-mail: southforkresort@southforkresort.com Website: www.littlefirlanding.com/ of Mtn. View at Allison) E-mail: chris@littlefirlanding.com 14300 Hwy. 14 W/P.O. Box 2514, MARION Marilyn’s RV Park & Antiques......... 17 sites Mountain View, AR 72560 Memphis KOA............................. 100 sites (6 miles east of Mount Ida and 26 miles Phone: 870-585-2400; 870-585-2399 (7 miles north of West Memphis on I-55, west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270) Website: www.arkansastrout.com exit 14) 3551 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957 E-mail: kim@arkansastrout.com 7037 I-55, Marion, AR 72364 Phone: 870-867-0168 Jack’s Fishing Resort..................... 15 sites Phone: 870-739-4801; 800-562-3240 Website: www.mtidarvpark.com (6.5 miles north of Mtn. View on Hwy. 5 N) Website: www.memphiskoa.com E-mail: marilyns@ipa.net P.O. Box 2120, Mountain View, AR 72560 E-mail: info@memphiskoa.com Phone: 870-585-2211 Website: www.jacksresort.com NOTE: Information shown in this list of campsites was furnished by the respective E-mail: jacksfishingresort@yahoo.com busi­­­nesses and does not represent an endorsement by the State of Arkansas.

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Private/Municipal Campgrounds

Mountain View RV Park & Guesthouse Motel......................... 50 sites 711 N. Bayou Dr., Mountain View, AR 72560 Phone: 870-269-3758 Website: www.mountainview-rvpark.com E-mail: mvrvp@yahoo.com Ozark RV Park .............. 5 cabins, 76 sites (Adjacent to Ozark Folk Center)

Downtown Riverside RV Park .......61 RV sites (Exit 141B off I-30)

250 Locust North Little Rock, AR 72114 Phone: 501-340-5312 Website: www.northlittlerockriverside rvpark.com KOA-North Little Rock.................. 100 sites

(I-40 Crystal Hill Exit 148, 1 mile south­­west; 1022 Park Ave., Mountain View, AR 72560 then right on Kampground Way—or— Phone: 870-269-2542; 866-692-7578 I-430 Maumelle Exit 12, east 0.5 mile; Website: www.ozarkrvpark.com then left on Kampground Way.) Sylamore Creek Camp................... 40 sites 7820 Kampground Way (5 miles north of Mtn. View on Hwy. 14 on North Little Rock, AR 72118 Sylamore Creek) Phone: 501-758-4598; 800-562-4598 214 Sylamore Creek Rd. Website: www.nlrkoa.com Mountain View, AR 72560 E-mail: NLRKOA@AOL.com Phone: 870-585-2326; 877-475-4223 Trails End RV Park......................... 60 sites Website: www.sylamorecreek.com (Morgan/Maumelle I-40 Exit 142; Hwy. E-mail: scc@mvtel.net 365 N; go 1/2 city block, then right on Whitewater RV Park...................... 60 sites Stricklin Cove) (.5 mile south of the Ozark Folk Center 14223 Stricklin Cove next to City Park; 2 blocks north of down- North Little Rock, AR 72118 town court square) Phone: 501-851-4594 108 E. Webb St., P.O. Box 446, Email: trailsendrvpark@yahoo.com Mountain View, AR 72560 OAKLAND Phone: 870-269-8047 Website: www.whitewaterrvpark.com Oakland Inn, Marina & Ozark Isle (Camp & Marina).......................... 51 sites MURFREESBORO 9924 Oakland Road, Oakland, AR 72661 Miner’s Camping & Rock Shop....... 33 sites Phone: 870-431-5381 (2 miles south of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 301) Website: www.oaklandmarina.net 2235 Hwy 301 S., Murfreesboro, AR 71958 Email: info@oaklandmarina.net Phone: 870-285-2722 OZARK E-mail: Jgoodin776@aol.com Website: www.minerscamping.com Byrd’s Adventure Center.............. 100 sites Murfreesboro RV Park............. ......10 sites (13 miles north of Ozark on Hwy. 23, then 6 (1 mile north of Crater of Diamonds S.P.)

1410 South Washington Ave. Murfreesboro, AR 71958 Phone: 870-925-0591 Website: www.murfreesbororvpark.com E-Mail: murfreesbororvpark@yahoo.com NEW BLAINE

Lonesome “D” Horse Camp & RV Park .......................... 30 sites 776 Cravens Lane, New Blaine, AR 72851 Phone: 479-938-2899 Website: www.lonesomed.com NORFORK

miles east on Hwy. 215)

7037 Cass Oark Rd., Ozark, AR 72949 Phone: 479-667-4066 Website: www.byrdsadventurecenter.com E-Mail: byrdsadvcenter@live.com Mulberry Mountain Lodge ............. 48 sites (16 miles north of I-40 Exit 35 on Hwy 23 N)

4117 Mulberry Mtn. Loop, Ozark, AR 72949 Phone: 479-667-1919; 866-667-1919 Website: www.mulberrymountainlodge.com E-mail: mulberrymountain@aol.com Turner Bend Inc............................. 14 sites

(11.5 miles north of I-40 on Hwy. 23 N) Woodsman’s Sports Shop & Fishing Service, Inc........... 8 sites, RV only 20034 N. Hwy 23, Ozark, AR 72949 59 Fisherman St., Norfork, AR 72658-8938 Phone: 479-667-3641; 479-209-3782 Phone: 870-499-7454 Website: www.turnerbend.com NORTH LITTLE ROCK E-mail: turnerbend@centurylink.net Burns Park Campground................38 Sites (Off I-40 Exit 150)

PARIS

PENCIL BLUFF

Ouachita River Haven Resort..........14 sites; 5 RV (Between Pencil Bluff & Sims off Hwy. 88. Turn on Maddox Bend Rd. near Fiddler Cr.)

122 Ouachita River Haven Road Pencil Bluff, AR 71965 Phone: 870-326-4941; 877-314-2836 Website: www.ouachitahaven.com E-mail: info@ouachitahaven.com Turtle Island RV Park ....... 10 sites, RV only 96 Hwy. 88 West P.O. Box 9, Pencil Bluff, AR 71965 Phone: 870-326-4970; 870-326-5584 Fax: 870-326-4970 PERRYVILLE

Harris Brake Lakeside Resort............38 RV, 8 motel, 4 cabin sites (2 miles southeast of Perryville from Hwy. 9/10 on Hwy. 300)

18 Coffee Creek Landing Perryville, AR 72126 Phone: 501-889-2745 Website: www.harrisbrakelakeresort.com E-mail: hblresort@gmail.com PONCA

Lost Valley Canoe & Lodging........... 7 sites (25 miles southwest of Harrison on Hwy. 43 S)

Hwy. 43 Box 10, Ponca, AR 72670 Phone: 870-861-5522 Website: www.lostvalleycanoe.com E-mail: Lostvalleycanoe@gmail.com PROTEM

Blue Waters Resort & RV Park ....... 24 sites (Annual Rental Only—3.5 miles south of AR/MO border on Bull Shoals Lake)

4962 McBride Road, Protem, MO 65733 Phone: 417-785-4375, 877-394-7051 Website: www.bluewatersresort.net Email: bluewatersresort@gmail.com RAVENDEN

Rone Valley Park............ ......15 RV, 50 tent 54 U.S. 63, Ravenden, AR 72459 Phone: 870-351-1262; 870-869-2716 E-mail: ronesalvage@yahoo.com ROGERS

Beaver Lake Hide A Way Campground & RV Park............... 140 sites (13 miles east of Rogers, Rocky Branch Area)

8369 Campground Circle, Rogers, AR 72756 Phone: 479-925-1333; 800-209-0081 Website: www.beaverlakehideaway.com E-mail: camp@beaverlakehideaway.com

4101 Arlene Laman Dr. Twin Pines RV Park ........... 8 sites; RV only North Little Rock, AR 72118 (2 miles south of Cove Lake on Hwy. 309 S.; 5 Phone: 501-771-0702 miles north of Mt. Magazine State Park) Website: www.northlittlerock.org 361 Community Center Rd., Crystal Hill RV Park....................... 27 sites Paris, AR 72855 Phone: 479-963- 6048 (Exit 148 off I-40 north to Lumsden Rd.) 6601 Lumsden Road PEA RIDGE North Little Rock, AR 72118 Rogers/Pea Ridge Garden RV: See Rogers Phone: 501-771-4496

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VILONIA Website: www.pilgrimsrestrvpark.com Monte Ne Family Campground & Cabins..............80 RV sites Whisler Park ................... 65 sites, RV only Lester Flatt Memorial RV Park

(Exit 83, New Hope Rd. off I-540, Hwy. 94 East)

15039 E Hwy 94, Rogers, AR 72758 Phone: 479-925-1265 Website: www.monteneatbeaverlake.com E-mail: campgroundreservations@yahoo.com Rogers/Pea Ridge Garden RV......... 50 sites (U.S. 62, east of Rogers)

15170 Hwy. 62E, Garfield, AR 72732 Phone: 479-451-8566 Website: http://gardenrv.com

(.5 mile north of U.S. 412 E on Hwy. 265)

1101 S. Old Missouri Rd. Springdale, AR 72764 Phone: 479-751-9081

STAMPS

(Lester Flatt Dr. off Hwy. 107.)

50 Lester Flatt Drive, Vilonia, AR 72173 Phone: 501-835-2451; 501-796-2030 WALDRON

Big Pine RV Park .......................... 16 sites

Lafayette Motel ................................. 6 RV (U.S. 71 B) 2137 North Main, 1109 E. Entigo, Waldron, AR 72958 Stamps, AR 71860 Phone: 479-637-1000; 479-637-6785 Phone: 870-533-4555 E-mail: bjm77@suddenlink.net ST. CHARLES

WALNUT RIDGE

Campers Refuge .......................... 20 sites RUSSELLVILLE 2-J RV Campground...................... 23 sites 2910 Hwy. 1, St., (Approximately 6 miles north on U.S. 67 Ivys Cove RV Retreat..................... 23 sites Charles, AR 72140 from jct. of U.S. 63) (Exit 84 from I-40 in Russellville; Hwy. 331E, Phone: 870-282-3765 3591 U.S. 67 N, 0.12 mile past Flying J) Website: www.campersrefuge.com Walnut Ridge, AR 72746 321 Bradley Cove Road E-mail: craigeastham@yahoo.com Phone: 870-886-5810 Russellville, AR 72802 ST. JOE Phone: 479-280-1662 WEST MEMPHIS Website: www.ivyscove.com Buffalo Camping & Canoeing/Gilbert Shell-Lake Campground: See Heth E-mail: dmi@ivyscove.com General Store: See Gilbert Tom Sawyer’s Mississippi Mission RV Park............................ 40 sites STORY River RV Park.............................. 100 sites (I-40 at Exit 78, U.S. 64) Highway 27 Fishing (I-40 Exit 280 or I-55 Exit 4; South on Martin 229 Mission Dr., Russellville, AR 72802 Village...........................6 cabins, 35 sites Luther King Dr. to sign) Phone: 479-967-3576; 479-858-1104 (Lake Ouachita, 8 miles north of Mt. Ida 1286 S. 8th St., Website: www.missionrvparkruss.com on Hwy. 27) West Memphis, AR 72301 E-mail: missionrv@centurytel.net 214 Fishing Village Road Phone: 870-735-9770 Story, AR 71970-8111 SHERIDAN E-mail: info@tomsawyersrvpark.com Phone: 870-867-2211 Southland Village.......................... 24 sites Email: highway27fv@yahoo.com WIEDERKEHR VILLAGE (1.5 miles from downtown Sheridan on Hwy. 167 S)

Muddy Creek Campground ....................... 9 RV with W/S 148 Muddy Creek, Story, AR 71970 Phone: 501-209-0661; Fax: 501-767-4975 Website: www.facebook.com/ SHIRLEY muddycreekcampground Golden Pond RV Park..................... 50 sites Email: muddycreekcampground (Hwy. 16 & 330) @yahoo.com 241 Hwy. 330 S., Shirley, AR 72153 TEXARKANA Phone: 501-723-8212; 866-723-1723 Four States Fairground SILOAM SPRINGS ........................... 400 sites, 80 w/RV hookups Ark. 59 Canoeing & Rafting........... 30 sites (Loop 245 & East 50th St.) (Located 4.5 miles off U.S. 412) 3700 E. 50th St., Texarkana, AR 71854 20466 S. Hwy 59, Phone: 870-773-2941 Siloam Springs, AR 72761 Website: www.fourstatesfair.com Phone: 479-524-2223 Sterling RV Park ........................... 50 sites Greentree RV Park......................... 37 sites 915 East Broad St., Texarkana, AR 71854 (on U.S. 412 W next to Super 8 Motel) Phone: 870-779-1732 1800 U.S. 412 W. Sunrise RV Park.......................... 111 sites Siloam Springs, AR 72761 (I-30 Mandeville Exit 7) Phone: 479-524-8898 8225 Camper Lane, Texarkana, AR 71854 SPRINGDALE Phone: 870-772-0751 Motor Inn RV Park......................... 36 sites E-mail: sunriservpark@hotmail.com 84 Village Lane, Sheridan, AR 72150 Phone: 870-942-5354; 870-917-7713

(U.S. 71B N)

3348 N. Thompson, Springdale, AR 72764 Phone: 479-751-1562 Website: www.motorInnRVpark.com Pilgrim’s Rest RV Park ..............39 RV, tent camping sites 21225 Hickory Flatt Rd., Springdale, AR 72764 Phone: 479-789-7152

VAN BUREN

Oaks Corner Campground............. 12 sites (2 miles west of Alma on U.S. 64-71)

6918 Alma Hwy., Van Buren, AR 72956 Phone: 479-632-2524 Overland RV Park..................... .....50 sites 1716-1/2 Fayetteville Hwy. Van Buren, AR 72956 Phone: 479-471-5474

Wiederkehr Wine Cellars, Inc........ 20 sites (Exit 41 off I-40 then 4.5 miles south on Hwy. 186)

3324 Swiss Family Drive Wiederkehr Village, AR 72821 Phone: 479-468-3611; 800-622-9463 Website: www.wiederkehrwines.com Email: info@wiederkehrwines.com WINSLOW

Winn Creek RV Retreat: See Fayetteville

Silver Leaf Campark......... 15 sites, RV only (16 miles south of Fayetteville on U.S. 71)

18761 U.S. 71 S, Winslow, AR 72959 Phone: 479-634-5861

“Y” CITY

“Y” City Mountain Inn & Campground................................. 15 sites (10 mi. south of Waldron on U.S. 71)

18060 Hwy. 71 S., Boles, AR 72926

YELLVILLE

Sherwood Forest RV Park & Campground .......22 RV sites; 14 Tent sites (Hwy. 14 E, 5 miles south of Yellviille. —Closed Dec. 31-Mar. 1)

216 MC 5042, Yellville, AR 72687 Phone: 870-449-3452 E-Mail: Sherwood@yellville.net Website: www.arksherwoodforestRV Park.com

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Home Valley Bluff, Ozark National Forest

Index Link for Outdoors Update—START

There’s History in These Hills

Arkansas’s abundant natural resources first enticed travelers in the 19th century. In fact, in 1987, upon the proclamation of then Governor Bill Clinton, Arkansas became known as “The Natural State.” The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laid the foundation for modern recreational development in Arkansas in the 1930s. Many federal, state, county, and city parks were built by participants in this program. Hiking trails, log and stone structures and bridges and roads built by the CCC still stand as a testament to the legacy of excellent craftsmanship shown by these hard-working people. Perhaps some of the finest examples may be seen at Devil’s Den, Lake Catherine, Mount Nebo, Petit Jean and Crowley’s Ridge state parks, the national forests, and at the Buffalo National River. Running through the heart of the Ozarks, the Buffalo River was one of the major undammed streams in Arkansas. A victory for conservationists, in 1972 Congress made the Buffalo America’s first national river. Arkansas has had many other successful environmental projects as well—aimed at protecting examples of the state’s early day environments, protecting endangered plant and animal species and preserving the cultural, historical and natural heritage of Arkansas.

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Arkansas Weather Will Make Your Stay!

averages are to be used for general planning purposes only. Plan ahead and be reasonably prepared. Contact the National Weather Bureau, (501) 834-0308, or a local airport for up-to-date forecasts before you start your trip.

There is an old saying in Arkansas: “If you don’t like the weather, just stick around, for it will change.” Most of the time, this statement is very accurate. Arkansas experiences four distinct seasons and each one can be subject to dramatic change. As is true anywhere, it is very difficult to predict the weather. Arkansas’s climate is temperate most of the year, especially in spring and fall; however, hot and humid days are typical of late summer. Winter temperatures occasionally dip into the teens or below, although such outbreaks usually last for short periods. The following information is designed to give outdoor enthusiasts a basis for planning their activities to complement the potential weather conditions. These month-by-month

JANUARY

• maximum temperature 48.9° • minimum temperature 30.1° • total precipitation 3.72 inches • total snowfall 2.3 inches • north/northeasterly winds

Cedar Falls, Petit Jean State Park

January temperatures often fall below the average minimum and occasionally drop to the 0° range. January is usually the heaviest snow­fall month. By most standards, January road conditions are good; however, during early morning and late evening hours, ice patches are common. This is particularly true in rural areas due to low traffic volumes. Ice storms and freezing rain occur most frequently during the month of January.

FEBRUARY

• maximum temperature 54.2° • minimum temperature 33.6° • total precipitation 3.42 inches • total snowfall 1.7 inches • northwesterly winds

February is similar to January with occasional variations in low temperatures and icy road conditions. These winter months are popular with a variety of hardy outdoor enthusiasts due, in part, to the greater solitude. Climate Data Source: Garwood, Alfred N.; Weather America (Little Rock Adams Field Data); Toucan Valley Publications, Inc., Milpitas, CA; 1996

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MARCH

• maximum temperature 63.8° • minimum temperature 42.4° • total precipitation 4.69 inches • total snowfall .7 inches • west/southwesterly winds

March gradually signals the beginnings of spring; however, it is common to see one last snowfall. During the latter part of the month, leaves and flower buds begin opening to welcome the warmer temperatures.

A PRIL

• maximum temperature 73.4° • minimum temperature 50.8° • total precipitation 5.63 inches • southwesterly winds

April is considered to be the first true spring month because of more consistent warmer temperatures. April also has the highest average rainfall. This early spring period is the time when the cabin fever blues of winter are washed away by spring showers and sunshine.

MAY

• maximum temperature 80.8° • minimum temperature 59.1° • total precipitation 5.35 inches • northwesterly winds

May is one of the most popular months in Arkansas for outdoor activities. The weather is moderate, early wildflowers are abundant, and trees are beginning to show plenty of new growth. Rivers, streams, and waterfalls swell with heavy flows from spring rains and provide many photo opportunities.

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Outdoors Update

J UNE

• maximum temperature 89.2° • minimum temperature 67.7° • total precipitation 3.76 inches • southwesterly winds

June is the month when the heat and humidity of the summer begin to be noticeable. Temperatures still remain fairly moderate and participation in outdoor activities remains high. The early part of the month is usually quite pleasant.

J ULY

• maximum temperature 92.4° • minimum temperature 71.6° • total precipitation 3.57 inches • southwesterly winds

The old saying “Hot as a Fourth of July firecracker” applies particularly toward the end of the month. Temperatures can reach in the triple-digit range for short periods. Late July through early September generally signals a marked decrease in strenuous outdoor activities. This is a time when water sports are certainly the most popular activities.

A UGUST

• maximum temperature 91.2° • minimum temperature 69.9° • total precipitation 3.45 inches • southerly winds

August is generally known to be the “pinnacle” of summer heat and humidity. Temperatures frequently reach the triple-digit range and humidity levels can become quite high. This creates very oppressive conditions for strenuous activities.

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S EPTEMBER

the state. As the month progresses, temperatures can frequently change to harsh cold.

• maximum temperature 84.5° • minimum temperature 63.4° • total precipitation 3.95 inches • south/southeasterly winds

O CTOBER

• maximum temperature 74.5° • minimum temperature 51.1° • total precipitation 4.11 inches • north/northeasterly winds

October truly signals the beginning of autumn. Fall colors begin to appear in the northern sections of the state by the second week in October and continue slowly southward. Mid to late October generally provides peak fall color in the northern portions of Arkansas. October and November are two of the most popular months for outdoor enthusiasts due to the beautiful fall colors and pleasant temperatures.

NOVEMBER

• maximum temperature 62.3° • minimum temperature 41.6° • total precipitation 5.41 inches • total snowfall .3 inches • northwesterly winds

Frost starts to become common during this month. The first of November is generally peak fall color in the central to southern parts of

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• maximum temperature 52.9° • minimum temperature 34.0° • total precipitation 4.89 inches • total snowfall .1 inches • northwesterly winds

December signals the beginning of winter temperatures with heavy frosts becoming quite common. This is the preferred winter month for those who like to experience the colder temperatures.

Eagle, Lake Ouachita

September is the slow transition from summer heat to the pleasant temperatures of autumn. During the first half of the month, summer usually tends to drag on; however, pleasant conditions usually prevail by the last week of the month.

D ECEMBER

Preserve Our Plant And Animal Heritage

Arkansas’s plethora of flora and fauna ranges from upland and bottomland hardwood and pine forests to an abundance of wildflowers and medicinal plants. A diversity of game and non-game species—black bear, whitetail deer, bald eagles, migratory waterfowl and hundreds of species of songbirds, plants and fish­—­are found statewide. Bring your camera to capture moments so they become memories. Please do not disturb plants, rocks or animals. Remember: “Take only pictures and leave only footprints.”

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Outdoors Update

Trail Guides Can Show You The Way

There are a number of different information sources for maps and trail guides in Arkansas. The Ozark Interpretive Association is a non-profit organization based in Mountain View, Arkansas. It offers information from many sources including Forest Service trail maps, Buffalo National River trail maps, private trail guides, specific wilderness area maps, and a variety of naturalist field guides, identification guides, etc. To order a free publications catalog, contact the Ozark Interpretive Association, 1001 East Main St., Mountain View, AR 72560; 870-757-2211; 888-757-2246; Website: www.Oiagift.com; E-mail: Oiagift@gmail.com. Tim Ernst is a noted hiker, photographer, volunteer, and trail resource. Tim authors a number of excellent Arkansas hiking guides which provide an information supplement to some trails and a sole source of information for other trails. These guides provide a detailed description of the trails along with accurate maps and mileages. To order any of these books, or for a complete list of Tim’s books, contact Tim Ernst, HC 33, Box 50-A, Pettigrew, AR 72752-9501; 800-838-HIKE; or visit his websites at www.timernst. com or www.hikearkansas.com. Trails Illustrated, Inc. is a private company based in Evergreen, Colorado. They produce high quality trail maps generally for national parks and other popular hiking destinations. Included are two maps which cover the Buffalo National River: the west half and the east half. The maps may be ordered online at www.natgeomaps.com. For hiking in areas without trails, or for detailed topographic information United States Geological Survey quadrangle maps may be purchased from: Arkansas Geological Commission, 3815 West Roosevelt Road, Little Rock, AR 72204; 501-2961877; www.geology.ar.gov/ catalog/mapsdata.htm. Local bookstores, outdoor outfitters and sporting goods stores carry a variety of books and guides about the Arkansas outdoors. Local outfitters can recommend hiking clubs in your area as well.

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

Advice To The Wary While in The Wild

• BE PREPARED—KNOW YOUR MAPS: Maps can be important, particularly if you are not familiar with the area you plan to hike or explore. Obtain and study trail and road maps and guides before you go hiking, backpacking, or back country driving. Specific maps, brochures and trail guides, along with addresses, are listed in this booklet so that you can receive the most detailed information in order to prepare ahead of time. • PURIFY ALL DRINKING WATER: Do not drink untreated water! Water in Arkansas’s springs, streams, and lakes is often clear and inviting but should not be considered safe to drink until properly treated. Regardless of how clean it appears, a stream or lake can be infested with parasites or bacteria that may make you quite sick. The last thing you need is to become ill in a remote location or on your vacation. Treat all water with water purification

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tablets as instructed on the label, boil for approximately 6-10 minutes, or use water purification filters which are specifically labeled “effective against Giardia.” • HUNTERS AND OTHERS: Autumn is a popular time for hiking, backpacking and floating. However, this is also the beginning of Arkansas’s hunting seasons. With a little pre­pa­ration, hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts can enjoy nature simultaneously. In fact, both groups actually benefit from each other. The sale of hunting licenses has been the state’s primary source of funds for managing its wildlife resources and, in turn, hunters benefit from trails and roads that provide backcountry access. During Arkan­sas’s turkey and deer seasons, you must wear blaze orange clothing to increase your visibility. Those who prefer to avoid contact with hunters have the option of recreating in Arkansas’s state parks, Corps of Engineers recreation areas, or national parks where hunting is prohibited. Others may wish to schedule their trips around the state’s hunting seasons to avoid any potential conflicts. These dates are set each year in February by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. For a list of hunting season dates, contact: Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, #2 Natural Resources Drive, Little Rock, AR 72205; Phone 501-223-6300, or check their website: www.agfc.com.

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• WEAR THE CORRECT CLOTHING: Dress properly for your trip. During the winter, dress in multiple layers so you can adjust as necessary. For recommendations, see the clothing checklist in the backpacking section of this guide. Or—if you plan to sail on a zip line or swing from a rope—observe the important mandates required by the respective site managements as outlined in the “Aerial Adventures” listings. When hiking, shoes may be the most important item to check before your trip. Do not wear new ones, since they can rub your feet and form blisters. Break in new shoes or boots completely before wearing them for an extended hiking trip. Make sure they fit well, are comfortable, and provide support and protection. In warmer months, do not underestimate the need for clothes. They are needed to protect you from the sun and to warm you after it sets. • THINGS THAT GET UNDER YOUR SKIN: Ticks, chiggers and mosquitos are widespread throughout Arkansas. During spring, summer and fall the use of a good insect repellent is recommended. Although related diseases are rare, there have been cases of West Nile Virus, Lyme’s Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever reported in Arkansas. These insects can become quite annoying and very uncomfortable. Check your body, head, and hair often for ticks after being in wooded or grassy areas. Immediate-

Pub4_AAG1415_Update-d3.indd 62

Outdoors Update

ly remove any you find. Firmly grip the tick and it will usually release its hold at once. If it does not, gently grasp it with tweezers or forceps and pull. Make sure that all parts are removed. • THINGS THAT RUB YOU THE WRONG WAY: Poison ivy is quite common and is found in abundance in wooded areas. It can take the form of a spreading groundcover or a climbing vine that attaches itself to trees and rocks. Heed the rule “Leaves of three—let it be.” Learn to recognize the three shiny leaves and vines with reddish, hairlike rootlets that characterize this plant. Poison ivy is con­tracted by absorbing the oily substance called urishiol which is found year-round on its vines, stems and leaves. It can also be spread via shoes, clothing, pet hair, etc. If these items are subsequently handled, the oil may irritate the contacted section of the body. If poison ivy comes in contact with your skin or clothes, wash with soap and cold water as soon as possible. If you know you are highly allergic, consult your pharmacist before making an outdoor trip. Ivy block medications are available to provide protection. • WATCH YOUR STEP: Only a few poisonous snakes are found in Arkansas. Snakebite incidents are quite rare and are most often prevented by being alert. Avoid stepping where you cannot see. Do not put your hands inside holes in trees, logs or rocks. Do not wander

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

about camp in the dark without a flashlight. Learn the difference between poisonous and non-poisonous snakes. Common poisonous snakes in Arkansas are the copperhead, rattlesnake and water moccasin. The majority of snakes are non-poisonous; nevertheless, if in doubt, assume the snake is poisonous and avoid it. In case of a bite, keep the victim quiet, seek medical help quickly and above all, remain calm! Most severe snakebites are the result of mishandling the injury rather than from the venom itself. A snake bite kit can be an asset if you encouner a venomous snake. Prepare for the unexpected by consulting your physician in advance about emergency procedures. • DON’T GET TOO CLOSE TO THE EDGE: To preserve scenic beauty and ecology, many times fences and warning signs have not been installed along trails and overlooks. Caution and close supervision of children are required in these areas. • ALWAYS PRACTICE ACCIDENT PREVENTION: It is difficult and time consuming to rescue injured individuals in remote areas. Please use common sense and be especially cautious in secluded areas. Serious and fatal injuries can occur. If an accident happens, remain calm. Make the victim comfortable and evaluate your options. Go for help as quickly as possible. Rapid treatment by qualified medical personnel increases the chances for a quick and

PAGE 63

complete recovery. Outdoor adventurers who participate in strenuous activities should visit their physician at least once a year for a thorough physical examination. NOTE: More activity-oriented safety tips can be found in specific sections of this guide. Included are precautions for float streams; regulations for canoes, kayaks and inner tubes; backpacking preparations; multi-use trail rules; and back country drive guidelines. Refer to the Table of Contents or Index pages to find more information.

Keep Arkansas Beautiful!

Litter spoils everyone’s outdoor experience! Please do not contribute to the litter problem—help be a solution to it. Remember: if you pack it in, pack it out. You can also help by keeping an extra bag in your pack to carry out any trash left by others less considerate.

Volunteers Are Vital

The cost of building and main­ taining trails is increasing rapidly. With­out support, trail providers may have to close existing trails and defer plans to construct new ones. You can help by volunteering a little of your time and effort. For more information on how you can help, contact: Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, Volunteer Coordinator, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201; 501-682-1191.

Index Link for Outdoors Update—END Pub4_AAG1415_Update-d3.indd 63

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11

22

33

44

Pea Ridge Nat’l Nat’l Mil. Pk. Pea Ridge Mil. Pk.

Bella Vista Bella Vista Village ▲▲ Village 71 71

23 23

65 65

412412

Kin

er

er

Cr Cr

C ad r on C C ad r on r k . Cr k.

167167

u

M

Gould Gould

ew om

8 8

278278

278278 Warren Warren

M oro M oro

6363

River

Hampton Hampton

SE Monticello Monticello

425425

Bo d c au Bo d c au

iv e

iv e

r

r

▲▲

15 15 167167 7 7

82 82

LAKELAKE JACKJACK LEE LEE

22

33

44

55

66

INDEX LINK FOR Pub4_AAG1415_Update-d3.indd 64

9/15/14 5:38 PM

Derm D

La

82 82

Hamburg Hamburg

425425

Junction CityCity Junction

11

DE SW

u

u

Bradley Bradley

79 79

B

Bayou

● ● Dumas Dum

CaneCane ar ar CreekCreek S.P. S.P. t h ol t h o

Battleground Battleground Mon.Mon. ●Hist. ●Hist.

167167

7 7

u

B

79 79

s

s

Fordyce Fordyce

9 9

Ba y

6363

Rison Rison StarStar Marks' MillsMills CityCity Marks'

Smackover Smackover O O ●Logoly ●Logoly ac ac LAKELAKE ● ● h i t ah i t a MoroMoro GEORGIA S.P. S.P. Ark. Museum GEORGIA of of Ark. Museum Bay S.P.PACIFIC ● Bay ●S.P. Magnolia Magnolia PACIFIC Natural Resources Natural Resources R R 82 82 El Dorado Arkansas● ● El Dorado SouthSouth Arkansas Crossett Crossett Arboretum Arboretum

Conway Conway Cemetery Cemetery LAKELAKE ERLING ERLING S.P. S.P. ● ●

G

425425 65 65A o o

Ba y

79 79

Camden Camden

Stephens Stephens79 79

M M A r kaAnr kan eto sa sa

PinePine Bluff Bluff

Hist.Hist. Mon.Mon.

River

Stamps Stamps

HallHall

Sheridan Sheridan

● ●

Poison Poison Spring Spring WhiteWhite Oak Oak Battleground Battleground LakeLake S.P.● S.P.● Hist. Hist. Mon.Mon. WHITE OAKOAK L. L. WHITE ● ●

371371

530530 White White

e lin Sa e lin

Cre e k Cre e k

270270

St

15 15 79 79

Sa

R iv e r

J J

er

29 29

R iv e r

49 49

er

278278

Lewisville Lewisville

71 71

Prescott Prescott24 24

Hope Hope

er

er

82 82

hi t a ac O u hi t a ac

Ri v

Ri v

▲▲

Texarkana Texarkana

Ou

▲▲

11 1

Bayo u

d

30 30

Haze H Carlisle Carlisle

Lonoke Lonoke

165165

8 8

Gurdon Gurdon 67 67 7 7 Riv Riv

S.P.

67 67

7 7

30 30

CraterCrater of Diamonds S.P. S.P. of Diamonds MissMoiusrsi ouri

Millwood Millwood S.P. S.P.

Jacksonville Jacksonville Sherwood Sherwood

Bayo u

Ca

tle

Ashdown Ashdown ● ●

5 5

▲▲

Malvern Malvern

Arkadelphia Arkadelphia

S.P. S.P.

Murfreesboro Murfreesboro ● ●

Historic Historic 27 27 278278 Washington Washington

.

11

Lower Lower Beebe RiverRiv White Beebe White Museum ● Cabot Cabot S.P.Museum S.P. De

LAKELAKE CONWAY CONWAY

FerryFerry Jenkins' 67 67 9 9Jenkins' Battleground Battleground

● ●

MILLWOOD MILLWOOD LAKELAKE

Red Red

r

7

27 27 DeGray LakeLake Resort DeGray Resort

Washington Washington S.P. ● ●

Foreman Foreman

32 32

d

tl e

.

r

● ●

Nashville Nashville

A ed ed Ri Searcy Searcy

67 67 64 64167167

Pinnacle Mtn.Mtn. S.P. S.P. Pinnacle

30 30 LAKELAKE Lake● Lake● HAMILTON HAMILTON Catherine Catherine S.P. S.P.

DaisyDaisy S.P. S.P.

371371

5 5

North North Maumelle Maumelle Little Little Rock 10 10 ● ● Rock

9 9

Li

BaldBald Knob Knob

5 5 70 70

L. GREESON L. GREESON

Salin e R Salin e R

C o s s a t ot R. Cos er s a t ot R.v r tl e ve

71 71

Ri Ri

HotHot Springs Springs

do do

Dierks Dierks

De Queen De Queen Lit Lit

Ca

tle

70 70

DIERKS L. L. DIERKS

DeQUEEN DeQUEEN LAKELAKE

Woolly Woolly Hollow Hollow

L. MAUMELLE L. MAUMELLE L. WINONA L. WINONA

7 Glenwood Kirby KirbyR i veRGlenwood i v e DeGRAY LAKELAKE DeGRAY

Lit

71 71

Lit

GILHAM L. L. GILHAM

● ●

Conway Conway

Perryville Perryville100100

RiveRr iver

16 16

65 65 S.P. S.P.

7 7

270270

8 8

278278

9 9

Heber Heber Springs SpringsLi

LakeLake Village 430430 Village 440440Plantation Agriculture Museum Plantation Agriculture Museum Ouachita Ouachita L.R. L.R. ● ●Scott S.P. S.P. Little Little Scott Bryant Bryant Central Central ● ● Rock Rock LAKELAKE OUACHITA OUACHITA HighHigh ● ● H.S. H.S. 630630 School School Toltec Toltec Nat’l.Nat’l. Mounds Mounds L. L. Benton Benton Pk. Pk. England England Arch. S.P. Arch. S.P. CATHERINE CATHERINE HotHot Springs Springs

r r 88 88 71 71 ve ve O u aO c huiatac hitaR i R i Mount Mount 8 8 Mena Mena Ida Ida

Wickes Wickes

OlaOla

LAKELAKE

25 25

Morrilton Morrilton Perry Perry

10 10

NIMROD L. L. NIMROD

27 27

“Y”“Y” CityCity

● ●

Je anJe an R i R i Petit Petit JeanJean S.P. S.P.

167167

Greers Greers

FERRY FERRY Ferry Ferry

ig Pi n ey ig Crk . Pi n ey Crk . ois ois

270270

● ●

HH

16 16

Clinton ClintonGREERS GREERS

Batesv Ba

R

e e rch rch Fou Fou

Cossatot RiverRiver S.P.-S.P.Cossatot Natural Area Area Natural

GG

e e La FaLva Fa v

14 14 5 5 Fairfield Fairfield 25 25 BayBay

R

Danville Danville

Waldron Waldron

Queen Queen Wilhelmina Wilhelmina S.P. S.P.

it it P et P et

BLUEBLUE MTN.MTN. L. L.

E Even ShaS

tt le

23 23

L. HINKLE L. HINKLE

FF

Marshall Marshall

tt le

71 71

167167

Melbourne Melbourne

9 9

Mountainburg Mountainburg VanVan 27 27 40 40 Buren Buren Clarksville Clarksville Ozark Ozark Il l i nIl l i n FortFort ▲▲ AlmaAlma OZARK OZARK s A r k aAnrskaasn s aLAKE Smith Smith LAKE LAKELAKE B B 540540 DARDANELLE R Altus R Altus DARDANELLE Russellville Russellville Charleston Charleston i v e ri v e rSubiaco Ft. Smith Ft. Smith Subiaco LakeLake Nat’l.Nat’l. 22 22 Dardanelle Dardanelle Historic Historic S.P. S.P. Paris Paris ● ● 22 22 40 40 Mt. Mt. Site Site Greenwood Greenwood NeboNebo ● ● Dardanelle Dardanelle Booneville Booneville ● ● 10 10 S.P. S.P. ● ● Mt. Magazine S.P. S.P. Mt. Magazine 10 10 ver ver Mansfield Mansfield

EE

7 7

21 21

62

AshA FlatFl

9

ver ver

DD

Ri c h land Crk. Ri c h land Crk.

Riv

Riv

23 23

Hardy Har

Mountain OzarkOzark Folk ● Folk Mountain ● View Ri Ri Center S.P. S.P.View Center

16 16

Pelsor Pelsor

L. SHEPHERD L. SHEPHERD SPRINGS SPRINGS Lee Lee LAKELAKE FT. FT. L. Ft.L.Smith S.P. S.P. Ft. Smith ● ● SMITH SMITH rriyv eRri v e r MulbMeurrlby eR

5 5

27 27 14 14

9 9

i te

e

TylerTyler BendBend

16 16

71 71

i te

er Ri v er Ri v

e

65 65

Jasper Jasper

Boxley Boxley

Winslow Winslow

Devil's Den S.P. Devil's Den S.P. ● ● k. k.

Norfork Norfork 9 Wh Wh Calico Calico Rock Rock

62 62

gs

gs

hit

49 49

▲▲

21 21 412412

Bayou

Kin

hit

West West ForkFork16 16

62 62

BB

W

W

Grove Grove

Mammoth MammoS ●

Lakeview Lakeview5 5 Mountain Mountain 14 14 Home Home 412412 BullBull Shoals Shoals ● ● Bull Shoals-White RiverRiver Bull Shoals-White Salem NORFORK NORFORK Salem S.P. S.P. LAKELAKE 7 7 178178

BEAVER LAKELAKE BEAVER Berryville Berryville Hobbs S.P.-S.P.Hobbs Eureka Eureka ● Conservation ● Conservation Rogers Rogers Siloam Siloam Cro oCkreodokeCdreeCkreek Springs Springs Alpena Area Area Alpena Springs Springs Withrow Withrow Springdale Springdale Springs Springs Flippin Harrison Harrison Yellville Yellville Flippin S.P.● S.P.● Prairie GroveGrove Prairie Battlefield Battlefield Fayetteville Lost Lost BuffaBluoffalo Fayetteville Buffalo r r Buffalo S.P. S.P. ValleyValley v e v e PointPoint ● ● Prairie Prairie Huntsville Huntsville Ri Ri N a tiNonaatliona l

Bentonville Bentonville

▲▲

CC

66

BULLBULL SHOALS LAKELAKE SHOALS

B a yo u B a yo u

AA

62 62

55

16


77

88

99

▲▲ R

Ri ve r Ri ve r

Newport Newport

Li

67 67

tt le

tt le

BaldBald Knob Knob

64 64

R

R

Lower Lower RiverRiver White Beebe White Beebe Museum ● ● Cabot Cabot S.P.Museum S.P. DesDes ArcArc

Cree

Cree

DeWitt DeWitt

OLDOLD

TOWN 44 44 1 1 TOWN LAKELAKE

Her

Gillett Gillett

s

M

I

I

a

M

s

Ba y

Ba y

● ● Dumas Dumas

165165

B

B

1 1

ew om ew om

278278 SEVEN SEVEN Monticello Monticello

S aint

Helena Helena

River

Dermott Dermott

Lake Village Lake Village

HH

Multilane Divided Multilane Divided U.S. Highway U.S. Highway

Eudora 165165 Eudora

77

GG

Interstate Highway Interstate Highway

82 82 65 65

Hamburg Hamburg

National Park/Historic National Park/Historic Site/Monument Site/Monument ▲▲Welcome Center Welcome Center Great River Road Great River Road

National Forest Area National Forest Area

LakeLake S.P. S.P. Chicot ●Chicot

▲▲

82 82

● ●State Park/Museum State Park/Museum

(SEE TRAILS LOCATOR MAP) (SEE TRAILS LOCATOR MAP)

LAKELAKE CHICOT CHICOT

FF

Lake/River/Creek/Bayou Lake/River/Creek/Bayou Physiographic Regions Physiographic Regions

McGehee McGehee

DEVILS DEVILS SWAMP SWAMP

425425

k

k

165165

CaneCane ar ar CreekCreek S.P. S.P. t h ol t h ol

KE GIA FIC

EE

Helena Helena 49 49 ▲West ▲West

Elaine Elaine

425425 65 65

sett rossett

Big

Big

Marvell Marvell

DD

R R E E R I RV I V

● ●

Ark. Ark. PostPost Nat’l.Nat’l. Mon.Mon. l t l t De De ● ● Ark. Post Ark. Post Museum Museum CANACLANA L r r Gould Gould R i v eR i v e

425425

CC

Hughes Hughes

79 79

(UNDER DEVELOPMENT) (UNDER DEVELOPMENT)

M M A r kaAnr kan eto eto sa sa

ou ou

West West Memphis Memphis

70 70

LAKELAKE Mississippi RiverRiver S.P. S.P. Mississippi

r ve Ri r ve

Bayo u

Bayo u

hite ll

6161Wilson Wilson

● ●

Stuttgart Stuttgart

15 15 79 79

Museum Museum S.P.S.P.

4040 Arch. S.P. S.P. Arch.

Louisiana Purchase Louisiana Purchase Hist.Hist. Mon.Mon. Ri

165165

c s England ngland P.

Hampson Hampson

Archeological ● ● Archeological

6363

● ●

Brinkley Brinkley Marianna MariannaBEARBEAR CRK.CRK.

11 11

BB

5555 Marion Marion Earle Parkin Parkin64 64Earle ● ● Parkin Wynne Wynne Parkin ▲▲

Forrest Forrest CityCity

DeValls Bluff DeValls Bluff Hazen Hazen Carlisle Carlisle Clarendon Clarendon

ott Scott ●

en Warren

POINSETT POINSETT

70 70 1 1

on Agriculture Museum ntation Agriculture Museum

StarStar CityCity

Marked Marked Tree Tree

● ● Harrisburg Harrisburg LAKELAKE

49 49

40 40

onville cksonville wood herwood

Poinsett Poinsett S.P.S.P.

Village Creek S.P. S.P. Village Creek

W h i te

W h i te

11 11

Bayo u Bayo u

67 67

64167167

oke onoke

McCrory McCrory

Augusta Augusta ed ed R i veRri ver Searcy Searcy

14 14

5555

Osceola Osceola

Trumann 1 1LakeLakeTrumann

Wh it e R iv e r iW t age T a H e r h i t e raRilivSe r . it age T rail P . S. P. SS I SS IP SS P I SS IP I PI

16 16

Weiner Weiner

Ca c he DeV iCeawc he DeV iew

Heber Heber prings SpringsLi

● ●

49 49

L’Ang ui L’Ang le Rive r uil eR i ver

14 14

167167

s

Ri v er Ri v er

Batesville Batesville

Jacksonport Jacksonport S.P.S.P.

▲▲

Fr a ncis Fr a ncis

r ve Ri r ve

Ri

ver ver

14 14 5 25 25

66

A A The Department of Parks

ck

ck

r ry be r ry be

bourne Melbourne ain untain w Ri Ri

S aint

9 9

3

Piggott Piggott

Davidsonville Davidsonville Bla Bla Historic Historic Rector Rector 62 62 S.P.S.P. Pocahontas Pocahontas AshAsh LakeLake 49 49 Crowley's ● ● Walnut WalnutCrowley's FlatFlat Charles S.P.S.P. Charles Ridge ● ● Ridge Ridge Ridge Paragould Paragould S.P.S.P. Straw Straw ● ● 412412● ● Powhatan Powhatan Hoxie Hoxie Historic Historic ● ● Gosnell Gosnell 167167 LakeLake S.P.S.P. Frierson Frierson Blytheville Blytheville Evening Evening S.P. S.P. 63 63 Shade Shade Herman Herman● ● 1818 DavisDavis Manila Jonesboro Jonesboro Manila 25 25 Hist.Hist. Mon. Mon. 67 67

o k

EE

C

lem Salem

Arkansas Welcome Centers

1 01 0

6262

Corning 115115 urre urre Corning . . C

63 63

Hardy Hardy

67 67

Maynard Maynard

Spring S.P.S.P. Spring

9 9

nt . R nt . R

R. Poi nt R. en ev Poi nt E l en ev

El

Mammoth Spring Mammoth Spring ●▲ ●▲ Mammoth Mammoth

R

66

JJ

State Highway State Highway

88

99

1 01 0

& Tourism operates 13 Arkansas Welcome Centers at points of entry into the state. These facilities are built and maintained by the Highway Department and staffed by trained travel consultants from the Tourism Division. Consultants provide suggested tour routes, an Arkansas Tour Guide, and other travel literature on places of interest to help make your visit more en­­joy­ able. Starting from the top left on the map, Welcome Center locations are: • Bentonville, U.S. 71 North; 479-855-3111 • Harrison, U.S. 65 North; 870-741-3343 • Mammoth Spring, U.S. 63 North; 870-625-7364; • Corning, U.S. 67 North; 870-857-6014 • Blytheville, I-55 North; 870-762-2512 • West Memphis, 704 East Service Road North; 870-735-3637 • Helena/West Helena, U.S. 49 Bypass; 870-338-7602 • Lake Village, U.S. 65 & U.S. 82; 870-265-5832 • El Dorado, U.S. 167; 870-881-9160 • Texarkana, 10000 I-30 East; 870-772-4301 • Red River, 12555 N. State Line Ave.; 870-772-7511 • Van Buren/Fort Smith, I-40 West; 479-474-9512 • Siloam Springs, U.S. 412 West; 479-524-4445 A 14th center is located at Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism, 1 Capi­­tol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201; 501-682-7777 (TDD).

ARKANSAS ROADMAP Pub4_AAG1415_Update-d3.indd 65

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Outdoors Update

GPS Technologies Create Fun Cache-and-Seek Pastimes in The Natural State!

Interpreting clues and coordinates, geocaching provides fun for all ages and the thrill of finding the elusive cache. Grab your family or a few friends, hiking boots, maps and your GPS—and discover your own geocaching adventure! Solving these modern-day geographical challenges promises a few hours of hunting or several days of hidden pastimes. Geocaching is a fast-growing hobby with enthusiasts around the globe. It combines technology with nature outings to produce an exciting problem-solving, competitive form of entertainment for those who like to be more adventurous in their leisure time. In such hi-tech scavenger hunts, different kinds of caches are secretly stashed all over the world by groups

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Lake Ouachita State Park

The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 67

or individuals. The location of each geocache is marked with Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates which are shared via the Internet. Hand-held, mobile GPS units are used to explore for the mysterious caches. Each hunt and the terrain it covers can vary in difficulty. Some caches include only logbooks enclosed in small tins or film canisters, while others hold mini treasures inside containers such as old ammunition boxes. For the successful cache hunter, the standard geocaching protocol is to leave something if you take something. With more than 11,000 active caches in The Natural State, there are cache prizes all around you! In eastern Arkansas, there are 150 special Great River Road caches spread along the scenic byway that take cachers to historic sites, museums and attractions in the Arkansas Delta. Arkansas State Parks offers the ParkCache program—collect the codes from a special cache in all 52 state parks and the numbers create a special set of coordinates that lead you to an additional 53rd cache, featuring special Arkansas State Parks geocoins and trackables. As for many experienced cachers, the objective is not always the cache that is tracked—but successfully tracking the cache—that matters most. Geocaching is a truly unique way to enjoy the outdoors and have a good time discovering a few cultural elements of Arkansas along the way. Whether you’re a novice to the hobby or a hard-core cacher, you’ll find an interesting array of the “hidden treasures” throughout the state, ranging from super easy souvenirs to nearly impossible to find momentos. For more information, visit online at www.arkansasstateparks.com/ things-to-do/geocaching/.

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Buffalo National River

No Print--Flt Stream Index Mark--START

Find Fresh-water Adventures on One of Many Year-round Float Streams

Arkansas has over 9,000 miles of streams, and a good deal of this mileage is perfect for floating—be it by canoe, kayak, johnboat, or raft. The variety of enjoyable experiences provided by this assort­­­­­­­­ment of rivers is remarkably wide-ranging: from matchless trout fishing trips, to rugged white­water runs, to peaceful passages ideal for first-timers. The streams of Arkansas are, in a word, inviting. Introductions to 18 of the state’s favorite waterways are found in the following pages of this guide. Seasons, access points, fishing tips, and basic characteristics of the rivers are included along with locator maps. What the reader won’t find are mile-by-mile descriptions of the streams; these details are for you to discover!

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 69

Glass and Water Don’t Mix…

Little Missouri River

What’s nearly invisible, has sharp edges, and can slice your foot to the bone? Broken glass in Arkansas’s creeks and rivers can ruin your river experience. The good news is that glass containers are now banned on any vessel susceptible to overtuning on all Arkansas waterways. When you’re packing for a canoe trip, remember the rules—they’re for everyone’s safety as well as the preservation of our streams. Floaters are also encouraged to take an extra bag for carrying out any glass or trash you find discarded by others. Your solitary actions can make a big difference! Official regulations for the use of canoes, kayaks and inner tubes are summarized at the end of this section.

IMPORTANT REMINDERS

HOW TO GET THERE

COUNTY MAPS: Several of the stream write-ups in this publication recommend the purchase of “general highway maps” for particular counties. These can be obtained from:

1. Wear those life jackets; 2. Take along a spare paddle; 3. Pay attention to local weather forecasts; 4. Dress appropriately for the season; 5. Don’t travel alone; 6. Avoid camping in areas subject to sudden rises; 7. Know your ability and don’t exceed it; 8. Refrain from drinking creek or river water no matter how clean it appears; 9. Carry out whatever you carry in; 10. Should you capsize, try to stay with your boat and swim it to shore, making certain that you’re on the upstream side of the craft to avoid getting pinned between it and rocks or willows; 11. Stay off streams during dangerously high water. 12. Carry a GPS unit and map.

Pub5_AAG1415_Float-d2.indd 69

Map Sales, Room 205, Arkansas State Highway & Transportation Dept. mailing address: P.O. Box 2261 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 street address: 10324 Interstate 30, Little Rock, Arkansas 72209 PHONE: 501-569-2444 WEBSITE: www.ArkansasHighways.com

TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS: For a more detailed look, refer to topographic maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey. These are available for a fee (plus postage and handling charges). For more information on Arkansas Topographic Maps, go to: www.geology.ar.gov/catalog/topo_maps.htm

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DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY CLASS RATINGS I-VI The narratives also occasionally refer to class ratings for the streams, based on an international scale of six levels of difficulty: • Class I: EASY—Moving water with few riffles and small waves. Few or no obstructions. Correct course is easy to determine. • Class II: MEDIUM—Fairly frequent, but unobstructed rapids. Course generally easy to recognize. Some maneuvering is required. • Class III: DIFFICULT—Numerous rapids with high and irregular waves. Narrow passages that often require complex maneuvering. Course not always easily recognizable. • Class IV: VERY DIFFICULT—Long rapids characterized by high and irregular waves with boulders directly in swift current. Course often difficult to recognize requiring some scouting from bank. • Class V : EXCEEDINGLY DIFFICULT—Continuous rocky rapids with high and irregular broken water which cannot be avoided. Extremely fast flow, abrupt bends, and strong cross currents. Difficult rescue conditions. Frequent inspections from bank necessary. • Class VI: LIMIT OF NAVIGABILITY—Class V difficulties increased to the upper limits of skill and equipment. Extremely dangerous. Only for teams of experts.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Many of the streams mentioned in this collection flow through or near Arkansas’s national forests—the Ouachita National Forest and the OzarkSt. Francis National Forest. Both offer superb hiking, camping, and hunting opportunities in addition to their river recreation possibilities. For more information, contact:

Float Streams

The Arkansas Game & Fish Commission is the agency charged with managing the state’s wildlife resources. It has established a fine network of hatcheries, public fishing lakes, and wildlife management areas. More information, including order forms for hunting and fishing licenses, may be obtained by contacting: Information & Education Division Arkansas Game & Fish Commission 2 Natural Resources Drive Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 PHONE: 501-223-6300 WEBSITE: www.agfc.com

The Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism manages the state park system and visitor welcome centers. It produces the Arkansas Vacation Kit and houses the Arkansas Great River Road Division, Arkansas History Commission, Keep Arkansas Beautiful Commission and the Arkansas Trails Council. For details on these or similar topics, contact: Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism 1 Capitol Mall Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 PHONE: 501-682-7777 WEBSITE: www.Arkansas.com

Other helpful websites include: Arkansas Canoe Club www.arkansascanoeclub.com Arkansas Geological Commission www.geology.ar.gov Arkansas Highway & Transportation Department www.ArkansasHighways.com Ozark Whitewater Pages www.ozarkpages.com/whitewater U.S. Geological Survey (for current streamflow and rainfall data) http://arkweb.er.usgs.gov

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ot

Forest Supervisor Ouachita National Forest P.O. Box 1270 Hot Springs, Arkansas 71902 PHONE: 501-321-5202 WEBSITE: www.fs.usda.gov/ouachita Forest Supervisor Ozark-St. Francis National Forest 605 West Main Street Russellville, Arkansas 72801 PHONE: 479-964-7200 WEBSITE: www.fs.usda.gov/osfnf

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Rivers and Their Future...

The Arkansas Adventure Guide

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Rivers are special. They always have been; always will be—we hope. The truth is, though, that the future of our rivers is anything but guaranteed. The only sure bet is that those we still have will become even more precious as time goes by. The major threat to the streams of Arkansas are projects—projects for water supplies, flood control, hydropower, dredging and channelization. While the heyday of these developments seems to have peaked, several more major impoundments and stream realignments are already on the drawing board. Even in cases where some public use is served, these projects each remove another free-flowing stream from a steadily shrinking list. But dams and dredges are not the only threats facing river recreation. Recreationists themselves often create problems by littering, trespassing, leaving gates open, or even damaging property. Since most riparian land remains in private ownership, these actions only serve to create additional conflicts be­tween river users and landowners. Property owners feel compelled to post their lands, thereby reducing floaters’ access to streams and rivers. Everybody stands to lose. The problems of river recreation will not be answered overnight. What will help is the realization that rivers are critical to the Arkansas way of life, and that their prognosis is indeed fragile. If floaters don’t do their part in developing a river ethic for the state, it won’t get done. And, our rivers, as we know them now, won’t be special; they’ll be gone.

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PAGE 72

Big Piney Creek

Big Piney Creek (C-3 and C-4)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to Lake Dardanelle (Ark. River), a distance of approximately 67 miles.

Big Piney Creek

At 67 miles, Big Piney Creek is not particularly long by Arkansas standards. But mile for mile, there’s no doubt it ranks among the best float streams in the state. For one thing, the Piney is situated in some very interesting country—the heart of the Ozarks. Its headwaters region is rugged and remote, and the few communities to be found have appropriate names like Fallsville, Limestone, and Deer. The Piney itself is a clear mountain stream wasting little time on its journey toward the Arkansas River. It hurries pellmell over ledges and numerous rapids in a twisting course through Newton, Johnson, and Pope counties. It flows past bluffs, alongside gravel bars, and under overhanging hardwoods. Some consider the Piney to be “the classic Ozark stream.” If nothing else, the Piney offers a classic mix of recreational opportunities. The creek and adjacent public lands provide an ideal setting for floating, fishing, camping, hiking, hunting, and swimming—not to mention other rituals like rockskipping and plain old relaxing. In short, the Piney has something for everyone. CHARACTERISTICS Depending on one’s point-of-view, Big Piney Creek is either a series of short pools interrupted by rapids, or a series of rapids interrupted by stretches of relative calmness. Fishermen probably prefer the first description, while canoeists will generally opt for the latter. In any event, the creek offers good water for both users. The Limestone to Hwy. 123 run is not a common float (the water’s usually too low), but when conditions are right, the 10-mile section is worth considering. In this stretch the Piney has numerous rapids (some up to a Class III rating), along with a good supply of those traditional canoe-catchers—willow thickets. The next section is the Hwy. 123 to Treat run, a float covering about eight miles. As with the upper stretch, the water’s clear and the scenery’s good. Here, though, the valley is not so tight, and the stream’s pace slackens a bit. The rapids are a little more subdued (all of the Class I and II varieties), but willows—while not so plentiful as upstream—can still cause problems. The third section of Big Piney Creek—the Treat to Long Pool float—is where the stream has earned its reputation among whitewater enthusiasts. The hills start crowding the creek for space along this 10-mile-run, and one result is rapids—rapids with names like “Roller Coaster,” “Surfing Hole,” and even “Cascades of Extinction.” Gravel bars are

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conveniently located just below most of these rapids and provide ideal spots for a breather, a picnic, or, in some cases, a salvage operation. The Piney’s next section—Long Pool to Hwy. 164 (or Twin Bridges)—slows down considerably in its five-mile journey. As the creek leaves the Ozarks, its pools become longer, and the rapids are generally in the Class I category. Willow strainers, if anything, are more common here than in the upper reaches. The stream’s final stretch—Hwy. 164 to Lake Dardanelle (or points in between)—isn’t for those who require their water to be white. In these last few miles, the Piney slowly meanders toward Piney Bay, an arm of Lake Dardanelle. BIG PINEY CREEK AND VICINITY To Ark. 16

To Harrison

B

29

IG P IN EY C REEK

Limestone

7

29 HURRICANE CREEK WILDERNESS

29

Natural Bridge

58 CA

59 Rosetta

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HURR I

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Pelsor

123

61

58 Ft. Douglas

123

Rotary Ann

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LEGEND Access Points Campground Bridge Points of Interest Trail Day Use Area State Highway County Road

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112 56

162

123

0

1

14

112 16

SCALE IN MILES 1

Helton's Farm

ford

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71

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3

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Hagarville

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To Scottsville

IL

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Dover

7

To Russellville

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Big Piney Creek/Buffalo River

SEASONS Big Piney Creek offers year-round recreation. The canoe season usually begins in late fall and can last through mid-June, depending on local rainfall. Fishing is a year-long possibility for those willing to wade-fish or drag their boats over the shoals during the drier months. And after the first frost has discouraged ticks and chiggers, hiking and backpacking are highly recommended, particularly in the 15,000-acre Hurricane Creek Wilderness just northeast of the Hwy. 123 bridge. ACCESS POINTS Considering the ruggedness of the country, access to Big Piney Creek is surprisingly good. At Limestone, the stream can be reached by Forest Road 1004. Forest Road 1002 also provides access a few miles south of the 1004 crossing. The next put-in or take-out points are at Hwy. 123 and Forest Road 1802. Perhaps the most popular beginning point for float trips is the Helton Farm access at Treat (Forest Road 1805), where local landowners allow canoeists to put-in for a small fee. Ten miles downstream is Long Pool, a Forest Service campground complete with restrooms, changing rooms, loading/unloading areas, and a parking lot (the Long Pool site is a fee area except for the winter season). The last major access point is another five miles downstream at Hwy. 164. SCENERY While the Piney doesn’t have the towering bluffs of the Buffalo River, it has no shortage of good scenery. The steep hillsides are covered with a mixed hardwood and pine forest and occasionally offer glimpses of deer, turkeys, or even black bears. Along the way floaters will pass an astonishing assortment of rocks—some house-sized—that over the eons have toppled into the stream. In addition, quiet travelers may discover great blue herons, wood ducks, or beavers along their route. FISHING A vast majority of those floating the Big Piney don’t carry fishing equipment. No doubt some fear they’ll lose their rods and reels at the first rapid, but most probably don’t realize that the stream is a good place to fish. A veteran fisherman, though, will note the cool, clear water with its rocky cover and come to one conclusion—smallmouth bass. Not only can this fish be caught in the pools of the Piney, but so can spotted and largemouth bass, longear and green sunfish and rock bass. Fishing the Big Piney can be a twelve month pastime, but most authorities will recommend the late spring/early summer period. In the hotter months, diehards may have some luck in the creek’s deep pools, but getting there may require dragging boats over shallows or even bushwhacking through cane thickets. Anglers seldom visit the Piney during late fall and winter months, but it’s during this period the largest bass are often taken. SERVICES AVAILABLE Supplies can be obtained in Dover or Russellville; the latter city also offers numerous motels. Camping is permitted just about anywhere in the Ozark National Forest, but two “developed” campgrounds—Long Pool and Haw Creek Falls—are available. Canoes can be rented in the vicinity, and several local families are willing to provide car shuttles for a fee. OTHER INFORMATION The best time to float the Piney is when its water level is in the 2.5-5.0 range, although the uppermost reaches may require a higher minimum reading for best conditions. At five feet and beyond, the stream is considered dangerous. Lastly, a good deal of private property borders the stream. Visitors should take care to avoid trespassing problems.

Buffalo River (B-3, B-4 and B-5) SECTION DESCRIBED: Entire length—150 miles.

North Arkansas’s Buffalo River was the country’s first national river, is roughly 150 miles long, and includes nearly 95,000 acres of public land along its corridor. It has been the topic of a full-length book, the subject of a National Geographic feature article, and the cornerstone for the state’s environmental movement. Like the Mulberry River and Big Piney Creek, the Buffalo originates in the rugged Boston Mountains division of the Ozarks near Fallsville in southwestern Newton County. Unlike the other two streams which eventually head south to meet the Arkansas River, the Buffalo goes east where, ultimately, it joins the White River. Along the way it descends nearly 2,000 feet through layers of sandstone, limestone and chert. One immediately obvious result is bluffs and more

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Buffalo National River

bluffs—the highest in all the Ozarks. Hidden away, ready for discovery, are other geologic marvels—springs, caves, waterfalls, natural bridges, and box-like canyons. But the Buffalo is much more than an ongoing display of natural curiosities. It is, in the words of the National Park Service, “an island of time and space.” It is a valley where turn-of-the-century lifestyles and landscapes still exist. It is a place that refreshes the spirit. CHARACTERISTICS The Buffalo River gets its start in national forest country, nearly within rock-throwing distance of the highest point in the Ozarks. Some floating takes place in the headwaters area (the “Hailstone” trip from Dixon Road to Hwy. 21 is almost legendary among serious paddlers), but mostly, this is a good place to put on the hiking boots. A real treat is the Upper Buffalo Wilderness, a 14,200-acre tract managed by the Ozark National Forest and the Buffalo National River. Visitors can expect to see caves, bluffs, waterfalls, old cabin sites, and maybe even a black bear. The Buffalo’s next section—from the Hwy. 21 bridge south of Boxley to the Ponca low-water bridge at the Hwy. 74 crossing—is another that doesn’t get a great deal of use; the water’s usually too low. But when conditions are right, this six-mile stretch offers a fast-moving series of Class II rapids, many of which are laced with willows. Perhaps the most famous of all Buffalo River floats are those that take place between Ponca and the Hwy. 7 crossing (known until recent years as the community of Pruitt). Something for everyone can be found in this 25-mile section: Class I and II rapids (complete with hazards like “Gray Rock”); the highest waterfall in mid-America (at Hemmed-in-Hollow); the 11,300-acre Ponca Wilderness; towering cliffs including the 500-foot-tall Big Bluff; and an excellent assortment of swimming holes. In addition, there are several conveniently located access points/ campgrounds—Steel Creek, Kyles Landing, Erbie, and Ozark—between Ponca and Hwy. 7. The Buffalo’s next stretch—from Hwy. 7 to Hwy. 123 (or Carver)—is about 10 miles in length. While it doesn’t offer the spectacular scenery available just upstream, this is a fine float, especially for families. It features Class I rapids, gravel bars, and numerous bluffs. Campsites and access are available at Carver or two-and-a-half miles upstream at Hasty. Another major section of the river begins at Carver and concludes about 32 miles downstream at the U.S. 65 bridge (in-between access and camping areas are available at Mount Hershey, Woolum, and Tyler Bend). Many Buffalo

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Buffalo River

veterans consider this to be among the stream’s finest stretches. While other sections feature higher bluffs and more challenging rapids, this portion of the river is one of its quietest and most peaceful trips. The scenery is good, too, including such things as “The Narrows”—a tall but narrow rock outcrop separating the Buffalo and Richland Creek. The 27-mile trip from U.S. 65 to Buffalo Point (still referred to by many as “the old state park”) is a long, lazy float ideally suited for those interested in casual canoeing. The scenery’s good, and the rapids are interesting but easy. Other access points within this part of the river include Gilbert, Maumee North, Maumee South, and the Hwy. 14 crossing. BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER AND VICINITY PONCA WILDERNESS AREA

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Harriet

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The Buffalo’s final stretch—from Buffalo Point to Buffalo City (on the White River)—is 30 miles in length, with only a single takeout point (Rush) in between. The 7.5-mile float from Buffalo Point to Rush is short, safe, and scenic—perfect for families. The remaining 23-mile trip passes through some of Arkansas’s wildest country, including better than 39,000 acres of wilderness (the Lower Buffalo Wilderness and the adjacent Leatherwood Wilderness). This is the one for those wanting to get away from it all. SEASONS The Buffalo is a river for all seasons. Canoeing is a year-round possibility except in the upper reaches where it’s limited to the winter and spring months. Camping, too, is a year-long pursuit, though visitors should remember the state’s lowest winter temperatures traditionally occur along this stream. The Buffalo’s corridor is also a great locale for hiking and backpacking, but expeditions should be scheduled outside the tick/chigger season. ACCESS POINTS Visitors can get to the Buffalo River via U.S. 65 and a whole host of Arkansas highways—21, 74, 7, 123, 333, 14, and 268. In addition, a good many county roads provide access to points between the highway crossings. SCENERY Spectacular is the best word to describe scenery along the river. For 150 miles, the Buffalo offers an unmatched mixture of clear water, lofty cliffs, overhanging hardwoods, and inviting gravel bars. There’s excellent scenery off the river, too. One place that shouldn’t be missed is Lost Valley, a unique bluff-lined canyon between Boxley and Ponca. The Richland Creek Valley is also a sight-seer’s paradise, especially in its upper reaches where an 11,800-acre wilderness area awaits the adventurous. FISHING To many anglers, the hordes of visitors attracted to the Buffalo destroy the peaceful, aesthetic values that are the reason for going fishing in the first place. But this spirited colt of a stream has a remarkable capacity for swallowing up people in a maze of bluffs and canyons. The Buffalo is a gem among Arkansas’s float fishing streams. Considered a model smallmouth bass stream, the Buffalo has fast, clear, oxygen-rich water with the kind of gravel bottom and boulder beds smallmouths love. Floating in a johnboat or canoe is the accepted method of fishing, but during spring, try beaching your craft at the head of a deep, swift chute and drifting a lure near a boulder in the fast water. Many fishermen make the mistake of working the holes where the bass aren’t and floating through the swift water where they are. The knowing locals often work surface lures at night for the big ones, and they catch them regularly. The Buffalo’s cool, clean waters also provide the perfect habitat for channel catfish, green and longear sunfish and spotted bass. Veterans frequently rely on natural baits—crayfish, minnows and worms—in their efforts to entice a keeper. SERVICES AVAILABLE About two dozen concessionaires rent canoes along the Buffalo and offer other related services. In addition, several rent johnboats and can provide complete fishing packages. Lodging choices range from genuine log cabins to bed and breakfast facilities to modern motel rooms. And, of course, designated campgrounds are located at frequent intervals along the river. Most all supplies can be obtained at Harrison, Marshall, Jasper, Yellville or other nearby communities. OTHER INFORMATION The National Park Service maintains Information Stations at the Hwy. 7 crossing (Pruitt), near the U.S. 65 crossing (Tyler Bend), and at Buffalo Point. Maps and river guides are available for purchase at these sites, from the Park Headquarters in Harrison, or from local outfitters. Additional information may be obtained by writing: Superintendent, Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut, Ste. 136, Harrison, Arkansas 72601-1173. Or visit the Buffalo National River Website at www.nps.gov/buff. Kenneth L. Smith’s Buffalo River Country provides a fascinating introduction to the river and its surrounding landscape. The book may be ordered through the Ozark Society, P.O. Box 2914, Little Rock, Arkansas 72203.

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Caddo River

Caddo River (F-3)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to DeGray Lake, a stretch about 40 miles in length

Caddo River

Flowing out of the Ouachita Mountains in west central Arkansas is one of the state’s most unappreciated streams— the Caddo River. Those that know it, however, describe the Caddo as among the best “family outing” type streams in the state. It begins in southwestern Montgomery County, and flows near or through the communities of Black Springs, Norman, Caddo Gap, Glenwood, and Amity before entering the backwaters of DeGray Lake. In fact, throughout this 40-mile journey, the Caddo is never very far from civilization. Railroad tracks parallel the stream for several miles, a few houses can be spotted from the river, and cattle frequently gaze down at passing floaters. This surrounding landscape may not be original wilderness, but it sure is peaceful. The Caddo itself is also peaceful— at least in most places. But to prevent paddlers from becoming too complacent, a handful of faster rapids (Class I/Class II) have been strategically placed in the stream. The river also features some top-notch gravel bars—ideal places to stop, lean back, and contemplate the mysteries of moving water. CHARACTERISTICS While the Caddo River is floatable above Norman (the water has to be high, and it’s a very fast float), most trips on the stream’s upper reaches begin at the southwest edge of this small town. The eight-mile float down to Caddo Gap is scenic, but is possible only after extended periods of rainfall. Probably the most popular Caddo River float is the six-mile journey from Caddo Gap to Glenwood. One highlight is a swinging footbridge over the river at the put-in (the low-water bridge west of the Caddo Gap community) which, for safety’s sake, should be appreciated from below. Rock gardens are common along this stretch and can cause consternation when the water’s low. The actual “gap” for the Caddo occurs about a mile and a half into the trip (just above the Hwy. 240 bridge). At this point the river passes through a narrow opening between the ridges, and so do Hwy. 8 and the railroad—all three bunched closely together. The gap is also the site of a geological oddity: some hot springs bubble up into the streambed here (for those wishing to experience these thermal waters, here are some rough directions: go upstream 200-300 yards from the old low-water bridge; springs will be on the west bank, and are usually at or below the river’s surface; barefoot waders will have no trouble recognizing the spot!). Two-and-a-half miles later, the Caddo’s South Fork enters from the west. Small rapids, long gravel bars, and an occasional willow thicket characterize the stream as it approaches Glenwood. The float from Glenwood to Amity is a slower version of the upper sections. Pools are longer, and the rapids lose some of their intensity. Yet it’s a fine float, perfectly suited for those wishing to gain encouraging experience in a canoe.

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SEASONS Like most of Arkansas’s canoeing streams, the Caddo usually gets too low in the summer and early fall for good floating. The best months for a successful trip are March through June. ACCESS POINTS The Caddo River is an easy stream to get to. Access points are numerous, and the shuttle routes are almost always along paved roads. Traditional put-in and take-out points include: the bridge immediately west of Norman; the low-water bridge west of Caddo Gap; the old low-water bridge on Hwy. 182 north of Amity; and the Hwy. 84 bridge northeast of Amity. CADDO RIVER AND VICINITY To Mena

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To Mount Ida

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Kirby

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Black Springs

To DeQueen

8

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To Arkadelphia

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Caddo River/Cadron Creek

SCENERY The Caddo may lack dramatic views, but it has plenty of good scenery. The floater often travels next to forested hillsides and past rocky outcrops. In several places the stream flows under a green canopy of overhanging hardwoods. FISHING The Caddo is one of the most underrated and overlooked warm-water fishing streams in Arkansas. That’s unfortunate, for this small river offers excellent fishing in a peaceful setting that’s ideal for a weekend family “getaway.” Smallmouth and spotted bass are the most notable sportfish inhabiting the Caddo. The most productive bass angling begins near Caddo Gap and ends below Amity. During low water periods, portions from Caddo Gap to Glenwood can be floated. Longear and green sunfish are often caught in this stretch as well. This is one of the few streams where white bass are an important species. These scrappy fighters migrate upstream from DeGray Lake during their spring spawning runs and are taken by boaters and bankfishermen alike using live minnows, jigs, spinners and minnow-replica crank-baits. Hybrid bass and walleyes are also occasionally taken during their spring spawning runs. SERVICES AVAILABLE Most of the communities along the Caddo River include gas stations and grocery stores. Glenwood, by far the largest town along the route, also features several restaurants and at least four motels, one of them within sight of the river, plus a bed and breakfast just a few miles upstream. OTHER INFORMATION Because nearly every acre along the Caddo is privately owned, floaters need to be particularly careful not to aggravate local landowners. Camping sites are available at the Crystal Recreation Area north of Norman off Forest Road 177. Also, the Caddo can be floated below DeGray Lake to its confluence with the Ouachita River. This short stretch is one of the most convenient in the state, crossed by I-30, U.S. 67, and Hwy. 7.

Cadron Creek (D-5)

Cadron Creek

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to Arkansas River, a distance of about 59 miles. (The Cadron has nearly 140 free-flowing miles of stream. There are many more miles of enjoyable paddling on this creek.)

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Each spring dozens and dozens of canoeists load up their gear and head for north Arkansas’s famed Buffalo River. Many coming from central and southern parts of the state drive up U.S. 65 north of Conway and never realize that they pass right over another great canoeing stream—Cadron Creek. The Cadron begins way up in Cleburne County, nearly within the city limits of Heber Springs. It flows in a westerly direction, is joined by its North Fork near Quitman, then continues on a southwesterly course toward its eventual destination—the Arkansas River. Along the way the stream passes by things most might expect—fields and occasional farm houses—and, for many, some startling surprises—rapids, bluffs, and canyon-like surroundings. CHARACTERISTICS The Cadron doesn’t receive much canoeing use above the Hwy. 124 bridge west of Quitman, although the North Fork can be floated downstream from Gravesville. The first major run begins at the Hwy. 124 crossing and goes down to a county bridge—sometimes called the Iron Bridge—northeast of Guy. The float is about 4.5 miles long with Class I rapids. Incidentally, history buffs might enjoy knowing that the bridge marks the site of the old Hartwick Mill which operated on the creek from 1868 until the great flood of 1927. Rocks from the old mill dam still can be seen in the creekbed. The second section of the Cadron starts at the county bridge northeast of Guy (local storeowners can provide directions) and is roughly 10 miles in length. The take-out point is at the new bridge between Guy and Twin Groves in an area known as Pinnacle Springs. Once the site of a flourishing resort in the 1880s, the community boasted a dozen bath houses along with two hotels, a college, a saloon, a skating rink, and even a cotton gin. To get to this historic take-out, go west of Guy for three miles or so to the Hwy. 310 bridge. Access can be found nearby. The float is a good one, particularly during its last few miles where the current picks up. Class II rapids—some with willow thickets—can be expected. The Cadron’s third section—Pinnacle Springs to U.S. 65—is the shortest of the four, but may be the best of the lot. In its three-and-a-half mile run, the paddler will find rocky shoals (up to Class II), quiet pools, and rugged bluffs. Willow strainers will also be present. The last float on the Cadron is the 10-11 mile trip from the U.S. 65 bridge down to the Hwy. 285 crossing 10 miles north of Wooster. It, too, offers a good experience, complete with Class I/Class II rapids, the highest bluffs on the creek, and occasional wildlife. SEASONS Cadron Creek is a pretty reliable stream. One published account claims it can be floated “90% of the time between December and June.” ACCESS POINTS Points of access include: the Hwy. 124 crossing; the county bridge northeast of Guy; Hwy. 310 going west from Guy; the U.S. 65 bridge; and the Hwy. 285 crossing. SCENERY First-time visitors to the Cadron are invariably surprised at the scenery. Most have no idea that a white water stream exists in central Arkansas—much less that it features bluffs, pinnacles, and caves. But all of these attractions are found on Cadron Creek. Not only that, the scenery changes from season to season. Many of the bluffs will be ice-encrusted during the winter months; later on they’ll be the locations for waterfalls. FISHING By all appearances, Cadron Creek should be a great little smallmouth stream. But surprisingly, smallmouth bass are virtually absent from these waters. Because the water is warmer than on most Arkansas float streams, the Cadron hosts a variety of species more commonly found in the sluggish streams of the lowlands. Here anglers pursue tailwalking largemouth bass, feisty crappie and the good-things-come-in-small-packages bluegill. Flathead catfish, which may tip the scales at 50 pounds or more, are also present in good numbers, giving the visiting angler an outstanding opportunity to land a real leviathan. SERVICES AVAILABLE Most all supplies can be obtained in Greenbrier, Damascus or other nearby communities. Campgrounds are located

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Cadron Creek

at Woolly Hollow State Park a few miles northeast of Greenbrier and at two privately operated outposts on the creek. Canoes can be rented and shuttles arranged with a local outfitter. Private resorts, beds and breakfasts and motels are available nearby. Conway, about 15 miles south of the Cadron on U.S. 65, is a major trade center. OTHER INFORMATION Cadron Creek is also floatable downstream from the Hwy. 285 bridge. While it doesn’t offer the whitewater recreation of the upstream reaches, this lower section can be enjoyable. NORTH CADRON CREEK AND VICINITY To Clinton

Bee Branch

Southside

TH CADR NOR

ON

65

C

To Heber Springs

K RE E

Quitman

Gravesville

124 Damascus

EK

280

25

RE

124 Twin Groves

285

280

Guy

C

AD

To Springfield

NO

282 310

65

RO N

Martinville

124

C

25

H RT

285

LEGEND

Greenbrier

Access Point Bridge U.S. Highway State Highway County Road

25

65

Wooster

SCALE IN MILES

Springhill

1

0

1

2

3

4

25 To Conway and I-40

To Conway and I-40

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In addition, the Cadron has a sister stream—East Cadron Creek—that can provide several good float trips. One—the eight-mile section between Hwys. 36 and 107—goes past Mansfield Bluff, Rainbow Falls, Buzzard’s Roost, and an interesting array of tupelo gum trees. A 10-mile float from the Hwy. 107 crossing down to a county bridge is also possible. Finally, Cadron Creek and its East Fork flow almost entirely through private property. Canoeists, therefore, need to respect the rights of riparian landowners.

Cossatot River (F-1, F-2, G-1 and G-2)

SECTION DESCRIBED: From headwaters area to Gillham Lake, a distance of approximately 26 river miles.

The National Park Service describes it as “probably the most challenging” whitewater float in the state. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a little more emphatic, saying it “is the most difficult whitewater stream in the state of Arkansas.” Early American Indians simply called it Cossatot—their word for “skull crusher.” Today the Cossatot River is still crushing things, but they’re mostly canoes and the egos of over-confident paddlers. The stream heads up in rugged Ouachita mountain country just southeast of Mena. It flows in a southerly direction for about 26 miles before its current ceases at Gillham Lake. Along the way the Cossatot travels through the Ouachita National Forest, alongside a wilderness area, and over and around upended layers of jagged, east/west orientation bedrock. This last characteristic is what gives the stream its Class IV/Class V rating. Much of the river’s white water is not recommended for casual canoeists. Experienced river-runners should always check water levels in advance. Helmets, life-jackets, and proper clothing to guard against hypothermia and the jagged rocks are essential during the prime floating season. The Cossatot, however, is not just for floaters. The stream offers something for nearly everyone interested in Arkansas’s outdoors. CHARACTERISTICS The Cossatot’s headwaters run from its source to the Hwy. 246 bridge northwest of Athens. Not much floating activity takes place on this stretch (the water’s usually too low), although the three mile trip from the lower Forest Road 31 crossing to the Hwy. 246 bridge can be an exciting Class II/Class III journey. What this area offers is an interesting landscape—whether it be seen from a car, by foot or in a canoe. Forest Road 31 parallels the stream for several miles, providing the driver with pleasurable views of a small mountain stream and attractive rural countryside. In these upper reaches, the Cossatot also flows next to and through the Caney Creek Wilderness, a 14,400-acre area perfect for hikers, photographers, bird-watchers, and backpackers. Immediately upstream from the Hwy. 246 bridge is Brushy Creek River access, located within the Cossatot River State Park Natural Area. This access includes a canoe launch, pedestrian river walkway, solar restrooms, a day-use area, nature trail, trailhead for the River Corridor Trail and a huge gravel bar perfect for sunning and picnicking. Just above the Hwy. 246 crossing, the Cossatot leaves the Ouachita National Forest. For most of the rest of its journey to Gillham Lake, the stream flows through the state park natural area, and access to the Cossatot is via Weyerhaeuser roads and bridges. The Cossatot’s second stretch begins at the Hwy. 246 bridge and ends about three miles downstream at a lowwater crossing known as Ed Banks Bridge. Good scenery, rock gardens, and Class II/Class III rapids are typical of this fast-moving section. The third stretch of river is the float from Ed Banks Bridge to the sandbar bridge just above Cossatot Falls. It’s short— about two miles—but steep, dropping around 60 feet in the process. The trip gets down to business very quickly with a solid Class III rapid—Zig Zag—during the first few hundred yards. Coming up next, and soon, is a hazard to navigation known as the “Esses.” It’s a 200-yards-long rapid that resembles a rock-filled flume—narrow, noisy, and nonstop. Several more Class III drops take the floater to another sandbar bridge (at Weyerhaeuser Road 52600) upstream from the falls. The Cossatot’s final stretch—from the Sandbar low-water bridge to U.S. 278—is its most difficult. In this five-mile section, the river has ripped through several ridges creating some mighty interesting rapids. The first of these—located a quarter of a mile or so below the low-water bridge put-in—is Cossatot Falls itself. The falls is a series of six rocky cascades over which the river descends 33 feet within one-third mile. This stretch is a very exciting place with strong

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Cossatot River

Cossatot River

currents, big waves, six- to eight-foot drops, and tricky channels. All of this adds up to a Class IV/Class V rating during high water levels. For those having second thoughts (and this is to be recommended for all but the most experienced paddlers), Cossatot Falls can be portaged to the left (east bank), although the portage has been described “as easy as carrying your boat six flights down a fire escape.” Survivors of the float (or portage) can look forward to several more Class III rapids, plus Devils Hollow Falls which has been described as one of the most difficult places on the river (most portage on river right), before reaching the U.S. 278 bridge. The bridge is 87 feet above the water, and offers a panoramic view of the narrow river valley. SEASONS Floating is a wet weather adventure on the Cossatot, requiring a minimum stream depth of three feet (Note: for daily readings, call the river stream gauge modem at 870-387-3141). The best months for the preferred floating levels are December through April. Due to the intermittent flow levels, shuttle and rental services are not available. Paddlers floating the upper sections of the river should bring their own equipment. The Cossatot should not be viewed as solely a float stream. Sightseers, campers, anglers, hikers, rock hounds, and photographers are among the many other groups that will find a season for this stream. ACCESS POINTS The river may be reached via U.S. 278, Hwy. 246, Weyerhaeuser roads (particularly #52000 which leads to Ed Banks Bridge and #52600 which goes to the Sandbar low-water bridge above Cossatot Falls), and Forest Service Road 31. SCENERY The Cossatot River is one of the state’s most scenic streams, although this fact is not always appreciated by paddlers who spend most of their time trying to stay afloat. For those who can slow down to enjoy the sights, it’s quickly apparent that the Legislature was correct in naming the Cossatot as one of four components in Arkansas’s Natural and Scenic Rivers System. The upper section also carries a National Wild and Scenic River designation.

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FISHING Smallmouth and spotted bass are the noteworthy inhabitants of the Cossatot River. Getting to them is the biggest problem facing most anglers; the stream just doesn’t lend itself to a casual fishing/floating trip. The quiet streamside hiker, however, may find good bass fishing around boulders that break the current in deep pools and chutes, especially when using live crayfish or jig-and-pig artificials. Green and longear sunfish are also abundant in the Cossatot, and anglers may occasionally hook channel catfish, largemouth bass, rock bass or bluegill. Grass pickerel or white bass populate the lower regions of the stream. (NOTE: The Cossatot is a Ouachita Zone Quality Stream. Smallmouth daily limit is two 12 inches or larger. Catch and release is encouraged.) COSSATOT RIVER AND VICINITY To Ark. 8 / Mena and U.S. 71

LEGEND Access Points Bridge State Park/Tent Camping Only Points of Interest U.S. Highway State Highway County Road County Rd. F.S. No. Forest Service Rt.

375

OUACHITA NATIONAL

SCALE IN MILES 1

0

1

2

402

3

25

81

140

31 30C

To Little Missouri Falls

FOREST

79 633 CANEY CREEK WILDERNESS AREA

31 To U.S. 71

C aney Creek

402

246

31

Cossatot River State ParkNatural Area

246

52200

To Athens and Ark. 84

52000

52600

Cossatot Falls

278

To Wickes and U.S. 71

C

AT O

278

T

To U.S. 70 and Hot Springs

ER R IV

OS S

Gillham Lake

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Cossatot River/Crooked Creek

SERVICES AVAILABLE Basic supplies can be obtained in the nearby communities of Athens, Langley, and Wickes, as well as Daisy and Queen Wilhelmina state parks. Also, a gift shop is featured in the visitor center at Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area. Campsites are available at the Sandbar and Cossatot Falls access areas. Campsites are also available in the Ouachita National Forest (Shady Lake and Bard Springs) and at Gillham Lake. OTHER INFORMATION Publications about floating the upper sections of the Cossatot are available from: Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area, 1980 U.S. 278 West, Wickes, Arkansas 71973. Also, canoeists should be advised that another 15.5 miles of the Cossatot can be floated between Gillham Dam and U.S. 70/71 east of De Queen. Excellent scenery—complete with bluffs, islands, and rapids (Class I/Class II)— characterizes the first five miles; the last 10 feature slower water and a pastoral landscape. Several bridges and fords provide access along this stretch. A brochure describing this float may be obtained by writing: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Millwood Project Office, 1528 Hwy. 32E, Ashdown, Arkansas 71822 (Note: a similar brochure for the upper river is also available).

Crooked Creek (B-4 and B-5)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to mouth, a distance of about 80 miles.

Crooked Creek

Arkansas’s stream inventory includes ten Crooked Creeks (not to mention a healthy collection of Crooked Bayous, Branches, and Sloughs), but only one has been described as “the blue-ribbon smallmouth stream of the state.” That particular Crooked Creek is found way up in the north central part of Arkansas. It originates near Marble Falls in Newton County, flows north and then east through Boone County, and continues east across Marion County where it empties into the White River. Along the way it passes through the communities of Harrison, Pyatt, and Yellville, but most of its journey is through rural countryside. CHARACTERISTICS As it meanders across northern Arkansas on the way to the White River, Crooked Creek passes through typical Ozark landscapes featuring rolling hills, cedar glades, bluffs, bottomland thickets, and lush pasturelands. The stream itself is characterized by deep pools, fast chutes, and clear water.

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In addition to its nationally known smallmouth fishery, Crooked Creek also provides habitat for many other species including channel catfish and several varieties of sunfish. Living along the stream corridor are numerous mammals— beaver, mink, and deer, to name a few—and an abundant assortment of water-oriented birds including kingfishers, ospreys, and great blue herons. While the stream’s upper reaches offer opportunities for wade-fishing and occasional float trips, most recreational use along Crooked Creek occurs in the lower 50 miles below Pyatt. A particular favorite of many smallmouth anglers is the Pyatt to Yellville section which can be broken down into at least three separate trips: a) Pyatt to Turkey—This half-day float features riffles, gravel bars, and overhanging limbs. To reach the take-out by car, go east of Snow for about two miles, then turn south off U.S. 62 onto a country road which provides access to the stream. b) Turkey to Kelly’s Slab—The longest of the three floats in the section, this one-day trip also offers good scenery, fast chutes, and occasional hazards (willow thickets, flood debris, and fallen timber). The take-out point is one mile due west of Yellville at a low-water bridge known locally as “Kelly’s Slab.” c) Kelly’s Slab to Yellville—This half-day float is similar to the upper trips, but shorter. The trip concludes on the east side of Hwy. 14 where the City of Yellville has built a public park. The last 22 miles to Yellville have been officially designated an Arkansas Water Trail by the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission (see the Water Trails section of this guide). Float trips are also possible past Yellville, but, as one account noted, this lower portion “is recommended only for the serious, dedicated fisherman.” The very ruggedness of the float—rocky shoals, tight chutes, and willow thickets—discourages most visits. Also, in late spring, a very peculiar thing happens to Crooked Creek below Yellville. It disappears, literally sinking into the ground. (Tests with colored dye revealed that the stream flows underground several miles and emerges at Cotter Spring on the White River near Cotter. The spring has been designated as a trout sanctuary by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and is now closed to fishing). SEASONS The best time for floating Crooked Creek is during spring, and that season’s early months are recommended for fishing. Good fishing is also reported in mid-fall. ACCESS POINTS Recent court decisions have supported a public easement for recreational use on Crooked Creek, such as floating and fishing. The public has a right to recreational use of the creek. However, recreational users should respect adjacent private property and should not trespass on, camp on, or litter on said property. SCENERY Clear water, colorful gravel bars, tree-lined banks, and a pastoral countryside make any Crooked Creek float a scenic experience. FISHING Crooked Creek has received national acclaim as one of the top smallmouth bass streams anywhere, and its reputation is well deserved. Ideal habitat and an abundance of crayfish, hellgrammites and other smallmouth foods combine to produce large numbers of quality fish. Two- to three-pounders are fairly common, and four- to six-pound smallmouths are not unusual. Below Yellville, the going is rough, but this is the stretch that produces six- and seven-pound “brownies.” May is perhaps the best month to fish Crooked Creek. During this season, live minnows and jigging frogs (one-eighth ounce brown jig and a brown pork frog) do exceptionally well. Fall fishing is also fantastic, especially when using crank-baits, spinnerbaits and live hellgrammites or crayfish. Popping bugs and streamers on a fly rod offer great sport for smallmouths, as well as for rock bass and longear sunfish that are also common in Crooked Creek. WATCHABLE WILDLIFE The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center on Crooked Creek near Yellville sits on 421 shoreline acres that occupy a 2.75-mile ”crook” of the creek just above Kelley’s access. Facilities include an education building, trails, the creek and acres of varied Ozark habit which provide ample indoor and outdoor learning areas. The classromm can facilitate up to 40, though larger numbers can be seated. It includes a wet lab, exhibits and wildlife common to the area as well as an outdoor Ozark native plant garden. The pavilion, which overlooks Crooked Creek and its floodplain, can seat approximately 100 people. The Creek Bottom Trail, a 2.5-mile loop, provides easy access for fishing or wildlife watch-

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Crooked Creek

ing. The Woodland Edge Trail is a one-mile loop that is wheelchair accessible for 0.6 mile. The center and area is a designated Arkansas Watchable Wildlife site with butterfly and birding checklists available at the center. OTHER INFORMATION Again, visitors to Crooked Creek should remain mindful that nearly every acre along the creek is in private ownership. Floaters should take special care to avoid potential trespassing problems. Like most Ozark streams, Crooked Creek can rise rapidly following heavy rains. In flood stage, it’s dangerous and should not be floated. CROOKED CREEK AND VICINITY 62

To Harrison

Pyatt Snow

C

RO

OK

ED

Yellville

14

To Buffalo River

To Bull Shoals

178

Flippin

62

CR E EK

2 3

101

LEGEND

1

Access Point Bridge U.S. Highway State Highway

0

SCALE IN MILES

1

Cotter

4

WH I

62

TE

To Mountain Home

RIVE R

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Eleven Point River (A-7, A-8, B-7 and B-8)

SECTION DESCRIBED: From Missouri State Highway 142 to the stream’s confluence with the Spring River, a distance of 44 miles.

Eleven Point River

A year-round float stream, the Eleven Point is fed by numerous springs making it an ideal destination for floaters any month. About 70 percent of its flow is supplied by these springs. Even when the river is low after a period of drought, all shoal areas can be navigated. Rising in the Ozarks of Missouri, the Eleven Point flows southward through the Mark Twain National Forest, passing rocky, dramatic country. But once it enters Arkansas, the terrain becomes more alluvial. Its pace slows, and the scenery becomes pastoral and bucolic. From the river, a fringe of forest hides the pastures and farm houses just beyond. A clear, unpolluted stream, the Eleven Point is a favorite of canoeists because of its frequent rapids. Sand and gravel bars on the lower river, some of considerable height, are subject to cave-ins due to the natural action of the water. This can be a problem to floaters, since the resulting debris can obstruct the stream’s flow. Islands are characteristic of the Eleven Point, probably formed in times past by these cave-ins. Passage around some of these islands may be blocked, requiring an occasional portage. In addition to the islands, there are five old stone dams providing their own form of hazard if the stream is high. Below the community of Dalton, inexperienced canoeists should avoid the river due to the tricky nature of these dams. However, above Dalton, the stream is reasonably safe for all when the water is low to medium in height. CHARACTERISTICS A traditional put-in point is at the east end of the Missouri 142 bridge near the Calm community. Five miles downstream, the Missouri-Arkansas line is crossed, marked by an “Entering Arkansas” sign. Another mile or two and floaters come to the first of the old stone dams. The best way to navigate this one is to walk the canoe through a small chute on the left. The second old stone dam is at the 15-mile mark. While it can be negotiated to the left of the center island with a sharp right turn, it’s perhaps simpler and safer to drag your canoe over gravel on the right. Just beyond is the Hwy. 93 bridge at Dalton. Campsites are available on private land here; inquire at the grocery store for details, and for directions to the nearby put-in point. The swift current along the shore is difficult to maneuver in, and it might be best to walk a canoe through, keeping it out of the current before getting underway. A third stone dam lies just about eight miles downstream, shortly after an island and its accompanying brush-filled channels. There is a break in the dam to the right that can be run, but because of willows just beyond, it might be best to walk the craft through. Less than a mile beyond is the Hwy. 90 bridge, supported by high banks. There is deep water on the left, and a landing beyond the bridge, but the property is private and posted.

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Eleven Point River

Next comes the Black Ferry Bridge, on a county road. Steep banks and deep water make this a difficult launching site. (The Corps of Engineers has proposed in times past the damming of the Eleven Point at a site just beyond, to be called Water Valley Dam. The resulting impoundment would have extended to the state line.) Just above the U.S. 62 bridge is the fourth dam, which can be run at low water. On the upstream side of the bridge you’ll find a put-in on the east bank. Seven-tenths of a mile below the 62 crossing is an emergency exit on the left at the site of the old bridge for the highway. ELEVEN POINT RIVER AND VICINITY To Doniphan, MO and U.S. 67/ Corning, AR

To Thayer, MO and U.S. 63 / Mammoth Spring, AR

142

EL E N VE

Elm Store

MISSOURI ARKANSAS

93

LEGEND PO

Access Points Bridge State Park/Campground U.S. Highway Arkansas State Highway Missouri State Highway County Road

I

NT

Dalton

R VE RI 93

SCALE IN MILES 1

0

1

2

3

4

90

E

VEN LE

Ravenden Springs

To Corning

90 To U.S. 63

NT POI

67

RI V

ER

Pocahontas

To Hardy

RIV ER

62

S P R IN G 63

166

Imboden

ACK BL

R

IVE

R To Jonesboro

To Black Rock

361

Davidsonville Historic State Park

216

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The fifth stone dam comes into view next, complete with several breaches for lining a canoe through. Within a few miles the Eleven Point enters the Spring River, and four and a half miles later the Spring joins up with the Black River. The Game and Fish Commission maintains a public landing ramp on the right bank of the Black River just below the junction. Access is provided by a county road from Black Rock, a little over a mile away. SEASONS Because of its numerous springs, the Eleven Point is a year-round stream. However, when the river is up and charging southward, all but the most experienced canoeists should stay on the bank. ACCESS POINTS Principal access points are: Missouri 142; Dalton (Hwy. 93); Hwy. 90; the county road at Black Ferry Bridge; and U.S. 62. SCENERY Although farmland borders the Eleven Point throughout most of its Arkansas length, the heavy growth along the banks tends to conceal the signs of civilization and to give the floater the sense of being miles from anywhere. Black gum, sycamore, bois d’arc, oak, sweet gum, willow, walnut and river birch are found in this lush growth. Wildflower displays are frequent and a special treat of the Eleven Point. Herons often stand sentinel in quiet reaches of the stream. And, on hot summer days, the Eleven Point makes a delightful swimming hole because of its spring-fed coolness. FISHING The Eleven Point’s gravelled path is an ideal spawning ground for smallmouth bass. While an occasional three- or four-pounder is taken, most will weigh from one to two pounds. Even so, the number of smallmouths in the river is phenomenal, and it’s not unheard of to haul in a pair of smallmouths on a single crank-bait. When the water is clear, minnow-replica crank-baits on fairly light line are recommended. On those rare occasions when rains give the water some turbidity, large spinner-baits and crank-baits are also good producers. One of the most overlooked fish species in Arkansas’s cold-water streams is the channel catfish. While most people associate channels with muddy, slow-moving waters, they actually prefer clear, gravel-bottomed streams. Channel cats are abundant in the Eleven Point and will accept a variety of offerings including chicken liver and stinkbaits. The flathead catfish, another common Eleven Point sportfish, prefers live baits such as minnows and small sunfish. Anglers will also find good action for spotted bass and longear sunfish. The Eleven Point offers fish a smorgasbord of aquatic foods such as crayfish, hellgrammites, leeches, salamanders, mayfly and stonefly nymphs, a variety of chubs, darters and small fish, worms, mussels and an occasional terrestrial insect washed in during a cloudburst. It goes without saying that fish use these foods on a day-to-day basis in this and other float streams, and a fresh, well-fished live bait offering is often more enticing than an artificial lure. SERVICES AVAILABLE The nearby city of Pocahontas is a major trade center for the area around the Eleven Point. Public campsites are available at Davidsonville Historic State Park southwest of Pocahontas. OTHER INFORMATION Since along most of its Arkansas length, the Eleven Point flows past privately-owned farmland, visitors need to be mindful to avoid trespassing problems.

Illinois Bayou (C-4 and D-4)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Entire length from backwaters of Lake Dardanelle to headwaters in the Ozarks.

For most of us, the term “bayou” means one thing: a sluggish body of water. But anybody getting on the Illinois Bayou with that thought in mind is in for a big and wet surprise. The Bayou, as many of its floaters know it, has its origins high up on the south slopes of the Ozarks. As the stream works its way toward Russellville and the Arkansas River, there’s nothing slow and lazy about it. It may be the only bayou in the country featuring Class II/III whitewater.

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Illinois Bayou

Illinois Bayou

CHARACTERISTICS The Illinois Bayou really is not one stream but four: 1) the North Fork; 2) the Middle Fork; 3) the East Fork; and 4) the main stem (downstream from Bayou Bluff). Because of these divisions in what is a relatively small watershed, it takes a good amount of rainfall to get them up to floating levels. But once there, they offer some of the state’s best white water. In fact, the Bayou is recommended for experienced paddlers. It is not a good first-time float. The North Fork offers a trip through truly remote country. During the 10-mile float from the Dry Creek put-in (on Forest Road 1310) to the Forest Road 1001 take-out, visitors will be well removed from civilization, passing no roads, bridges, houses, or fields. Prospective floaters are warned that the shuttle is an ordeal involving considerable driving. The float itself is a delight—Class II and III rapids (19 feet/mile gradient), short pools, narrow channels, great scenery, and a wonderful sense of solitude. In times of high water, floaters may put in at Forest Road 1000, but again, the stream is strictly for the experienced paddler. The Bayou’s Middle Fork offers a two-mile float that is one of Arkansas’s best for continuous white water. It begins at the Snow Creek put-in (two miles up Forest Road 1312, off Hwy. 27) and concludes at Bayou Bluff Campground, just below the junction of the Middle and East Forks. Along the way, the stream drops 20 feet per mile, creating all kinds of excitement including some Class II/III rapids. Unlike the North Fork’s float, this Middle Fork section is seldom far from roads, yet it also offers a sense of remoteness. A good float can also be had on the East Fork—when conditions are right. A 12-mile trip from Forest Road 1301 to Bayou Bluff is steep, dropping 25 feet per mile, and wild, passing through the middle of the 10,800-acre East Fork Wilderness Area. Like its companion floats, this one is not for the novice. The main stem of the Illinois Bayou begins where the Middle and East Forks run together near Bayou Bluff and continues, for floating purposes, to the Hwy. 164 bridge north of Scottsville. This stretch includes the most commonly floated section of the Bayou—the four-mile trip from Bayou Bluff to the Hwy. 27 bridge north of Hector. Throughout this trip the paddler can expect many Class II rapids, including one just upstream from the take-out that features large standing waves. The second float—from the 27 bridge to the 164 crossing—is about seven miles long and considerably calmer than the others. The North Fork joins up with the main stem about halfway along this float. Rapids are present, but most are of the Class I variety.

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ACCESS POINTS Primary points of access for the Bayou and its forks are the Hwy. 164 and 27 bridges, and several Forest Road crossings (chiefly 1000, 1001, 1301, and 1312). The Hwy. 27 access is less than 20 miles north of Interstate 40. SEASONS The Illinois Bayou is a seasonal stream, floatable only after periods of extended rainfall. A good indicator of “floatability” is the Scottsville reading on the Corps of Engineers’ recording (501-324-5150). Levels between 6.0 and 7.0 are best (6.5 minimum for the North Fork), and much beyond 7.5 is considered risky. ILLINOIS BAYOU AND VICINITY To Ark. 7

Ben Hur

16

To Witts Springs

Pedestal Rocks

16 16

BAY OU

To Marshall

17 To Ark. 7

73

51

21

51

EAST FORK WILDERNESS AREA

RK FO

ek

27

51

72

RK

DDLE

EAST

21

MI

re w C

ILLINOIS

IS INO

Sn o

BAYOU

72

F O RK

FOREST

ILL

Dry

Cre e

k

NATIONAL

27

B AYOU

OZARK

ILLINOIS

73

51

F

O

N OR

TH

Bayou Bluff

19

20

21

LEGEND 51

YOU BA

S OI ILLI N

27

Hector

27 To Dover and Russellville

SCALE IN MILES 1

164 Scottsville

Access Points Campground Bridge Points of Interest State Highway County Road

0

1

2

27 105

To Atkins and I-40

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Illinois Bayou

Kings River

SCENERY The scenery is superb for all floats on the Bayou. The three forks—North, Middle, and East—provide exposure to rugged and remote country. Rocky outcrops, steep hillsides of dense forest, and periodic glimpses of wildlife can be expected. The main stem offers overhanging trees, interesting vistas, and occasional scenes of pastoral landscapes. FISHING Bass are king on Illinois Bayou, and anglers will find healthy populations of three species—the largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass. Bass fishing is generally best in spring and early summer, although some anglers prefer to fish the potholes that form during drier months. Anglers who want to land a real lunker may want to bait up with small sunfish or large minnows and try for one of the flathead catfish lurking in these waters. Cold-water flatheads may reach weights up to 50 pounds or more, making them the largest fish available to float stream fishermen. The best flathead fishing is at night, and the best areas to try include washouts around downed timber and deep holes in the outside bends of the stream. Multi-colored green and longear sunfish are also abundant in Illinois Bayou. These fish readily accept worms, crickets, mini-jigs and tiny crank-baits, and while they rarely reach even a pound in weight, they can provide hours of fishing fun for kids and adults alike. SERVICES AVAILABLE Most any necessity (other than rental canoes) can be obtained in the nearby towns of Hector and Atkins. Camping is possible at the Bayou Bluff Campground at the confluence of the Middle and East Forks. In addition, the Forest Service has other developed campgrounds—like Brock Creek and Long Pool—that are within easy driving distance. OTHER INFORMATION One of Arkansas’s more interesting geological marvels can be observed at Pedestal Rocks, a site within the watershed of the Illinois Bayou’s North Fork. In addition to seeing the large, weathered limestone columns, visitors to the area can poke around in caves and bluff shelters. Photographers will also enjoy the panoramic views of the North Fork’s valley. To get there, turn east off Hwy. 7 onto Hwy. 16, and then go for about five miles toward Ben Hur. The parking area will be visible on the south side of the highway. Another interesting area is the East Fork Wilderness. While it is accessible by canoe at times, the best way to see the wilderness is by foot. Features include upland swamps, waterfalls, and generally rugged country. The best times for visits are during fall, winter, and spring months.

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Finally, floaters should bear in mind that private property does exist within the Ozark National Forest. Posted land should not be entered.

Kings River (A-3 and B-3)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Headwaters to the Arkansas-Missouri border, a distance of approximately 90 miles.

High in the Boston Mountains of Madison County lie the beginnings of the Kings River. From this steep country the stream twists its way northward to the White River and finally flows into southern Missouri’s Table Rock Lake. In its KING'S RIVER AND VICINITY Table Rock Lake

MISSOURI ARKANSAS To Rogers

Summer's Ford

Grand View

62

221 143

62

Eureka Springs Berryville

LEGEND

221

23

Access Points Bridge Points of Interest State Park/ Campground Trail U.S. Highway State Highway

62 Trigger Gap

To Harrison and U.S. 65

Rockhouse W

arm

21

F o r k C r e ek

SCALE IN MILES 0

1

2

3

4

5

412

Marshal Ford

Forum

To Harrison and U.S. 65

127 Withrow Springs State Park

To Springdale

Marble

Alabam

412

412 Huntsville

Kingston

74 74

23

Kings River Falls Natural Area

To Pettigrew

Boston

16

16

16 23

To Boxley

KINGS R IV E R

To Fayetteville

21

To Fallsville

OZARK NATIONAL FOREST

To Ozark and I-40

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Kings River

upper reaches, the Kings cuts a narrow gorge through sandstone, shale, and limestone. On downstream the surrounding countryside is not quite so precipitous, but the water is the same—clear and cool. The Kings’ most attractive features are found along the rocky banks and bluffs where floaters will notice wild azaleas, ferns, umbrella magnolias, and other fascinating plants. In addition, observant visitors can view a great many signs of wildlife—beaver cuttings and deer and raccoon tracks, for instance—and may even spot some of the local creatures. CHARACTERISTICS The headwaters area is, of course, no place to float, but it does offer some hiking opportunities. One good place in particular is the Kings River Falls Natural Area, a preserve of the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission. In addition to observing the falls themselves (which drop about 6 feet over a water-sculpted ledge), visitors can inspect a great many interesting plants in the area, and history buffs might try to envision the grist mill which was once located at the site. To get there, travel to the community of Boston, located on Hwy. 16. At Boston, go north on the county road for about 2 miles until the road forks. Keep to the right and continue north for another 2.5 miles or so, at which point the road again forks. Take the left fork, ford the creek, and then park your car to the right. A trail—about three-quarters of a mile along and paralleling the river—will lead downstream to the falls. While some floating takes place in the Kingston area, Marble is a traditional starting-off place for many Kings River visitors (note: the put-in is northwest of Marble at a county road crossing). After 11 miles of deep pools, overhanging trees, occasional rapids, and several large bluffs, floaters will arrive at Marshall Ford, an access point northeast of Alabam. The second Kings River stretch is the Marshall Ford to Rockhouse run, a 15-mile trip through quiet and attractive country. Access to the river at Rockhouse is a little out-of-the-ordinary; floaters must navigate a feeder stream (Warm Fork Creek) for a few hundred yards before entering or exiting the Kings. A seven-mile stretch from Rockhouse to Trigger Gap is the third in the series, and offers a peaceful float. The take-out point is a low-water bridge on Hwy. 221 about 9 miles southwest of Berryville. The next section—Trigger Gap to the U.S. 62 crossing—is a favorite of Kings River veterans. The 12-mile trip combines good scenery with good fishing. Osage Creek, the Kings River’s largest tributary and a float stream in its own right early in the year, enters on the right about a quarter of a mile above the U.S. 62 bridge. A 12-mile float from the U.S. 62 crossing to Summers Ford (off Hwy. 143) is another memorable run, and a popular choice for fishermen. Some fine gravel bars are found in this stretch of the river. The last Kings River trip begins at Summers Ford and concludes eight miles later in Missouri at the Highway 86 bridge. Halfway into the trip floaters will encounter backwaters of Table Rock Lake. SEASONS Upstream from U.S. 62, the April-June period is considered best for a float, although fall rains, if sufficient, can make for good canoeing. Below 62, floating extends into early summer. ACCESS POINTS General Highway Maps for Carroll and Madison counties will help floaters locate the entry points listed in earlier paragraphs. (Note: Visitors are advised that access is not recommended at the U.S. 412 bridge east of Marble.) SCENERY Overhanging hardwood forests, fine gravel bars, and rugged bluffs give the Kings River good marks in the scenery department. Also attesting to the stream’s beauty is the fact that in 1971 the General Assembly passed legislation to protect that portion of the river in Madison County, noting that it “possesses unique scenic, recreational, and other characteristics in a natural, unpolluted and wild state.” Thus, the Kings River was the state’s first stream to receive governmental protection. FISHING A float on Kings River is a return to fishing in its purest form—no motors, no loaded bass boat, only your partner quietly paddling as you both absorb the untainted outdoor grandeur. The Kings has countless rock bass and hefty channel cats, but when fishing this stream, first and foremost on the minds of most anglers are the big smallmouth bass. If you want to catch the real Kings River lunker smallies, take along heavy tackle. Some people expect bass from this

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smallish stream to be small, too, and that can cost trophy fish which commonly reach four to six pounds. A baitcasting reel, a medium-action rod, and 10- to 12-pound line are appropriate. Two sportfish often overlooked by Kings River anglers are the walleye and white bass. Both species are common in the portion of the river near Table Rock Lake during the spring spawning runs in March, April and early May. White bass will hit a variety of shad-imitation lures and minnows, while walleyes are usually taken on live baits such as minnows, crayfish and worms or artificial lures, particularly deep-running crank-baits and jigs. SERVICES AVAILABLE Berryville and Eureka Springs are both located near the Kings River and can meet the needs of most visitors. In addition, several outfitters have operations in the area for those wishing to experience the stream. OTHER INFORMATION Folks who enjoy floating the Kings River will be equally delighted by its sister stream, War Eagle Creek. War Eagle, which flows west of the Kings and parallel to it, is chiefly a springtime float offering good scenery and fine fishing. Canoes may be rented at Withrow Springs State Park which borders the stream north of Huntsville.

Little Missouri River (F-2)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Headwaters area to Lake Greeson, a total of 29 miles.

Little Missouri River

From its headwaters south of the Big Fork community to the backwaters of Lake Greeson, the Little Missouri River descends some 1,035 feet. For the 29-mile journey, that’s an average drop of 35 feet per mile, and that means one thing—white-water. But the stream offers more than excitement, although it has plenty of that. It also provides a solid introduction to the Ouachita Mountain country of southwest Arkansas. Pine-covered ridges tower hundreds of feet above the rocky channel. In several places, the Little Missouri has cut through the twisted rock layers that are the very essence of the Ouachitas. It is, in short, an interesting stream. CHARACTERISTICS The stream’s first section—from its source to Albert Pike—is not one for floating. This upper stretch has its merits, however. A chief attraction is the Little Missouri Falls area which has been developed for day-use activities (i.e., no

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Little Missouri River

camping) by the Ouachita National Forest. While there are no developed facilities between the falls and Albert Pike, the river corridor offers possibilities for all kinds of outdoor pursuits—swimming in deep pools, hiking along the streambank, and wildlife photography, just to name a few. The Albert Pike to Hwy. 84 run is one of the best in the state. It begins on national forest property near the junction of Forest Roads 73 and 106, and continues for about 8.5 rough-and-tumble miles. This stretch of the river heads downhill at a good clip—25 feet per mile. The rapids are exciting (up to Class IV in high water), with many featuring standing waves at their bases. Along the way floaters will pass the mouth of Greasy Creek, near which Albert Pike—the famed LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER AND VICINITY To Mena

OUACHITA NATIONAL FOREST

8

8

25

L I T T LE

To Glenwood

43

MISSO URI

73

Little Missouri Falls

43

RIVE R 4 To Bard Springs Recreation Area

Albert Pike

106 73

Winding Stair Falls

LEGEND

Langley To U.S. 278

1

2

To Hot Springs

MI S 369

VER

0

84

RI

70

SCALE IN MILES 1

LITTL E

SOUR I

Access Points Campground Bridge Points of Interest Day Use Area State Park/ Campground U.S. Highway State Highway County Road County Rd. Forest Service Number

To Hot Springs

70

Daisy State Park

3 To DeQueen

Lake Greeson

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pioneer lawyer, general, and poet—once lived in a well-appointed cabin. More noticeable will be Winding Stair Rapid, a series of drops that may well put water into one’s boat. The rapid—which is approximately three miles below the putin—can, and should, be scouted from the left (east) bank; heavy flows can put it in the Class IV level. The remainder of the float features numerous rapids in the Class I-Class III categories, including a diagonally-running ledge about a quarter mile below Winding Stair that can be tricky. While the Hwy. 84 to Lake Greeson section doesn’t require the technical paddling skills of the upper section, it, too, offers gunnel-grabbing excitement. Its claim to fame is standing waves—some of the biggest in the state when the water is up. The floating distance is 10-11 miles. SEASONS The Little Missouri River is among the most seasonal of Arkansas streams, primarily because of its small watershed. It’s floatable only after periods of considerable rainfall, and even then the stream may not stay navigable for long. The wet months of spring offer the best chances for catching it at a good level. ACCESS POINTS The stream’s major access points are: at Albert Pike area off Forest Road 106 north of Langley; the Hwy. 84 bridge west of Langley; and the U.S. 70 bridge at the Star of the West area on Lake Greeson. All roads are paved with the exception of those in the Ouachita National Forest. SCENERY It doesn’t take a geologist to note some differences between the Ouachita mountains and the Ozarks. Floaters can pick up on them, too. Bluffs, which are common on many Ozark rivers, are unusual in the Ouachitas. Unlike the flat-topped mountains found in the northern parts of the state, steep ridges—many of them the hogback variety—are the rule in the Ouachitas. And where streams have worked their way through these ridgelines, they’ve exposed upturned rock strata whose rough, jagged edges are unlike anything in the Ozarks. Floaters beware! In short, the Ouachitas are no less scenic than their sister mountains to the north; they’re just built differently. Finally, the Arkansas General Assembly has even recognized the beauty of the Little Missouri River. In 1985 the legislature passed an act placing this 29-mile stretch into the Arkansas Natural and Scenic Rivers System—one of the first such designations. FISHING Like many of Arkansas’s other mountain streams, the Little Missouri harbors smallmouth bass, spotted bass, green sunfish and longears which may be taken year-round. White bass are also present in the headwaters of Lake Greeson during the spring spawning run. The Little Missouri seldom comes to mind when the state’s great trout streams are mentioned. However, thousands of rainbow trout are stocked in the stream both above and below Lake Greeson, providing exciting sport for trout enthusiasts. The lower Little Missouri (below Narrows Dam) differs from other Arkansas trout streams in that it is primarily a coldweather fishery. When there is no demand for electricity, the flow from Narrows Dam is cut to a mere 15 cubic feet per second, which isn’t sufficient to sustain lower water temperatures required by trout. As a result, the trout season here runs from early December (when the Game and Fish Commission begins its annual stocking program on the river) to Memorial Day or thereabouts. Stocking is finished by early April each year, and by late May, fishing pressure and rising water temperatures have just about wiped out the trout. Few fish manage to survive through the summer, but the lower Little Missouri offers excellent fishing for about five months each year for trout in the one-half to three-quarter pound range, and that’s nothing to sneeze at. Rainbow trout can be caught in the river above Lake Greeson, especially near the Albert Pike area, year-round. SERVICES AVAILABLE Following the tragic flood of June 2010, the Ouachita National Forest closed the public campground at Albert Pike. A private campground, located nearby, was also closed, although Lowery’s Store remains in operation along with several rental cabins. Other services are available in the Langley, Kirby, and Daisy communities. Several public campgrounds can be found on Lake Greeson, including one—Star of the West—at the take-out point for the lower float.

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Little Missouri River/Little Red River

OTHER INFORMATION Few people realize that much of the Little Missouri River and the surrounding landscape nearly became a national park back in the late 1920s/early 1930s. Only a last-minute veto by then-President Calvin Coolidge prevented establishment of the 165,000-acre Ouachita National Park. The Little Missouri River can also be floated below Lake Greeson, and is popular with trout fishermen for the first half-dozen miles below the dam.

Little Red River (C-5)

SECTION DESCRIBED: From Greers Ferry Dam to Ramsey Public Access, a distance of approximately 29 miles.

Little Red River

One of the most popular fishing and floating streams in Arkansas, the lower Little Red River flows from the base of Greers Ferry Dam near the town of Heber Springs to eventually merge with the White River at the Hurricane Lake Wildlife Management Area just east of Searcy. The chief reason for its popularity is trout—thousands and thousands of which are stocked in the stream on a regular basis. Good scenery and convenient access also work in the river’s favor. CHARACTERISTICS The Little Red River is generally a good year-round float. The condition of the river is dependent upon generation periods of the powerhouse at the dam. It becomes very swift and dangerous in spots when water is released, but after generation ceases, the Little Red reverts to a peaceful Ozark mountain stream with long, gentle pools and numerous shoals. During periods of high flow, the river should be floated only by experienced boaters. The first few miles of river below Greers Ferry Lake are strewn with boulders, making a challenging float for canoers, but a difficult one for crafts larger than a johnboat. Beyond this stretch, there is a long pool of deep water. Farther downstream, an island hinders river travel. The usual approach is to veer left at the island, which will take floaters into one of the river’s largest fishing holes. Approximately one-and-one-half miles downstream, a series of shoals impedes travel of large boats when water levels are low. Beyond this shoal area, canoes are the best choice for shallow areas and a series of bends. Next is a three-mile-long deep hole, followed by a narrowing of the river into another long shoal. These shoals give way to deep pools above Pangburn, then the river’s pace picks up with a series of rapids upstream of the low water bridge north of town. Beyond the rapids, the river widens as it flows through another series of shoals.

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The last access point, Ramsey Access, is a few miles downstream. Total distance from the dam to the last access is 29 miles. Trout waters end a few miles beyond the Ramsey area at Hwy. 305. ACCESS POINTS A Corps of Engineers public ramp on the north bank, located next to the Federal Fish Hatchery, is the easiest access to the upper portion of the river. Other public access points on the middle and lower stretches of the river, maintained by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, include Barnett (Winkley Bridge), Lobo (adjacent to Lobo Landing Trout Dock), Dripping Springs, and Ramsey. Four commercial boat docks also offer launch ramps. LITTLE RED RIVER AND VICINITY

25

Greers Ferry Lake

25

Heber Springs

110

To U.S. 65

Dam

Greer's Ferry Information Center

110

To Batesville

Trout Hatchery

337

2

25

LEGEND

1

Access Points Bridge Trout Hatchery Points of Interest Parking U.S. Highway State Highway

0

SCALE IN MILES

1

210

LITTLE

16

110 Wilburn

RED

337

110

RIVE

R

16

Big Creek Natural Area

K BIG C R E E

Pangburn

16

To Searcy

124 To Alonzo and Ark. 87

To Ark. 305

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Little Red River

Most of the land bordering the river is privately-owned and is posted. Always check with landowners before attempting access to the river via private property. SEASONS Water conditions on the Little Red don’t vary so much by season as they do by day of the week. On weekdays, when power demand is usually at its greatest, water is frequently released around mid-morning. Demand for electricity drops over the weekends, and so do water levels. When the river reading is low, expect to wade and drag boats over the shoals. SCENERY The scenery is outstanding, easily good enough to offset one of those rare occasions when the fish aren’t biting. As it cuts through beautiful Ozark foothills, the Little Red provides excellent year-round viewing. FISHING The Little Red is among the real blue-ribbon trout streams of America and takes her place alongside the White as one of the best in the South. Hundreds of thousands of rainbow trout are stocked here annually. The Little Red is an excellent fishery for brown trout as well, having populated the river through natural reproduction from two introductions in the 1970s by fly fishing clubs. The secret to fishing the Little Red is light tackle and small lures. Ultralight spinning rigs and two- to four-pound line are popular. Most trout are taken on bait, rather than artificials, simply because more anglers use it. Whole kernel corn, redworms, nightcrawlers, waxworms, salmon eggs, and even Velveeta cheese all take their share. Favorite artificials for Little Red trout include marabou jigs, small spinners and spoons, and crayfish- and minnowimitation crank-baits. But one of the most productive techniques involves a curious marriage between bait and artificials. This rig consists of a small, clear bobber rigged about four or five feet above a brown feather jig, on the barb of which is impaled a small white waxworm. The rig is cumbersome to cast, but that’s acceptable since the proper fishing technique is to work the lure in as slowly as possible. During highwater, driftfishing with the current is favored. Bait is cast upstream and allowed to bump the bottom as it drags behind the boat. On low water, stillfishing deep holes, weedbeds, and timber from an anchored boat is preferred. The Little Red is also one of Arkansas’s most popular flyfishing streams, and the many shoals exposed during low water periods offer ideal locations to hook a hefty trout on a variety of fly patterns. Arkansas’s trout season never closes, but many of the larger fish are taken from October through February. Although trout get most of the publicity on the Little Red, anglers shouldn’t overlook opportunities for taking other species as well. The river has healthy populations of chain pickerel, spotted and smallmouth bass, green and longear sunfish, rock bass and bluegills. SERVICES AVAILABLE A network of resorts, private campgrounds, restaurants, bait shops, and guide services has been established to serve the recreating public. In addition, the nearby city of Heber Springs serves as a trade center for the surrounding area. Public camping spots are located on Greers Ferry Lake. OTHER INFORMATION In the spring, the forks of the Little Red are floatable above Greers Ferry Lake, and the best of the lot is probably the Middle Fork. Flowing between the towns of Leslie and Shirley, the Middle Fork cuts a 30-mile path through some of the state’s most rugged terrain. The river boasts a sharp fall creating a series of rapids that can be treacherous during periods of heavy rainfall. Only experienced canoeists should attempt this float when water levels are high. Another of the tributaries, the South Fork, flows for 13 miles between Scotland and Clinton, and is not a bad fishing stream. Canoeists interested in getting on new water might also check out Big Creek, one of the Little Red’s major tributaries. Several put-in points are located on county roads east of Wilburn (see a Cleburne County map for details), while the traditional take-out is an old iron bridge near the stream’s confluence with the Little Red. To get to the iron bridge, go north on Hwy. 110 from Pangburn, then turn east on a county road about three-quarters of a mile beyond the Little Red River bridge. Highlights of the float include deep pools, class l/II rapids, towering bluffs, and—believe it or not—cypress trees and knees. Floaters will also find several interesting attractions in the area. One is the Greers Ferry Visitors Information Center,

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an impressive structure housing a museum, a Corps of Engineers display, and an exciting audiovisual presentation of the region’s history. Two nearby trails, Mossy Bluff and Buckeye (handicapped accessible), provide lofty views and interpretive stops along the way. In addition, visitors can tour Greers Ferry Dam and the National Fish Hatchery, located just downstream from the dam.

Mulberry River (C-2 and C-3)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to Arkansas River, a distance of 50-55 miles.

Mulberry River

It wouldn’t be completely accurate to describe the Mulberry River as 50 miles of white water, but it would not be far from the truth for several months of the year. According to one publication, the stream “is definitely the state’s wildest river during spring.” From its beginnings deep in the Ozarks to its confluence with the Arkansas River, the Mulberry pours over ledges, shoots through willow thickets, and whips around sharp turns. These wild characteristics are what give the stream its Class II/III rating, and high marks from the floating public. In drier times, the river takes on a completely different personality. It’s a good place to swim, wade, skip rocks, and stalk the wary smallmouth. The best floating during the summer months is on an air mattress at one of the local swimming holes. In short, the Mulberry River is a seasonal stream, but the good news is that it offers a season for just about anybody. The General Assembly recognized this fact in 1985 when it officially declared the Mulberry to be “a scenic river of the State of Arkansas.” CHARACTERISTICS The Mulberry flows in a west-southwesterly course in its rush to leave the Ozarks. Access points are fairly common, particularly where the stream is within the Ozark National Forest. The first major put-in point is Wolf Pen. A minimum river level of 2.0 feet is necessary to start this far up. The Little Mulberry joins up with the main stem about two miles below Wolf Pen; paddlers will note its entry on the right side (north shore) of the Mulberry. The best action begins here. The High Bank Access is on river right 2 miles below Little Mulberry. The river continues its fast pace with several named and unnamed rapids, one after the other. Byrds Access is on the right one mile above Low Water Bridge, which is the Forest Road 1504 cross-

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Mulberry Rivers

ing. There is a fee for access and parking at Byrds. Access at Low Water Bridge is very difficult and there is no parking. Safe passage is to the right at Low Water Bridge. The stretch from Wolf Pen to Byrds is about 8.5 miles, with a gradient of 15 feet per mile. The second float, from Byrds to Turner Bend (Hwy. 23 crossing) is a popular stretch of river because the access is good and action steady. It is 7.5 miles, with a gradient of 13 feet per mile. There is plenty of Class II excitement along this route, including some rather large boulders that tend to influence the stream flow. Redding Campground, a Forest Service Development, is on the right 2.7 miles below the 1504 bridge. Shortly below Redding the river takes a major split. MULBERRY RIVER AND VICINITY 215

M

BERR Y

R I VE

1514

R

1003

Milton's Ford Access

451

I-40 23

To Ozark and U.S. 64

23

OZARK

1

32

2

NATIONAL

83

84

88

0

SCALE IN MILES

1

FOREST

Redding Recreation Area

To Huntsville

Cass Turner Bend

219

U.S. Highway State Highway County Road Forest Service Route

LEGEND

Access Points Bridge Campground Interstate Highway

Shores Lake Recreation Area

To Ft. Smith

Mulberry

UL

To U.S. 64

3

164

Wolf Pen Recreation Area

4

LE TT

LI

R VE RI

MULBERRY

215 Catalupa

R

103

36

IV ER

Clarksville

Harmony

MULBERRY

Oark

103

I-40

To Lake Dardanelle

To Fallsville

21

Ozone

21

To Russellville

NO PRINT窶認OR INDEXING MAP ONLY Mulberry River Pub5_AAG1415_Float-d2.indd 104

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Either fork is navigable, although the right fork is more commonly used. A private campground is found at Turner Bend. The third major float takes on more of a “pool and drop” characteristic beginning at Turner Bend. Big Eddy, a popular swimming hole and occasional access point, is on the right 2.4 miles below the Hwy. 23 bridge. Milton Ford Access, located on Forest Road 1501 west of Hwy. 23, is approximately 8.5 miles downstream from Turner Bend on the right. Most use Campbell Cemetery as an access point 1.9 miles downstream. This entire stretch is 10.6 miles, with a gradient of 11 feet per mile. Like the Mulberry’s earlier floats, this one features solid Class II white water, plus several notorious willow thickets that should be negotiated with caution. The Mulberry’s last section, a beautiful and remote stretch between Campbell Cemetery and Mill Creek (12.7 miles, with a gradient of 11 feet per mile), is less floated because of the length of the float and shuttle. The pools are a little longer but the rapids are big. The river splits just below Campbell. Either fork is okay. A slow stretch of river leads up to the confluence with Spirits Creek. Some boaters access at Spirits Creek by dragging their boats to a Forest Service road that dead ends approximately 400 yards from the north bank of the Mulberry. One and a half miles below Spirits Creek is the confluence with Hurricane Creek, a major tributary that comes in on the right and marks the midway point between Campbell and Mill Creek. The pace picks up a little here over several shoals. Most folks take out at Mill Creek Access. At this point you have left the Ozark National Forest and the mountains as the river approaches its confluence with the Arkansas River. To reach Mill Creek Access, turn east off Hwy. 215 between an old store and the Crawford county line. SEASONS Traditional floating months are late fall to June, but conditions can vary according to local rainfall. The best bet for canoeists is to visit RiverGages.com. Readings between 2.0 and 4.0 are ideal, while 4.5 and beyond are considered dangerous. ACCESS POINTS Primary points of access include Hwys. 23 and 215 (all paved), and Forest Roads 1003, 1501, and 1504. And while the Mulberry is located in some of the state’s wildest country, the stream is amazingly convenient; the Hwy. 23 crossing is less than a dozen miles north of Interstate 40. SCENERY Visitors to the Mulberry can expect basic Ozark Mountain scenery—narrow canyons, tree-lined bluffs, and dense woods. A good assortment of wildlife is found in the immediate area, including one of the state’s largest concentrations of black bears. The stream itself is clear, cool, and challenging. FISHING The Mulberry River is a fine fishing stream provided you’re on it at the right time. In early spring, it’s frequently too high and fast for a laid back fishing trip. In late spring and early summer, though, when things have calmed down somewhat, the river is an excellent choice when angling for smallmouth, largemouth and spotted bass and green and longear sunfish. The potholes can be fished during drier months but getting to them may require some hiking up or down a slippery streambed. SERVICES AVAILABLE Supplies and overnight accommodations are available in Ozark, a city located about 15 miles south of the Hwy. 23 crossing. In addition, several outfitters are located on or near the river. The Forest Service operates two campgrounds—Redding and Wolf Pen—on the river, and three others—Shores Lake, Ozone, and White Rock Mountain—within easy driving distance. Campsites are also available in conjunction with a couple of the outfitting operations. OTHER INFORMATION While much of the Mulberry River is within the boundaries of the Ozark National Forest, the stream frequently flows through private property, a good bit of which is posted. Visitors, therefore, are urged to take care not to abuse the rights of riparian property owners. Canoeists should also make a point of checking into local weather forecasts. A heavy rain can quickly transform the Mulberry into a rampaging torrent. Because of the chance for these sudden rises, visitors are advised that camping on islands and gravel bars is generally not recommended.

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PAGE 106

Mulberry River

Ouachita River (E, F, G & H-4, H & J-5 and J-6)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Headwaters to Lake Ouachita, a distance of about 70 miles.

Ouachita River

For many first-time visitors, the most difficult thing about the Ouachita River is learning to say it correctly. For some reason, the pronunciation—“Wash-i-taw”—bears little resemblance to the spelling. Regardless of how it’s said, though, the Ouachita is a fine stream, ideally suited for family outings. From its beginnings where two small creeks converge at the base of Rich Mountain in Polk County, the river winds its way through the scenic Ouachita Mountains and beyond. It is in these higher elevations that the stream offers a good range of recreation opportunities for floating and fishing enthusiasts alike. A major draw is its location within the Ouachita National Forest. The Forest Service provides campgrounds, picnic areas, and access points along the river and several of its tributaries. In addition, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission maintains several access areas along the stream. These developments attract not only experienced river travelers, but many people venturing out for their first trip in a canoe. CHARACTERISTICS In its upper reaches, the Ouachita is a narrow, fast-moving stream with Class I (and occasionally Class II) rapids. Further downstream, the river still has some interesting shoals, but the pools are a little longer and deeper. The uppermost float on the Ouachita begins at the McGuire Access, a Game and Fish Commission development. It’s located on the south side of Hwy. 88 about halfway between the communities of Ink and Cherry Hill. The seven-mile trip down to the Cherry Hill Access—another Game and Fish project—should be scheduled after periods of extended rainfall to avoid a good deal of dragging. The float features narrow channels, tight turns, and quiet pools. Paddlers should be on the lookout for logjams and overhanging limbs. The second Ouachita River float is the 13-mile journey from Cherry Hill to Pine Ridge. The take-out point is a county bridge about one mile east of Pine Ridge, just to the southeast of Hwy. 88. Like the earlier float, this one requires plenty of rain and cautious canoeists. A 10-mile trip from Pine Ridge to Oden is next in the series of Ouachita excursions. Noisy shoals, quick turns, and a tunnel of overhanging trees characterize this section. The Hwy. 379 bridge south of Oden is the take-out point.

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

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One of the most popular trips on the river is the journey from Oden to the Rocky Shoals Campground at the U.S. 270 crossing. This 10-mile trip features some of the best scenery on the Ouachita, including a towering bluff a few miles above the take-out. Deep pools, stimulating rapids, and shady banks are also found along this stretch. In the springtime, quiet canoeists may hear the gobbling of wild turkeys up on the steep hillsides. Canoeists putting in at Rocky Shoals have several options. They can take out at the Sims Campground, located four miles downstream, or at the Fulton Branch Campground, which is another three miles down the river. Each of these camping/launching areas also is a good starting point for trips down to the last two public take-outs—Dragover and OUACHITA RIVER AND VICINITY

71

To Ft. Smith

To Rich Mountain

270

Mena

71

To Texarkana

88

71

8

O UAC H I TA

CH UA I

5

Ink

4

Access Points Bridge Campground U.S. Highway State Highway County Road

3

TA

2

LEGEND

1

SCALE IN MILES

0

O

RIV ER Cherry Hill

67

65

270

Pine Ridge

20 86

88

20

N AT I O N A L

69

8

270

Pencil Bluff Sims

FOREST

Oden

379

27

61

37

8

Norman

88

138

59

To Danville

To Ark. 27

27

Lake Ouachita

59

37

Mt. Ida To Hot Springs

270

To Glenwood

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PAGE 108

Ouachita River

Richland Creek

River Bluff. Both offer toilets, boat ramps, and campsites. The Fulton Branch to Dragover trip covers about two miles, while the float on to River Bluff covers another three miles. Several other take-outs are possible on the backwaters of Lake Ouachita around the Hwy. 27 crossing. SEASONS The Ouachita can be floated much of the year, particularly if its visitors don’t mind getting their feet wet and pulling their boats through the shallows during drier months. The best period for good canoeing in the upper reaches is late fall to late spring—generally November through June. The lower stretches (below the 270 bridge) come closest to offering year-round floating conditions. ACCESS POINTS Major access points include the U.S. 270 crossing, the Hwy. 379 bridge, several county road crossings off Hwy. 88, and a handful of forest service campgrounds. SCENERY The Ouachita River’s scenic beauty is due in part to the bluffs along the route. Though they are common sights in north Arkansas’s Ozarks, these occurrences are few and far between in the Ouachita Mountain range. Other features of the Ouachita River are its clear water, intriguing rock formations, and a canopy of overhanging trees. In its upper reaches, the dogwoods and redbuds which bloom in the spring make for an unmatched setting of beauty. With only sparse population along its banks, the river also offers a sense of solitude. The Ouachita’s long, lazy pools and sparkling shoals make the river especially inviting for families wishing to pause for a swim and/or picnic along the way. Wildlife viewing is another distinct possibility on this river. Floaters report seeing beaver, deer, wild turkeys, and an assortment of wading birds. FISHING The Ouachita has been a favorite fishing spot among sportsmen for decades. Heavy stringers of smallmouth and spotted bass come from the stream year-round, although the best angling for big bass (four-pounders are not uncommon) is usually during the cooler months from October through March. In the lower reaches just above Lake Ouachita, the

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 109

spawning runs of white bass always attract large numbers of spring fishermen, and, as might be expected, this cool stream supports large numbers of green and longear sunfish. Anglers will also land an occasional walleye, largemouth bass, rock bass, catfish or bluegill. SERVICES AVAILABLE Supplies can be obtained in Pencil Bluff, Mount Ida, or more distant towns like Mena and Hot Springs. In addition to the Forest Service campgrounds along the river, the Corps of Engineers has developed numerous camping sites on Lake Ouachita. Rental canoes are available in Pencil Bluff. OTHER INFORMATION The Ouachita is the longest and largest river in the Ouachita Mountain region. The river is also floatable (and fishable) below Lake Hamilton to Arkadelphia and well beyond. Supplies, including rental canoes, are available in Arkadelphia for this stretch. The newest recreation developments on the stream are found in extreme southern Arkansas where the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Corps of Engineers are constructing facilities within the Fesenthal National Wildlife Refuge. Hunters and fishermen are giving the area rave reviews.

Richland Creek (C-4)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Entire length—30 miles

Let’s face it: given Richland Creek’s steep drops, big rocks, and narrow chutes, the stream is too fast, furious, and unforgiving for all but the expert paddlers. It’s seldom floatable, and even when the water is up most of us should keep the canoes and kayaks on top of the cars where they’re safe. Yet Richland Creek appears here for one reason: it may be the most beautiful stream in the state. And anybody familiar with the creeks and rivers of Arkansas will quickly realize the significance of that statement. CHARACTERISTICS Richland Creek is a classic Ozark stream with classic beginnings. Its uppermost tributaries drain off to the east from Hwy. 7—the state’s first Scenic Byway and a road traditionally listed among the country’s 10 prettiest drives. Dropping 1,400 feet along the way, these waters eventually join up with those of the Buffalo National River at Woolum—an access point for floaters which also features a primitive campground. In this 30-mile journey, the creek works its way through some of the most rugged country to be found in the state. For much of its length, the stream is relatively inaccessible to all but those willing to put on their hiking boots. Because of this remoteness and isolation, quiet hikers may be able to sneak up on all sorts of wildlife—mink, beaver, turkey, deer, and perhaps a black bear. To top it off, Richland Creek itself provides some of the best smallmouth bass and panfish habitat in this part of the country. In its early stretches the creek flows through a mosaic of public (Ozark National Forest) and private ownership. About midway in its route to the Buffalo, the stream enters the Richland Creek Wilderness, an 11,822-acre tract of forest service property containing the most outstanding features in the entire watershed. Highlights include: • Richland Falls—a 100-foot-wide cascade that drops six to eight feet; • Twin Falls—where Long Devil’s Fork and Big Devil’s Fork converge with side-by-side drops of 20 to 25 feet; • Rose Hollow and Jack Jones Hollow—both featuring canyon-like settings with lots of exposed rock; • Falling Water Creek—a picturesque tributary of Richland which flows along much of the eastern border of the wilderness area (note: Falling Water Falls, located about four miles south of the wilderness boundary and within view of Forest Service Road 1205, is a 10- to 12-foot cascade with lots of photographic potential). One good way to experience Richland Creek is to hike the Ozark Highlands Trail, a 178-mile long (and expanding) path which includes an interesting route through Richland Valley. The trail enters the watershed a couple of miles north of Pelsor at Fairview, a Forest Service campground on Scenic Byway 7. The trail gradually works its way downstream, then skirts around the wilderness area before continuing to the Forest Service’s Richland Creek Campground (immediately west of the intersection of Forest Service Road 1205 and the creek). The campground, which is 19.1 miles east of Fairview, provides a fine trailhead for excursions into the wilderness area Richland Falls and Twin Falls are approximately

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PAGE 110

Richland Creek

two-and-one-half miles upstream from the camp, and can be reached following a primitive trail which parallels the stream. Hikers will enjoy the scenery, but should watch out for loose rocks, poison ivy, and slippery spots. Observant visitors will notice some spectacular fossils on the way. The Ozark Highlands Trail follows Richland downstream past the campground and eventually leads to Woolum on the Buffalo National River. The distance is about 21 miles, and is scenic every step of the way. Hikers can expect to see RICHLAND CREEK AND VICINITY

ford

FA

The Narrows

LO

RI C H L

123

R

B

UF

Piercetown

To Pindall & St. Joe

Woolum

BUFFALO RIVER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA

VE

To Hasty

RI

A

ND ford

Mount Judea

LEGEND

To Marshall

1201

0

1

2

3

377

EEK

SCALE IN MILES 1

To Snowball

ford

U.S. Highway State Highway County Rd. Forest Service Number Ford

CR

Access Point Campground Bridge Point of Interest

Eula

BUFFALO RIVER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA

4

1205 1201

123 BIG

DEV I L S

VI

LS

377

EK

EK

RICHLAND CREEK WILDERNESS AREA

CRE

C RE

1203

Richland Falls

FOREST

Richland Creek Campground

RIC H L A N D 7

Pelsor (Sandgap) To Russellville & I-40

Pedestal Rocks/ King Bluff

16

1219 L L I NG

1203 16

Witts Spring

WATER

Lurton

Magic Springs

Twin Falls

1200

NATIONAL

RK

RK

FO

OZARK To Harrison

1205

FO

LONG D E

1200

Ben Hur

FA

1205 16

1205

16

Falling Water Falls

16 To Clinton

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 111

lots of rocky outcrops, boulder-filled creekbeds, and numerous springs and seeps. Like the upper portion, this lower stretch is a good one for those wishing to observe wildlife. SEASONS For those who insist on floating this creek (and we’re not kidding; it’s not for casual canoeists), the best times to catch it are during the late winter and early spring, particularly following abundant rainfall. Those wishing to explore by foot will also enjoy this period, although fording the creek can be a cold and risky proposition. The waterfalls, of course, are at their peak during the spring. Many Richland Creek veterans save their hiking trips for the fall months. The pesky critters are out of the way by then, but the real treat is the foliage—gums, hickories, and maples that light up the landscape. Others opt for the dead of winter when the real lay of the land is clearly visible through the bare trees. ACCESS POINTS Richland Creek is not very easy to get to, and that’s one reason it’s so special. Given the difficulty of successfully floating this stream, the following describes primarily the access points for hikers. As mentioned earlier, the adventurous can hike in via Scenic Hwy. 7 at Fairview. Vehicular access is also available by way of Pelsor on Scenic 7. At Pelsor, go east on Hwy. 16 to the community of Ben Hur where you’ll turn north on Forest Road 1203 which drops down into Richland Creek’s valley and in places serves as the western boundary of the wilderness area. This road merges with Forest Service Road 1200 (bear right) and eventually intersects with Forest Service Road 1205 on the northern edge of the Richland Creek Wilderness Area. By following 1205 east and then south, visitors will eventually arrive at the Richland Creek Campground (now closed). Please be advised that this is a rather lengthy drive over steep and occasionally rough gravel roads. The lower stretches of Richland Creek can be approached from Snowball—a small town in Searcy County—via a county road that leads west to the community of Eula. County roads heading both north and south out of Eula lead to Richland Creek, and each crosses the stream by ford. These crossings can be tricky and should be avoided in average to high water. For floaters, primary access points are the Forest Service Road 1203 crossing north of Ben Hur and the Richland Creek Campground off Road 1205. Fords between Woolum and Richland Creek Campground can serve as take-out points for floating the lower half of the creek. SCENERY The Richland Creek valley is scenic whether seen by foot, car, canoe, or horseback. Chief attractions are Richland Creek itself and its main tributary—Falling Water Creek. Both are characterized by pools, ledges, falls, and the music of moving water. Steep, tree-covered hillsides interrupted by occasional crags and bluffs are the norm in the upper two-thirds of the valley. In its lower third, Richland flows through a pastoral setting toward its union with the Buffalo National River. FISHING Like the Buffalo, Richland Creek features ideal smallmouth bass habitat—a rocky streambed covered with clear, oxygenrich water. The deep pools followed by noisy rapids are a fisherman’s delight. Considering the inherent difficulty in floating the creek, the best bet may be to wade-fish the stream. In addition to trying out the pools, anglers will also want to drift a line past good cover in faster water. Likewise, there’s no need to stick with artificials; locals have had years of success with crayfish, minnows, and other natural baits. SERVICES AVAILABLE Canoe services and lodging are not present in the immediate area, and rescue services are also not readily available. Food, gasoline, and other supplies can be purchased in communities such as Pelsor and Dover which are in the general vicinity, though not particularly handy. OTHER INFORMATION An interesting side trip for Richland-bound visitors is the Pedestal Rocks/King Bluff area, a scenic point between Pelsor and Ben Hur on the south side of Hwy. 16. A short hike from the parking area will lead to fascinating rock columns, bluff shelters, and good views.

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PAGE 112

Richland Creek/Saline River

Another interesting feature is “The Narrows,” a thin ridge of rock rising between the Buffalo and Richland valleys just upstream from Woolum. It’s a little scary at the top (especially on windy days), but the panorama is worth the climb. While the Ozark National Forest, the Buffalo National River, and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission own much of the land within the Richland Creek watershed, private holdings are not uncommon. Please take care to avoid trespassing problems!

Saline River (E, F & G-5, G-6 and H-6)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Source to Ouachita River, a distance of 204 river miles.

Saline River

The Saline River maintains the intangible quality of timelessness. Born of the rivulets that flow out of the eastern foothills of the rugged Ouachita Mountains, its three major divisions—Middle, Alum and North Forks— merge above Benton. Below this point the river flattens out to begin its long journey through Grant, Cleveland, Bradley and Ashley counties to its confluence with the Ouachita River in the heart of Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge. The Saline River is the last major undammed stream in the entire Ouachita Mountain drainage, and its watershed contains some of the finest deer, turkey and squirrel hunting in Arkansas. That, combined with the excellent fishing, scenery and backcountry floating that the river produces, makes it no wonder that Arkansans who know it regard the river with an almost fanatical devotion. CHARACTERISTICS The upper portion of the Saline, above Benton, is characterized as a clear, cold-water section with a series of fastrunning shoals interspersed with short, quiet pools. The middle section of the river (Benton to Warren) contains long pools and few riffles with clear to murky water. The river’s lower section below Warren has a sluggish current with slightly murky water. The Saline is one of only a few rivers that has a gravel bottom throughout its entire length. SEASONS The Saline is a good year-round float stream except in the uppermost portions. ACCESS POINTS Access to the Saline is generally at state highway crossings, county road crossings and numerous little-known fords and ferry sites. The Game and Fish Commission has developed several access points along the river, including (working downstream): a boat ramp adjacent to Hwy. 229 between Traskwood and Poyen; Lee’s Ferry Access from Hwy. 35; Pool access at Hwy. 79; Mt. Elba off Hwy. 35; Hwy. 4 out of Warren; at Longview off Hwy. 189 between Fountain

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 113

Hill and Johnsville; and Stillions at the mouth of the canal right below Lake Georgia Pacific. There is also access in Grant County at Jenkins’ Ferry Historical Monument between Sheridan and Leola. Local inquiry will generally uncover others on or near forest roads. SCENERY The Saline remains relatively unspoiled by man and creates an illusion of wilderness along much of its length. Dense forests line the river banks. Visitors may be treated to the sight of deer, mink, otters, beaver, muskrats and a variety of bird species. SALINE RIVER AND VICINITY Alum

r Fo

rk Fo

dle

To Little Rock

or k N or t h F

Mi d

k

5

I-30

To I-530

Benton To Hot Springs

270

167 Traskwood

Lake Catherine State Park

35

291 Malvern Poyen

I-30 Arkadelphia

Jenkins’ Ferry Battleground Historical Monument State Park

291

229

229

?

79

35 48

Farindale

Access Point Welcome Center Bridge Interstate Highway U.S. Highway State Highway State Park/Campground State Park

To Pine Bluff

Rison

63 35

Kingsland Fordyce

Pansy

189

SCALE IN MILES To Texarkana

To Pine Bluff

190

Leola

LEGEND

270

Sheridan

46

1 0 1 2 3 4

Marks’ Mills Battleground Historical Monument State Park

79

To Monticello

8

278

Warren

8

To Magnolia

167

63

Johnsville

RIVER SALINE

Hampton

Camden

8

Moro Bay State Park Stillion To Texarkana

82

El Dorado

FELSENTHAL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

?

82

Crossett

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Saline River/Spring River

FISHING The Saline is one of the most underrated fishing rivers in Arkansas. Smallmouth bass abound in the upper reaches; largemouth bass occupy the lower reaches; and the intermediate water between has a healthy population of spotted bass that overlaps into both areas. The warmouth, longear, and green sunfish top the panfish offering, with some bluegills and crappie. The river also has a good walleye fishery, and channel catfish are common. Rock bass are found in association with smallmouth bass on the upper third of the river. Fishing during much of the year is a wade-a-little, fish-a-little proposition, and for this reason, canoes are preferred over the traditional flatbottom johnboat. A motor is normally more trouble than it’s worth on headwater float trips, though a light electric trolling motor can be a real boon at times. SERVICES AVAILABLE Gas, groceries, restaurants and overnight accommodations are available in nearby communities. Picnicking and swimming are available at the Jenkins’ Ferry Historical Monument south of Sheridan. OTHER INFORMATION The best time to float the Saline is when it’s low and clear. When the current is swift, logjams, brushpiles and uprooted trees can make travel difficult in some areas.

Spring River (A-7 and B-7)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Mammoth Spring State Park to the Black River, a distance of about 57 miles.

Spring River

Mammoth Spring is the headwaters for the Spring River. Flowing at almost ten million gallons of water per hour, the state’s largest spring provides great canoeing and fishing on the river throughout the year. CHARACTERISTICS There’s no getting around the fact that Spring River is chilly. After all, over nine million gallons—every hour—of 58° water is hard to ignore. But it is this volume of cool water that: 1) makes the Spring River a year-round float stream, and 2) allows the river to be regularly stocked with rainbow trout.

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Most Spring River canoe trips take place in the 17-mile stretch between Mammoth Spring State Park and Hardy, an historic town in northern Sharp County. This section is recommended for beginning to intermediate canoeists, and is very popular for family outings. The first half of this section begins at the base of Dam #3, a former hydropower structure located south of Mammoth Spring. To get to the launching area, take Hwy. 342 (west off U.S. 63) for slightly less than a mile. Floaters of this nine-mile portion can look forward to numerous rapids, and even a couple of small waterfalls (both of which should be portaged in high water). The take-out point is Many Islands Camp, a private development located between Hardy and Mammoth Spring, and about two-and-one-half miles west of U.S. 63 (directional signs are present). SPRING RIVER AND VICINITY To Mt. Home

62

9

SOUTH

Salem

To Melbourne

9

412

F O RK S

289

PR IN

R.

175

?

RI V E R

63

Hardy

S

PR IN

G

412

4

58

58

Mammoth Spring State Park

62

G SP RIN

G

Ash Flat

Mammoth Spring

167

Saddle

To Batesville

LEGEND U.S. Highway

3

Access Point

2

State Highway

1

Visitor Information Center

Mammoth Spring National Fish Hatchery

MISSOURI ARKANSAS

?

SCALE IN MILES

State Park/Campground

1

Spring River State Fish Hatchery

State Park

0

Bridge

Williford

412 Ravenden

412

Imboden

115

63 62 To Pocahontas

E L EVEN POINT RIVER

To Walnut Ridge

Old Davidsonville State Park

RI

R

Black Rock

Historic Powhatan Courthouse State Park

CK

A VE

RIVE R

To Cave City

Lake Charles State Park

25

BL

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PAGE 116

Spring Rivers

The second half of the Spring River’s upper portion begins at Many Islands and concludes about eight miles downstream at Hardy Beach, a public park below the U.S. 62/167 bridge on the stream’s southwest (right) bank. Like the previous section, this one also features rapids and waterfalls although they’re not as frequent. One especially noteworthy spot is High Falls, a six-foot waterfall which looks considerably taller than that from a canoe going over its brink. The Spring River remains floatable for another 30 or so miles below Williford. While this section is seldom visited by canoeists because of the long, slow pools, folks strictly interested in a quiet fishing trip might find it ideal. SEASONS The constant flow from Mammoth Spring makes the Spring River a dependable year-round stream for floating, even in the summer months when most other creeks are too low. ACCESS POINTS The Spring River is one of Arkansas’s more accessible streams, with U.S. 63 paralleling much of its length. Major public access points include: Cold Springs and Dam #3 (both reached off U.S. 63 between Hardy and Mammoth Spring), Bayou Access (off Hwy. 289 on the river’s west side), Hardy Beach, the Williford Launch Area (off Hwy. 58), two entry/takeout points at Ravenden (one south of town on a county road; the other to the east at U.S. 63), and a final launch site at Imboden (at U.S. 62 crossing). In addition, access can also be obtained at several private developments along the river. SCENERY Clear water, overhanging trees, and occasional wildlife make the Spring a scenic float. The very construction of the river itself (a stairstep series of ledges and pools) makes it one of the most interesting and appealing in the state. FISHING The cool waters of the Spring River provide ideal conditions for stocking trout. Rainbow trout are by far the most abundant and popular species, but recent stockings of brown trout have also proven successful. The likelihood of catching a lunker trout on the Spring is minimal, but what the fish lack in poundage by comparison with those on the White or Little Red is compensated by the fierce fight that the fish can wage in the relatively calm water. The stretch of river from Mammoth Spring to Dam No. 3 is best waded and fished afoot except for the deep portion of the river near the dam. The first mile or two is an ideal flyfishing stretch. The heart of the Spring’s trout waters lies in the three-mile stretch below the dam. This portion of the river, which is difficult to fish from the bank, holds some of the larger trout. One- to three-pounders are fairly common in the shoals and pools down to Many Islands, but the flow of water from Myatt Creek a few miles further on increases the water temperature to such a degree that very few trout are found in the river below. The best fishing spots for trout are immediately below the falls where the falling water hits, creating a frothing white mass. Back under the ledges is where the rainbows lie, waiting to nip out and grab food coming over the falls. The most deadly method is to stand on the lip of the falls and let lure or bait drift over the lip with the current. Strikes are lightning fast and hard to feel in the churning water. In addition to trout, the Spring offers high-quality smallmouth bass fishing and seasonal walleye fishing. These two species are scattered in the river from Myatt Creek to well below Hardy. Spring River anglers will also find good action for jumbo channel and flathead catfish, tailwalking spotted bass, and small but sassy rock bass, warmouths and longear sunfish. SERVICES AVAILABLE The nearby towns of Mammoth Spring and Hardy can supply the needs of most any visitor. Private resorts, campsites, motels and canoe outposts are readily available in the area. OTHER INFORMATION One attraction that should not be missed is Mammoth Spring State Park. In addition to viewing one of the largest springs in the country, visitors can hike, picnic, or even examine an exhibit of train memorabilia. Next door to the park is the Mammoth Spring National Fish Hatchery, the nation’s leading producer of smallmouth bass (and also a source for largemouth and striped bass, walleye, channel catfish, and redband trout). Visitors can take a self-guided tour of the hatchery, and also view one of the nicest public aquariums in the region. Another place worth a closer inspection is Hardy, one of those towns which has managed to retain a good deal of its

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PAGE 117

original character. Attractive old buildings are still in place, with many of them housing shops featuring antiques or local arts and crafts. And one last bit of news for floaters: the Spring River’s South Fork is canoeable during many months of the year. The first float—a 12-miler—is from Saddle (on Hwy. 289) to the bridge at the Cherokee Village Campground. A six-mile trip from this bridge down to Hardy Beach is also possible. While the South Fork’s gravel bars are great for picnicking, potential campers should note that these same gravel bars can be quickly inundated following local or upstream rainfall.

Strawberry River (B-6 and B-7)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Entire length, a distance of approximately 109 miles.

Strawberry River

Flowing out of the Ozark foothills in north central Arkansas is the Strawberry River, a friendly stream good for family excursions. It begins just a few miles west of Salem in Fulton County, and meanders in a southeasterly direction for slightly over 100 miles before merging with the Black River. While it does not offer the white water of the Mulberry or the bluffs of the Buffalo, the Strawberry has a lot going for it: convenient access, interesting scenery, and a smallmouth bass fishery. In fact, because of its fine qualities, the stream’s upper section has been placed in Arkansas’s Natural and Scenic Rivers System. CHARACTERISTICS The upper one-third of the Strawberry River is generally too low for good floating, although wade fishing is a possibility for the die-hard. The best bet for a good outing is in the river’s middle third—the section between the U.S. 167 crossing north of Evening Shade and the Hwy. 115 bridge northeast of Jesup. The first float, a nine- to 10-mile journey, begins at Hwy. 167 and concludes at a low-water bridge which is about two miles north off Hwy. 56 and roughly halfway between Evening Shade and Poughkeepsie. A second float—also nine to 10 miles in length—begins at this same crossing and ends at the next low-water bridge about two miles north of Poughkeepsie, just west of Hwy. 58. The third float is from this second low-water bridge to the Hwy. 58 crossing, a distance of about two-and-a-half miles. These three floats offer certain similarities. They all possess fine gravel bars, and something else not too common to Arkansas streams— sandy beaches. In addition, these sections all include some very fishable waters, with bass (smallmouth, largemouth, rock, and spotted) and sunfish receiving the most attention. The Strawberry can also be floated from the Hwy. 58 crossing on down to the 115 bridge near Jesup, but it’s a lengthy trip (around 20 miles). Rather than floating the entire distance, some fishermen prefer to paddle (or motor) upstream from either of these access points, and then leisurely fish their way back down to the vehicles.

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Strawberry River

SEASONS For floating, the time to visit the Strawberry is in the spring of the year. The river is also a prime candidate for wade fishing when water levels are too low for a successful boat trip. ACCESS POINTS Primary points of access include U.S. 167 near Evening Shade; a low- water bridge north of Hwy. 56 and about halfway between Evening Shade and Poughkeepsie; the Hwy. 58 crossing; and the Hwy. 115 crossing near Jesup. The Sharp County General Highway Map helps in locating these and other put-in/take-out points. STRAWBERRY RIVER AND VICINITY

LEGEND

To Mountain Home

Access Point State Park/Campground Bridge U.S. Highway State Highway

62

SCALE IN MILES

Salem

1 0 1 2 3 4

412 412 62 Horseshoe Bend

289 Franklin

ST

Brockwell

Myron

RA WB

Zion Melbourne

69

Center

RY

Poughkeepsie

56

Lake Charles State Park

58 Calamine

To Powhatan

117

Smithville

53 69

115

To Powhatan

25 Lynn

Jesup

117

Sidney

Strawberry

115

Cave City

167

230 Saffell

ER

To Batesville

361

RIV

To Mountain View

To U.S. 63

167

Evening Shade

289

Sage

354

ER

9

58

56

ER

354 Oxford

To U.S. 63

Ash Flat

25

RI V

289

Wiseman

9

To Hardy

Glencoe

9

To Batesville

LA

CK

To Batesville

B

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SCENERY The scenery, in a word, is attractive. The river itself has easy rapids, deep pools, and good-looking water. In many places canoeists are sheltered by over-hanging trees. And the surrounding country, while not wild, is quiet and peaceful. FISHING The gravel-bottomed Strawberry offers ideal habitat for channel catfish, one of the primary sportfish found here. These sleek underwater bulldogs usually lurk near rocks and downed timber out of strong current. Crayfish are their primary forage and consequently the best bait, but channel cats will take a variety of other offerings, including worms, minnows, catalpa worms, liver and stinkbaits. Huge flathead catfish also haunt the Strawberry, offering heart-pounding thrills to catfishermen in-the-know. While catfish abound in the Strawberry, they are often overlooked by anglers who usually come here to try their luck for spotted and smallmouth bass. Wade fishing for bass is popular in the upper reaches where a fly rod and popping bug can produce non-stop fishing entertainment. However, most bass are taken in the lower two-thirds of the river using ultralight rods and reels equipped with small spinner-baits, jigs, plastic worms or salamanders or crayfish-lookalike crank-baits. Other less important, but often caught, fish include crappie, bluegills, saugers and warmouths. SERVICES AVAILABLE Supplies can be obtained in the nearby communities of Ash Flat, Evening Shade, or Cave City, but bring your own boat since rentals are not available locally. The nearest camping facilities are at Lake Charles State Park, located about 15 miles east of Jesup. OTHER INFORMATION The Strawberry is another one of those streams receiving a good deal of public recreational use, despite the fact that there is little if any public land along the river. Traditional access points may, in fact, be on private property. Therefore visitors are encouraged to check with local residents concerning recommended put-in and take-out locations.

White River (A & B-5, B & C-6, C, D, E & F-7, F-8 and G-8)

SECTION DESCRIBED: Entire length of 720 miles, with emphasis on headwaters region and trout fishing section.

To a casual reader of maps, the White River appears mostly, well, indecisive. It flows west in its headwaters region before turning north in the Fayetteville-Springdale area. On toward Eureka Springs, the river bends back to the east, then wanders up through southern Missouri before reentering Arkansas and angling to the southeast past Cotter, Calico Rock, and Batesville. At Newport, the stream makes an abrupt turn to the south and flows some 257 miles in that direction before joining up with the Mississippi River. In this 720-mile journey, the White undergoes several transformations. It begins as a small, mountain stream (complete with rapids), and ends up as a broad, meandering waterway serving the barge and towboat industry. In between, the river’s flow is interrupted by at least eight dams, six in Arkansas and two more in Missouri. The largest of these—Bull Shoals—is responsible for converting what had been a warm-water fishery into one of the nation’s premier stretches of trout habitat. Today this cold-water section of the White River is among the state’s major tourist destinations. But the White River is more than an attraction for outdoor recreation-types. As it passes through or alongside nearly a fourth (18) of Arkansas’s 75 counties, it exerts a steady though sometimes subtle influence on a vast portion of the state. CHARACTERISTICS The first 31 miles of the White River are similar to the beginning stretches of other Ozark streams—fast and furious in the wet months, and comparatively calm the rest of the year. In this upper stretch above the first impoundment—Lake Sequoyah—the stream offers a series of pools and shoals with overhanging trees, tight turns, and gravel bottoms. While Hwy. 16 is seldom more than a quarter of a mile away, it goes virtually unnoticed by floaters. The bluffs, forests, and quiet pastures hold visitors’ interest. The next floatable section of the White begins many miles downstream, right at the base of Bull Shoals Dam. Here the river is considerably larger and, because of the hydropower discharges from deep within the lake, very cold—just

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White River

White River

right, in fact, for rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout. Each year thousands of people try their luck with these fish, and numerous guide services, outfitters, trout docks, and resorts have been established to help out. Also contributing to their success is the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission which annually stocks great quantities of trout into the stream. Many of these are caught fairly soon after their release, but others manage to hide out year after year, getting bigger all the time. Some get exceptionally large, like the 19-pound, 1-ounce rainbow or the 33-pound, 8-ounce brown trout which are discussed in the fishing section. But trout are only one part of the White River picture. There’s the scenery itself, featuring some of the best bluffs in all of the Ozarks. Others remember the river by the thin layer of fog suspended delicately above the stream each morning around sunrise. And not to be overlooked are the famous shore lunches on handy gravel bars, cooked on the spot by experienced outfitters. The trout section of the river stretches all the way to Guion, or a distance of about 90 miles. Flowing into the White along the route are two superb smallmouth streams—Crooked Creek and the Buffalo River—and another fine trout stream—the North Fork River. The latter offers a scenic six-mile float between Norfork Dam and the town of Norfork. There are numerous ways to get to know the White. One extreme—and the choice of thousands of vacationers every year—is to hire a guide and a johnboat, relax in a deck chair, and head for a fishing hole. Another extreme is to emulate the annual Boy Scout pilgrimage by putting a canoe in at Bull Shoals-White River State Park and paddling like crazy all the way to Batesville—a distance of 120 miles. No matter how they get on the river, visitors need to remember that the stream is subject to sudden fluctuations because of power generation at the dam. When all the turbines are in operation, the White River can become bank-full and very swift. At normal operating levels, however, the stream’s shoals and pools provide an ideal combination for a memorable fishing trip. SEASONS The White’s upper reaches are strictly seasonal, with the late October through Apr./May period traditionally the best time for float trips. Below Bull Shoals Dam, the White River is a year-round float stream, with some of the best fishing reported during the winter months. ACCESS POINTS Launch sites for the White are too numerous to list. The Game and Fish Commission has constructed many access points downstream from Bull Shoals, and the Arkansas State Parks Division has a handy launch ramp at

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Dam

ek

62 Cotter

Cre

RIVE R

Mountain Home

62

412

5

5

Norfork Lake

Norfork

R I V ER

Blanchard Springs Caverns

14

Fifty-Six

N.

Calico Rock

5

56

Ozark Folk Center State Park

Sylamore

ree lC k

To U.S. 62 and Salem

m

ore C

87

Allison

9

UP

Mountain View

r.

66

r.

la Sy

yla mor e

To Rushing

To U.S. 65

To Yellville

OZARK NATIONAL FOREST

ITE WH

Buffalo City

126

Bull Shoals-White River State Park

Cr o o ke d

178 Flippin

Bull Shoals Lake

LEGEND 62 To Harrison

FF

R

To Huntsville

P

RIV E

23

UPPER WHITE RIVER To Huntsville

St. Paul

Mi l

Access Points Bridge Points of Interest Campground State Park/ Campground State Park U.S. Highway State Highway SCALE IN MILES 5

74

ER W

HI TE Combs

Brashears To Ozark

Brockwell

9

TE

9

14

RI VE R

Guion

Melbourne

W

HI

1 0 1 2 3 4

Fayetteville City Limits

Elkins

Durham

16

Crosses Delaney

23

C

A LO

No rt Fo h rk S. S

BU

56

69

To Ash Flat

To Batesville

58

To Locust Grove

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PAGE 121 The Arkansas Adventure Guide

Bull Shoals-White River State Park. In addition, many of the resorts along the river have developed launching areas for their guests. SCENERY People have been commenting on the beauty of the White River since at least 1819 when explorer Henry Rowe Schoolcraft said of the stream: “It unites a current which possesses the purity of crystal, with a smooth and gentle flow, and the most imposing, diversified, and delightful scenery.....Our canoe often seemed as if suspended in the air, such is the remarkable transparency of the water.” WHITE RIVER AND VICINITY

NO PRINT—FOR INDEXING MAP ONLY White River


PAGE 122

White Rivers

Today’s visitors will not be in quite the wilderness that Schoolcraft experienced, but there’s still plenty of good scenery—towering bluffs, wildflowers, thickly forested hillsides, and lots of wildlife. FISHING The upper White River with its assortment of bass (smallmouth, largemouth, rock, and Kentucky), catfish (channel, blue, and flathead), and sunfish should satisfy nearly any angler. Spinnerbaits, crawfish imitators, and skirted jigs (with pork tails) are recommended, along with minnows, crawfish, and other natural baits. Below Bull Shoals Dam, the White River takes on an entirely different character. Here it is one of the most famous float fishing streams in the world. And with good reason. Probably more rainbow trout are caught here each year than in any other trout stream in America. The Game and Fish Commission stocks hundreds of thousands of rainbows in the White annually, and more than 90 percent of them are caught each year by anglers who come here from all corners of the globe. Brown trout? Well, let the figures speak for themselves. In 1972, Gordon Lackey landed a monster brown weighing 31-pounds, 8-ounces. This stood as the North American record until fellow guide Leon Waggoner landed a 33-pound, 8-ounce giant in 1977, now just mere ounces under the world record brown. Missouri angler Tony Salamon landed a 30-pound, 8-ounce leviathan in 1986 that set a new world line-class record for 6-pound-test line. Very few browns grow that large, of course. But frankly, 5-10 pounders are common, and anglers have a good chance of landing an 11-20 pound trophy. And, yes, a few 20 pound plus monsters are usually corralled each year. Although White River rainbows don’t approach North American record size, the river still boasts the 19-pound, 1-ounce Arkansas state record. Ten-pound fish are considered large, but there are plenty of real thoroughbreds in the 2-6 pound class. As an added bonus, White River anglers can also find cutthroat and brook trout in these fine waters. Cutthroats were first stocked in 1983, but the river has already produced 9-pound-plus fish. Brook trout are a rare catch, but they have reached up to four pounds in the North Fork of the White. Bull Shoals to Cotter is the stretch best known for trophy browns. Many are taken on live crayfish or sculpins, but a variety of other live baits and artificials can also be employed successfully, especially at night since brown trout are nocturnal feeders. Flyfishing is extremely popular on the White during low water periods, but most anglers opt for the standard White River rig—a 16-to 20-foot johnboat equipped with a 10-20 hp motor. The North Fork of the White from Norfork Dam to the White has produced two record rainbows and the state record brook trout. The Crooked Creek and Buffalo River junctions are also good lunker trout holes. Smallmouth bass fishing is good at the mouths of feeder streams, including the mouths of Sylamore Creek, Buffalo River, Rocky Bayou and Piney Creek. Fishing is good for channel catfish and rock bass, and in lake headwaters, white bass, hybrid stripers and walleyes are important sportfish. SERVICES AVAILABLE For the upper reaches, the cities of Fayetteville and West Fork can supply most needs of floaters and fishermen. The nearest campground is at Devil’s Den State Park located west of Winslow on Hwy. 74. Visitors to the trout-fishing section of the White River can choose from numerous resorts and guide services. Many are located around Cotter, a city which modestly bills itself “Trout Capital of the World.” Public campgrounds are found along the river at Bull Shoals-White River State Park and at Corps of Engineers facilities on Bull Shoals Lake. The James A. Gaston Visitor Center provides a focal point for visittors and interprets the White River, Bull Shoals Dam and Bull Shoals Lake. OTHER INFORMATION The Norfork National Fish Hatchery, located near the base of Norfork Dam, is an interesting stop for area visitors. So is the Wolf House, an historic cabin located in Norfork at the confluence of the White River and its North Fork. Many miles downstream is another point of interest—the White River National Wildlife Refuge. This 113,000-acre tract is home for waterfowl, songbirds, deer, and one of Arkansas’s largest black bear concentrations. Finally, the reader should be advised that the lower White River is well known for its catfish. Restaurants in DeValls Bluff, Des Arc, and other river towns have taken full advantage of this resource and can serve some of the best food to be had anywhere.

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Arkansas Game & Fish Commission Regulates Official State Guidelines for Canoes, Kayaks and Inner Tubes Floaters are expected to observe the following rules while on Arkansas streams and waterways:

Life Jackets Are Mandatory

Every vessel must have one type I, II, III, or V personal floatation device for each person on board. All life vests musts be: • United States Coasts Guard-approved; • in good and serviceable condition; and • of proper size. Children 12 and under must wear a life jacket, which must be securely fastened while on board any vessel.

Cooler Lids Must Be Secure

Foods and beverages on board a canoe, kayak, inner tube or other vessel easily susceptible to swamping, tipping or rolling must be kept in a container that seals or locks in a way that prevents them from spilling into the water.

Containers Are Required to Carry Food & Beverages

Anyone transporting food or beverages in a canoe or similar craft must have a sturdy, sealable trash container or mesh bag affixed to the boat. All trash must be kept in the container until it can be safely or lawfully discarded in a trash receptacle.

Pub5_AAG1415_Float-d2.indd 123

• Paddlers are encouraged to remove trash materials that have been left by others and will not receive a fine for trash that they pick up which is too large to be transported in their trash container.

Floating Beverage Holders Are Required

Beverages that are not securely in a cooler or trash container must be placed in a floating holder (can koozie) or other device which will prevent it from sinking beneath the surface of the water.

Glass Containers Are Prohibited

Except for containers for prescribed medicinal substances, no glass containers are allowed on board a canoe, kayak, inner tube or other vessel easily susceptible to swamping, tipping or rolling within the banks of Arkansas’s navigable waterways. • Paddlers are encouraged to remove glass previously discarded by others, and will not be charged with a violation as long as the removed glass is secured in a trash container until take-out or suitable trash receptacle is available.

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PAGE 124

Outfitter’s Directory

Outfitters’ Directory

Outfitting services owners who operate on any of the streams described in the Arkansas Adventure Guide and would like to be included in this listing should mail their business name, brief directions to business location (optional), business address, mailing address (if different), phone number(s), e-mail/Website information, name of float stream(s) serviced and season(s) of operation to the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, Communications Section, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201. Phone: 501-682-7602, or E-mail: info@arkansas.com. Big Piney Creek Moore Outdoors 3827 SR 164 West, Dover, AR 72837 479-331-3606 Website: www.mooreoutdoors.com E-mail: MooreOutdoors@hughes.net River Tech 5393 N. Arkansas Russellville, AR 72802 479-890-6980 Website: www.rivertech.com Buffalo River (Lower) Buffalo River Float Service LLC 11637 Suite 1 Hwy. 14 South Yellville, AR 72687 870-449-2042; 877-350-6592 Website: www.buffaloriverfloat service.com E-mail: buffaloriverfloat service@gmail.com Cotter Trout Dock P.O. Box 96, 321 Big Springs Pkwy. Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-6525; 800-447-7538 E-mail: ctd@southshore.com Dirst Canoes & Log Cabins 538 Hwy. 268 East Yellville, AR 72687 800-537-2850; 870-449-6636 Website: www.dirstcanoerentals.com E-mail: dirstcanoes@yahoo.com Newland’s Lodge, Float Trips & Conference Center 295 River Road, Lakeview, AR 72642 870-431-5678; 800-334-5604 Website: www.newlands.com E-mail: info@newlands.com Norfork Resort & Trout Dock 150 Fisherman Street P.O. Box 129, Norfork, AR 72658 870-449-5500; 877-240-8382 Website: www.norfork.com/troutdock E-mail: norforktroutdock@yahoo.com Riley’s Station Outfitter & Hideaway 129 CR 640 Mountain Home, AR 72653 870-425-4221 Website: rileysstation.com E-mail: rileysstation@centurytel.net

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Rose’s Resort & Trout Dock P.O. Box 82, #39 River Rd. Norfork, AR 72658 888-425-1141 Website: www.rosestroutdock.com Email: rosetroutdock@yahoo.com White Buffalo Resort (Located in Buffalo City) 418 White Buffalo Trail Mountain Home, AR 72653-7719 870-425-8555 Website: www.whitebuffaloresort.com E-mail: wbuffalo@mtnhome.com Wild Bill’s Outfitter 23 Hwy. 268 East #1 Yellville, AR 72687 870-449-6235; 800-554-8657 Website: www.ozark-float.com E-mail: wildbill@yellville.net Woodsman’s Package, Inc. 59 Fisherman St. Norfork, AR 72658-8938 870-499-7454 Buffalo River (Middle) Buffalo Camping & Canoeing @ Gilbert 20 Dry Creek Rd.; 1 Frost St. St. Joe, AR 72675 870-439-2888; 870-439-2386 Website: www.gilbertstore.com E-mail: riverfun_gilbert@live.com Buffalo River Outfitters 9664 Hwy. 65, St. Joe, AR 72675 870-439-2244; 800-582-2244 Website: www.buffaloriveroutfitters.com Crockett’s Country Store & Canoe Rental (Hwys. 27 & 14) Box 26, Harriet, AR 72639 870-448-3892; 800-355-6111 Website: www.buffalorivercanoe rental.com E-mail: canoes@buffalorivercanoe rental.com Silver Hill Float Service 9826 Hwy. 65 S., St. Joe, AR 72675 870-439-2372 Website: www.silverhillcanoe.com E-mail: info@silverhillcanoe.com

Silver Hill Grocery and Outfitters (Silver Hill entrance to Tyler Bend, Buffalo Nat’l River) 9819 U.S. 65 North, St. Joe, AR 72675 870-439-2599; 870-439-8599 Website: www.silverhillgrocery.com E-mail: silverhg@ritternet.com Buffalo River (Upper) Buffalo Outdoor Center, Ponca Hwy. 43, Box 1, Ponca, AR 72670 800-221-5514; 870-861-5514 Website: www.buffaloriver.com E-mail: boc@buffaloriver.com Buffalo River Canoes (From Hwy. 7, head west on 74, 5 miles on the right; from Hwy. 43, head east on 74, 9 miles on the left.) HC 70, Box 136B, Jasper, AR 72641 Phone: 870-446-2644 Website: www.floatthebuffalo.com Email: info@floatthebuffalo.com Gordon Motel & Canoe Rental 206 East; Hwy. 7; P.O. Box 60 Jasper, AR 72641 870-446-5252 Website: www.gordonmotel.com Lost Valley Canoe & Lodging Hwy. 43, Box 10, Ponca, AR 72670 870-861-5522 Website: www.lostvalleycanoe.com E-mail: lostvalleycanoe@gmail.com Riverview Motel & Canoe Rental P.O. Box 352 304 East Court Street, Jasper, AR 72641 870-446-2616 Website: riverviewmotelandcanoe.com E-mail: riverviewmotel@hotmail.com Caddo River Caddo River Camping & Canoe Rental (Jct. U.S. 70 & Hwy. 8, 35 miles west of Hot Springs) 26 Hwy. 8 East, Glenwood, AR 71943 870-356-5336; 888-300-8452 Website: www.caddoriver.com Email: float@caddoriver.com

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

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Cadron Creek

The Ozark Angler (Hwy. 110 East) 659 Wilburn Rd., Heber Springs, AR 72543 501-225-6504; 501-362-3597 Website: www.ozarkangler.com Email: ozarkflys@sbcglobal.net

Cadron Creek Outfitters 54 Cargile Lane, Greenbrier, AR 72058 Phone: 501-679-5050 Website: www.cadroncreekoutfitters.com Email: cadronboy@sbcglobal.net Crooked Creek

Mississippi River

Crooked Creek Canoes (1 mile south of U.S. 62 at Snow) 1002 MC 4006, Yellville, AR 72687 870-404-6054

Quapaw Canoe Company 107 Perry Street Helena-West Helena, AR 72342 870-228-2266 Website: www.island63.com E-mail: john@island63.com

Wild Bill’s Outfitter: See Buffalo River (Lower)

Mulberry River

Illinois Bayou

Byrd’s Adventure Center 7037 Cass Oark Rd., Ozark, AR 72949 479-667-4066 Website: www.byrdsadventurecenter.com Email: byrdsadventure@live.com

Arkansas 59 Canoeing & Rafting 20466 S Hwy 59 Siloam Springs, AR 72761 479-524-2223 Kings River

Turner Bend Inc. 20034 North Hwy. 23, Ozark, AR 72949 479-667-3641 Website: www.turnerbend.com E-mail: turnerbend@centurylink.net

Kings River Outfitters P.O. Box 483 Eureka Springs, AR 72632 479-253-8954 Website: www.kingsriveroutfitters.com E-mail: ernie@kingsriveroutfitters.com

Ouachita River

Riverside Resort & Canoes (5 miles east of Eureka Springs on Hwy. 62) 3031 U.S. 62 West Berryville, AR 72616 800-528-4645 Website: www.riversideresortand canoes.com

High Shoals Cabins & Campgrounds P.O. Box 16, Mount Ida, AR 71957 870-867-3937 Website: www.highshoalscabins.com E-mail: highshoalscabins@wind stream.net M & M Canoe Rentals (Corner of U.S. 270 & Hwy. 88) P.O. Box 81, Pencil Bluff, AR 71965 870-326-4937; 800-99-FLOAT Website: www.mandmcanoes.com

Little Red River

Lobo Landing Resort (Hwy. 337 South) 3525 Libby Rd., Heber Springs, AR 72543 501-362-5802; 800-659-8330 Website: www.lobolandingresort.com Email: lobolandingllc@hotmail.com Red River Trout Dock 285 Ferguson Rd., Heber Springs, AR 72543 501-362-2197 Website: www.redrivertroutdock.com Email: fish@redrivertroutdock.com

Ouachita River Haven Resort (2.3 miles east of Pencil Bluff just off Hwy. 88. Turn on Maddex Bend Rd.) 122 Ouachita River Haven Road Pencil Bluff, AR 71965 870-326-4941; 877-314-2836 Website: www.ouachitahaven.com E-mail: info@ouachitahaven.com

Two Spirits Ltd. Canoe Adventures (5 miles west of Mt. Ida off U.S. 270, then right .25 mi. on Hwy. 298, then right at Y; then follow green canoes with white arrows) 1167 Puckett Bend Rd. Mt. Ida, AR 71957 800-841-3632; 870-867-5028 Website: www.twospiritsltd.com E-mail: fsklein@windstream.net Saline River Saline River Canoe 4444 Ark. 5, Benton, AR 72015 501-749-2266 Website: www.salinerivercanoe.com E-mail: info@salinerivercanoe.com Spring River 3 Rivers Outfitters (Jct. Of U.S. 63/62 & 412) 400 Church St., Hardy, AR 72542 870-856-4945 Website: www.3riversoutfitters.com Many Islands Camp & Canoe Rental 2988 Many Islands Rd. Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 870-856-3451 Website: www.manyislands.com Riverside Resort, Camp & Canoe Rental (11.2 mi. north of Hardy off U.S. 63) P.O. Box 494 Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 870-625-7501 Website: www.ArkansasCanoe.com E-mail: riversideresort@msn.com Southfork Resort (12 miles south of Mammoth Spring. 9 miles north of Ash Flat) 7230 Hwy. 289 N Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 870-895-2803 Website: www.southforkresort.com Email: southforkresort@southfork resort.com

Trout

Lindsey’s Resort 350 Rainbow Loop Heber Springs, AR 72543 501-362-3139; 800-305-8790 Website: www.lindseysresort.com Email: lrr@arkansas.net

River View Cabins & Canoes 92 West River View Dr., Oden, AR 71961 888-547-1146; 870-326-4630 Website: www.riverviewcabins-canoes.com

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PAGE 126 Spring River Canoe Club (8 miles north of Hardy off Hwy. 63) 1069 Saddler Falls Rd. P.O. Box 58, Hardy, AR 72542 870-710-1050; 870-856-2744 Website: www.springriverland.com E-mail: canoespringriver@yahoo.com War Eagle Creek Withrow Springs State Park 33424 Spur 23, Huntsville, AR 72740 479-559-2593 Website: www.ArkansasStateParks.com White River & North Fork Anglers White River Resort (Hwys. 5/9/14 North at Allison) P.O. Box 1254, Mountain View, AR 72560 870-585-2226; 800-794-2226 Website: www.anglerswhiteriver.com E-mail: reservations@anglerswhite river.com Blue Heron Campground & Resort P.O. Box 1253 150 Blue Heron Drive, Flippin, AR 72634 870-453-4678 Website: www.BlueHeronCampground.com E-mail: blueheron@ozarkmountains.com Bull Shoals Lake Boat Dock (Hwy. 178) P.O. Box 748 , 719 Shorecrest Dr. Bull Shoals, AR 72619 870-445-4166 Website: www.bullshoalslakeboat dock.com Email: boatdock@bullshoals.net Bull Shoals-White River State Park Trout Dock (1 mi. below Bull Shoals Dam) 153 Dam Overlook Lane Bull Shoals, AR 72619 870-431-5557; 870-445-3629 Website: www.ArkansasStateParks.com

Outfitter’s Directory Denton Ferry RV Park 740 Denton Ferry Rd., Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-7275; 800-275-5611 Website: www.dentonrv.com E-mail: bill@dentonrv.com

Jenkins Fishing Service & Motel P.O. Box 303, Calico Rock, AR 72519 870-297-8181 Website: www.jenkinsfishingandmotel.com E-mail: jenkinstroutdock@hotmail.com

Gaston’s White River Resort 1777 River Road, Lakeview, AR 72642 870-431-5202 Website: www.gastons.com E-mail: gastons@gastons.com

Lindsey Trout Dock & Campground (3 miles west of Calico Rock on Chessmond Rd. access) 1168 Chessmond Ferry Rd., Calico Rock, AR 72519 870-297-4543; 870-297-8253 Website: lindseytroutdock.tripod.com

Gene’s Trout Fishing Resort (Just below Norfork Dam; North Fork R.) 324 River Acres Dr., Salesville, AR 72653 870-499-5381; 800-526-3625 Website: www.norfork.com/genes E-mail: genes@mtnhome.com

Maddox Bay Landing (right off Hwy. 17 S.) 499 Resort Rd., Holly Grove, AR 72069 870-462-8317; 870-842-0533

His Place Resort (Denton Ferry Rd., .75 mile from U.S. 62) 89 Chamberlain Lane, Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-6535; 866-435-6535 Website: www.hisplaceresort.net E-mail: info@hisplaceresort.net

Newland’s Lodge, Float Trips & Conference Center: See Buffalo River (Lower)

Hooks RV & Trout Resort (Northwest Jct. of Hwys. 5, 9 & 14; 5 miles north of Mtn. View @ Allison) 14300 Hwy. 14 W; P.O. Box 2514 Mountain View, AR 72560 870-585-2400; 870-585-2399 Website: www.arkansastrout.com E-mail: kim@arkansastrout.com

P.J.’s White River Lodge 384 Lodge Lane, Norfork, AR 72658 870-499-7500; 877-761-7575 Website: www.pjslodge.com Email: info@pjslodge.com

Hurst Fishing Service 926 Denton Ferry Rd., Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-6414; 888-764-6414 Website: www.hurstdock.com Email: fishhurst@centurytel.net Jack’s Fishing Resort (6.5 mi. north of Mountain View, Hwy. 5) P.O. Box 2120 Mountain View, AR 72560 870-585-2211 Website: www.jacksresort.com Email: jacksfishingresort@yahoo.com

Norfork Resort & Trout Dock: See Buffalo River (Lower)

Rainbow Drive Resort & Campground 669 Rainbow Landing Drive Cotter, AR 72626 870-430-5217 Website: www.rainbowdriveresort.com E-mail: rainbow@mtnhome.com

Rose’s Resort & Trout Dock: See Buffalo River (Lower) Rim Shoals Resort 153 Rim Shoals Camp Mountain Home, AR 72653 870-435-6144 Website: ww.rimshoals.com E-mail: info@rimshoals.com

Charlie’s Rainbow Trout Resort 270 River Acres Drive Salesville, AR 72653-9795 870-499-7214 Website: www.rainbowtroutresort.com E-mail: charliesrainbow@live.com

Dally’s Ozark Fly Fisher 1200 West Main #7, Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-6166 Website: theozarkflyfisher.com E-mail: info@theozarkflyfisher.com

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Richland Creek

Cotter Trout Dock P.O. Box 96, 321 Big Springs Pkwy. Cotter, AR 72626 870-435-6525; 800-447-7538 E-mail: ctd@southshore.com

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide Spider Creek Resort 8179 Hwy. 187 Eureka Springs, AR 72631 479-253-9241 Website: www.spidercreek.com Email: info@spidercreek.com Sportsman’s White River Resort 458 MC 7004, Flippin, AR 72634 870-453-2424; 800-626-3474 Website: www.sportsmans-resort.com E-mail: Fishing@mtnhome.com Stetson’s Resort 906 MC 7002, Flippin, AR 72634 870-453-8066 Website: www.stetsons-resort.com Email: stetsons@stetsons-resort.com Sylamore Creek Camp (5 mi. north of Mtn. View on Hwy. 14 on Sylamore Creek) 214 Sylamore Creek Rd. Mountain View, AR 72560 870-585-2326; 877-475-4223 Website: www.sylamorecreek.com E-mail: scc@mvtel.com

The Ozark Angler: See Little Red River White Buffalo Resort: See Lower Buffalo River White Hole Resort 4971 MC 7001, Flippin, AR 72634 870-453-2913; 866-781-6056 Website: www.whiteholeresort.com E-mail: info@whiteholeresort.com

PAGE 127 White River Bait & Tackle 108003 Hwy. 5 S., Norfork, AR 72658 870-291-3461; 870-291-1753 White River Campground & Cottages P.O. Box 99, Cotter, AR 72626 870-453-2299 Website: www.campthewhite.com

Wild Bill’s Outfitter: See Lower Buffalo River Wildcat Shoals Resort 1063 MC 7019; P.O. Box 1032 Flippin, AR 72634 870-453-2321 Website: www.wildcatshoals.com

Woodsman’s Package, Inc.: See Buffalo River (Lower) White River (Upper) Riverview Resort & Country Store 17939 U.S. 62 West Eureka Springs, AR 72632 479-253-8367 Website:www.riverviewcabinsand canoes.com E-mail: riverviewcabinsand canoes@yahoo.com

Spider Creek Resort: See White River & North Fork

Find Extra Adventure on Additional Arkansas Waterways

In addition to the float streams destinations described in this guide, the following providers also offer supplies or services for paddling and boating on additional waters of The Natural State. For more information, contact the outfitter or rental service below. Lake Outfitters BULL SHOALS LAKE Oakland Inn, Marina & Ozark Isle 924 Oakland Road, Oakland, AR 72661 870-431-5381 Website: www.oaklandmarina.net E-mail: info@oaklandmarina.net GREERS FERRY LAKE Green Water Kyak and Boat Rental 8893 Edgemont Road Greers Ferry AR 72069 501-206-4724; 501-206-4803 Website: greenwaterboatrental.com E-mail: greenwatergf@att.net

Statewide Outfitters

Ozarks highway scene near Alma

Ouachita Outdoor Outfitters 112 Blackhawk Lane Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-767-1373 Website: www.ouachitaoutdoors.com E-mail: ouachitaoutdoors@gmail.com

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Ozark Outdoor Supply, Inc. 5514 Kavanaugh Blvd. Little Rock, AR 72207 501-664-4832; 877-OZARK30 Website: www.ozarkoutdoor.com E-mail: ozarkoutdoorsupply @comcast.net

River Tech: See Big Piney Creek

NOTE: Information shown in this directory was provided by the various businesses and does not represent an endorsement by the State of Arkansas.

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Outfitters’ Facilities Chart

Outfitter’s Facilities Chart CANOE RENTAL JOHNBOAT RENTAL RAFT RENTAL SHUTTLE SERVICES GUIDE SERVICES LODGING CAMPGROUND SUPPLIES RESTAURANT KAYAK RENTAL

Page 128

Big Piney Creek Moore Outdoors River Tech

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Buffalo River—Lower Buffalo River Float Service LLC ● ● ● ● ● ● Cotter Trout Dock ● Dirst Canoes & Log Cabins ● ● ● ● ● Newland’s Lodge Float Trips & Conference Center ● ● ● ● ● ● Norfork Resort & Trout Dock ● ● ● ● Riley’s Station Outfitter Hideaway & Hideaway ● ● ● ● ● Rose’s Resort & Trout Dock ● ● ● ● White Buffalo Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Wild Bill’s Outfitter ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Woodsman’s Package, Inc. ● ● ● ●

Buffalo River—Middle ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Buffalo National River

Buffalo Camping & Canoeing @ Gilbert Buffalo River Outfitters Crockett’s Country Store & Canoe Rental Silver Hill Canoe Rental Silver Hill Grocery and Outfitters

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Outfitters’ Facilities Chart

PAGE 129 CANOE RENTAL JOHNBOAT RENTAL RAFT RENTAL SHUTTLE SERVICES GUIDE SERVICES LODGING CAMPGROUND SUPPLIES RESTAURANT KAYAK RENTAL

The Arkansas Adventure Guide

Buffalo River—Upper Buffalo Outdoor Center, Ponca Gordon Motel & Canoe Rental Lost Valley Canoe & Lodging Riverview Motel & Canoe Rental

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Caddo River Caddo River Camping & Canoe Rental

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Cadron Creek Cadron Creek Outfitters

● ● ● ●

Crooked Creek Crooked Creek Canoes Wild Bill’s Outfitter

● ●

● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ●

Illinois Bayou Arkansas 59 Canoeing & Rafting

● ● ● ●

Kings River Kings River Outfitters Riverside Resort & Canoes

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Little Red River Lindsey’s Rainbow Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● Lobo Landing Resort ● ● ● ● ● Red River Trout Dock ● ● ● ● ● The Ozark Angler ● ●

Mississippi River Quapaw Canoe Company

● ●

Mulberry River Byrd’s Adventure Center Turner Bend Inc.

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Ouachita River High Shoals Cabins & Campgrounds M & M Canoe Rentals Ouachita River Haven Resort River View Cabins & Canoes Two Spirits Ltd. Canoe Adventures

● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ●

● ● ● ● ● ●

Saline River Saline River Canoe

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Spring River 3 Rivers Outfitters

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Outfitters’ Facilities Chart

Outfitter’s Facilities Chart CANOE RENTAL JOHNBOAT RENTAL RAFT RENTAL SHUTTLE SERVICES GUIDE SERVICES LODGING CAMPGROUND SUPPLIES RESTAURANT KAYAK RENTAL

Page 130

Spring River (Continued) Many Islands Camp & Canoe Rental Riverside Resort, Camp & Canoe Rental Southfork Resort Spring River Canoe Club

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

War Eagle Creek Withrow Springs State Park

● ● ●

White River & North Fork Anglers White River Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Blue Heron Campground & Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Bull Shoals Lake Boat Dock ● ● ● ● ● Bull Shoals-White River State Park Trout Dock ● ● ● ● ● ● Charlie’s Rainbow Trout Resort ● ● ● ● Cotter Trout Dock ● ● ● ● ● ● Dally’s Ozark Fly Fisher ● ● Denton Ferry RV Park ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Gaston’s White River Resort ● ● ● ● ● Gene’s Trout Fishing Resort ● ● ● ● His Place Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Hooks RV & Trout Resort ● ● ● ● Hurst Fishing Service ● ● ● ● ● Jack’s Fishing Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Jenkins Fishing Service & Motel ● ● ● ● Lindsey Trout Dock and Campground ● ● ● ● ● Maddox Bay Landing ● ● ● ● Newland’s Lodge Float Trips & Conference Center ● ● ● ● ● ● Norfork Resort and Trout Dock ● ● ● ● P.J.’s White River Lodge ● ● ● ● ● ● Rainbow Drive Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Rim Shoals Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● Rose’s Resort and Trout Dock ● ● ● Spider Creek Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● Sportsman’s White River Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● Stetson’s Resort ● ● ● ● ● Sylamore Creek Camp ● ● ● ● ● ● The Ozark Angler ● ● White Buffalo Resort ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

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Outfitters’ Facilities Chart

PAGE 131 CANOE RENTAL JOHNBOAT RENTAL RAFT RENTAL SHUTTLE SERVICES GUIDE SERVICES LODGING CAMPGROUND SUPPLIES RESTAURANT KAYAK RENTAL

The Arkansas Adventure Guide

White River & North Fork (Continued) White Hole Resort ● ● White River Bait & Tackle ● ● ● ● White River Campground & Cottages ● ● ● ● Wild Bill’s Outfitter ● ● ● ● ● Wildcat Shoals Resort ● ● Woodsman’s Package, Inc. ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

White River—Upper Riverview Resort & Country Store Spider Creek Resort

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Other Arkansas Waterways Green Water Kayak and Boat Rental (Greers Ferry Lake) ● ● ● Oakland Inn, Marina & Ozark Isle (Bull Shoals Lake) ● ● ● ● ● ● Ouachita Outdoor Outfitters (Statewide) ● ● Ozark Outdoor Supply, Inc. (Statewide) ● River Tech (Statewide) ● ● ●

White River

NOTE: Information shown in this list of outfitters was furnished by the respective busi­­­nesses and does not represent an endorsement by the State of Arkansas.

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Bayou DeView

Arkansas Water Trails  System Promotes Paddling The Natural State’s Waterways Arkansas has more than 90,000 miles of rivers, streams and bayous, and many of these unique waterways are perfect for floating. An Arkansas Water Trails program serves to create public paddling trails in these and other settings for all experience levels. Communities and organizations interested in developing a water trail in their area can form partnerships with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, which prepares site assessments and produces supporting maps, signs and other information to promote conservation awareness. Arkansas Water Trails are designed to be day trips. Current trails are located in or around several wildlife management areas that feature a variety of recreation and nature viewing opportunities. For more information, contact the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission or visit a water trails partner website.

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 133

BE WELL-PREPARED

Floating on Arkansas’s Water Trails can slowly take you in and out of some very secluded areas. Recommended equipment includes a map, GPS unit, food, water, sunscreen, footwear (water sandals or wading boots), a shirt for sun protection, a cap or sun hat, insect repellant, sunglasses, ID and a trash bag. You may also want to bring a camera, binoculars, cell phone and dry bag, fire starter, fishing gear and license, knife, paddling gloves, rain gear, toilet paper and baggies, a small first-aid kit, waterproof flashlight and extra batteries, and extra lines or tie-downs. 71

63

62

49

Crooked Creek

412

7 40

63

540

Arkansas River 71

Grassy Lake Little Maumelle 430

270

30

PLAN TO GO FISHING

Largemouth bass, crappie, paddlefish, catfish and bream use backwaters for parts of their life cycles. Keep an eye out for large fish such as common carp, bowfin, gar and buffalo moving through shallow water. Other fish common to Arkansas Water Trails include black bass, smallmouth bass, Ozark bass, green sunfish, redear sunfish, bluegill and spotted bass.

ENJOY THE VIEWS

Watch for songbirds, white pelicans, great egrets, bald eagles, great blue herons, beavers, nutria, muskrats, deer and raccoons near the bayou. In backwater areas, watch for wading birds, 63 67 62 62 ospreys, red-shouldered hawks, barred owls, migrating waterfowl and warblers. Harmless broadbanded water snakes, an occasional alliga55 63 tor and several species of turtles live along these rivers and streams. Trees 67 native to these areas include bald cy40 Robe Wattensaw Bayou press, cottonwood, sycamore, hackberry Bayou Bayou Deview and persimmon trees. But no matter your nature sightseeing agenda—adventures on 49 Arkansas’s Water Trails are an equal opportunity to spot an interesting bird, land a smallmouth bass, Arkansas meet a gator, meander through some Post 65 ancient cypress trees that sprouted 500 years before Columbus discovered America, or paddle the scenic waters Cut-off Creek of Arkansas’s first settlement. 440

530

7 71

30

167 16 67 82 49

82

65

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

Plan to float at about 1-2 miles per hour, depending on the water level, flows and rate of paddling. Dense vegetation may slow or block the path during summer months, and require adjusting your route. During low water levels, man-made obstructions, log jams and snags can increase and may render a water trail inaccessible. Bayous are normally flat-floats, with put-in and take-out often feasible from the same location. However, heavy rain, strong winds or high water can create dangerous conditions. Know your own abilities and do not exceed them.

BEWARE OF THE HUNTER

During permit seasons, hunting is allowed in the designated wildlife management areas, and extra cautions should be taken. Be aware of hunting seasons and wear hunter orange when appropriate. Check www. afgc.com for schedules.

PLAY BY THE RULES

The same state regulations for canoes, kayaks and inner tubes apply to all float stream and water trail paddlers alike. Remember also to respect private property; always plan your stops on public land when possible.

REMINDERS FOR PADDLERS

1. Access may be restricted during hunting seasons; check before you go. 2. If you shuttle, remember to bring the keys for your take-out vehicle. 3. Familiarize yourself with landmarks for put-in and take-out points. 4. Carry a GPS unit, map and compass for navigation. 5. Mosquito repellent is important survival gear. 6. Observe the alligators from a safe distance!

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Arkansas Water Trails

Arkansas Post Water Trail

REGION: Southeast Arkansas—Arkansas County

Arkansas Post Water Trail

• TRAIL LENGTH: 5 miles (one way) with launching and landing at Moore Bayou Access • TRAIL PARTNERS: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; National Park Service; Arkansas Canoe Club; Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/arpost-watertrailmap.pdf • DESCRIPTION: Arkansas Post was established in 1686 by French explorer Henri de Tonti as a trading post to buy furs from the native Quapaw Indian villages. It became the first semi-permanent European settlement in the lower Mississippi Valley. One of only two Revolutionary War battles fought west of the Mississippi, Colbert’s Raid, occurred here in 1783. This area became part of the United States during the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The fur trade drew settlers through 1819, when the post was a thriving river port and capital of the Arkansas Territory. The Civil War Battle of Arkansas Post was fought here in 1863. The national park site is located next to the 10,268-acres, Trusten Holder Wildlife Management Area, on a peninsula of land which borders a section of the water trail. After paddling, continue your adventure with visits to the Arkansas Post National Memorial site, and also nearby Arkansas Post Museum State Park. No hunting is permitted within the two parks boundaries. • ACCESS POINT: Trusten Holder Wildlife Management Area—Moore Bayou • DIRECTIONS: Moore Bayou River Access. From U.S. 65 at Gould go east on Hwy. 212 for 11.8 miles. Turn left onto U.S. 165 and travel north for 4.3 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 169 and travel east for 1 mile. Turn right into Moore Bayou River Access. From Gillett, travel 5.8 miles south on U.S. 165. Turn left onto Hwy. 169 and travel east for 1 mile. Turn right into Moore Bayou River Access. • NOTES: Enjoy the large yellow American lotus blooms which dot the waterways in late summer. Be aware that wind and waves can create dangerous conditions on the open water of Post Bayou and Post Lake. Moore Bayou provides more shelter. Don’t enter the Arkansas River channel at the south end of Arkansas Post National Memorial. Boat traffic and strong currents can be dangerous.

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 135

Arkansas River Water Trail

REGION: Northwest Arkansas—Sebastian County

Crooked Creek Falls

• TRAIL LENGTH: 2.5 miles • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/ArkansasRiverWaterTrailMap.pdf • DESCRIPTION: The Arkansas River flows east to the Mississippi River. The river wraps around Fort Smith, which began as a Western frontier military post in 1817. The river is a corridor for transportation and recreation, and home to a wide variety of wildlife—from the endangered pallid sturgeon to millions of migratory waterfowl. The shallow backwaters adjacent to the Arkansas River provide wonderful opportunities for paddling, fishing and wildlife viewing. • ACCESS POINT: Fort Smith Park, Powers Port • DIRECTIONS: Fort Smith Park Access. Turn north onto Riverfront Drive (Hwy. 255) from Midland Boulevard (U.S. 64 and U.S. 71). After crossing railroad tracks, turn right into Fort Smith Park and look for the boat ramp. Powers Port Access. Continue west from Fort Smith Park on Riverfront Drive to North 19th Street and turn right. • NOTES: Barge traffic and strong currents can be hazardous on the main channel of the river

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Arkansas Water Trails

Crooked Creek Water Trail

REGION: North Central Arkansas—Marion County

• TRAIL LENGTH: 22.1 miles; Pyatt Access to Snow Access: 6.7 miles; Snow Access to Kelley’s Slab Access: 11.9 miles; Kelley’s Slab Access to Yellville Access: 3.5 miles. • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/crookedcreek-watertrailmap.pdf • DESCRIPTION: Crooked Creek is known for smallmouth bass fishing but it offers much more for visitors seeking solitude, exploration and a float trip down a river. To help anglers, paddlers and wildlife watchers enjoy this Ozark stream, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission designated the Crooked Creek Water Trail in 2012. The trail covers 22 miles of the stream—from Lower Pyatt Access to Yellville—although other stretches of the stream may be floated. The water level in the creek depends entirely on rainfall. This peaceful stream can turn into a raging torrent very quickly, especially during heavy spring rains. Paddlers should seek weather and water-level information before beginning a trip. For those planning longer routes, primitive campsites are available at Snow Access and Brooksher Crooked Creek Preserve, which has no access by road. Paddlers also may camp at Fred Berry Conservation Education Center on Crooked Creek with permission from the center’s manager. Camping is limited to one night per campsite. Almost all property along Crooked Creek is privately owned and marked by fences, signs or purple paint. Please respect private property and camp only at designated areas. • ACCESS POINT: Lower Pyatt, Snow, Kelley’s Slab, Yellville • DIRECTIONS: Lower Pyatt Access. The access is on the north side of the U.S. 62 bridge over Crooked Creek in western Marion County. Upper Pyatt Access, a primitive launch site, is about a mile upstream of Lower Pyatt Access. It’s on the east side of the U.S. 62 Spur bridge south of Pyatt. Snow Access. From Snow on U.S. 62 in western Marion County, take Marion County Road 4006 south. Continue on 4006 (bear left at 4007 split) about 1.3 miles and turn left at railroad tracks. Continue about 0.7 miles to access. Kelley’s Slab Access. To reach Kelley’s Slab, turn on Marion County Road 4002 from U.S. 62 at the western edge of Yellville. Continue 1 mile to Crooked Creek. The access is on the east side of the creek at the slab, slightly downstream of the 4002 bridge. Yellville Access. The access is in Yellville City Park, reached via Hwy. 14 immediately south of Yellville and U.S. 62. • NOTES: Under normal circumstances, paddlers can expect to cover about 2 river miles per hour on this stream with deep pools, fast chutes, riffles and small waves. The stream may flow underground during summer from Yellville to Cotter Spring on the White River (the underground stream does not follow the creek’s channel). A USGS gauge reads conditions near Kelley’s Slab at Fred Berry Conservation Education Center on Crooked Creek. A bridge (between mile markers 35 and 36) and Kelley’s Slab (between mile markers 26 and 27) can be dangerous. Scout both areas before floating.

Cut-Off Creek Water Trail

REGION: Southeast Arkansas—Drew County

• TRAIL LENGTH: Northern Wildlife Management Area boundary to Upper Weir Access: 4 miles; Upper Weir Access to Lower Weir Access: 4.3 miles. • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/Cut-offCreek-watertrailmap.pdf • DESCRIPTION: Cut-Off Creek flows south to Bayou Bartholomew. Cut-Off Creek is free of rapids, although high water can create dangerous conditions around trees and other obstacles; watch for snags, floating logs and cypress knees. The creek flows south; flow is minimal most of the year (expect to travel 1-2 miles per hour). At normal water levels, paddling upstream is an option. Respect private property marked by fences, signs or purple paint. • ACCESS POINT: Upper Weir, Lower Weir. • DIRECTIONS: Upper Weir: From Dermott (Chicot County), travel 7 miles west on Hwy. 35 to Collins (Drew County). Turn south on Collins Line Road and travel 5.2 miles to Upper Weir Access Road (watch for sign). Turn east and travel 3.2 miles to boat ramps. Lower Weir. From Dermott (Chicot County), travel 7 miles west on Hwy. 35 to Collins (Drew County). Turn south on Collins Line Road and travel 9.4 miles to Lower Weir Access Road (watch for sign). Turn east and travel 1.3 miles to boat ramp. • NOTES: A weir (dam) blocks boat travel on the creek between the two boat ramps at Upper Weir Access (see map). Another dam a few yards below Lower Weir Access also blocks boat travel; the creek is overgrown below that point. Plan

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your trip accordingly. Designated campsites (marked by signs) are available along Upper Weir Road (Drew County Road 54) and at Lower Weir Access. Gravel pads can accommodate small and medium campers. To check on the availability of seasonal camping along the creek, contact the AGFC at 870-367-3553.

Dagmar Wildlife Management Area Water Trails REGION: East Arkansas—Monroe County; Bayou DeView; Robe Bayou

Dagmar Wildlife Management Area

• TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Canoe Club; Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURES/MAPS: www.agfc.com/resources/Pages/WildlifeViewingMaps.aspx. • DESCRIPTION: Sheffield Nelson Dagmar Wildlife Management Area is a bottomland hardwood overflow area with many lakes, ponds, sloughs and bayous. Bayou Deview, Robe Bayou, Hickson Lake, Gator Pond, Bowfin Overflow, Straight Lake, Apple Lake Waterfowl Rest Area and numerous other small lakes and sloughs occupy approximately 800 acres. Some cypress trees in these areas are more than 850 years old. The Ramsar Convention, an intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for protection of the world’s most significant wetlands, has named this region a “wetland of international importance.” The ecosystem contains approximately 9,805 acres and is protected and managed by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. • DIRECTIONS: Dagmar Wildlife Management Area is accessible from Interstate 40, exiting at either Brinkley or Biscoe, depending on direction of travel, and traveling U.S. 70 west 6 miles from Brinkley or east 10 miles from Biscoe. Signs are posted at the entrance of Dagmar Wildlife Management Area on U.S. 70. • NOTE: Two paddle trails within Dagmar Wildlife Management Area boundaries, the Bayou DeView Water Trail and the Robe Bayou Water Trail, are designated as Arkansas Water Trails program and are described below.

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Arkansas Water Trails

Bayou DeView Water Trail

• TRAIL LENGTH: 1.5 miles, depending on water levels • ACCESS POINTS: Dagmar Wildlife Management Area—Off U.S. 70; Rock Island Road • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/BayouDeViewWaterTrail.pdf • DIRECTIONS: U.S. 70 Access. From U.S. 70 just east of the Bayou DeView river crossing, turn north and travel about 0.25 miles to boat launch. Rock Island Road Access. From U.S.70, about 0.5 miles west of Bayou DeView river crossing, and about 0.5 miles east of Robe Bayou river crossing, turn north on Dagmar Road. Go about 1.5 miles and turn east on Rock Island Road; continue about 0.75 miles to boat launch. This access can only be used at certain water levels. • NOTES: The water levels of Bayou DeView are highly variable. The main channel is not always distinct. A GPS unit, map and compass are necessary for navigation. Apple Lake Waterfowl Rest Area is adjacent to access points. Check hunting regulations for times when this area is closed.

Robe Bayou Water Trail

• TRAIL LENGTH: 4.5 miles, depending on water levels. • ACCESS POINT: Dagmar Wildlife Management Area—Dagmar Road • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/RobeBayouDagmarWaterTrail.pdf • DIRECTIONS: From U.S.70, about 0.5 miles west of Bayou DeView river crossing, and 0.5 miles east of Robe Bayou river crossing, turn north on Dagmar Road. Travel about 1.5 miles to Rock Island Road and continue north about 0.5 miles to a “T” intersection; bear left for about 0.5 miles, passing the Interstate 40 boat launch, and continuing north one mile to the next boat launch. Robe Bayou flows south. • NOTES: Paddle either upstream or downstream. Upstream, a footbridge blocks the channel about a mile north of the boat launch. Portage around this bridge to paddle farther north on the bayou. Downstream, a weir one mile south of the boat launch holds water in the bayou at Interstate 40, where the water trail ends. Travel Dagmar Road further north to Hickson Lake for further paddling opportunities.

Grassy Lake Water Trail

REGION: Central Arkansas—Faulkner County

• TRAIL LENGTH: Grassy Lake Loop: 3.3 miles; Bell Slough Spur: 1 mile out-and-back. • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/GrassyLakeWaterTrail.pdf • DESCRIPTION: Grassy Lake Greentree Reservoir is a wetland with seasonal paddling. Water is held during winter to provide habitat for waterfowl and released during spring to avoid damage to hardwood trees (call the AGFC Russellville Office for details). Keep a trail marker in sight; route is not always distinct so a GPS unit, map and compass are needed. • ACCESS POINT: Grassy Lake • DIRECTIONS: From Interstate 40 Exit 135 at Mayflower, turn south on Interstate Drive, immediately east of the exit. Continue on Interstate Drive past Gibson Bridge Road and over Palarm Creek, to Bell Slough Wildlife Management Area (1.5 miles total). Continue 0.7 miles on Grassy Lake Road and veer left. Travel 0.8 miles and turn left on Grassy Lake Road. Continue 0.3 miles; turn left. Veer right at 0.3 miles and continue to access. • NOTES: The Grassy Lake Water Trail passes through Camp Robinson on the eastern side of the loop (see map). Boaters must stay in their vessels on this section of the trail. Boating hours are limited during waterfowl hunting seasons. Check www.agfc.com/hunting/Pages/HuntingWaterfowl.aspx or the Arkansas Waterfowl Hunting Guidebook for regulations.

Little Maumelle Water Trail

REGION: Central Arkansas—Pulaski County

• TRAIL LENGTH: 8.2 miles • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, Pinnacle Mountain State Park • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/LittleMaumelleRiverWaterTrail.pdf • DESCRIPTION: The Little Maumelle River flows east to the Arkansas River. Towering cypress trees, sprawling American lotus and solitude near the city draw paddlers and anglers to the Little Maumelle River. The Little Maumelle River is free of rapids, although high water can create dangerous conditions around trees. At normal water level, paddling upstream is an option. Contact Pinnacle Mountain State Park for guided float trips, and canoe and kayak rentals.

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• ACCESS POINTS: Two Rivers Park, River Mountain Park, Pinnacle Mountain State Park. • DIRECTIONS: Two Rivers Park Access. From Hwy. 10 (Cantrell Road) in west Little Rock, turn north on Pinnacle Valley Road. After crossing the Little Maumelle River, continue straight on County Farm Road to Two Rivers Park Road and veer right. Continue through the park to the boat launch. River Mountain Park Access. From Hwy. 10 (Cantrell Road) in west Little Rock, turn north on River Mountain Road. Travel 1 mile, cross the railroad tracks and continue straight to the boat launch. Pinnacle Mountain State Park Access. From Hwy. 10 (Cantrell Road) in west Little Rock, turn on Hwy. 300. Travel 2 miles and turn right at Pinnacle Mountain State Park entrance. Continue 0.25 miles through the park to boat launch. • NOTES: Confluence of trail with Arkansas River just west of Interstate 430 bridge can be dangerous during high flow.

Wattensaw Bayou Water Trail

REGION: East Arkansas­—Prairie County; Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area

Little Maumellle River

• TRAIL LENGTH: 7.8 miles (North Road to Robinwood Road – 3.5 miles; Robinwood Road to Fire Tower Road – 4.3 miles). • TRAIL PARTNERS: Arkansas Canoe Club; Arkansas Game and Fish Commission • BROCHURE/MAP: www.agfc.com/resources/wildlifeviewing/wattensaw-watertrailmap.pdf • DESCRIPTION: Mike Freeze Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area contains approximately 19,750 acres, with the eastern border formed by the White River. These bottomlands consist mostly of timber, and several hundred acres of old beaver ponds, two oxbow lakes, and 200 acres of streams, plus nine ponds created from the removal of dirt for construction of Interstate 40. Wattensaw Bayou flows east toward the White River. Put in at any of the access points and paddle upstream or downstream. • ACCESS POINTS: Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area. Fire Tower Rd.; North/Wattensaw Auto Rd.; Robinwood Rd. • DIRECTIONS: Fire Tower Road Access. From I-40, take Exit 193 and go north on Hwy. 11 for 1.6 miles. Turn east into the Mike Freeze Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area. Fire Tower road turns to gravel at the 1.0 mile mark. Continue for 2 miles to a “T” intersection and turn left at this junction. At mile 6.2, stay to the right; the launch is just around the corner at mile 6.3. North/Wattensaw Auto Road Access. From 1-40, take Exit 193 and go north on Hwy. 11 for 3.1 miles. Turn east on North/Wattensaw Auto Road. This road is not marked, but Hwy. 249 South is on the west side of the road directly across from it. Stay to left at mile 2.3. The launch is at mile 2.6. Robinwood Road Access. From 1-40, take Exit 193 and go north on Hwy. 11 for 7.1 miles to Childers Corner. Turn east on Letchworth. At mile 4.4, the road takes a sharp left. Continue straight in this curve. Stay to the right at mile 4.9. At mile 6.9, the road comes to a “T” intersection. Turn right; the boat launch is at mile 8.0. • NOTES: Logjams are possible at a train trestle 0.3 miles upstream from the Robinwood Road Access.

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Pinnacle Mountain State Park

The Time Is Always Right to Take a Hike!

Day hikers can choose from trails that can be walked in less than an hour—to all-day excursions. Backpackers may select from trails that range from a leisurely overnight beginner’s adventure—to others that can take a month or more to complete. The state’s nationally-designated wilderness areas are rugged and physically challenging, usually with no established trails. However, these make excellent hiking areas for hikers who wish to choose their own path. For those who prefer self-guided or interpretiveguided trail experiences, a variety of choices is also available. The six physiographic regions of Arkansas offer a variety of experiences ranging from views from the top of an Ozark or Ouachita mountain to the fragrance of pine forests which abound in the rolling hills of south Arkan­sas’s West Gulf Coastal Plain (see Hiking Trails & Wilderness Areas map). Towering pines, lush hardwoods, large lakes, flowing waterways, fertile delta highlands, abundant wildflowers and a variety of wildlife provide many opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy experiencing Arkansas’s beauty.

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THE OZARK MOUNTAINS 1. Alum Cove Recreation Area 2. Beaver Lake 3. Blanchard Springs Rec. Area 4. Buffalo Nat’l. River 5. Bull Shoals Lake 6. Bull Shoals-White River S.P. 7. Davidsonville Historic State Park 8. Devil’s Den State Park 9. Greers Ferry Lake 10. Hobbs S.P.-Conser­vation Area 11. King’s Bluff Loop 12. Lake Charles State Park 13. Lake Fort Smith State Park 14. Lake Wedington Rec. Area 15. Mammoth Spring State Park 16. Norfork Lake 17. North Sylamore Crk. Hiking Trail 18. Ozark Highlands Trail

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19. Morning Star Mine Interpretive Trail & Rush Mountain Trail 20. Shores Lake/White Rock Loop Trail 21. White Rock Recreation Area 22. Withrow Springs State Park THE ARKANSAS RIVER VALLEY 23. Cove Lake Recreation Area 24. Lake Dardanelle 25. Lake Dardanelle State Park 26. Mount Magazine State Park 27. Mount Nebo State Park 28. Petit Jean State Park 29. Woolly Hollow State Park THE OUACHITA MOUNTAINS 30. Albert Pike Recreation Area 31. Bell Slough Watchable Wildlife Trail 32. Big Brushy Recreation Area 33. Cossatot River S.P.-Natural Area 34. Caney Creek Trail

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER WILDERNESS AREAS A. Lower Buffalo Wilderness B. Ponca Wilderness C. Upper Buffalo Wilderness (South) OUACHITA NATIONAL FOREST WILDERNESS AREAS D. Black Fork Mountain Wilderness E. Caney Creek Wilderness F. Dry Creek Wilderness

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35. Charlton Recreation Area 36. Crystal Recreation Area 37. Daisy State Park 38. DeGray Lake 39. DeGray Lake Resort State Park 40. Eagle Rock Loop 41. Hot Springs Nat’l. Park 42. Jessieville Visitor Infor. Center 43. Lake Catherine State Park 44. Lake Ouachita State Park 45. Lake Sylvia Rec. Area 46. Little Blakely Trails 47. Little Missouri Falls Rec. Area 48. Ouachita Trail 49. Pinnacle Mountain State Park 50. Queen Wilhelmina State Park 51. Shady Lake Recreation Area 52. Toad Suck Ferry 53. Womble Trail

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THE WEST GULF COASTAL PLAIN 54. Crater of Diamonds State Park 55. Millwood State Park 56. White Oak Lake State Park 57. Logoly State Park 58. Moro Bay State Park 59. Cane Creek State Park THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA 60. Post Bayou Nature Trail 61. Delta Heritage Trail (under dev.) 62. Lake Chicot State Park 63. Jacksonport State Park 64. Louisiana Purchase State Park 65. Merrisach Lake 66. Toltec Mounds Arch. State Park CROWLEY’S RIDGE 67. Crowley’s Ridge State Park 68. Village Creek State Park 69. Mississippi River State Park

G. Flatside Wilderness H. Poteau Mountain Wilderness OZARK NATIONAL FOREST WILDERNESS AREAS I. East Fork Wilderness J. Hurricane Creek Wilderness K. Leatherwood Wilderness L. Richland Creek Wilderness M. Upper Buffalo Wilderness (North)

* NOTE: Due to the extensive number of hiking trails in Arkansas, this booklet lists only a typical sampling of trails in each area of The Natural State.

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Arkansas Hiking Trails

Petit Jean State Park

PAGE 142

HIKING TRAILS—One Day or Less

Arkansas has over 250 hiking trails scattered through the state’s Corps of Engineers recreation areas, National Forest areas, National Parks, and State Parks. All of these hiking trails are perfect for a day in the outdoors. The seclusion that characterizes a trip on Arkansas’s trails gives families the chance to be together. Children can learn many new things accompanying their parents on excursions away from the quick pace of day-to-day life. Perhaps the best thing about hiking is that it can be enjoyed any time of the year. Every season offers something special in the outdoors and you need no special equipment— just a good pair of shoes and the desire to breathe clean, fresh air.

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Bell Slough Watchable Wildlife Trail

Arkansas Game & Fish Commission Trail

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission maintains several fish hatcheries, net ponds and stocked lakes, along with many state and federal wildlife refuges. They also control the hunting and fishing on Arkansas’s lands and waterways. To further expose the people to all there is to enjoy in the Arkansas outdoors, the commission has opened its first trail dedicated to hiking and wildlife observation.

Bell Slough Area ( D-5)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Arkansas Game & Fish Commission, Communications Division, 2 Natural Resources Drive, Little Rock, AR 72205. PHONE: 501-223-6351. LOCATION: Take Interstate 40 west from Little Rock to the Mayflower exit. At the end of the exit ramp turn right on to Hwy. 89; then take an immediate right on to the access road and follow to Bell Slough.

BELL SLOUGH WATCHABLE WILDLIFE TRAIL ( D-5)........................................................................................ • LENGTH: 2.25 miles; Time: 1-1.5 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at trailhead and from above Game & Fish Commission address. • DESCRIPTION: This is an interpretive wildlife trail with stunning views. It was designed for viewing wildlife and migratory waterfowl in their natural environment. Along the trail there are observation terraces, a photography blind, viewing scopes and an overlook arbor. Two loops make up this trail with the longer one being 1.75 miles and the shorter being 1.3 miles. There are benches along both sections for a peaceful rest in the outdoors. For the education of the hiker there are interpretive panels along both corridors that describe the various plant and animal species found in Bell Slough. The trail surface is composed of crushed slate and there is a bathroom at the trailhead.

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Devil’s Den State Park

Arkansas State Parks Trails

Fifty-two state parks are scattered throughout Arkansas, 41 of which provide hiking trails. Many state parks offer a variety of recreation facilities such as cabins, restaurants and campgrounds. Fees are charged for the use of certain facilities. While state parks are open throughout the year, some close on certain days of the week or seasonally. Check the current Arkansas State Parks guidebook or www.ArkansasStateParks.com for specific park information.

Bull Shoals-White River State Park (A-5)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Bull Shoals State Park, 153 Dam Overlook Lane, Bull Shoals, AR 72619. PHONE: 870-445-3629. E-MAIL: bullshoalswhiteriver@arkansas.com LOCATION: 6 miles north of Mountain Home on Hwy. 5 North, then 8 miles west on Hwy. 178

BIG BLUFF TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 1.75 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate, with some rough terrain • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail traverses the wooded hills below Bull Shoals Dam. Overlooking the White River, the trail offers examples of plant succession and wildlife native to the area. A portion of the trail is located near a bluff, so be careful to stay on the trail at all times. GASTON WILDFLOWER GARDEN TRAIL (A-5)................................................................................................... • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, ADA accessible • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This memorial wildflower garden loop trail meanders through three acres of wildflowers that change each week throughout the season. Wildlife, including birds and butterflies, can be observed throughout the trail at feeders and rest areas. HERITAGE AND HABITAT TRAIL (A-5)............................................................................................................... • LENGTH: 0.54 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center. • DESCRIPTION: Through exhibit panels along this nature trail, learn how this land looked during the construction of Bull Shoals Dam and how it is currently regenerating into the forest it once was. LAKESIDE TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This scenic trail has an abundance of wildlife and is located along a cove on Bull Shoals Lake. It offers good viewing of spring and fall colors.

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OAKRIDGE MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 2-4 miles; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous (3 miles) • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This multi-use trail offers hikers and bikers access to remote areas of the park. The trail features creek crossings, dirt roads, open meadows, and long downhill and taxing uphill terrain.

Cane Creek State Park (G-6)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: Cane Creek State Park, 50 State Park Road, Star City, AR 71667. PHONE: 870-628-4714. E-MAIL: canecreek@arkansas.com LOCATION: 5 miles east of Star City on Hwy. 293

CANE CREEK KAYAK TRAIL (G-6) • LENGTH: 1.5 mile; TIME: 1-1/2 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: Kayaking on Cane Creek Lake offers kayakers a chance to explore through cypress trees and water lilies with beaver lodges to view along the way. All along the trail you can view wildlife such as bald eagles in the winter and great egrets in the summer. This trail is marked with yellow blazes on the trees. * NOTE: If you don’t have your own kayak, you can rent one at the park visitor center. CANE CREEK LAKE TRAIL (G-6) • LENGTH: 15.5 miles; TIME: 8-10 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Dramatically experience a beautiful and unique setting where two of Arkansas’s natural divisions meet. This multi-use trail meanders through the rolling terrain of the West Gulf Coastal Plain and then along the lake where the flatlands of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain stretch. Offering excellent birding and wildlife viewing opportunities, the trail crosses many bridges including three spectacular suspension bridges. Contact the park for trail conditions and closures. DELTA VIEW TRAIL (G-6) • LENGTH: 2.5 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This 2.5-mile trail that winds through rolling West Gulf Coastal Plain terrain is a fairly easy hike. At an east pace, the hike shouldn’t take over two hours. A nice resting spot is a bench overlooking Cane Creek Lake and the Mississippi Alluvial Plain landscape on the opposite side of the lake. For hiking and biking enthusiasts, this trail is an opportunity to enjoy the flora and fauna of Arkansas’s West Gulf Coastal Plain.

Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area (F-2)

Cane Creek State Park

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: 1980 Hwy. 278 West, Wickes, AR 71973. PHONE: (870) 385-2201. E-MAIL: cossatotriver@arkansas.com LOCATION: Visitor center is located about 9 miles east of Wickes on U.S. Hwy. 278. Trail head is located off U.S. Hwy. 278 about a mile east of the visitor center.

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State Parks Hiking Trails

HARRIS CREEK TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 3.5 miles; TIME: 3-4 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail features easy to moderately difficult walking that passes through six different habitats that range from a dry open shale pit to a mature shortleaf pine/hardwood forest. Half way through the trail there is an overlook that offers a spectacular view of the Cossatot River as it winds its way through the Ouachita Mountains. BRUSHY CREEK NATURE TRAIL (F-2)................................................................................................................ • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail overlooks the confluence of Brushy Creek and the Cossatot River and features a self-guided tree trail where visitors can learn about the different species of trees of southwest Arkansas. A steel walkway spans the river offering barrier-free access to both sides of the river. RIVER CORRIDOR TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 12 miles; TIME: 2-3 days; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: Map available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Completed in 2011, this 12-mile linear trail winds through some of the most scenic terrain in the Ouachita Mountains. The trail may be divided into three shorter hikes. The trailhead is located at the Brushy Creek Recreation Area on Hwy. 246, approximately eight miles east of Vandervoort. From there the trail extends five miles to the Ed Banks Access. High water can limit hiking if the river is over the crossing at the Ed Banks low water bridge. The next section is two miles long and extends from the Ed Banks Access to Cossatot Falls. The last section is five miles long extending from Cossatot Falls to the Hwy. 278 Access. This trail is excellent for backpacking; however, park management asks that hikers limit their camping to the access areas (Ed Banks, Sandbar, Cossatot Falls, and the Hwy. 278 Access Area). WATERLEAF ADA NATURE TRAIL (F-2)............................................................................................................. • LENGTH: ADA section—0.25 mile; another 1.25 mile section leads down the North Slope to the Hwy. 278 River Access. TIME: 20 minutes for each section. DIFFICULTY: Moderate, Barrier free on ADA section • Brochure: None • Description: The first section of the trail begins just east of the Visitor Center parking lot and meanders for 0.25 mile along the ridge top. This section is barrier-free and offers five wayside exhibits. A playground and butterfly garden flanks this section of the trail.

Crater of Diamonds State Park (G-3)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: Crater of Diamonds State Park, 209 State Park Rd., Murfreesboro, AR 71958. PHONE: 870-285-3113. E-MAIL: craterofdiamonds@arkansas.com. WEBSITE: www.craterofdiamondsstatepark.com LOCATION: 2 miles southeast of Murfreesboro on Hwy. 301

LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER TRAIL (G-3)............................................................................................................... • LENGTH: 1.2 miles; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Barrier free on half of the trail • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: The trail winds through the woods to the scenic Little Missouri River. The trail then loops back through the forest to the trailhead. Outdoor panels along the barrier-free portion of the trail interpret the plant and animal life of this beautiful river bottomland.

Crowley’s Ridge State Park (B-8)

REGION: Crowley’s Ridge FOR INFORMATION: Crowley’s Ridge State Park, 2092 Hwy. 168 North, Paragould, AR 72450. PHONE: 870-573-6751. E-MAIL: crowleysridge@arkansas.com LOCATION: 15 miles north of Jonesboro on Hwy. 141, or 9 miles west of Paragould on U.S. 412, then 2 miles south on Hwy. 168

DANCING RABBIT TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1.25 miles; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center

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• DESCRIPTION: The park was once a campground for American Indians who named the setting of this trail the “Dancing Rabbit Arroyo.” The Spanish word “arroyo” stands for “deep gulley.” This trail leads hikers along this gulley, formed years ago by erosion, over a swinging bridge, and loops back to the visitor center. LAKE PONDER TRAIL (B-8) ............................................................................................................................... • LENGTH: .45 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Barrier-free • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: View the plants of Crowley’s Ridge from a rustic-style boardwalk and stone overlook in the unique construction style of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Many CCC structures are visible along the trail and are highlighted by wayside exhibits outlining the park’s rich history. SPIDER CREEK TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail begins at the southern end of the picnic area and features a diversity of plant and animal life. Wildflowers are particularly numerous around the spring. WALCOTT LAKE TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: .5 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This easy trail atop the fishing lake levee offers a chance to view shorebirds as well as the best vantage point to view the park’s bat condo.

Daisy State Park (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Daisy State Park, 103 East Park, Kirby, AR 71950. PHONE: 870-398-4487. E-MAIL: daisy@arkansas.com LOCATION: 3/4 mile south of Daisy off U.S. 70

DAISY CREEK TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This hiking trail leads through Ouachita Mountain timberland where seasonal natural beauty and outstanding wildlife watching opportunities can be enjoyed. The trailhead is across from the pavilion parking lot.

Davidsonville Historic State Park (B-8)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Davidsonville Historic State Park, 7953 Hwy. 166 South, Pocahontas, AR 72455. PHONE: 870-892-4708. E-MAIL: davidsonville@arkansas.com LOCATION: 2 miles west of Pocahontas on U.S. 62, then 9 miles south on Hwy. 166; or from U.S. 63 at Black Rock, go six miles north on Hwy. 361.

Crowley’s Ridge State Park

BLACK RIVER TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail begins in the historic town site and then meanders along the Black River passing the PhillipsReeve Cemetery and ending at Trappers Lake.

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HISTORIC TOWNSITE TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center. • DESCRIPTION: Travel back in time to visit the site of the Arkansas Territory’s first post office, courthouse and federal land office. Twelve wayside exhibits tell about the history and culture of historic Davidsonville. SCOTT CEMETERY TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail runs from the campground to the historic town site passing by the Scott Family Cemetery, the burial plot of the family who ran a ferry across the Black River from the 1880s to late-1920s. TRAPPERS LAKE TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail winds around the 12-acre lake built in 1980 for fishing and wildlife viewing.

DeGray Lake Resort State Park (F-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: DeGray Lake Resort State Park, 2027 State Park Entrance Rd., Bismarck, AR 71929-8194 PHONE: 501-865-5810. E-MAIL: degraylakeresort@arkansas.com. WEBSITE: www.degray.com LOCATION: Exit No. 78 off I-30 at Caddo Valley, then 7 miles north on Hwy. 7

GREEN HERON TRAIL (F-4) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at lodge or visitor center. • DESCRIPTION: This trail winds through reforested pastureland mixed with pine and hardwood, which supports a wide variety of plants and wildlife. It is a bird watcher’s dream and also features a viewing station overlooking DeGray Lake. ISLAND TRAIL (F-4) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at lodge or visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail begins near the lodge and follows the west end of the island for about one mile. The trail is slightly hilly. Watch for shorebirds, beaver and other wildlife along the lake.

Delta Heritage Trail (under development) (E-8, F-8, G-8, G-7)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Delta Heritage Trail, 5539 Hwy. 49, West Helena, AR 72390. PHONE: 870-572-2352. E-MAIL: deltaheritagetrail@arkansas.com LOCATION: Upon completion, this rails-to-trails conversion will extend from one mile south of Lexa (approximately 7 miles west of West Helena on Hwy. 242) to Arkansas City. The first 21-mile segment stretches from Helena junction to Elaine. Trail heads are located at Helena junction near Barton; Walnut Corner at the U.S. 49 overpass; Lick Creek, Lake View and Elaine.

DELTA HERITAGE TRAIL (E-8, F-8, G-8, G-7) • LENGTH: 84.5 miles (when complete); TIME: Limited access (under development); DIFFICULTY: Easy to strenuous • BROCHURE: Contact the park. • DESCRIPTION: The Delta Heritage Trail is a rails-to-trails conversion that was acquired by Arkansas State Parks in 1993. Twenty-one miles near Helena are completed and open to hikers and bicyclists looking for an experience in some of the most remote and scenic areas remaining in eastern Arkansas’s Mississippi Delta. Five primitive tent sites are located by the visitor center at Barton. Call for updates.

Devil’s Den State Park (C-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Devil’s Den State Park, 11333 Hwy. 74 West, West Fork, AR 72774. PHONE: 479-761-3325. E-MAIL: devilsden@arkansas.com LOCATION: 8 miles south of Fayetteville on I-49 (Exit 53) then 18 miles southwest on Hwy. 170, or 7 miles west of I-49 (Exit 45) at Winslow on Hwy. 74

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BUTTERFIELD HIKING TRAIL (SEE BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS SECTION) CROSS COUNTRY MOUNTAIN BIKING TRAIL (C-2) • LENGTH: 8 miles; TIME: 2-3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: Rugged multi-use trail offers single and double track rides along Holt Road Ridge offering scenic views, creek crossings, dirt roads, long downhills and taxing uphills. The trail is divided into three different loops outside the park in the Ozark National Forest. Riders must obtain a free permit at the park visitor center to ride this trail. DEVIL’S DEN SELF-GUIDED TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (C-2) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 1-2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The Devil’s Den Trail is one of the most popular trails within the park. Gravity flow springs, peculiar erosional remnants of sandstone strata, wet weather waterfalls, and lush Ozark plant and animal life are just a few of the sights you can expect as you wind through the rugged Boston Mountain terrain. Extreme caution should be used while walking in the cave area due to open crevasses! Trailheads are located behind the visitor center and by the Hwy. 170 bridge at Lee Creek. Parking is available at both locations. WOODY PLANT TRAIL (C-2) • LENGTH: 0.25 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This short, self-guided trail begins near either bathhouse in Camping Area E and meanders through the woods surrounding the campgrounds. To help visitors learn more about the diversified plant life found in this part of the Ozarks, plants along the trail have been numbered to correspond with an identification sheet which is available at the visitor center.

Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area (A-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, 20201 East Highway 10, Rogers, AR 72756. PHONE: 479-789-5000. E-MAIL: hobbs@arkansas.com LOCATION: 10 miles east of Rogers on Hwy. 12, which bisects the park property

Hobb’s State Park-Conservation Area

HIDDEN DIVERSITY MULTI-USE TRAIL (A-2) • LENGTH: 24 miles; TIME: Entire trail 12-15 hours by foot. Smaller loops 2-9 hours. DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Trail map available at trail accesses, www.friendsofhobbs.com and most northwest Arkansas outfitting or sporting goods stores • DESCRIPTION: The trail is designed for use by hiking, off-road biking, and horseback riding enthusiasts. Two trail accesses are available. The larger parking area, Townsend Ridge Trail Access, is just west of the War Eagle turn-off, 2 miles south of Hwy. 12 on Townsend Ridge Road. The smaller parking area, Piney Road Access, is located just past Hwy. 303 one mile south of Hwy. 12 on Piney Road. This trail has multiple options, all in loop configurations. The largest loop is the 9-mile Little Clifty Creek Loop that circles Van Winkle Hollow and crosses Little Clifty Creek at two points, one that includes a beaver pond. The 6-mile War Eagle Loop traverses steep terrain and provides views of War

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Eagle Creek and historic War Eagle Valley. Two other 3-mile loops are available, with a 0.5-mile access spur and parking at the Piney Road Trail Access. Both the Bashore Loop and the Dutton Hollow Loop follow the ridges and hollows of the Blackburn Creek region of the park. Both loops can be covered individually or joined together for a 7-mile trip. Through a spur trail, the Bashore Loop provides access to Beaver Lake. The entire multi-use trail network provides an incredible diversity of the Ozark region and a great representation of the natural communities and micro-habitats of the park. A 3-mile round trip trail spur provides access to the park’s visitor center. HISTORIC VAN WINKLE TRAIL (A-2)................................................................................................................. • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME; 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, ADA accessible • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This trailhead parking lot, with restrooms, is located approximately 11.5 miles east of Rogers, AR, on Hwy. 12. Access historic area via tunnel under Hwy. 12. Interpretive sign panels describe the historic home and mill sites of the Peter Van Winkle family during and after the Civil War. Also, there is a beautiful stream, spring and raised garden site. Only some rock foundation stones remain of buildings. Guided tours available. * NOTE: There is no access from this trail or its parking lot to the Hidden Diversity Multi-Use Trail. OZARK PLATEAU TRAIL (A-2) ........................................................................................................................... • LENGTH: Choice of 0.5, or 0.75, or 1 mile; TIME; 1/4 to one hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, ADA accessible • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This concrete walking and wheelchair accessible trail begins outside the east door of the park’s visitor center. Parking is available adjacent to this stacked-looped, interpretive trail with wayside panels. It includes a typical Ozark mixed forest ridge topped with a diversity of wildlife, including deer. Two different loops offer easy, shaded hikes under tall pines, oaks, and hickory trees. The upper ADA loop is approximately 0.33 mile long. The lower barrier-free “challenge” loop is nearly 0.5 mile long. It also has a small overlook above a hollow/vallley where a tiny, yet classic example of a fluctuating spring in a streambed is located, on which native animals depend. The lower loop shares half of the upper loop, for a total of almost 0.75 mile. Combined, the upper and lower portions are about one mile. Turnouts with resting benches are positioned every few hundred feet on both sections. For pre-arrangements, staff guided tours may be available on request. PIGEON ROOST TRAIL (SEE BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS SECTION) SHADDOX HOLLOW TRAIL (A-2) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME; 1-2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Map on trailhead information board • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead parking lot is located on the north side of Hwy. 303, approximately 1 mile from the intersection on the north side of Hwy. 12. The first 0.5 mile of this loop trail follows a ridgeline, providing an easy hike. A scenic vista provides an overlook of Beaver Lake. The trail then descends into Shaddox Hollow. The descent is rather steep in places. The trail winds along the creek through stands of hardwoods and native Ozark vegetation. Some interesting limestone bluffs are found along this section. After progressing up the creek, the trail begins the climb back to the trailhead. This climb can be strenuous in places. SINKING STREAM TRAIL (A-2) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead shares the parking lot, restroom, and picnic area on Hwy. 12 with the Van Winkle Trail. For foot traffic only. Horses and mountain bikes are not allowed on this trail. This natural surface, single track loop leads upstream from the tunnels under Hwy. 12. It follows some old, level road beds paralleling the West Fork of Little Clifty Creek crossing three Boy Scout Eagle Service Project elevated bridges. The trail returns on the opposite stream bank enroute back to the parking area. The upstream portion of the creek sinks under the stream bed gravel, especially during dry spells, and then re-emerges further downstream. A stream flows year-round on the west side of the trail. Spring wildflowers abound in this hollow that also offers excellent wildlife viewing opportunities.

Jacksonport State Park (7-C)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Jacksonport State Park, 205 Avenue Street, Newport, AR 72112. PHONE: 870-523-2143. E-MAIL: jacksonport@arkansas.com LOCATION: From Newport, 3 miles north on Hwy. 69

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THE TUNSTALL RIVERWALK TRAIL (7-C) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This trail takes the hiker along the bank of the White River. Spring and summer hiking offers breathtaking beauty of the Tunstall Riverwalk Conservation Area wildflowers. Wildlife is seen regularly and bird watching is prime making one’s hiking experience memorable.

Lake Catherine State Park (F-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Lake Catherine State Park, 1200 Catherine Park Road, Hot Springs, AR, 71913-8605 PHONE: 501-844-4176. E-MAIL: lakecatherine@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit No. 97 off I-30 at Malvern, then 12 miles north on Hwy. 171

DAM MOUNTAIN TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (F-4) • LENGTH: 4 miles; TIME: 2-1/2 to 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail passes through the pine/hardwood forest of the park to the top of Dam Mountain. Spring and fall offer a variety of wildflowers, plants, and animal life. Streams and cascades are great for providing solitude and attracting the keen eye of the photographer. FALLS BRANCH TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (F-4) • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail begins near the campground and winds through the pine/hardwood forest of the park, crossing Little Canyon Creek several times. It eventually leads to a scenic waterfall on Falls Creek and works its way back to the trailhead. HORSESHOE MOUNTAIN TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (F-4) • LENGTH: 3.5 miles; TIME: 2 to 2-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail passes through pine/hardwood forests and novaculite glades along the ridgetop of Horseshoe Mountain. Hikers can enjoy wildflowers, interesting rock formations and scenic vistas.

Lake Charles State Park (B-8)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Lake Charles State Park, 3705 Hwy. 25, Powhatan, AR 72458. PHONE: 870-878-6595. E-MAIL: lakecharles@arkansas.com LOCATION: 8 miles northwest of Hoxie on U.S. 63, then 6 miles south on Hwy. 25

Lake Catherine State Park

BUTTERFLIES & BLOOMS TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1.33 mile; TIME: 20 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail crosses connects the campground and visitor center. Best wildflower viewing time is May through September with black-eyed Susan, purple coneflower and plains coreopsis among the most numerous flowers.

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CEDAR TRAIL (B-8) LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy BROCHURE: Available at visitor center DESCRIPTION: This paved trail extends along a portion of the Lake Charles shoreline that features a variety of tree species including Sugarberry, White Ash, Eastern Red Cedar and a variety of oaks and hickories. Limestone is also noticeable along the shoreline. These rocks were formed from seashell and coral fragments from an ancient ocean that at one time covered this area. MOCKERNUT TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail loops through the forest and along the lakeshore. The namesake trees are home to woodpeckers and song birds, with the thick-shelled hickory nuts a favorite for the squirrels. WHITE OAK LAKE TRAIL (B-8) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 1 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail crosses intermittent streams and a portion parallels the lake shoreline. White oak trees are prized for wood to make furniture and flooring. Their acorns provide an excellent source of food for deer and squirrels.

Lake Chicot State Park (H-8)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Lake Chicot State Park, 2542 Hwy. 257, Lake Village, AR 71653. PHONE: 870-265-5480. E-MAIL: lakechicot@arkansas.com LOCATION: 8 miles northeast of Lake Village on Hwy. 144

DELTA WOODLANDS TRAIL (H-8) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: A variety of bottomland hardwood trees can be seen along the trail at Lake Chicot State Park. Birds and wildflowers flourish here. Groves of mature pecan trees add to the beauty.

Lake Dardanelle State Park (D-4)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Lake Dardanelle State Park, 100 State Park Drive, Russellville, AR 72802. PHONE: 479-967-5516. E-MAIL: lakedardanelle@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit No. 81 off I-40 at Russellville to Hwy. 7 South, an immediate right on Hwy. 326 after crossing south over I-40, then 5 miles west to park

Lake Ouachita State Park

MEADOW BROOK SELF-GUIDED TRAIL (D-4) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The theme of the Meadow Brook Self-Guided Trail is change: the succession of plants, man’s influence on the environment, and the variety of flowers, plants, and trees in the Arkansas River Valley. The trail begins and ends near the park amphitheater.

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Lake Fort Smith State Park (C-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Lake Fort Smith State Park, P.O. Box 4, Mountainburg, AR 72946. PHONE: 479-369-2469. E-MAIL: lakefortsmith@arkansas.com

OZARK HIGHLANDS TRAIL (SEE THE BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS SECTION) NOTE: Lake Fort Smith State Park is the western terminus for this 165-mile trail that passes through the heart of the Ozark Mountains.

Lake Ouachita State Park (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Lake Ouachita State Park, 5451 Mountain Pine Road, Mountain Pine, AR 71956. PHONE: 501-767-9366. E-MAIL: lakeouachita@arkansas.com LOCATION: 3 miles west of Hot Springs on U.S. 270, then 12 miles north on Hwy. 227

CADDO BEND TRAIL (E-4) • LENGTH: 4 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Nature lovers, photographers, and geologists will enjoy walking on the slopes near Lake Ouachita’s Caddo Bend Trail. Wildflowers, large boulder gardens, an abundance of quartz, scenic views, and an observation deck overlooking the lake at the end of the point are some of the main attractions. The trail begins near the park amphitheater and circles the entire peninsula back to its beginning.

Logoly State Park (H-4)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: Logoly State Park, P.O. Box 245, McNeil, AR 71752. PHONE: 870-695-3561. E-MAIL: logoly@arkansas.com LOCATION: 6 miles north of Magnolia on Logoly Road (Columbia County Road 47) just off U.S. 79 near McNeil highway junction

Louisiana Purchase State Park

CRANE FLY TRAIL (H-4) • LENGTH: 3/4 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail leads you by a small pond and several woodland streams. A boardwalk crosses over the pond at one location, and the trail offers excellent opportunities for plant and wildlife observation. SPRING BRANCH TRAIL (H-4) • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1 to 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail leads you through two food plots, by the Spring Branch Creek and over the rolling hills of the West Gulf Coastal Plain.

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Louisiana Purchase State Park (E-8)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Arkansas State Parks, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201. PHONE: 888-AT-PARKS. E-MAIL: louisianapurchase@arkansas.com LOCATION: From I-40 at Brinkley, go 21 miles south on U.S. 49 , then 2 miles east on Hwy. 362 to end of road

LOUISIANA PURCHASE BOARDWALK (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (E-8) ............................................... • LENGTH: 0.375 mile round trip; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair Accessible • BROCHURE: Available from the address listed • DESCRIPTION: A 950-foot boardwalk leads to the beginning point from which the Louisiana Purchase was surveyed. The headwater cypress swamp is interpreted by signs and wayside exhibits along the boardwalk. This scenic walk is accessible to wheelchairs and is an excellent area for photographing scenery and wildlife. No other facilities are located at this park except pit toilets.

Mammoth Spring State Park (A-7)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Mammoth Spring State Park, P.O. Box 36, Mammoth Spring, AR 72554. PHONE: 870-625-7364. E-MAIL: mammothspring@arkansas.com LOCATION: East off U.S. 63 at the intersection of Hwy. 9 within the city limits of Mammoth Spring

SPRING LAKE TRAIL (A-7) • LENGTH: 0.66 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail is accessible from most of the park’s facilities. The park’s feature attraction is Mammoth Spring, the largest spring in Arkansas and a National Natural Landmark. Other attractions include a train depot museum, a walkway across the dam and an out-of-service hydroelectric station.

Millwood State Park (G-2)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: Millwood State Park, 1564 Hwy. 32 East, Ashdown, AR 71822. PHONE: 870-898-2800. E-MAIL: millwood@arkansas.com LOCATION: From Texarkana, go 19 miles north on U.S. 71, then 9 miles east on Hwy. 32

Moro Bay State Park

WATERFOWL WAY TRAIL (G-2) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This level loop trail begins at Camping Area E. It crosses a bog and prairie bumps and meanders through both pine and hardwood stands. Fishing, waterfowl observation and photography are popular activities for hikers on this trail. At Cypress Point, a picnic table is available for those wanting to rest or enjoy a picnic lunch. On its return loop the trail passes an active beaver lodge and an alligator ‘hole’. This trail is especially popular during the fall and winter months when many varieties of migratory waterfowl use Millwood Lake as a resting site along their long journeys. WILDLIFE LANE TRAIL (G-2) • LENGTH: 4.2 miles; TIME: 1-3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This multi-use trail for hikers and bikers meanders through several hundred acres of wildlife sanctuary.

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Mississippi River State Park (E-8)

REGION: Crowley’s Ridge FOR INFORMATION: 2955 Hwy. 44, Marianna, AR 72360. PHONE: 870-295-4040. E-MAIL: mississippiriver@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit 239 off I-40 and go 19 miles south on Hwy. 1 to Marianna; then take Hwy. 1 Business to Hwy. 44, and go 5 miles to Bear Creek Recreation Area.

* NOTE: Park operates under special use permit from the USDA Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. BEAR CREEK NATURE TRAIL (E-8) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This easy 1 mile loop-trail takes in the beauty of Crowley’s Ridge. Tree identification and woodland scenery are the main focus of this trail. TROTTING FOX TRAIL(E-8) • LENGTH: 0.50 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This gentle loop trail begins and ends at the visitor center, and takes in the restoration of the area to native plants. Wildlife viewing and wayside exhibits are highlights of this trail.

Moro Bay State Park (H-5)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: Moro Bay State Park, 6071 Hwy. 600, Jersey, AR 71651. PHONE: 870-463-8555. E-MAIL: morobay@arkansas.com LOCATION: 29 miles southwest of Warren, or 23 miles northeast of El Dorado on U.S. 63

Mount Magazine State Park

DEER RUN TRAIL (H-5) • LENGTH: 0.25 mile; TIME: 1/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: Deer Run Trail is best known for the beautiful and unusual Mayhaw trees, an edible variety of hawthorn. These trees are found within the park’s bottomlands. The fruit of this tree makes a fine jelly. Deer and other wildlife are regularly seen along the trail. LOW WATER TRAIL (H-5) • LENGTH: 0.25 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: Meandering through some of the largest trees in this area of the state, the trail offers hikers an opportunity to view plenty of wildlife and bird activity. The trail is open when the Ouachita River is not flooding (usually late spring to late fall).

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Mount Magazine State Park (D-3)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Mount Magazine State Park, 16878 Hwy. 309 South, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-8502. E-MAIL: mountmagazine@arkansas.com. WEBSITE: www.mountmagazinestatepark.com LOCATION: 1 mile south of Paris on Hwy. 109, then southeast on Hwy. 309 for 16 miles; or 10 miles north of Havana on Hwy. 309 FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS: see USDA Forest Service Trails, Mount Magazine Trail

* NOTE: Park operates under special use permit from the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. BEAR HOLLOW TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: 2.8 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The Bear Hollow Trail follows the upper rim of Bear Hollow from the Benefield Picnic area to the northern trailhead at Hwy. 309 just below the Horse Camp. Points of interest include WPA steps, Sunrise Rock, Inspiration Point, Bear Head Bluff and Big Shoal Creek. Some of the best scenery on the mountain is found on this trail. It crosses several wet weather creeks which lead to beautiful waterfalls. The upper part of the hollow has never been logged and is some of the last remaining virgin hardwood forest in Arkansas. This trail offers options of starting at the picnic area, or near the visitor center to create a 7.5-mile loop connecting four other trails. The first part of this trail, just north of the picnic area, was orignially constructed by the Works Progress Administration in 1938. To hike a short loop, a spur trails reconnects with the Benefield West Loop just west of the main trail junction. HUCKLEBERRY MOUNTAIN HORSE TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: 35 miles (0.6 mile of this trail is within the state park boundaries); TIME (total length): 10-20 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This is the only multi-use trail in the state park. Horses and motorized vehicles are not allowed on any other trail listed here. From the horse camp down to the highway, this old wagon road drops 200 feet. For more details, see the Ozark National Forest description of this trail in the Multi-use Trail pages of this guide. NORTH RIM TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: 2.1 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Starting just west of the visitor center, this trail follows the north rim of the mountain to Cameron Bluff Overlook Drive. It leads through hardwood forests, scrub oaks and cedar glades across several tumbling creeks to windswept bluffs overlooking a rugged hollow, the Arkansas River Valley and the Ozark Plateau. A spur connects with the western end of the Mossback Ridge Trail to create a 4.4-mile loop back to the visitor center.

Mount Nebo State Park (D-3)

Petit Jean State Park

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Mount Nebo State Park, 16728 West State Hwy. 155, Dardanelle, AR 72834. PHONE: 479-229-3655. E-MAIL: mountnebo@arkansas.com LOCATION: 7 miles west of Dardanelle on Hwy. 155

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SUMMIT PARK TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-3) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail begins at a point on the northwest side of the mountaintop. Named for the Summit Park Hotel, built near the trailhead in 1889, it meanders down to Fern Lake along the same path that it has taken since it was first used by guests of the famous hotel. The Civilian Conservation Corps improved the trail with beautiful native rock work in the 1930s. This trail intersects with the park’s Bench Trail near Fern Lake. A self-guided trail brochure can be obtained at the park visitor center. BENCH TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: 4 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The Bench Trail begins at the overlook shelter you’ll see as you drive up the mountain to the park. There is a narrow shelf called a bench that encircles the entire mountain. In the early 1900s, this bench featured a road. Today the bench is a trail route through a woodland that teems with large trees and wildlife. Fern Lake, remnants of historic springs, and steps that were a part of this early resort development are still visible. The gently rolling trail offers views from the mountain, especially during seasons from late fall through early spring.

Petit Jean State Park (D-4)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Petit Jean State Park, 1285 Petit Jean Mountain Rd., Morrilton, AR 72110. PHONE: 501-727-5441. E-MAIL: petitjean@arkansas.com. WEBSITE: www.petitjeanstatepark.com LOCATION: Exit 108 off I-40 at Morrilton, 9 miles south on Hwy. 9, then 12 miles west on Hwy. 154

CEDAR CREEK TRAIL (D-4) • LENGTH: 1.25 mile; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: At visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead is located at the Pioneer Cabin one mile west of the visitor center on Hwy 154. Constructed by the CCC in the early 1930s, the trail winds along a scenic section of Cedar Creek above Cedar Falls. The rocky mountain stream, high bluffs and thick vegetation make it a perfect location for watching local bird and plant life. CEDAR FALLS TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-4) • LENGTH: 2.25 miles round trip; TIME: 1-1/2 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at lodge and visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Trail begins behind Mather Lodge, the park’s rustic style mountain lodge, and winds down into Cedar Creek Canyon. Massive stone boulders and large trees adorn the trailside. The trail then follows Cedar Creek to 95-foot Cedar Falls, one of the tallest continuously flowing waterfalls in the state. This is a photographer’s paradise. SEVEN HOLLOWS TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-4) • LENGTH: 4.5 miles; TIME: 4 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at lodge and visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail passes through a series of small canyons under the canopy of a dense hardwood forest. Unique features such as a natural stone arch, rock shelters, a box canyon and signs of prehistoric bluff-dwelling American Indians add to the experience of this truly spectacular trail.

Pinnacle Mountain State Park (E-5)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Pinnacle Mountain State Park, 11901 Pinnacle Valley Road, Little Rock, AR 72223. PHONE: 501-868-5806. FAX: 501-868-5018. E-MAIL: pinnaclemountain@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit No. 9 off I-430 at Little Rock, and travel seven miles west on Hwy. 10; then go two miles north on Hwy. 300

ARKANSAS TRAIL (E-5) ..................................................................................................................................... • LENGTH: 0.6 mile; TIME: 3/4 to 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair Accessible • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center and trailhead • DESCRIPTION: This paved loop trail with numerous benches is the center of the 71-acre Arkansas Arboretum. Audio sign panels interpret the variety of woody plants and trees found in the six natural divisions of Arkansas.

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State Parks Hiking Trails

BASE TRAIL (E-5) • LENGTH: 3 miles round trip; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The Base Trail is a 3 mile loop that runs along the base of Pinnacle Mountain. This trail can be accessed at either the West Summit Trailhead or the East Summit Trailhead. The trail runs through a mix of hardwood and pine forest, and is fairly level while still offering picturesque views of the Little Maumelle River as well as a wide variety of plant communities. While hiking the trail you will encounter several intersections at the West Summit Trail, East Summit Trail and Ouachita Trail. EAST SUMMIT TRAIL (E-5) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at the visitors center • DESCRIPTION: The East Summit trail is an extremely rugged trail that begins on the northeast side of Pinnacle Mountain and runs south before turning due east, up the mountain. The trail winds through a mix of hardwoods and pine before ascending through a boulder garden to a truly breathtaking view at the top. To return you must retrace your steps or hike the less strenuous West Summit Trail (see below), and return via the Base Trail for a total hike of 4.5 miles. JACKFORK MOUNTAIN BIKING TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 7.4 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead is located on the south side of the lower visitor center parking lot near the bus parking area. The trail is routed through a forested area and is designed for moderately advanced mountain bikers. KINGFISHER TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (E-5) ........................................................................... • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, ADA accessible • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center and trailhead. • DESCRIPTION: This hard-surfaced loop trail winds through the floodplain of the Little Maumelle River. Unique plants, wildflowers, animals and birds can be seen here. Along the river, large cypress trees filter sunlight into this special bottomland forest. Birdwatchers will enjoy exploring this trail early in the morning. RABBIT RIDGE MOUNTAIN BIKING TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 0.75 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead is located at the pump house on the west side of the visitor center entrance road about 25 yards past the intersection of Pinnacle Valley Road. The trail is routed through a forested area and is designed for beginner mountain bikers. ROCKY VALLEY TRAIL (E-5) • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1/2 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center and trailhead. • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead starts at the upper parking lot of the the visitor center. This 2-mile loop enters a heavily forested valley after leaving an old rock quarry area. The trail is marked in green blazes. WEST SUMMIT TRAIL (E-5) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles round trip; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This rocky trail begins at the park picnic grounds and winds its way to the top of Pinnacle Mountain. From the top is a spectacular, unobstructed view of Lake Maumelle, the Arkansas River Valley, the Ouachita Mountains and the west Little Rock area. To return, you must retrace your steps or hike down the rugged East Summit Trail (see above) and return via the base trail for a total hike of 4.5 miles. The trail is marked in yellow blazes. OUACHITA TRAIL (SEE BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS SECTION)

Queen Wilhelmina State Park (E-1)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Queen Wilhelmina State Park, 3877 Hwy. 88 West, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2863. E-MAIL: queenwilhelmina@arkansas.com. WEBSITE: www.queenwilhelmina.com LOCATION: Park location is 13 miles west of Mena on Hwy. 88. During inclement weather, travel 6 miles north from Mena on U.S. 71, then 9 miles on U.S. 270, then 2 miles on Hwy. 272

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LOVERS’ LEAP TRAIL (E-1) • LENGTH: 0.33 mile; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at lodge. • DESCRIPTION: Rich Mountain offers superlative views of the Ouachita Mountains. This windblown mountaintop often looks like the high reaches of the Smoky Mountains, with heavy fog and stunted, contorted hardwood trees. The attraction of this loop trail is an overlook on a high rock bluff with a sweeping view of the surrounding Ouachita National Forest. Recommended for late fall-early spring hiking. OUACHITA TRAIL (SEE BACKPACKING/WILDERNESS HIKING SECTION)

Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park (E-6)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park, 490 Toltec Mounds Road, Scott, AR, 72142. PHONE: 501-961-9442. E-MAIL: toltecmounds@arkansas.com LOCATION: (6 miles southeast of North Little Rock). Take No. 7 exit off I-440 and travel 10 miles southeast on U.S. 165; then go .25 mile south on Hwy. 386

KNAPP TRAIL (E-6)............................................................................................................................................. • LENGTH: 0.8 mile; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair Accessible • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This fully-accessible trail and boardwalk leads visitors through this pre-historic American Indian site. See three of the 18 mounds that once stood within the site’s earthen embankment. A self-guided tour brochure describes this archeological site inhabited by ancestors of the American Indians over a thousand years ago.

Village Creek State Park (D-8)

REGION: Crowley’s Ridge FOR INFORMATION: Village Creek State Park, 201 CR 754, Wynne, AR 72396. PHONE: 870-238-9406. E-MAIL: villagecreek@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit 242 off I-40 at Forrest City, then 13 miles north on Hwy. 284

BIG BEN NATURE TRAIL (D-8) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail begins near the visitor center and loops through this unique area of Crowley’s Ridge. LAKE DUNN TRAIL (D-8) • LENGTH: 2.75 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at the visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail starts at Lake Dunn boat dock. It travels along wooded ridgetops and winds around to the swinging bridge where the Old Military Road once passed. MILITARY ROAD TRAIL (D-8) • LENGTH: 2.25 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This beautiful trail preserves the most dramatic remaining Arkansas portion of Trail of Tears. Called the Memphis to Little Rock Road, it was completed in 1829 and provided the first improved route between Memphis and Little Rock, and became a major route of Indian Removal for Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw and 600 Cherokee.

White Oak Lake State Park (G-4)

REGION: West Gulf Coastal Plain FOR INFORMATION: White Oak State Park, 563 Highway 387, Bluff City, AR 71722. PHONE: 870-685-2748. E-MAIL: whiteoaklake@arkansas.com LOCATION: From I-30 at Prescott, travel 20 miles east on Hwy. 24, then 2 miles southeast on Hwy. 387

BEECH RIDGE TRAIL (G-4) • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Beginning among bottomland hardwoods, this loop trail climbs to a loblolly pine forest. Along the trail, beech and hickory predominate. Transition of forest and ecosystem types is the dominant theme of this scenic trail.

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State Parks Hiking Trails

COASTAL PLAIN TRAIL (G-4) • LENGTH: 3 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail is a spur from the southeast corner of the Beech Ridge Trail which loops through some of southern Arkansas’s most unique terrain. Arkansas Oak, Loblolly Pine, and other unusual members of the Sand Hill Plant Community may be found along this scenic trail. Near the lake, watch for great blue herons, green herons, and great egrets. FERN HOLLOW TRAIL (G-4) • LENGTH: 9.8 miles; TIME: 4-5 hours hiking/2-3 hours biking; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Beginning at the Beech Ridge trailhead in the tent camp area, this multi-use trail is used by hikers and mountain bikers. White blazes with a red center mark the route. Features include the foundation of an old homestead, and Sand Hill Plant Community flora including Beech and American Holly trees and many species of native ferns. A primitive camp is located at the halfway cut off. Those planning to camp here must register first at the visitor center. SPRING BRANCH TRAIL (G-4) • LENGTH: 0.33 mile; TIME: 45 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: Beginning at its trailhead in the picnic area, this gentle loop trail features White Oak, Pine and American Holly trees; many species of ferns; and the quiet solitude of Spring Branch. Watchable wildlife opportunities include sightings of gray squirrel and white-tailed deer.

Withrow Springs State Park (B-3)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Withrow Springs State Park, 33424 Spur 23, Huntsville, AR 72740. PHONE: 479-559-2593. E-MAIL: withrowsprings@arkansas.com LOCATION: 5 miles north of Huntsville on Hwy. 23

WAR EAGLE TRAIL (B-3) • LENGTH: 2 miles round trip; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: The trail is named for the scenic river which runs along its length. A small cave with rock formations is located about halfway down the trail (cave is closed temporarily). Past the cave and through the beautiful Ozark hardwood forest, a scenic overlook is located atop a 150-foot-high bluff. A great view of the river and mountain countryside makes this trail very popular.

Woolly Hollow State Park (D-5)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Woolly Hollow State Park, 82 Woolly Hollow Road, Greenbrier, AR 72058. PHONE: 501-679-2098. E-MAIL: woollyhollow@arkansas.com LOCATION: Exit 125 off I-40 at Conway, then 12 miles north on U.S. 65, then 6 miles east on Hwy. 285

Woolly Hollow State Park

HUCKLEBERRY TRAIL (D-5) • LENGTH: 3.5 miles; TIME: 2-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: Beginning at the bathhouse in the campground and looping around Lake Bennett, the trail climbs the ridge, offering scenic views of the lake. Crossing the lake’s earthen dam, the trail winds through a hardwood forest back to the main area of the park.

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Lost Valley Trail, Buffalo National River

National Park Service Trails

Four of Arkansas’s six national park-operated sites offer a variety of facilities for visitors. Hiking trails are located at Hot Springs National Park, Buffalo National River, Arkansas Post National Memorial and Pea Ridge National Military Park. Camping is available at Hot Springs and along the Buffalo River. Listed below is a representative sample of hiking trails available in the national parks. To obtain information on additional trails, contact the park at the address listed. The Buffalo National River currently has an active trail construction program and new trails are being added every year.

Arkansas Post National Memorial (G-7)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Arkansas Post, 1741 Old Post Road, Gillet, AR 72055. PHONE: 870-548-2207. WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/arpo

POST BAYOU NATURE TRAIL (G-7) • LOCATION: 15 miles north of Dumas on U.S. 165, turn east on Hwy. 169 for 2 miles • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Contact the Park address • DESCRIPTION: This woodland trail begins near the visitor center and extends through the forested peninsula between the Arkansas River and the Post Bayou. It travels along the bayou and connects to the picnic area. It also links up with other trails which lead through the historic Arkansas Post village area and the Civil War rifle pits.

Buffalo National River (B-3, B-4 and B-5)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Buffalo National River, 402 North Walnut Street, Ste. 136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-439-2520. WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Guides are available at area bookstores, sporting goods stores, and outdoor centers. Buffalo River area trail maps are available from park visitor contact stations and www.easternnational.org. There are two maps which cover the entire National River area. “Buffalo National River, Arkansas—West” encompasses lands extending from the headwaters of the Upper Buffalo Wilderness to Richland Creek Valley at Woolum Campground. “Buffalo National River, Arkansas—East” encompasses lands extending from Woolum Campground downstream to the confluence with the White River near Buffalo City. Call for cost of maps.

BUFFALO RIVER TRAIL (SEE BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS SECTION) ERBIE TRAILS (B-4) • LOCATION: These trails are located at the old community of Erbie. There are several ways to get to this area. The easiest is to travel west off Hwy. 7, approximately 5 miles north of Jasper, on the gravel Erbie campground access road; however, getting to the trails on the north side of the river will involve fording the Buffalo on a low-water concrete crossing. During high water periods, the north side can be accessed from the Dogpatch-Erbie road west off Hwy. 7. • LENGTH/TIME: There are a number of trails in this area which provide opportunities for a short stroll, a good day-long hike, or an overnight trip.; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available at address listed

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National Park Service Hiking Trails

Arkansas Post National Memorial

• DESCRIPTION: The Erbie Trails provide excellent opportunities to visit historic farmsteads, quiet stream valleys, waterfalls, old farm fields, wooded mountainsides, and bluff-top vistas. There are several trails on the north side of the river which may be hiked individually or combined into a loop of approximately 7.5 miles. The Cecil Creek Trail travels upstream along Cecil Creek to another trail intersection near the foundation of an old church. The faint trail to the right, marked with blue blazes, travels for about a mile to a waterfall area known as Broadhollow Falls. The trail to the left, known as the Cecil Creek Bench Trail, climbs out of the creek valley and runs along a bench past an old cemetery and a couple of old home sites. These trails provide a wonderful hike of great variety. The trailhead is located adjacent to the old Erbie Church and provides picnic tables and toilets. The Cherry Grove Cemetery Loop, just across the river on the south side, skirts old fields and wooded bluffs along the river to the historic cemetery. Elk and deer frequent many of these old fields along the river in the early morning and evening hours. This trail begins at the Parker-Hickman Farm, the oldest existing farmstead on the Buffalo River. INDIAN ROCK HOUSE SELF-GUIDED NATURE TRAIL (B-5) • LOCATION: This trail is at Buffalo Point, 14 miles south of Yellville on Hwy. 14, then three miles east on Hwy. 268 • LENGTH: 3.5 miles; TIME: 3 to 5 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at address listed, or for a small fee at trailhead • DESCRIPTION: The Indian Rockhouse Trail winds across hillsides and along a beautiful stream to the spectacular Indian Rockhouse Cave, which once sheltered prehistoric bluff-dwelling Native Americans (there are no “ruins” at the site). The length of the round trip is three miles and coming back is uphill. It can get quite tiring. Allow 3 to 4 hours for the trip to the Rockhouse Cave. The trail begins across the road from the trailhead parking lot. Two trails angle off from the road. Take the right, or lower, trail. If you have hiked the trail in years past, you will notice that the routing has been reversed to take better advantage of the slopes and make the return trip easier. LOST VALLEY TRAIL (B-3) • LOCATION: 22 miles west of Harrison on Hwy. 43; take access road 1 mile south of Ponca. • LENGTH: 2.1 miles round trip; TIME: 2-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available from address listed, or for a small fee at trailhead • DESCRIPTION: This trail begins at the Lost Valley campground and terminates in a cave 1.5 miles up the valley. Features include waterfalls, a cascading creek, towering cliffs, a large bluff shelter, a natural bridge, spring wildflowers and a hardwood forest containing American beech. The cave itself is a tight squeeze for approximately 200 feet ending in a large room with a 35-foot-tall waterfall. Clark Creek, like most tributaries to the Buffalo River, tends to dry up or go underground during the late summer and early fall of most years. The available brochure is self-guiding. The first mile to Eden Falls is level and easy going. The trail then climbs steeply to the mouth of the cave. You will need reliable lights if you plan to explore the cave.

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MORNING STAR MINE INTERPRETIVE TRAIL AND RUSH MOUNTAIN TRAIL (B-5) • LOCATION: Both trails start in the old mining town of Rush, approximately 5 1/2 miles northwest of the Buffalo River Bridge on Hwy. 14. A well-marked side road (6035) turns north off of Hwy. 14. • LENGTH: 0.2 mile interpretive loop trail begins the 4-mile round-trip Rush Mountain Trail • TIME: 1/2 hour to 4 hours • DIFFICULTY: Easy; Moderate to strenuous respectively • BROCHURE: Available at the Buffalo Point Ranger Station • DESCRIPTION: The Morning Star Mine Interpretive Trail begins the story of the Rush zinc mining era dating from the 1880s. Branching from this trail, the Rush Mountain Trail (2-miles, one-way) traverses the “mine level” of many of the Rush mines. Entry into the mines is prohibited and unsafe.

Hot Springs National Park (F-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Hot Springs National Park, 101 Reserve St., Hot Springs, AR 71901 PHONE: 501-624-2701. WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/hosp * NOTE: Hot Springs National Park has over 35 miles of trails. Maps are available at many locations throughout the city, or at the Hot Springs National Park Visitor Center in the Fordyce Bathhouse on Central Avenue. For a complete listing of trails, visit www.gov/hosp/planyourvisit/hiking-trails-list.htm.

Hot Springs National Park

THE GRAND PROMENADE (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (F-4) ................................................................. • LOCATION: City of Hot Springs; access trail at various locations on the east side of Central Avenue (Hwy. 7). • LENGTH: 0.33 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair accessible (There is a steep ramp at the south end which provides access to the trail, as well as a ramp at the north end.) • BROCHURE: Available at National Park Service Visitor Center • DESCRIPTION: The Grande Promenade is a brick-paved trail that divides the city development from Hot Springs Mountain. Along the trail are many benches, native and ornamental plants, an abundance of birds, and hot springs. Several scenic overlooks allow views of the city and the Ouachita Mountains. THE SUNSET TRAIL (F-4) • LOCATION: City of Hot Springs; access trail at various locations around the park, including the upper road loop on West Mountain, Black Snake Road, Cedar Glades Road, and Mountain Valley Road. • LENGTH: 8.5 miles; TIME: 6 -7 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at National Park Service Visitor Center • DESCRIPTION: This trail generally follows the mountain crests from the overlook on West Mountain, to Music Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain, and Blowout Mountain. Although the trail is in mountainous terrain, the grade is generally gentle. There are a number of rock outcrops which provide outstanding views into the mountains and valleys. Among these is Balanced Rock, a spectacular quarry which was used by Native Americans; it is accessed via a short spur trail. This trail is isolated as much as possible from the sights and sounds of the city of Hot Springs, yet it is easily accessible to visitors and citizens.

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Winding Staircase, Ouachita National Forest

USDA Forest Service Trails OUACHITA NATIONAL FOREST

The Ouachita National Forest encompasses 1.8 million acres in the Ouachita Mountain natural division in west and central Arkansas. Activities such as hiking, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, camping, and floating are popular throughout the forest. Twenty-three forest recreation areas provide easy access for recreation users. The Ouachita National Forest currently has an active trail construction program and new trails are being added every year. FOR INFORMATION/MAPS: Forest Supervisor, Ouachita National Forest, P.O. Box 1270, Federal Building, Hot Springs, AR 71902. PHONE: 501-321-5202. WEBSITE: www.fs.usda.gov/ouachita

Albert Pike Recreation Area (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101 LOCATION: Turn north off Hwy. 84 at Langley onto Hwy. 369 for 6 miles.

ATHENS-BIG FORK TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 10.1 miles one way; TIME: Allow at least 10 hours total hiking time.; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: The northern trailhead of this linear trail is located on Forest Road 25, approximately 3.5 miles northwest of Little Missouri Falls Recreation Area. This is also the northern trailhead for the Little Missouri Trail. The southern trailhead is located off Forest Road B23F. From Hwy. 246, 2.25 miles west of Athens, take Forest Road 38 toward Shady Lake. At about 1 mile, turn right on Forest Road 53800. Travel 0.7 mile on 53800 until reaching B23F on the left. The trail is about 1 mile on the left down this road. This trail is a century-old mail route which originally ran uninterrupted from Athens to Big Fork. The trail is unique in this area, and strenuous, because it runs north-south across three mountains rather than east-west with the ridges and valleys. The views from the top of Big Tom Mountain, Brush Heap Mountain, and Eagle Rock Vista on Brushy Mountain offer fantastic Ouachita Mountain scenery. This trail, combined with the Little Missouri Trail and Viles Branch Equestrian Trail, forms a loop of approximately 27 miles (see Eagle Rock Loop Trail in the Backpacking & Wilderness Hiking Trails section). LITTLE MISSOURI TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 16 miles one way; TIME: 15 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous (depending on water crossings) • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning in Camp Area B of Albert Pike Recreation Area, this trail follows the Little Missouri River upstream to Little Missouri Falls Recreation Area and beyond. The trail can be accessed at Little Missouri Falls or at a trailhead on Forest Road 25, approximately 3.5 miles northwest of Little Missouri Falls.

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This terrific trail winds along the banks of the Little Missouri River, an area long known for its scenic beauty. It offers outstanding views of waterfalls, wildlife, and hardwood and old growth pine stands. It also offers access to the river for some great fishing opportunities. The trail is popular with both day and overnight hikers. The trail is fairly level, but it does cross the river three times (including the dam at Little Missouri Falls) and three major stream tributaries. Bridges are planned for these water crossings; but, at the time of this printing, there are no bridges. There are times during excessive runoff when these streams are not fordable. WINDING STAIRS TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 4.8 miles one way; TIME: 4 to 5 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning at the Little Missouri trailhead in Camp Area B, or the Winding Stairs trailhead approximately 2 miles west of Albert Pike on Forest Road 106, the trail follows the Little Missouri River downstream to the National Forest boundary. The southern trailhead can be accessed by gravel roads off Hwy. 84. Take the first gravel road 2.7 miles west of Langley and head north. The road forks at an intersection after approximately 1.1 miles. The road at the intersection (adjacent to a large chicken farm) either turns left or goes straight. Take this left turn and follow it 2.2 miles to the trailhead on the river at Musgrove Hole. These intersections should be signed in the near future. This road is currently very rough near the end. This trail follows the Little Missouri River and allows access to an area known for its scenic beauty, popular swimming holes and challenging fishing opportunities. There are cascading waterfalls, abundant wildflowers and impressive spring and fall colors which contribute to the popularity of this trail. The trail provides several spectacular overlooks of the river. The most scenic spot on the trail is where Raven Branch flows into the river. There are large novaculite outcroppings overlooking the river which make this a popular spot for photographers. This trail is popular with both day and overnight hikers. This trail, combined with the Little Missouri Trail, provides about 16 miles of trail along the Little Missouri River.

Big Brushy Recreation Area (E-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 U.S. 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382 LOCATION: Six miles north of Pencil Bluff on U.S. 270.

Ouachita National Forest

BRUSHY CREEK TRAIL (E-2) • LENGTH: 3.6 miles to intersection with Ouachita National Recreation Trail which provides a 6-1/2 mile loop; TIME: 4 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: The Brushy Creek Trail begins at the Big Brushy Campground (day use only—no camping allowed) and winds along Brushy Creek. The trail intersects the Ouachita Trail, which can be followed back to the campground to make a 6-1/2-mile loop, or return on the original Brushy Creek Trail. Many interesting plants can be found along this trail, but please leave them for others to enjoy. Brushy Creek Trail is enjoyed by overnight backpackers as well as day hikers.

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USDA Forest Service Hiking Trails

Charlton Recreation Area (F-3)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101 LOCATION: West of Hot Springs on U.S. 270 for 20 miles.

PRAYER OF THE WOODS TRAIL (F-3) • LENGTH: 3/4 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: An easy one-hour hike along this interpretive trail allows visitors to see many of the 55 species of plants native to the area. Interpretive signs are located at key interest points. This loop trail was developed by the Forest Service as a cooperative project with the Arkansas Federation of Garden Clubs, Inc. and the Weyerhaeuser Foundation. Camping is permitted April through September. Call for exact opening and closing times. Tent and camper spots are available at Charlton Campground. Day use picnic sites and swimming also available.

Crystal Recreation Area (F-3)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101 LOCATION: Take Hwy. 27 north from Norman for 1 mile; turn east (right) on Forest Road 177 for 2 miles.

CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN SCENIC AREA TRAIL (F-3) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning on the south side of Forest Road 177, this loop trail provides a scenic trip into a stand of 300-year-old virgin shortleaf pine timber. The hiker may observe many quartz outcrops in the area. CRYSTAL RECREATION AREA TRAIL (F-3) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 3/4 to 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning in the Crystal Recreation Area, this loop trail starts next to the springs at the east end of the campground. After crossing Montgomery Creek, the trail turns upslope on a moderate grade for a short distance, then follows contours of the north slope of Crystal Mountain through old-growth hardwoods, and past several eastern white pines planted by the Forest Service in 1910. Hikers may watch for quartz outcrops along the trail. The western end of the trail again crosses Montgomery Creek into the campground, returning to its beginning point.

Jessieville Visitor Information Center Area (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Jessieville Ranger District, P.O. Box 189, Jessieville, AR 71949. PHONE: 501-984-5313 LOCATION: 18 miles north of Hot Springs on Hwy. 7

FRIENDSHIP TRAIL (E-4).................................................................................................................................... • LENGTH: 0.875 mile; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair accessible • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail begins at the parking lot behind the visitor center. It is a barrier-free, asphalt paved trail with no grade greater than 5 percent. It offers a restful break into the Ouachita Mountain woodlands with opportunities to view squirrels, deer, birds, and other animals. The trail offers access to Friendship Pond, a stocked fishing pond which provides another experience to the trail user. Many benches and picnic tables have been placed along the trail to allow opportunities to relax in the natural surroundings. The interpretive sites are designed to increase the public’s knowledge of wildlife, give users the chance to experience wildlife through sight and sound, and stimulate interest to help preserve one of nature’s priceless resources. HUNT’S LOOP TRAIL (E-4) • LENGTH: 4.25 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail begins either at Iron Springs Recreation Area or at the Ouachita Trail trailhead, located 5 miles north of the Jessieville Visitor Center on Hwy. 7. A portion of the Hunt’s Loop Trail (white paint blazes) is also

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a segment of the Ouachita National Recreation Trail (blue paint blazes). This trail follows a portion of the middle fork of the Saline River before joining with the Ouachita Trail. After breaking away to the south from the Ouachita Trail, the Hunt’s Loop Trail ascends to the top of Short Mountain, offering a scenic vista of the surrounding National Forest. LITTLE BLAKELY TRAILS (E-4) • LENGTH: 18.5 miles; TIME: Varies depending on routes hiked; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • LOCATION: From Lake Ouachita State Park on Hwy. 227, go right at the visitor center and follow the road for several miles (past the end of the pavement) to Forest Road 30200. There are a number of intersections between this road and the remote trailhead; however, each intersection should be marked with a post indicating the direction to “LB TRAIL.” • DESCRIPTION: The Little Blakely Trails offer a total of five loops which are stacked and combined to offer a variety of experiences for both hikers and mountain bikers. The trails have a diversity of features ranging from large timber to mossy glades and giant boulders, high ridgetops to the clear waters of Lake Ouachita. Due to the length of these trails and their arrangement, they offer both day-hike and overnight opportunities.

Lake Sylvia Recreation Area (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Winona Ranger District, 1069 N. Fourche, Perryville, AR 72126. PHONE: 501-889-5176 LOCATION: Hwy. 9 south of Perryville for 9 miles, west at Lake Sylvia sign on Hwy. 324 for 4 miles.

Little Miissouri River

TREES OF THE FOREST TRAIL (E-4) .................................................................................................................. • LENGTH: 1 mile round trip; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy to Partially wheelchair Accessible • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: This tree identification interpretive trail begins at the parking lot just past the Lake Sylvia camping entrance. The first half of the trail has an asphalt surface, and is an easy walk across the hardwood floodplain of Narrow Creek’s east forks. This part of the trail is easily negotiable by wheelchairs. The second half has a gravel surface with grades up to 5 percent. WILDLIFE TRAIL (E-4) • LENGTH: 2.33 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning on the east side of the camping area and merging for the short distance to the amphitheater, the trail consists of two loops and a spur. Loop A is a one-mile wildlife interpretive trail that returns by the Lake Sylvia dam and affords a beautiful view of Narrow Creek and its bluffs. Loop B starts on the back side of Loop A and affords a nice vista of the east fork of Narrow Creek and Lake Sylvia. This loop returns to Loop A, and their length totals 1.5 miles. The 0.75-mile spur up Chinquapin Mountain begins on the back side of the Chinquapin Loop. The top of the mountain presents a 270-degree panoramic view, including Lake Maumelle and Flatside Pinnacle. This trail complex has short grades in excess of 10 percent, but its views are more than worth the effort. A longer loop of 4.25 miles can be hiked by continuing past Chinquapin Mountain to the trail’s intersection with the Ouachita Trail (blue blazes). Turn west onto the Ouachita and follow it for 1.5 miles (crossing Forest Road 152) to a spur trail to the north. Follow the spur for 0.5 mile back to the road and the trailhead.

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USDA Forest Service Hiking Trails

Little Missouri Falls Recreation Area (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101 LOCATION: 7 miles northwest of Albert Pike on gravel Forest Road 25.

LITTLE MISSOURI TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available on Maps and Publications page of forest website • DESCRIPTION: Beginning in the Little Missouri Falls Recreation Area, this out-and-back trail offers access to the scenic Little Missouri Falls. It first crosses a native stone dam across the river. The hiker then faces a hill of steps in the trail which lead along large cliffs high above the river. The trail provides a view of the area above the falls on the left and a rock formation on the right. This part of the trail is a historic wagon trail which early settlers used to traverse the mountains from Langley to Big Fork. About 0.25 mile up the trail, a vista of Little Missouri Falls opens to the hiker. This trail is also a section of the Little Missouri Trail listed under Albert Pike Recreation Area.

Shady Lake Recreation Area (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 U.S. 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382 LOCATION: Hwy. 84 west from Langley for 8 miles; west on Hwy. 246 for about 3 miles.

A VALUABLE FOREST TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This is an interpretive trail. Etched metal signs along the trail tell how the forest was formed and describe the relationships between weather, rocks, soil and the plants growing in the area. The trail is an easy walk along the east fork of the Saline River. Many hikers cool their feet in the stream’s numerous pools. TALL PEAK TRAIL (F-2) • LENGTH: 6-1/2 miles round trip; TIME: 6 hours; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This trail from Shady Lake to Tall Peak is very strenuous; there is an elevation change of nearly 1,000 feet in slightly over two miles. A good portion of the trail runs along a beautiful little stream. The trail is well marked, and the tread is easy to follow; however, watch for abrupt turns in the main trail. There is an old restored fire tower on the summit providing a great destination. A connecting 3.2-mile trail circles the lake and campground.

OZARK/ST. FRANCIS NATIONAL FORESTS

Wildcat Cave, Blanchard Springs Caverns

The Ozark/St. Francis National Forests contain 1.3 million acres. The Ozark National Forest, located in the Ozark Mountain natural division, and the St. Francis National Forest, located along the Crowley’s Ridge and Mississippi Delta natural divisions, contains a total of 24 recreation areas that provide a wide variety of hiking, camping, fishing and recreation facilities. The Ozark/St. Francis National Forest currently has an active trail construction program and new trails are being added every year. FOR INFORMATION/MAPS: Forest Supervisor, Ozark/St. Francis National Forests, 605 West Main Street, Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 479-968-2354. WEBSITE: www.fs.fed.us/oonf/ozark

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Alum Cove Recreation Area (B-4)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Big Piney Ranger District, P.O. Box 427, Jasper, AR 72641. PHONE: 870-446-5122 LOCATION: 15 miles south of Jasper on Hwy. 7; west 1 mile on Hwy. 16; northwest on Hwy. 327 for 3 miles.

ALUM COVE NATURAL BRIDGE TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (B-4) • LENGTH: 1.1 miles; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available from Ranger District address or at the trailhead • DESCRIPTION: This trail leads down to one of the largest natural bridges in this part of the country. It is in a beautiful little valley enclosed by a rugged bluff line. The natural bridge is carved from solid rock by a small creek and spans over 130 feet. The trail goes across the natural bridge and then loops back underneath. It then loops through the valley, across a small creek to a long bluff line, and back through the valley to the natural bridge. There are large cave-like rooms to explore, and smaller natural bridges which are weathered out of this sandstone bluff. The valley contains a large variety of wildflowers and trees including dogwood, redbud, umbrella magnolia, and beech. From the natural bridge, you retrace your steps to the trailhead. This section is steep, so take your time climbing out. A reservation fee is required to reserve the pavillion; otherwise it is available on a first-come basis.

Bear Creek Lake Area (E-8)

REGION: Crowley’s Ridge FOR INFORMATION: St. Francis Ranger District, 2675 Hwy. 44, Marianna, AR 72360. PHONE: 870-295-5278 LOCATION: South of Marianna on Hwy. 44

BEAR CREEK NATURE TRAIL (SEE ARKANSAS STATE PARKS TRAILS, MISSISSIPPI RIVER STATE PARK)

Blanchard Springs Caverns (B-6)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Sylamore Ranger District, 1001 E. Main, Mountain View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-757-2211, 888-757-2246 or 877-444-6777. E-MAIL: reservations@recreation.gov LOCATION: Off Hwy. 14, 1 mile east of the community of Fifty-Six

Cove Lake

DISCOVERY TRAIL (B-6) • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 1 hour 35 min.; DIFFICULTY: Difficult • BROCHURE: Available on request • DESCRIPTION: The Discovery Trail offers an extended tour of Blanchard Springs Caverns. The trail, 1.25 miles long with nearly 700 steps, is not recommended for persons with cardiovascular or respiratory ailments. Guided tours on the Discovery Trail explore the middle level of the caverns, passing beneath the natural entrance and beside the cave stream. This tour experiences both barren, water-carved passages and chambers with spectacular formations. An admission fee is charged. Open Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. DRIPSTONE TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (B-6) ............................................................................. • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair accessible with assistance • BROCHURE: Available on request • DESCRIPTION: One of America’s most spectacular caverns is the main attraction of this area. The cavern offers outstanding examples of practically every type of calcite formation found in limestone caves—stalactites, stalagmites, draperies, flowstones, columns, etc. Guided tours are available to take visitors on their choice of two cavern trails. The Dripstone Trail is 0.5 mile long, and is designed to accommodate wheelchairs with assistance. It offers a look at the most spectacular formations. The trail is reached by a 216-foot elevator descent. An admission fee is charged. Open year-round.

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Cove Lake Recreation Area (D-3)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Mt. Magazine Ranger District, P.O. Box 511, 3001 East Walnut, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-3076 LOCATION: 1 mile south of Paris on Hwy. 109, then 9 miles southeast on Hwy. 309

COVE LAKE TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: 2.9 miles; TIME: 2-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available from Ranger District address • DESCRIPTION: This flat and easy trail loops around Cove Lake. Spur trails lead to a scenic vista and the Old Corley CCC Camp.

Lake Wedington Recreation Area (B-1)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Boston Mountain Ranger District, 1803 North 18 St., Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-667-2191 LOCATION: 13 miles west of Fayetteville on Hwy. 16

LAKE WEDINGTON TRAIL (B-1) • LENGTH: 15.4 miles round trip; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available from Ranger District • DESCRIPTION: This trail through the heart of the Ozarks leads past Twin Knobs, a unique rock formation, and terminates on the banks of the Illinois River. Camping is permitted along the trail. To return, it is necessary to retrace the same route. This trail is often used for overnight hiking trips.

Mount Magazine Recreation Area (D-3)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Mt. Magazine Ranger District, P.O. Box 511, 3001 East Walnut, Paris, AR 72855. PHONE: 479-963-3076 LOCATION: 1 mile south of Paris on Hwy. 109, then southeast on Hwy. 309 for 17 miles; or 10 miles north of Havana on Hwy. 309 FOR ADDITIONAL LISTINGS, see the Arkansas State Parks Trails section, Mount Magazine State Park.

Sam’s Throne, Ozarks

MOUNT MAGAZINE TRAIL (D-3) • LENGTH: Cameron Bluff to Cove Lake, 10.1 miles; Cove Lake loop, 2.9 miles; total length from Benefield Loop to Cove Lake, 14.2 miles one way; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Cameron Bluff to Cove Lake—Moderate to strenuous; Cove Lake loop—Easy • DESCRIPTION: At 2,753 feet, Mount Magazine is Arkansas’s highest mountain. From Cameron Bluff, the trail winds down the mountain to a broad bench where virgin oak, gum and ash are found. This trail is listed in both the day and overnight hiking sections due to the versatility offered by the variety of access points, distances and terrain. This is truly a unique mountain setting, offering some of the most expansive views in Arkansas. • BROCHURE: Available from Ranger District address

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Pedestal Rocks Area (C-4)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Big Piney Ranger District, 12000 SR 27, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150 LOCATION: Approximately 6 miles east of Pelsor on Hwy. 16; both the Pedestal Rocks Loop and the King’s Bluff Loop trails are accessed from the Pedestal Rocks Trailhead. CAUTION: Parts of these trails traverse along the edge of high bluffs. Railings have been added in certain locations; however, extra care should be taken in the vicinity of the bluffs.

KING’S BLUFF LOOP TRAIL (C-4) • LENGTH: 1.7 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Contact the Ranger District address • DESCRIPTION: This trail travels through a forest of large hardwoods and visits the awe-inspiring King’s Bluff. This is a beautiful area; the bluff and the views into the surrounding valley are simply fantastic. The creek which helped expose this majestic sandstone bluff spills over the edge, forming one of the highest waterfalls in this part of the Ozarks. PEDESTAL ROCK LOOP TRAIL (C-4) • LENGTH: 2.5 miles; TIME: 2-3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Contact the Ranger District address • DESCRIPTION: This spectacular trail derives its name from the large number of weathered limestone columns that resemble huge pedestals which are interspersed along the bluff line. Caves and shelters are also formed as a result of the massive weathering. These are located along the base of the bluff line. From the top of the bluff, visitors can enjoy a wonderful panoramic view down into the valley of the Illinois Bayou’s North Fork. This is truly a scenic area, offering a glimpse of the ancient geology of the Ozarks.

White Rock Mountain Recreation Area (C-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Boston Mountain Ranger District, 1803 North 18 St., Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-667-2191 LOCATION: North of I-40 on Hwy. 215 at Mulberry for 14 miles to Shores Lake campground. Continue past campground on gravel road, go left at intersection with Forest Road 1003, go right at intersection with Forest Road 1505, then continue to next right which is the entrance into the mountaintop recreation area. Trailhead is at end of road near cabins.

Pedestal Rock, Ozarks

CAUTION: This trail travels along the edge of a high bluff. Extra care should be taken in the vicinity of the bluffs. WHITE ROCK RIM LOOP TRAIL (C-2) • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • BROCHURE: Contact the Ranger District address • DESCRIPTION: This trail travels around the rim of the White Rock Mountain bluffline offering some of the most scenic views in the state. This area was constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. There are three rustic cabins and a bunkhouse-type lodge available for rent. There are also two small rooms in the bottom of the lodge which are available for hikers. There are also a number of beautiful stone shelters along the trail which offer outstanding views of the surrounding countryside.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Trails

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recreation areas are located in Arkansas on 16 large reservoirs and the McClellanKerr Arkansas River Navigation System. Many recreation facilities are provided, including those for water sports, camping, picnicking and hiking. A small fee is charged for use of some facilities.

Beaver Lake Area (A-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Chief Ranger, Beaver Lake, 2260 North 2nd, Rogers, AR 72756. PHONE: 479-636-1210

BENCH ROCK TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Begins before the gatehouse at Indian Creek Park. • LENGTH: 1.4 miles; TIME: 30 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at project office. •DESCRIPTION: The Bench Rock Trail, which begins directly before the gatehouse at Indian Creek Park, leads you along the top of a bluff which provides a great view of the lake. Plant identification tags are provided. An interpretive panel describes an overhanging rock bluff as typical shelter used by primitive bluff dwelling Native Americans. At its midpoint the trail turns back, following an abandoned road below the bluff. Here is an area of hardwood trees, shrubs, and wildflowers. DOGWOOD OVERLOOK TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Take the first left after crossing the dam, traveling south on Hwy. 187. • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 1-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: This trail starts with a steep incline leading up to an old quarry that provided the stone used to build Beaver Dam. The huge quarry that is visible from the trail is actually the smaller of the two quarries used for constructing Beaver Dam. The larger one is under water. The trail crosses the highway and reaches a rest point with a bench, then winds under bluffs before leading back to a trailhead. Hikers should note that there is a turn in the trail towards the end of the bluffs that is easy to miss—marked only by an arrow pointing back up hill and towards the highway. FISHTRAP NATURE TRAIL (A-2) • LENGTH: 0.3 mile; TIME: 30 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: This trail extends a short distance uphill to a level bench on the hillside leading to a long overhanging bluff. The bluff is typical of many such shelters of prehistoric bluff dwelling Native Americans, and can be found at multiple locations around Beaver Lake.

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DeGray Lake

LOST BRIDGE TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Across from Lost Bridge Marina. • LENGTH: 6 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: The first segment goes alongside the lakeshore across from the Lost Bridge Marina and provides spectacular views. The trail winds beside rock bluffs that served as prehistoric shelters for Native Americans. Slightly beyond the midpoint of the trail are the remains of the Old Schrader Homestead, with all the features marked by informational displays. The trail is relatively flat and a moderate hike for the average hiker. PINE RIDGE TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Behind the showers at Rocky Branch Park. • LENGTH: 1.1 miles; TIME: 50 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: The Pine Ridge Trail begins directly behind the showers at Rocky Branch Park. It follows a rugged but very well marked path; the last segment follows a closed dirt road. The road ends at the trail head. The Pine Ridge Trail offers an easy hike with a very little incline. The trail was constructed in the fall of 2005 as an Eagle Scout Service Project. RIM ROCK TRAIL (A-2) • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 40 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy – moderate • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: The Rim Rock Trail provides a walk through scenic woodlands right above the lake. Except for one very steep turn at the end of the bluffs, this trail is fairly flat and provides a leisure hike. The many wildflowers and hardwood trees provide a profusion of color in both summer and fall. The trail offers beautiful views of Beaver Lake’s open blue waters. SILVER BEAVER TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Entrance to the Lost Bridge Group Camp. • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 30 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: This scenic trail starts at the entrance to the Lost Bridge Group Camp, The loop winds around the side of the camp and down along the shoreline. About half way down the trail is a bench to rest and watch nature.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hiking Trails

TRANQUIL TIMBERS TRAIL (A-2) • LOCATION: Center of Horseshoe Bend Park. • LENGTH: 1.3 mile; TIME: 20 minutes; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at project office. • DESCRIPTION: This trail is an easy walk with a flat landscape through a forest of shortleaf pines located in the center of the Horseshoe Bend Park. The trail is known for an abundance of deer and occasional wild turkey. The entrance is east of the road a short distance north of the gatehouse and exits the pines in the day use area of the park.

Bull Shoals Lake Area (A-5)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Resident Engineer, Corps of Engineers, 324 W. 7th, Mountain Home, AR 72653. PHONE: 870-425-2700

DOGWOOD TRAIL (A-5) • LOCATION: North of the community of Lakeview on Hwy. 178 • LENGTH: 3 miles round trip; TIME: 2 to 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at visitor center • DESCRIPTION: This trail begins in Lakeview Park and winds through the hardwood forest of the Ozark Plateau. Scenic overlooks along the trail feature spectacular views of Bull Shoals Lake.

DeGray Lake Area (F-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Resident Engineer, Corps of Engineers, 729 Channel Rd., Arkadelphia, AR 71923. PHONE: 870-246-5501

Beaver Lake

ARLIE MOORE INTERPRETIVE TRAIL (F-4) • LOCATION: Halfway between DeGray Dam and Bismarck on Hwy. 7, turn left at Morrison’s Store, then travel 2 miles to the trailhead. • LENGTH: 1.33 miles; TIME: 1 to 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available at COE visitor center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: This trail has an interconnecting loop which allows you to cut the hike in half. The focus of the trail is the natural environment. Numbered posts correspond to a trail booklet and describe tree species, timber management and animals. IRON MOUNTAIN TRAIL SYSTEM (F-4) • LOCATION: Several entry points located on Skyline Drive, Channel Road, and Corps Road. • LENGTH: 17.2 miles; TIME: Varies on trail selected; DIFFICULTY: Varies on trail selected. • BROCHURE: Available at COE visitor center. • DESCRIPTION: The Iron Mountain Trail System has several interconnecting loops which allow you to select your distance while enjoying the natural environment.

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LOWER LAKE RECREATIONAL AREA (F-4) • LOCATION: In Caddo Valley about a quarter mile past the Arkadelphia Human Development Center. • DESCRIPTION: Watchable wildlife trail, fitness trail, reservable covered picnic pavilion, covered picnic tables, disc golf course, sand volleyball court.

Greers Ferry Lake Area (C-5 and C-6)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Operations Manager, Corps of Engineers, 700 Heber Springs Rd. North, Heber Springs, AR 72543. PHONE: 501-362-2416

Bona Dea Trail & Sanctuary

MOSSY BLUFF/BUCKEYE TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (C-6) ....................................................... • LOCATION: Heber Springs, just off Hwy. 25 on the west end of the Greers Ferry Dam • LENGTH: 0.5 mile; TIME: 3/4 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy (a portion of the trail is wheelchair accessible) • BROCHURE: Available at COE visitor center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: Downstream from the dam, this trail meanders along a bluff overlooking the Little Red River and fish hatchery. The trail is mostly level, except at each end, where mossy bluffs are crossed by flights of stairs. The trail provides excellent views from an overlook shelter of the Greers Ferry dam and lake, in addition to the river valley. The Buckeye Trail was constructed in conjunction with the Mossy Bluff Trail to provide a quality trail experience for persons who are not physically able to negotiate the more difficult areas. Displays are provided alongside these trails for interpretation of interesting natural features. SUGARLOAF MOUNTAIN NATURE TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (C-5) • LOCATION: This trail is located on an island in Greers Ferry Lake. It is accessible by boat from Hwy. 337 at Sugarloaf Recreation Area on the south and Hwy. 330 at Fairfield Bay Park on the north. • LENGTH: 2 miles; TIME: 2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at COE visitor center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: This trail affords spectacular views of Greers Ferry Lake and the surrounding countryside. The summit, 540 feet above the lake, overlooks the pines and hardwoods growing on the island where this trail is located.

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hiking Trails

Lake Dardanelle Area (D-3 and D-4)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Resident Engineer, Corps of Engineers, 1598 Lock & Dam Rd., Russellville, AR 72802. PHONE: 479-968-5008

BONA DEA TRAILS (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-4) ............................................................................ • LOCATION: South side of Hwy. 326 — turn right on Hwy. 326 immediately after crossing south over I-40 on Hwy. 7. • LENGTH: Total system length of 5.5 miles; TIME: 1/2 to 4 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy, Wheelchair Accessible • BROCHURE: Available at Arkansas River Visitor Center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: This hard-surfaced loop trail was designed as a jogging/fitness trail; however, it is excellent for easy walking through the Prairie Creek floodplain. Birds and wildlife are very prevalent, and feeding stations and benches are located along the way. The trail has interconnecting loops permitting hikes as short as 1/2 mile or as long as 5 1/2 miles. BRIDGE ROCK TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-3) • LOCATION: 2 miles north of New Blaine on Hwy. 197 • LENGTH: 1 mile; TIME: 1/2 to 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE: Available at the Arkansas River Visitor Center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: This self-guiding trail winds through a dense hardwood forest on a northwestern slope overlooking the Shoal Creek arm of Lake Dardanelle. It incorporates three routes of increasing length and difficulty, offering a variety of plant life and geology.

Merrisach Lake Area (G-7)

REGION: Mississippi Delta FOR INFORMATION: Resident Engineer, Corps of Engineers, 35 Wild Goose Lane, Tichner, AR 72166. PHONE: 870-548-2291

MERRISACH LAKE TRAIL (G-7) • LOCATION: Take Hwy. 1 south from DeWitt to the junction of Hwy. 44; turn east and follow Hwy. 44 to the park, 8 miles south of Tichnor on paved county road. • LENGTH: 0.5 miles; TIME: 1/2 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: None • DESCRIPTION: This trail features great wildlife sightseeing. Fall is a fine time to view the color of the bottomland hardwoods and to see deer, many varieties of ducks and other small game.

Norfork Lake Area (A-5)

Mountain Biking, Norfork Lake Area

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Resident Engineer, Corps of Engineers, 324 W. 7th, Mountain Home, AR 72653. PHONE: 870-425-2700

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DAVID’S TRAIL (A-5) • LOCATION: 9 miles east of Mountain Home on U.S. 62, then 1 mile north of Hwy. 101. Turn right at Panther Bay sign, then take the first left. • LENGTH: 50+ miles, upon completion; TIME: Varies on trail selected; DIFFICULTY: Varies on trail selected. • DESCRIPTION: The David’s Trail System will be a network of multi-purpose trails developed and maintained in cooperation with the Friends of David non-profit organization and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Winding around the edge of beautiful Lake Norfork, the David’s Trail System will offer handicapped accessible sections, graveled woodland loops and natural trail surfaces. Upon completion of all trail sections, the David’s Trail System will include more than 50 miles of outdoor trails for public enjoyment. NORFORK TRAIL (A-5) • DESCRIPTION: The Norfork section of the Ozark Trail enables nature observers and photographers to view the Ozark Mountains through the change of seasons. Spring flowering trees, shrubs and wildflowers add subtle colors, while fall brings the hills ablaze with the colors of oaks and hickories. Viewing wildlife is a popular activity on and around the lake. These two trails provide access to a variety of habitats. PIGEON CREEK TRAIL (A-5) • LENGTH: 10 miles; TIME: Varies on trail selected; DIFFICULTY: Varies on trail selected. • DESCRIPTION: The Pigeon Creek National Recreation Trail system is comprised of 10 miles open to mountain biking and hiking. ROBINSON POINT TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (A-5) • LOCATION: 9 miles east of Mountain Home on U.S. 62, then 2-1/2 miles south on paved access road • LENGTH: 3.33 miles; TIME: 3-1/2 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE: Available at COE visitor center or by writing • DESCRIPTION: This scenic trail follows the shores and bluffs of Norfork Lake. Your camera should be required equipment, for you will likely want to capture scenes of wildflowers, fall foliage, and breathtaking views of the Ozark Mountains and Lake Norfork. The end of the trail is a short loop atop Robinson Point, a high bluff overlooking one of the largest sections of Lake Norfork. The trail begins at the sign near the entrance gate of Robinson Point Park.

Toad Suck Ferry (Cadron Settlement) Area (D-5)

REGION: Arkansas River Valley FOR INFORMATION: Lake Manager, 6298 Price St., Conway, AR 72034. PHONE: 501-329-2986

Cadron Settlement, Tollantusky Trail

TOLLANTUSKY TRAIL (NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL) (D-5) ....................................................................... • LOCATION: Exit off I-40 at Conway and go 3 miles west on U.S. 64 to Hwy. 319. • LENGTH: 1.5 miles; TIME: 1 hour; DIFFICULTY: Easy • BROCHURE: Available by writing address listed • DESCRIPTION: The Tollantusky Trail is located along the Arkansas River in the historic Cadron Settlement. The trail begins just west of the entrance parking lot and loops back to its starting point. This historic trail interprets Arkansas and its settlers in the early 1800s. A short section of the trail is designed to be barrier free. This section begins up the hill from the trailhead and travels along the ridge to a point overlooking the Arkansas River.

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Little Missouri River

BACKPACKING & WILDERNESS HIKING TRAILS

For outdoor enthusiasts who desire solitude and beautiful scenery, Arkansas’s wilderness areas and backpacking trails are perfect. If you prefer to travel along scenic and traditional routes, try any of Arkansas’s several backpacking trails. These are found throughout the mountainous areas of the state and provide a variety of beautiful scenery. Wilderness lands located around the state total over 154,000 acres. Hiking through these areas is an added challenge because, for the most part, there are no designated trails or campgrounds—just you and Mother Nature. Motorized or mechanized vehicles are not permitted. Backcountry and wilderness areas in Arkansas are precious to both citizens and visitors of the state. Arkansans are working to keep these lands in the same natural condition in which they were discovered centuries ago. A section from the Arkansas Wilderness Act of 1984 best describes what wilderness areas are and the purpose behind them: “...to designate certain national forest system lands in the State of Arkansas as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System, in order to promote, perpetuate, and preserve the wilderness character of the land, protect watersheds and wildlife habitat, preserve scenic and historic resources, and promote scientific research, primitive recreation, solitude, physical and mental challenge, and inspiration for the benefit of all the American people...”

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Backpacking Preparations

Before beginning your hike, there are a few preparations you should make. All backpackers should try to learn as much about this recreational activity as possible. Read pamphlets offered by individual parks and recreation areas. Visit your local outdoor supply store for handbooks and guides about backpacking. Obtain good, clear maps and learn to read a compass well. And above all, in case of an emergency, be sure to tell someone where you are going and when you will return. • PHYSICAL CONDITION: Know your own limits. Do not try to go too far too fast. Listen to your body. If you are: Tired? Stop and rest. Cold? Put on another layer of clothes. Warm? Take off a layer. Take care not to allow your clothes to become wet with perspiration. Drink plenty of water and drink before you feel thirsty. Dehydration starts before you actually feel it. Above all, use common sense and do not ignore small problems or possible warning signs. • CLOTHING: Wear proper clothing: natural fibers such as wool, cotton or down are best. Some of the new synthetics are good, but make certain they breathe and wick moisture away from your skin rather than absorbing it. For this reason, cotton should be worn primarily in warm weather only. Dressing in layers makes it easy to regulate your comfort. Long sleeves and full length pants will protect you from sun, insects, and briars. Remember, much of your body heat is lost through your head. Good cold weather advice is: “If your feet are cold, put on a hat.” • FOOTWEAR: Hiking boots or good, sturdy walking shoes are essential. Sandals, thongs, high heels, or loafers are a “no-no.” Break in your boots before an all-day hike. Wear them around the house for several days, wear them to work, or on a shopping trip or two. Two pairs of socks—one lightweight inner, and a heavy outer sock—are strongly recommended with boots. • FIRST AID: Always carry a first aid kit. Make sure at least one person in your group has had first aid training, knows beforehand the contents and use of the kit, or has equivalent knowledge of how to deal with injuries. • HEAT EXHAUSTION: Heat exhaustion, which can afflict individuals in excellent physical condition, is caused by prolonged physical exertion in a hot environment. Cool the victim down by whatever means available. Have the person rest and drink plenty of fluids (non-alcoholic). • HYPOTHERMIA: Ignoring cold or wet conditions and letting your body’s core temperature drop can be a life threatening situation. Without treatment, the decline in body temperature can lead to stupor, collapse, and death. Prevention is the best treatment.

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Backpacking

Stay dry, and beware of wind; put on your wool clothes before you start to shiver; and make camp before you are exhausted. Symptoms include shivering, slurred speech, memory lapses, fumbling hands, and drowsiness. Treatment includes getting the victim out of the weather, removing wet clothes and replacing them with dry ones. Build a fire for additional warmth and give the person warm drinks. If victim is semi-conscious, or worse, try to keep him awake. Put him into a sleeping bag with another person. Skin-to-skin contact is best to transfer the warmth. If a person’s body temperature is dropping, they will not produce enough body heat, even when insulated with a sleeping bag, to provide enough warmth. • STORMS AND LIGHTNING: In wind, rain, snow, etc., take shelter and keep warm and dry. Do not take risks. If thunderstorms are predicted, avoid planning trips to high risk areas such as exposed ridges and open country. If you find yourself in a thunderstorm, find a place to hide. Never be the high point. Never shelter next to a high point, such as a lone tree or cliff base. Avoid metal structures and equipment. Metal pack frame? Take it off and get away. Avoid natural electrical conductors such as water. Find a grove of trees, a space between two boulders or any low spot. • HUNTING SEASON: In Arkansas, there is a hunting season of some type scheduled from September through the middle of June. These are also the most popular seasons for hiking. Many hikers may like to hunt while they are hiking; however, many others are concerned with potential safety conflicts. There are few conflicts which actually occur between hikers and hunters, but it is a good idea to use extra caution during this time. The recommendation is to wear bright colors (preferably blaze orange) on your torso and on your head, or any other garment that may help a hiker be more visible in dense woods. Hunting is prohibited within developed state park boundaries; however, it is allowed on most other public lands, such as the Buffalo National River and the National Forests. Some State Park facilities, such as the Butterfield Trail at Devil’s Den, are actually constructed on National Forest lands, so you may encounter hunters in these areas. The Pigeon Roost Trail at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area and the Cane Creek Lake Trail at Cane Creek State Park are the only overnight trails in Arkansas which are constructed on lands where hunting in seasons is allowed. For closures, contact the trail manager’s address listed in the guide.

Rent-A-Backpack

For those who want to backpack on some of Arkansas’s finest backpacking trails, but do not have their own equipment, one of Arkansas’s state parks offers a Rent-A-Backpack program. All the necessary equipment for an extended trip on park trails is available at: • DEVIL’S DEN STATE PARK, 11333 West Arkansas Hwy. 74, West Fork, AR 72774; PHONE: 479-761-3325

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Backcountry & Wilderness Guidelines

The goal is to keep the wild in wilderness—to keep everything as if it had never been seen or touched by man. Listed below are recommendations for low impact camping which will help eliminate evidence of your passage and preserve the character of the area. To leave wilderness areas and backpacking trails unspoiled for others to enjoy, please follow these very important rules: 1. Hike in small groups and stay on the trail. Large groups of people make a greater impact no matter how well-intentioned they are. This impact can take the form of physical damage to the resource or damage to another hiker’s experience of solitude. It is also very important to stay on the trail when available. Trails are built not only to make your travel into the backcountry easier, but also to confine the impact of foot travel to a limited corridor. Cutting switchbacks and hiking off trails increases soil erosion creating ugly scars in once beautiful areas. 2. Pack out your trash and pick up any litter left by others. If everyone carried out additional debris left by others, litter problems would be quickly eliminated. 3. To dispose of human waste, use established latrines where available. Use a cat-hole where no latrine is available. Dig a 4 - 6 inch-deep hole at least 200 feet from any water source and certainly out of sight of the trail. Dig the hole as one single chunk of earth so you can refill and disguise it when finished. 4. Be careful not to contaminate any water source. Try a soapless cleanup for yourself, your clothes, and your dishes. If soap is necessary, use biodegradable soaps; however, even these can put a significant strain on the resource. Do not wash anything in main waterways. Pour water that is soapy or contaminated with food particles on well-drained, absorbent ground. Thoroughly treat or boil all water collected along the trail. 5. Never damage a standing tree for a campfire. Scatter unused piles of collected wood. 6. If a fire ring is available at a campsite, use it, then dismantle it and scatter the rocks as far as possible. If you must have a wood fire, keep it very small and use a fire pit. Simply use a trowel to dig a 6-inch thick chunk of earth intact and set it aside for later replacement. Continue digging down to mineral soil in order to protect fragile top soil. Do not ring the pit with rocks, as this will permanently scar and blacken them. Burn all wood to ashes and scatter cold ashes. Refill the hole and disguise it. With continuing popularity of backcountry and wilderness use, campers are encouraged to refrain from building a wood fire and cook on a lightweight backpacking stove. This will greatly lessen any user impact and make your cooking chores much easier. 7. Above all, be aware that you are not alone in the woods. Other wilderness hikers and campers also enjoy the solitude. Make as little noise as possible while hiking. Camp far off the trail and away from water sources. When you leave your campsite, make sure you have left behind no signs of your having been there.

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Buffalo National River

Backpacking Trails BUCKEYE MOUNTAIN TRAIL (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 Highway 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382

• LOCATION: Caney Creek Wilderness Area; 15 miles south of Mena on U.S. 71; then 17 miles east on Hwy. 246; then 9 miles north on Forest Road 38. Eastern trailhead: Forest Road 38, approximately 1 mile north of the Caney Creek trailhead. • LENGTH: 4.6 miles; TIME: 1/2 day to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE/MAP: Available from Ranger District address • DESCRIPTION: The Buckeye Mountain Trail is a short spur trail which connects with the Caney Creek Trail at its midpoint. It is primarily a ridgetop trail through the Caney Creek Wilderness area which offers magnificent views into the Caney Creek watershed. The Buckeye Trail, combined with the Caney Creek Trail, can provide a good day-long loop hike or a versatile overnight hike.

BUFFALO RIVER TRAIL (B-3 and B-4)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut Street, Suite 136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-741-5443

• BROCHURE/MAP: Information available from address listed • ADDITIONAL TRAIL INFORMATION: Available at many area bookstores and sporting goods stores. Buffalo River area trail maps are available from Trails Illustrated, P.O. Box 4357, Evergreen, CO 80437-4357; 800-962-1643. There are two maps which cover the entire National River area. “Buffalo National River, Arkansas— West” encompasses lands extending from the headwaters of the Upper Buffalo Wilderness to Richland Creek Valley at Woolum Campground. “Buffalo National River, Arkansas—East” encompasses lands extending from Woolum Campground downstream to the confluence with the White River near Buffalo City. Call for prices of maps. • LOCATION: Western trailhead: The trail currently starts at the old Whitely Homestead, approximately 1.1 miles south of the Buffalo River crossing on Hwy. 21. From the trailhead, cross the highway, follow the gravel road through the gate and cross Smith Creek. Just past the creek, turn left off the road and go around the edge of a large field until you pick up the trail which begins to wind up the hill. Eastern trailhead: The trail currently ends at the Pruitt Visitor Information Station on Hwy. 7.

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• LENGTH: 36.5 miles; TIME: Varies with weather, physical ability, total hiking distance, etc.; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous, depending on section. • DESCRIPTION: The Buffalo River Trail is a relatively new trail. In fact, much of it is still under construction. When completed, this trail will extend almost the entire length of the Buffalo River. It will also provide a link between Arkansas’s Ozark Highlands Trail and Missouri’s Ozark Trail, forming a system of trails well over one thousand miles in length. There are currently two completed sections which run from Boxley to Pruitt (36.5 miles) and from Woolum to U.S. 65 (15 miles). Construction crews are regularly working on new sections, but the going is slow. Check with the address listed if you have questions on any particular section. This trail offers some of the best scenery in the state. It is also one of the state’s most rugged trails due to the topography of the Buffalo River Valley. It winds through the valley, skirting the river in some locations and perched high atop limestone palisades in others. The trail passes historic homesites, farmsteads and cemeteries. It offers opportunities for day hikes, overnight hikes, or a loop journey by combining a downstream river float with an upstream hike. There are also a number of opportunities to explore spur trails or bushwhack into scenic areas such as the north section of the Ponca Wilderness area. Major access points for the western section of the Buffalo River Trail are Boxley, Ponca low-water bridge, Steel Creek, Kyles Landing, Erbie, Ozark Campground and Pruitt. Although the Buffalo River is a world-class float stream, the Buffalo River Trail offers an opportunity to view backcountry that cannot be seen any other way.

BUTTERFIELD HIKING TRAIL (C-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Devil’s Den State Park, 11333 West Arkansas Highway 74, West Fork, AR 72774. PHONE: 479-761-3325. E-MAIL: devilsden@arkansas.com

• LOCATION: 8 miles south of Fayetteville on I-49 (Exit 53); then 18 miles southwest on Hwy. 170, or 7 miles west of I-49 (Exit 45) at Winslow on Hwy. 74 • LENGTH: 15 miles; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE/MAP: Available through address listed • DESCRIPTION: The Butterfield Hiking Trail gets its name from the Butterfield Stagecoach which ran in the area between 1858-1861. The Butterfield Trail is one of the few looped backpacking trails in the state. Beginning in Devil’s Den State Park near the park’s pavilion, the trail crosses Hwy. 74 and passes near Mount Olive. Scenic views, such as Blackburn Creek and Vista Point, are plentiful. Rock formations and mountainous outcroppings provide photographers with dramatic subjects. Backpackers must obtain a free permit at the park office before beginning their hike.

CANEY CREEK TRAIL (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 Highway 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382

• LOCATION: Caney Creek Wilderness Area; 15 miles south of Mena on U.S. 71; then 17 miles east on Hwy. 246; then 9 miles north on Forest Road 38. Western terminus: Forest Road 31, Eastern terminus: Forest Road 38. • LENGTH: 9.5 miles one way; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE/MAP: Available through address listed, call for price. • DESCRIPTION: The Caney Creek Trail is located in the Caney Creek Wilderness Area, a 14,460-acre territory specially managed to maintain its seclusion and natural surroundings. There are plenty of oaks, beeches and pines in the forest, providing protection and housing for deer, turkey and an endless variety of other birds. Rock outcroppings and mountain ridges afford outstanding views of the countryside. The Caney Creek Trail is a linear trail extending completely through the wilderness area. Parking is available at Bard Springs and Shady Lake Recreation Areas, and at trailheads on Forest Roads 31 and 38. Open camping is allowed, but only at a distance of at least 200 feet from the trail and water sources.

EAGLE ROCK LOOP TRAIL (F-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 Highway 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101

• LOCATION: Albert Pike Recreation Area; turn left off Hwy. 84 at Langley onto Hwy. 369 for 6 miles. • LENGTH: 26.8 miles; TIME: Varies with weather and physical ability; DIFFICULTY: Strenuous • BROCHURE: Contact the Ranger District address

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• DESCRIPTION: This trail offers the longest loop hike in the state. The entire loop is actually a combination of parts of three other trails: the Little Missouri, Athens-Big Fork and the Viles Branch Equestrian Trails (this combination actually provides five trailhead parking areas along the route). The Eagle Rock loop offers hikers a wide variety of resources from the crystal clear waters of the Little Missouri River and Viles Branch Creek to the wide-ranging vistas of the mountaintops along the Athens-Big Fork Trail. The route involves a number of stream crossings both on the Little Missouri and the Viles Branch. It also involves a number of steep hill climbs along the Athens-Big Fork Trail. Refer to descriptions of the Little Missouri and Athens-Big Fork Trails for additional information.

LAKE WEDINGTON TRAIL

(See the Day Hiking Trails section: USDA Forest Service Trails, Ozark National Forest)

LITTLE MISSOURI TRAIL

(See the Day Hiking Trails section: USDA Forest Service Trails, Ouachita National Forest)

MOUNT MAGAZINE HIKING TRAILS

(See the Day Hiking Trails section: Arkansas State Parks Trails, Mount Magazine State Park; and USDA Forest Service Trails, Ozark National Forest)

NORTH SYLAMORE CREEK HIKING TRAIL (B-5 and B-6)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Sylamore Ranger District, 1001 East Main St., Mountain View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-269-3228

Mt.Magazine State Park

• LOCATION: Western terminus: Barkshed Campground and Recreation Area. Turn north from Hwy. 15 to Forest Road 1112. Eastern terminus: Turn right off Hwy. 14, approximately 0.5 mile after turning west at the intersection of Hwy. 14 and 5 at the community of Allison. Low traveled gravel road turns right off 14 in outside of first curve, as road starts up hill. Follow signs to trailhead for 0.5 mile on gravel road. Trailhead sign stands in the middle of an old pasture. The trail begins to the left and behind the sign, down by the creek bank. • LENGTH: 15 miles one way; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate • BROCHURE/MAP: Available from Ranger District address

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• DESCRIPTION: The North Sylamore Trail is named for the scenic North Sylamore Creek which flows alongside the trail. The trail is marked with carsonite posts along the main route, and signs indicate trailheads. Waterfalls at Slick Rock Hollows, fern beds moistened by Ozark springs, and numerous scenic bluffs are a few features of the trail. The trail follows the north fork of the Sylamore Creek, providing one of the most scenic trails in the region. Camping is open, but there are developed camping areas such as Gunner Pool Campground and Blanchard Springs Recreation Area located at 4-5 mile intervals along the trail. The creek provides excellent opportunities for swimming, especially in hot weather when the spring-fed creek water remains cold.

OUACHITA TRAIL (National Recreation Trail) (E-1, E-2, E-3, E-4 and E-5)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Forest Supervisor, Ouachita National Forest, P.O. Box 1270, Hot Springs, AR 71902. PHONE: 501-321-5202

• LOCATION: Western terminus: Talimena State Park, Oklahoma. Eastern terminus: Pinnacle Mountain State Park Visitor Center, 15 miles west of Little Rock off Hwy. 10, north on Hwy. 300 and east on Pinnacle Valley Road. • CORRIDOR ACCESS: There are currently a multitude of additional walk-in points along the trail. • LENGTH: 225 miles; TIME: Varies with weather, physical ability, total hiking distance, specific distance, etc.; DIFFICULTY: Easy to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: From the east, the first 30 miles of the Ouachita Trail (OT) are managed by Pinnacle Mountain State Park. Hikers are encouraged to leave emergency information with park staff. Trail guides and a map of this section are available at the visitor center, or you can write to: Pinnacle Mountain State Park, 11901 Pinnacle Valley Road, Little Rock, AR 72223. PHONE: 501-868-5806. Call for price of map. The next 193 miles of the trail are managed by the USDA Forest Service, Ouachita National Forest. A map of this section is available from the Forest Service by writing to the Forest Supervisor at the Hot Springs address, call for price of map. This map indicates trailhead access points, topographic contours, streams, campgrounds, etc. The last 31 miles of the trail extend into Oklahoma. Detailed guides are available on-line at www.fs.usda.gov/internet/FSE_documents/fsm9_039448.pdf. • DESCRIPTION: The OT is an east-west corridor which extends from Pinnacle Mountain State Park near Little Rock to Talimena State Park near Talihina, Oklahoma. This mountain trail offers the hiker a wide range of opportunities from scenic vistas, upland hardwood and pine forests to clear streams, high ridges and wide valleys. Developed facilities are provided by two state parks—Pinnacle Mountain and Queen Wilhelmina—and one National Forest Recreation Areas—Lake Sylvia. Camping is allowed in developed campgrounds or anywhere outside of the recreation areas; although trail etiquette encourages camping at least 200 feet away from the trail and water sources, and preferably out of sight of the trail. If a previous campsite is available, please make camp there in order to lessen expanding impact. The abundance of access points makes the trail excellent for day hikes, weekend excursions and extended backpacking trips. Secured parking is available at Pinnacle Mountain and Queen Wilhelmina state parks and non-secured parking is available at most access points where the trail crosses major roadways. The main trail is blazed with blue vertical rectangles while most spur trails are blazed in white. The OT is an extremely diverse trail that traverses the pine and oak-clad Ouachita Mountains with elevations ranging from 600 to 2,600 feet. Numerous side trails to major recreation areas, scenic overlooks and other attractions offer opportunities that vary from interpretation to tests of physical stamina. A bountiful variety of vegetation types are found in this region. The mild climate, abundant moisture and suitable soil provide the basic support for over 2,500 native species. Because these unique mountains run east-west, hardwoods occupy the moist northern slopes, and pine types are primarily found on the southern slopes. The OT passes through some of Arkansas’s most beautiful country and truly gives hikers a chance to experience the rugged Ouachita Mountain terrain.

OZARK HIGHLANDS TRAIL (National Recreation Trail) (C-2, C-3 C-4 and B-4)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Forest Supervisor, Ozark/St. Francis National Forest, 605 West Main St, Russellville, AR 72801. PHONE: 479-964-7200

• LOCATION: Western terminus: Lake Ft. Smith State Park. Travel eight miles north of Mountainburg on scenic U.S. 71, or take exit 29 off I-540 at Mountainburg. Eastern terminus: Tyler Bend Campground on the Buffalo National River; U.S. 65 at Silver Hill • CORRIDOR ACCESS: There are currently a multitude of additional walk-in points along the trail.

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Backpacking Trails

• LENGTH: 165 miles; TIME: Varies with weather, physical ability, total hiking distance, specific section, etc.; DIFFICULTY: Easy to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: Detailed guides can be obtained from area bookstores, sporting good stores and the Ozark Highlands Trail Association, P.O. Box 4065, Fayetteville, AR 72702. WEBSITE: www.ozarkhighlandstrail.com. • DESCRIPTION: The Ozark Highlands Trail (OHT) has been rated as one of the most scenic trails in the United States. It travels east across the entire Ozark National Forest, turns north to cross the Gene Rush/Buffalo River Wildlife Management Area, and eventually ends up on the Buffalo National River in the Richland Valley across from Woolum Campground. At this point, the OHT joins a portion of the Buffalo River Trail which heads on downstream another 13 miles to the Tyler Bend Campground. The OHT is one of the most spectacular trails in the southeastern United States. It passes through some of the most remote areas of the Ozark National Forest and is noted for its mountainous terrain, scenic views, lush upland hardwood forests, unique rock outcroppings and clear mountain streams. Different forest vegetation abounds, with the predominant overstory trees being oak/hickory. The OHT is great for day hikes, weekend adventures, and extended backpacking. It is accessible at many forest road and highway crossings. The major National Forest Recreation Areas which provide access are Shores Lake, White Rock Mountain, Ozone, Haw Creek Falls, Fairview, Richland Creek and Redding campground. Parking for extended periods is available at these and other trailhead locations. Secured parking is available at White Rock Mountain. Although a permit is not required for hiking, please sign in at all trail registers you encounter. This is valuable in an emergency situation, but the data received from the registration boxes is extremely important to the continued support and management of the trail. Once you are past the first—westernmost—miles of the trail, camping is allowed anywhere outside of the recreation areas; although trail etiquette encourages camping at least 200 feet away from the trail and water sources, and preferably out of sight of the trail. If a previous campsite is available, please make camp there in order to lessen expanding impact. Please observe all leave-no-trace backcountry ethics along the trail. The trail has had a variety of markings in the past; however, white rectangular paint blazes have been adopted as the official marker. All spur and side trails will be marked with blue rectangular paint blazes. For those persons interested in experiencing the beauty and spirit of the Ozark Mountains much the same as our forefathers found them, this trail offers unmatched scenery. A camera is a must!

PIGEON ROOST TRAIL (B-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, 20201 East Highway 12, Rogers, AR 72756. PHONE: 479-789-5000. E-MAIL: hobbs@arkansas.com

• LOCATION: 13 miles east of Rogers on Hwy. 12 • LENGTH: 8.5 miles; TIME: Allow 6 - 7 hours total hiking time.; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: Available as indicated below • DESCRIPTION: The trailhead parking lot is located on the north side of Hwy. 12, about 0.5 mile east of the visitor center. This trail is a double stacked-loop trail; there is a short loop of approximately 4 miles for day hiking and a longer loop of 8.5 miles for overnight use. Camping is allowed on the longer loop at five designated campsites only. These campsites, on a ridge overlooking Beaver Lake, are available on a first-come basis. Contact the park at the phone number listed above to determine if there will be a campsite available. The trail is fairly short for an overnight trail, but there are several hills to climb which give the trail its difficulty rating. From the parking lot, the trail begins straight ahead down the ridgeline. This is an access spur which follows the ridgeline for about 0.5 mile, then drops off the ridge to the west to the bottom of a hollow where it intersects with the loop. At this point, you can go either left or right; however, the hiking is a bit easier if you take the left fork. The trail winds through narrow hollows and up and along rugged ridges. It travels through stands of native pines, hardwoods, and typical Ozark vegetation. During leaf-off, there are several locations which offer great views of the Van Winkle Hollow branch of Beaver Lake. At present, small game and deer hunting is allowed in the area. Guidebooks are available at the park visitor center and most northwest Arkansas outfitting and/or sporting goods stores. Trail map is available at trailhead or on website.

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SHORES LAKE/WHITE ROCK LOOP TRAIL (C-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Boston Mountain Ranger District, 1803 N. 18th St., Ozark, AR 72949. PHONE: 479-667-2191

• LOCATION: About 14 miles north of I-40 at Mulberry off Hwy. 215 • LENGTH: 14.5 miles; TIME: 12 hours to overnight; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: Available as indicated below • DESCRIPTION: This loop trail connects two of the more popular Forest Service recreation areas: Shores Lake and White Rock Mountain. It offers an excellent weekend hike up a beautiful creek drainage to the top of spectacular White Rock Mountain, and returns via another creek drainage. Camping is open along the trails; or there are campgrounds available at each end. White Rock also has cabins or a multi-person lodge available for rent. For reservations, call 501-369-4128. Plan on spending the night on the mountain; White Rock offers one of the best spots in the state to watch the sunset. The Shores Lake Trailhead is located at the back of the Shores Lake Campground on a spur road. A portion of the trail follows the Ozark Highlands Trail. • FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: The Ozark Highlands Trail–Western Section Map shows a portion of the trail. This map is available from the Forest Service at the address listed, call for price.

WOMBLE TRAIL (E-2 and E-3)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 Highway 270 East, Mount Ida, AR 71957. PHONE: 870-867-2101

Blanchard Springs Recreation Area

• LOCATION: North of Mt. Ida on Hwy. 27 Western terminus: North Fork Lake—take Hwy. 379 west off U.S. 270. Hwy. 379 changes to gravel and connects with Forest Road 68 after 7.3 miles. Turn west onto Forest Road 68 for 3 miles, then turn left at the sign to the lake. Eastern terminus: the Womble trail connects with the Ouachita Trail at Forest Road 149, about 2.5 miles off Hwy. 27 and 2 miles north of Story. • LENGTH: 39.5 miles; TIME: 3 - 5 days; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to strenuous • BROCHURE/MAP: Available from address listed • DESCRIPTION: The Womble Trail, located a few miles south of the Ouachita Trail, follows portions of the Ouachita River. It features forested mountains and a variety of wildlife. Parking is available at many sites, such as Rocky Shoals and Fulton Branch Recreational Areas. Camping is open, but only at a distance of at least 200 feet from the trail and from water sources. This is a beautiful hiking trail which receives very little use by hikers; however, sections have become very popular with mountain bikers.

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Goat Trail, Buffalo Wilderness Area

Wilderness Areas

Arkansas’s public lands include a dozen wilderness areas offering special recreation opportunities for the camper or backpacker willing to rough it. No developed campgrounds are to be found and mechanized vehicles are not permitted. However, for the person willing to travel by foot, canoe, or horseback, the 150,000 acres of Arkansas wilderness provide countless settings for remote camping and backpacking experiences. Hunting, fishing, hiking and open camping are all allowed. Map reading and orienteering skills are a necessity. Each listing includes the names of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) quadrangle maps which encompass the wilderness lands. These maps are available by name from the Arkansas Geological Commission, 3815 West Roosevelt Road, Little Rock, AR 72204. PHONE: 501-296-1877 Call for price of map. Maps of many of the individual wilderness areas are available from the Ozark Interpretive Association, P.O. Box 1279, Mountain View, AR 72560. PHONE: 888-757-2246 or 501-296-1877. Maps are currently available for Black Fork Mountain, East Fork, Flatside, Hurricane Creek, Leatherwood, and Richland Creek. Please call for correct prices.

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Buffalo National River Wilderness Areas LOWER BUFFALO WILDERNESS (B-5)

FOR INFORMATION: Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut, Ste. 136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-741-5443 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Big Flat, Buffalo City

• LOCATION: In general terms, this wilderness area includes most of the Buffalo National River lands downstream from Panther Creek near Buffalo Point. It can be most easily reached via canoe. The area north of the river is accessible by driving to Rush, which is east off Hwy. 14, south of Yellville, or by Hwy. 101 east of Yellville. Follow 101 south past end of pavement, follow the road to the right at Old Buffalo City. This portion is rough and rocky with a number of creek crossings; use caution during high water. Continue on past the park boundary to the wilderness access parking. The portion of the wilderness on the south side of the river is accessible by driving to Cozahome, off Hwy. 14, just south of the river bridge. Just past the Cozahome church, take a left onto gravel Searcy County Road 650, then take a right onto gravel Searcy County Road 653 and continue to the wilderness access parking. • DESCRIPTION: 22,500 acres featuring mountain streams and rugged country. The north side features a number of old roads which offer easy access into the heart of the wilderness. Some of these roads form a 10-1/2 mile loop called the Cow Creek-Cook Hollow Trails, quite popular with equestrian trail riders. The south side of the river features an old road which provides trail access into the wilderness and down to the river. This is a good place for exploration into scenic areas such as Big Creek, Cold Spring Hollow and Loonbeam Hollow. The Lower Buffalo Wilderness is also contiguous with the 16,900-acre Leatherwood Wilderness, forming one of the largest and most remote wilderness systems in the eastern United States.

PONCA WILDERNESS (B-3)

FOR INFORMATION: Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut, Suite 136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-741-5443 USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: Ponca

• LOCATION: This wilderness area is most easily reached by canoe from the Ponca bridge or Steel Creek. The north side is accessible by hiking in off Hwy. 43 north of Ponca from either of two trailheads: the Center Point Trailhead 3 miles north of Ponca and the Compton Trailhead 1 mile south of Compton. The south side is accessible by hiking in from Steel Creek or Kyle’s Landing Campgrounds. • DESCRIPTION: 11,300 acres featuring scenic waterfalls, majestic bluffs, ancient caves, mountain streams, historic homesteads and rough terrain. From the Compton trailhead, a 2.5-mile hiking trail leads to Hemmed-In-Hollow Falls and a 4.5-mile equestrian/hiking trail travels down Sneed’s Creek and connects with the Hemmed-In-Hollow access. From Center Point, an old road provides a hike of four miles down to the mouth of Sneed’s Creek on the Buffalo, connecting with the other trails. From the Center Point Trail, a short spur trail provides access to the Goat Trail, a narrow ledge trail on the side of Big Bluff. The Buffalo River Trail, on the south side of the river, travels through the heart of the southern portion of the Ponca Wilderness between Steel Creek and Kyle’s Landing. A spur trail links the Buffalo River Trail to the river and the trails system on the north side.

UPPER BUFFALO WILDERNESS (NORTH) (B-3)

FOR INFORMATION: Buffalo National River, 402 N. Walnut, Suite 136, Harrison, AR 72601. PHONE: 870-741-5443 USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: Boxley

• LOCATION: 2 miles south of Boxley on Hwy. 21. • DESCRIPTION: This 2,200 acre National Park wilderness extends south to the park boundary where it adjoins the Upper Buffalo Wilderness Area managed by the Ozark National Forest (see Ozark National Forest Wilderness Areas). Significant features include a portion of the Upper Buffalo River, bluffs, caves, and rough terrain.

Ouachita National Forest Wilderness Areas BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS (E-1)

FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 Highway 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Page, Mountain Fork, Rich Mountain

• LOCATION: 6 miles north of Mena on U.S. 71; then 6 miles west on U.S. 270; then 4 miles north on Forest Road 516; also accessible from the Ouachita Trailhead on U.S. 270, 6 miles from U.S. 71. • DESCRIPTION: 7,568 acres featuring rugged terrain, rock glaciers, fantastic views and a forest of dwarf oak. A six-

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Wilderness Areas

mile trail offers easy hiking access into a portion of the wilderness. Much of this is on old road which is quite steep in places.

CANEY CREEK WILDERNESS (F-2)

FOR INFORMATION: Mena Ranger District, 1603 Highway 71 North, Mena, AR 71953. PHONE: 479-394-2382 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Eagle Mountain, Nichols

• LOCATION: 15 miles south of Mena on U.S. 71; then 17 miles east on Hwy. 246; then 9 miles north on Forest Road 38 • DESCRIPTION: 14,460 acres featuring secluded forest, high vistas and picturesque streams. A good portion of the wilderness is accessed by the Caney Creek and Buckeye Mountain Hiking Trails. Combined, these two trails offer over 14 miles of easy hiking opportunities into the heart of one of the oldest wilderness areas in Arkansas.

DRY CREEK WILDERNESS (D-2 and D-3)

FOR INFORMATION: Cold Springs Ranger District, P.O. Box 417, Booneville, AR 72927. PHONE: 479-675-3233 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Blue Mountain Dam, Sugar Grove

• LOCATION: From the junction of Hwy. 10 and 23, go east for 17 miles on Hwy. 10; then south 5 miles on Logan County Road 309; then south 3.9 miles on Forest Road 18; then west 4 miles on Forest Road 3 to the wilderness boundary. • DESCRIPTION: 6,300 acres featuring secluded forest, flowing streams and sandstone bluffs. This is truly a remote corner of Arkansas offering a wide variety of scenic resources. The wilderness is accessible by hiking in on old roads or going cross country.

FLATSIDE WILDERNESS (E-4)

FOR INFORMATION: Winona Ranger District, 1069 N. Fourche, Perryville, AR 72126. PHONE: 501-889-5176 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Aplin, Nimrod SW, Paron SW

• LOCATION: From the junction of Hwy. 9 and Hwy. 60, go 13.6 miles south on Hwy. 9; then 8.3 miles west on Forest Road 132; then north 3 miles on Forest Road 94 to Flatside Pinnacle. • DESCRIPTION: 10,105 acres featuring small creeks, clear springs and good views. A 10.5 mile section of the Ouachita National Recreation Trail provides easy access through the heart of the wilderness.

POTEAU MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS (D-2 and E-2)

FOR INFORMATION: Ouachita National Forest, Poteau Ranger District, P.O. Box 2255, Waldron, AR 72958 PHONE: 479-637-4174 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Abbott, Cauthorn, Harrington, Hon

• LOCATION: From the junction of Hwy. 80 and U.S. 71, go north on U.S. 71 for 5.5 miles; then west 2 miles on Forest Road 158 to the southern boundary of the wilderness. • DESCRIPTION: 10,884 acres featuring rock outcrops, streams and secluded forest. There are no developed trails in this area; however, there are a number of old roads which offer access.

Ozark National Forest Wilderness Areas EAST FORK WILDERNESS (C-4)

FOR INFORMATION: Big Piney Ranger District, 12000 SR 27, Hector, AR 72843. PHONE: 479-284-3150 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Lost Corner, Solo

• LOCATION: From the junction of Hwy. 27 and Hwy. 105 at Hector, follow Hwy. 27 north for approximately 13 miles—the wilderness area is on the east side of the highway. It is also accessible via Forest Road 1311. • DESCRIPTION: 10,700 acres featuring upland swamps, waterfalls and rugged country. There are no developed trails; however, a number of old roads offer access into the heart of the wilderness.

HURRICANE CREEK WILDERNESS (C-4)

FOR INFORMATION: Big Piney Ranger District, P.O. Box 427, Jasper, AR 72641. PHONE: 870-446-5122 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Deer, Fort Douglas

• LOCATION: At the junction of Hwy. 7, Hwy. 16 and Hwy. 123 (Pelsor), go west on Hwy. 123 for approximately 10.5 miles to the Big Piney Bridge. The wilderness area is to the north/northeast. The northeast side may be approached via Forest Road 1207 off Hwy. 7, then to Forest Road 1209 which runs along a good portion of the wilderness. • DESCRIPTION: 15,100 acres featuring rushing mountain streams, scenic blufflines and rock formations including a natural bridge. Approximately 13 miles of the Ozark Highlands National Recreation Trail passes through the Hurricane

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Creek Wilderness. This trail also includes a 2-mile ‘high water bypass’ spur which makes it possible to continue your hike during times that Hurricane Creek is too high to safely cross (this spur is an 8-mile hike at minimum). The wilderness is also accessible via a number of old settlement roads.

LEATHERWOOD WILDERNESS (B-5)

FOR INFORMATION: Sylamore Ranger District, 1001 E. Main, Highway 14 North, Mountain View, AR 72560. PHONE: 870-269-3228 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Big Flat, Buffalo City, Norfork, Norfork SE

• LOCATION: At Big Flat, go east on Hwy. 14 approximately 3.8 miles; then turn north on Hwy. 341 (Push Mountain Road). The wilderness lands lie generally west of Hwy. 341 and between Forest Roads 1118 and 1116. • DESCRIPTION: 16,900 acres featuring flowing streams, springs, caves and bluffs; contiguous with the 22,500-acre Lower Buffalo Wilderness on the Buffalo National River. Combined, these form one of the largest areas of unbroken wilderness in the eastern United States. There are no trails; however, there are several old roads which provide good access. One of the great opportunities that these wilderness lands provide is the chance to park and explore.

RICHLAND CREEK WILDERNESS (C-4)

FOR INFORMATION: Big PIney Ranger District, P.O. Box 427, Highway 7 North, Jasper, AR 72641. PHONE: 870-446-5122 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Lurton, Moore

• LOCATION: At the junction of Hwy. 7, Hwy. 123 and Hwy. 16 (Pelsor), turn east on Hwy. 16 to Ben Hur; then south about 1.5 miles to Forest Road 1205; keep on Forest Road 1205 for 9-10 miles (rough gravel road) to Richland Creek Campground located on the eastern edge of the wilderness area. Much of the wilderness is bounded by Forest Road 1205 offering many access points. • DESCRIPTION: 11,800 acres featuring waterfalls, bluffs, clear, flowing streams and rugged terrain. This wilderness area is one of the most scenic places in the entire United States; however, it does receive a great deal of use so all visitors must be extra cautious to “leave-no-trace.”

UPPER BUFFALO WILDERNESS (SOUTH) (B-3 and C-3)

FOR INFORMATION: Big Piney Ranger District, P.O. Box 427, Jasper, AR 72641. PHONE: 870-446-5122 USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Boxley, Fallsville

Dug Hollow, Buffalo Wilderness Area

• LOCATION: 15 miles south of Jasper on Hwy. 7, then west 8 miles on Hwy. 16 to Edwards Junction; or take Hwy. 7 north from Pelsor 14 miles, then west on Hwy. 16 to Edwards Junction; wilderness area generally lies between Hwy. 16 (on the south) and Hwy. 21 (on the east) to Forest Road 1410 (on the west) to Cave Mountain Road (Newton County Road 5, on the north). • DESCRIPTION: 11,094 acres featuring caves, bluffs, and the headwaters of the Buffalo National River. This area features beautiful, boulder-strewn, dramatic scenery. There are a number of side hollows which feed the Buffalo River and each one of these is worthy of exploring. There is one short primitive trail that provides access to a popular rock formation above the bluffline (called Whitaker Point or Hawksbill Crag). With that exception, there are no other developed trails into this area. There are; however, a number of locations around the wilderness boundary which provide good access to a variety of destinations. This wilderness area is contiguous with the 2,200 acre Upper Buffalo Wilderness managed by the Buffalo National River (see Buffalo National River Wilderness Areas).

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Equipment

Equipment Checklist ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST

Pack (One or More, as Appropriate)

For safety, take the following items along every time you leave the road behind:  Map and compass  Waterproof matches and fire starter  Full canteen or water bottle  Knife  Flashlight with new batteries  Sun protection (glasses, hat, sunscreen)  Emergency food  Insect protection  First aid kit, personal medications, spare eyeglasses  Rain gear and/or warm clothing  Small plastic garbage bag (to carry out your trash and any you find on the trail)

(proper fit critical)  Daypack  Hip pack  Belt pouch  Stuff sacks (for pack organization)

BACKPACKING CHECKLIST Shelter  Tent

(seam sealed with fly, stakes and all poles), or:  Bivouac Sack, or:  Tarp  Small sponge (to keep tent clean)  Extra tie-down cord (50 ft. minimum)

Sleeping

 Sleeping bag

(proper temperature rating)

 Sleeping pad

(for insulation and cushioning)  Ground sheet  Sleeping bag liner (optional)  Pillow (optional)

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 External frame pack, or:  Internal frame pack

Kitchen

 Matches  Stove and fuel, or:  Cooking grate  Cook pots and utensils  Cup

Eating Utensils

 Plate, bowl, fork, spoon  Sealed containers &

zip-locking plastic bags (for food, cooking oil, spices, coffee/tea, etc.)  Aluminum foil  Biodegradable soap  Water mixes (tea bags, coffee, powdered fruit drinks, etc.)  Large stuff sack (to hang food at night to protect from animals)

Clothing

 Boots (well broken-in)  Socks

CLOTHING (Continued)

 Shorts, T-shirt and light, long

sleeve shirt (seasonal)

 Effective insulation layers

(wool, pile, synchilla, etc. for moisture resistance—down for dry insulation)  Rain/wind gear (jacket and pants or poncho —waterproof, breathable preferred, coated nylon OK)  Watch cap, balaclava or appropriate headwear (seasonal)  Mittens or gloves (seasonal)  Camp shoes or sneakers  Bathing suit (seasonal)

Personal

 Toothbrush  Comb  Bandana  Small towel  Toilet Paper  Plastic trowel

(for digging latrine)

 Money  Sewing/repair kit

Miscellaneous (All Optional)  Notebook and pencil  Camera and extra film  Licenses and permits

(if necessary)

 Field books (at least three pair, wool outer  Binoculars socks with polypropylene or  Candle Lantern/candles silk liners)  Reading material  Gaiters  Playing cards (to prevent snow, moisture, gravel or debris from falling into  Hunting/fishing equipment boot tops)  Walking staff  Lightweight polypropylene long

underwear (seasonal)

 Wool or synthetic shirt and/or

sweater  Trousers  Underwear

Did You Check?

 Weather Forecast  Hunting Seasons/Fishing

Regulations

 Permits

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s Mu lti-u se T r ai l Wolf Pen Gap Village Creek State Park

Arkansas Multi-use Trails Take Diverse Paths To Explore The Natural State

This section contains a sampling of—but by no means all—of the multi-use trails in the state. These pages illustrate the varied recreational pursuits our public lands have to offer by various public entities. If you need further information on any particular trail, contact the trail manager. All multi-use trails, regardless of the designation in this guide, are open to hikers. When more than one user group is on the trail, common courtesy goes a long way. No matter the situation, use the same precautions recommended for the road (drive defensively!) and remember everyone has an equal responsibility to avoid accidents. On natural trail surfaces, the following guidelines apply: (1) Hikers should yield the trail to horses; (2) Bikers should yield the trail to both hikers and horses; (3) ATV riders should yield the trail to all other trail users except on those trails specifically designated for ATV use. Off-road vehicles are restricted in some areas, and users are cautioned to observe all applicable regulations governing their use. We recommend you follow the “No Trace” concept. Take out everything you take in, and don’t create excessive silt and soil erosion by driving ATVs in stream beds. It is everyone’s responsibility to practice trail preservation so others can use the trails and enjoy their beauty in the future.

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Arkansas Multi-use Trails

Mount Nebo State Park

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ARKANSAS STATE PARKS MULTI-USE TRAILS 1. Bull Shoals-White River/Oakridge Trail 2. Cane Creek Lake Trail 3. Delta Heritage Trail 4. Devil’s Den Multi-use Trails 5. Hobbs Hidden Diversity Trail 6. Mount Magazine/Huckleberry Mtn. Horse Trail 7. Mount Nebo Bench Trail 8. Pinnacle Mountain Multi-use Trails 9. Village Creek Multi-use Trails 10. White Oak Lake Fern Hollow Trail NATIONAL PARKS MULTI-USE TRAILS 11. Lower Buffalo Horse Trails 12. Middle Buffalo Horse Trails—Buffalo River Trail, Woolum to Gilbert 2

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Devil’s Den State Park

Arkansas State Parks Multi-use Trails

The trail system at Devil’s Den State Park is one of the most popular in the state. The trails offer a great outdoor experience for equestrians, mountain bikers and hikers. With the accompanying campground with full hook-ups there is no limit to the amount of time you can spend enjoying the trails. Mount Nebo State Park offers the trail user a chance to ride or hike a true bench trail circling the top of the mountain. Many other state park multi-use trail systems also showcase the state’s rich geographical diversity.

Bull Shoals-White River State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks Trails.) —Oakridge Mountain Bike Trail

Cane Creek State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks Trails.) —Cane Creek Lake Trail —Delta View Trail

Delta Heritage Trail State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks Trails.) —Delta Heritage Trail

Devil’s Den State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks Trails.) —Cross Country Mountain Biking Trail

Devil’s Den State Park Horse Trails (B-1)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Devil’s Den State Park, 11333 West Arkansas Highway 74, West Fork, AR 72774 PHONE: 479-761-3325. E-MAIL: devilsden@arkansas.com

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Strickler; Winslow • LOCATION: 8 miles south of Fayetteville on I-49 to Exit 53 (West Fork) then go 18 miles southwest on Hwy. 170; or exit I-49 at Exit 45 (Winslow) and go 7 miles west on Hwy. 74. Trailers longer than 26 feet should use Exit 53. • LENGTH: Approximately 20 miles; TIME: Varies; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to difficult • DESCRIPTION: The trails lead through Lee Creek Valley, on top of surrounding ridges to historical sites, natural bridges, scenic vistas, and waterfalls. There are three different trails, all of which begin and end at the horse camp: 1. Old Road Trail: (yellow blaze); 5 miles, 2 hours. This safe, easy trail is the only horse trail entirely within the park. 2. Gorley King Trail: (red blaze); 7 miles, 3 hours. Moderate difficulty. 3. Vista Point Trail: (green blaze); 8 miles, 5 hours. Steep climbs and ledges require experienced horses and riders. Each trail is blazed with a colored diamond-shaped plate with a horseshoe symbol in the center. The Old Road Trail which begins across from the entrance to the horse camp, is blazed yellow. The Gorley King Trail (blazed in red), and the Vista Point Trail (blazed in green), both begin inside the horse camp near bathroom. In places where the Gorley King and Vista Point Trails coincide, the trail blaze is both red and green. Where the horseshoe symbol appears to be hanging upside down this is a warning that the trail makes an obscure turn or intersects with other trails or roads. Be sure and look for the next blaze before proceeding. Horses are welcome on Highways 170, 74 and 220, but are not permitted on other park roads or in camping areas other than the horse camp. Also, horses are not permitted in the crevice area, Yellow Rock or on any of the hiking trails except where the horse trails and the Butterfield Hiking Trail are the same. • SITE AMENITIES: Restaurant, store, swimming pool. Water for humans and horses and a bathhouse are at trailhead. • CAMPING: The park has a complete campground for horses with bathhouse for riders and bathing area for horses. Trailer hook-ups and camper sites.

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Devil’s Den Horse Trails (Multi-Use) PAGE 196

Arkansas State Parks Multi-use Trails

• LODGING: The park has cabins for rent. There are motels in the Fayetteville area to the north, or to the south in Alma. • SPECIAL NOTE: Call ahead to inquire about availability at horse campground. It is reserved certain times of the year for private use. Mountain bike riders are also allowed on these trails and must yield to horses. Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area (See Day Hiking Trails; Arkansas State Parks Trails.) —Hidden Diversity Trail

Huckleberry Mountain Horse Trail (See Multi-use Trails section, Ozark/St.Francis National Forest. See also Day Hiking Trails section, Arkansas State Parks Trails) Lake Fort Smith State Park (See ArkansasStateParks.com website for information about this new trail) —Boston Mountain Multi-use Trail

Mount Magazine State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section, Arkansas State Parks Trails) —Huckleberry Mountain Horse Trail

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Mount Nebo Bench Trail (Multi-Use) The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 197

Mount Nebo Bench Trail (D-3)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: Mount Nebo State Park, 16728 West State Highway 155, Dardanelle, AR 72834 PHONE: 479-229-3655. E-MAIL: mountnebo@arkansas.com

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Chickalah Mountain East • LOCATION: From I-40, take Hwy. 7 south through Russellville to Dardanelle; turn right onto Hwy. 22 west, then left on Hwy. 155 west up the mountain. • LENGTH: 4 miles; TIME: 3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy • DESCRIPTION: The approach to the summit of Mount Nebo is as breathtaking as the park itself. Hwy. 155 (paved) zigzags up the eastern side of the mountain. From base to top there are a series of tight hairpin turns. We recommend MOUNT NEBO BENCH TRAIL Sunset Point

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Arkansas State Parks Multi-use Trails

no trailers or RVs over 24 feet long attempt the climb. Be sure your vehicle is in good condition, use low gear and turn off A/C to avoid overheating. At the Bench Overlook you can stop to enjoy the panoramic view and rest your vehicle. A huge, round slab of sandstone perhaps 15-20 feet thick lies approximately 300 feet below the summit of Mount Nebo. It extends completely through the mountain, like a gigantic solid pancake. Most of the bench is buried in the mountain itself. On this shelf, encircling the mountain is the Bench Road Trail. The scenic and historic trail offers easy access. Mountain bikes and horseback riders are welcome. Motorized vehicles are prohibited. • SITE AMENITIES: Parking at the trailhead; restrooms, small store and picnicking in park. • CAMPING: Horse camping is not allowed in the park or on the trail. • LODGING: Lodging facilities are available in the park and in Dardanelle. • SPECIAL NOTE: Bring drinking water—it is not furnished at the trailhead. Stay on the trail—rocks along the cliff edges may be loose. Stay off the trail when lightening is flashing—Mt. Nebo is the highest point for many miles. Pinnacle Mountain State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks.) —Jackfork Mountain Biking Trail —Rabbit Ridge Mountain Biking Trail

Village Creek State Park Multi-use Trails (D-8)

REGION: Crowley’s Ridge FOR INFORMATION: Village Creek State Park, 201 CR 754, Wynne, AR 72396 PHONE: 870-238-9406 E-MAIL: villagecreek@arkansas.com

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Wittsburg; Gieseck; Madison; Round Pond • LOCATION: 6 miles southeast of Wynne on Hwy. 284, or 12 miles north of Forrest City, exit 242 off Interstate 40. LENGTH: Approximately 25 miles. TIME: varies; DIFFICULTY: Easy to difficult • DESCRIPTION: Five different trails wind through high ridge tops and bottomland hardwood forest communities: 1. Center Ridge Trail (A,B,C) This trail is 6.05 miles in length and traverses over some high ridge tops. “B” loop is closed to bicycles. This trail rated as moderately easy. 2. Beech Valley Trail (D,E,F,G) This trail is 4 miles in length and passes near Lake Dunn and deep into the forests of Crowley’s Ridge. The trail is rated as moderately easy. 3. South Ridge Trail (H,I,J,K) This trail is 6.5 miles in length and features scenic views of valleys and stream and is rated as moderately easy. This trail features some steep areas. “I” loop is closed to bicycles. 4. Old Cattle Trail (L) This trail is 1.4 miles in length. It follows an old cattle trail and connects the rider to the south ridge and beech valley trails. This trail has some steep areas and is closed to bicycles. 5. Deer Run Trail (M,N,P) This trail is 4.6 miles in length and offers a view of Lake Austell. It follows a portion of the gas pipeline and features some very steep areas. Each trail is numbered with wooden squares hanging from the trees and each intersection has a numbered post and sign with map and directions. Some loops are closed to bicycles and some to horses. These areas are posted. White Oak Lake State Park (See Day Hiking Trails section; Arkansas State Parks.) —Fern Hollow Trail

Woolly Hollow State Park (See ArkansasStateParks.com website for information about this new trail)

Bull Shoals-White River State Park

—Enders Fault Mountain Bike Trail

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Buffalo National River

National Park Service Multi-use Trails

The Buffalo National River was the first waterway to be designated as a National River within the National Park system. The area encompassing the river corridor offers miles of scenic landscape for hiking and equestrian use. Most of the social trails are classified as primitive and offer a challenge to the visitor. Be prepared to negotiate rugged terrain and enjoy scenic views.

Lower Buffalo Horse Trails (B-5)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Buffalo Point Ranger Station, 2229 Highway 268 East, Yellville, AR 72687; PHONE: 870-449-4311 (for emergencies, call 888-692-1162); WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Maumee; Cozahome; Big Flat; Buffalo City • LOCATION: These trails are accessed from the Hathaway Hollow Trailhead. To drive there, take Hwy. 101 for 7 paved miles , through Rea Valley, then Marion County Road 644 for 4 miles, through Hand Valley. Take the right fork (the narrow road) and go another 1 mile to the trailhead parking area on the left. • LENGTH: More than 25 miles in network; TIME: 10-20 hours; DIFFICULTY: Moderate to difficult • DESCRIPTION: The wilderness area has a series of social trails that are well established but not maintained. There are no amenities (pit toilets, telephones, designated campsites, etc) at any of the parking areas, and Leave No Trace principles are strictly enforced. Any and all motorized vehicles, power tools and/ or equipment are prohibited in the wilderness area. This is in effort to provide as pure a natural experience as possible for all that visit the area. If you camp in the wilderness area, it is imperative that you pack out everything you pack in; and strive to leave the area cleaner (meaning absent of any human exposure) than when you arrived. • ACCESS LOCATIONS: There are designated parking areas at Hathaway Hollow Trailhead from the north (36 degrees, 9 minutes, 49.46 seconds north by 92 degrees, 27 minutes, 35.88 seconds west) Tilting Rock from the south (36 degrees, 4 minutes, 41.55 seconds north by 92 degrees, 28 minutes, 22.11 seconds west), Advance from the east (36 degrees, 8 minutes, 50.36 seconds north by 92 degrees, 25 minutes, 12.94 seconds west) and Jackson Ridge access from the west (36 degrees, 5 minutes, 50.69 seconds north by 92 degrees, 31 minutes, 5.53 seconds west). • SPECIAL NOTE: It is recommended that riders contact the ranger district above for river and fire conditions prior to trip. Comprehensive maps are also available from Trails Illustrated, P.O. Box 4357, Evergreen, CO 80437-4357, (800-962-1643), on the Internet at TrailsIllustrated.com, and also National Geographic Maps, (800-962-1643).

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National Park Service Multi-use Trails

Middle Buffalo Horse Trails— Buffalo River Trail, Woolum to Gilbert (B-4; B-5)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: National Park Service, Buffalo National River, Tyler Bend Visitors Center, 170 Ranger Rd., Saint Joe, AR 72675; PHONE: 870-439-2502; WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff

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• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Mount Judea; Eula; Snowball; Marshall; Maumee • LOCATION: Trailer to Woolum either at Searcy County 14 south of Saint Joe or on Searcy County 15 south of Pindall Arkansas. Both of these towns are off U.S. 65. The horsecamp /trailhead is located on the north side of the Buffalo River at Woolum. The trail is inaccessible from the north during times of high water in the river. • LENGTH: 17.7 miles; TIME: varies between 10-20 hours; DIFFICULTY: This is not a trail for the novice rider. Need a sure-footed mount and trail experience. Difficult to Most Difficult. • DESCRIPTION: This trail offers a variety of scenery, with some of the best views of the Buffalo River available from bluff-top trail locations, such as Manes Bluff, Whisenant Bluff, Tie-Slide and Long Bottom Bluff. For 2.2 miles the trail follows a single-lane road open to vehicles and also 2.1 miles of low-use road east of the Tie-Slide Overlook. If the Buffalo River is running high, the ford at the mouth of Calf Creek may be unsafe to use. An alternative parking area to access the trail during high water is to drive to Calf Creek, via the Tyler Bend Road. • SITE AMENITIES AND CAMPING: Limited parking at the U.S. 65 bridge. Woolum Trailhead/Horsecamp has access to pit toilets and stock watering from river. • SPECIAL NOTE: It is recommended that riders contact the ranger district above for maps and river conditions prior to trip. Comprehensive maps of all the trails in the Upper Buffalo Area are also available from Trails Illustrated, P.O. Box 4357, Evergreen, CO 80437-4357, (800-962-1643) and on the internet at TrailsIllustrated.com.

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• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Mount Judea; Eula; Snowball; Marshall; Maumee • LOCATION: U.S. 65 bridge. At north end of the Hwy. 65 bridge over the Buffalo River, turn east and park 0.1 mile off the highway beside guardrail, at pullout. Or trailer to Woolum either at Searcy County 14 south of Saint Joe or on Searcy County 15 south of Pindall Arkansas. Both of these towns are off U.S. 65. The horsecamp/trailhead is located on the north side of the Buffalo River at Woolum. • LENGTH: 9.8 miles; TIME: 10-15 hours; DIFFICULTY: Due to extensive undergrowth and low maintenance schedules, this trail can be difficult. • DESCRIPTION: The first mile of this loop trail follows the Buffalo River Trail from Woolum. At the “T” in the trail, ride right and stay on the bench, along the western slope of Point Peter Mountain, to the trail intersection with Searcy County Road 12. Ride right, downhill on that road for about 1/2 mile; then right again on County Road 14, down Richland Valley. The wide-open pasture lands of Richland Valley are in constant view for over five miles of the ride. • SITE AMENITIES, CAMPING, LODGING: Limited parking at the U.S. 65 bridge. Woolum Trailhead/Horsecamp has access to pit toilets and stock watering from river. • LODGING: Lodging for people only is available at St. Joe. There are no hotels, but cabins and a bed & breakfast near Gilbert. • SPECIAL NOTE: It is recommended that riders contact the ranger district above for maps and river conditions prior to trip. Comprehensive maps of all the trails in the Upper Buffalo Area are also available from Trails Illustrated, P.O. Box 4357, Evergreen, CO 80437-4357, (800-962-1643) and on the internet at TrailsIllustrated.com.

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REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: National Park Service, Buffalo National River, Tyler Bend Visitors Center, 170 Ranger Rd., Saint Joe, AR 72675; PHONE: 870-439-2502: WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff

Pea Ridge Trails (A-2)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Park Superintendent, Pea Ridge National Military Park (National Park Service), 15930 U.S. 62 East, Garfield, AR 72732; PHONE: 479-451-8122; WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/peri

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: Pea Ridge • LOCATION: The Pea Ridge Trails are located in the Pea Ridge National Military Park, just off U.S. 62, ten miles northeast of Rogers. • LENGTH: Hiking Trails: 9 miles; Horse trail: 11 miles currently open; Tour road (may be used by bicycles): 7 miles. TIME: 2-3 hours; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Pea Ridge Trails (Multi-Use) The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 201

• DESCRIPTION: Pea Ridge National Military Park preserves the site of the March 7-8, 1862, Civil War battle that helped Union forces gain control of Missouri. Trails wind through oak-hickory forest and fields associated with the Battle of Pea Ridge. The horse and hiking trails contain some slightly hilly sections. Many birds, and white-tailed deer are prevalent. • TOURING PEA RIDGE BATTLEFIELD: After stopping at the visitor center, follow the arrows from the parking area to the Old Telegraph Road. Built in 1828 between Springfield, Missouri, and Fayetteville, Arkansas, the road was part of the “Trail of Tears” that saw thousands of Cherokees forcibly relocated from their homes in the southeastern U.S. Indian PEA RIDGE TRAILS

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National Park Service Multi-use Trails

Territory of present-day Oklahoma. In 1858 the road became part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route to California. In 1860 a telegraph wire was strung along it. The numbers on the map correspond to stops on the battlefield driving tour, which is also accessible to bicycles. A brochure offering a detailed account of the battle is available at the visitor center. • SITE AMENITIES: Restrooms, parking, drinking water, information signage and a brochure with map are available at the visitor center, which also offers a museum and an orientation movie. A seven-day entrance fee is charged per person/vehicle. An annual pass is also available for purchase. • CAMPING: Available at Beaver Lake, ten miles away • LODGING: Available at various nearby locations • SPECIAL NOTE: Federal regulations prohibit hunting, disturbing wildlife and removing relics. Pets are permitted in the park, but they must be restrained. For your safety, be alert for poison oak and poison ivy, which are common in the park; rattlesnakes and copperheads may occasionally be found. Exercise common sense and caution. Do not climb on cannons, monuments, fences, bluffs or trees.

Upper Buffalo Horse Trails—Old River Trail (B-3; B-4)

REGION: Ozark Mountains FOR INFORMATION: Tyler Bend Visitors Center, 170 Ranger Rd., Saint Joe, AR 72675 PHONE: 870-439-2502; WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/buff

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Boxley; Ponca; Jasper; Hasty; Mount Judea • LOCATION: This trail may be accessed from four trailheads: 1. Ponca Trailhead: at the Ponca low-water bridge, near the intersection of Highways 74 and 43, at Ponca; 2. Steel Creek Trailhead/Horsecamp: 2.4 miles below Ponca (or 2.8 miles by road), about 1.4 miles on Hwy. 74 north of Ponca, turn on gravel road and go another 1.4 miles to trailhead. Warning: this is a steep road and requires good brakes and 4-wheel drive coming out with loaded horse trailer. 3. Erbie Trailhead/Horsecamp: Drive to Erbie via unpaved roads—about 5 miles north of Jasper, turn left on dirt road and follow to campground; or go west on dirt road off Hwy. 7 from Marble Falls to campground. Trailhead is located on north side of river near the Old Erbie Church. 4. Pruitt Trailhead: near canoe landing below Hwy. 7 bridge at Pruitt turn east from north end of bridge. Riders must cross Hwy. 7 to get onto trail upriver. • LENGTH: 24 miles; TIME: 10-20 hours, depending on the route you choose; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate. Trail crosses the river 20 times in the 14 miles between Ponca and Erbie, and 6 more times in the 10 miles between Erbie and Pruitt. • DESCRIPTION: The Old River Trail follows the settler’s road linking historic communities of Ponca, Erbie, and Pruitt, along the upper Buffalo River. It passes through old bottomland farms, where one can still find a few old vacant houses and barns, rock walls, fences and overgrown fields and orchards. Following the river (and crossing it 26 times), the trail affords fine views, including the tallest bluffs along the entire river. Camping on the rivers gravelbars is permitted, as long as stock is picketed well back from the river and tied in a manner to avoid damage to vegetation; manure scattered and other trash packed out. Several other short trails connect with the Old River Trail; they are: 1. Center Point Trail: 3.6 miles in length. Intersects at former settlement of Center Point and climbs up 1,250 feet to Hwy. 43, 3-1/2 miles north of Ponca 2. Sneeds Creek Trail: 4.1 miles in length. Intersects at the same point as the Center Point Trail and also climbs out 1,250 feet to Compton Trailhead. No amenities here. 3. Chimney Rock Trail: 3.4 miles. This trail also climbs out of the river valley about 1,200 feet. It can be accessed past the Steel Creek campground. Parts of this trail are old roadbeds. 4. Bench Trail: 4.4 miles. This fairly level trail follows a former settlement road trace along a natural level break, or bench, in the river valley slope. Sneeds Creek Trail intersects this trail on the west end. 5. Cecil Cove Loop Trail: Length is about 8 miles. This trail elevates about 8oo feet and has only one part where footing could be a problem at Goat Bluff. • SITE AMENITIES AND CAMPING: Restrooms and treated drinking water are available at the Steel Creek Trailhead; the other three trailheads have pit toilets and sources of water for livestock. Campsites at Steel Creek and Erbie Horsecamps have fire rings. Trails are marked with directional signs and yellow trail blazes. • SPECIAL NOTE: Comprehensive maps of all the trails in the Upper Buffalo Area are available from the address above and from Trails Illustrated, P.O. Box 4357, Evergreen, CO 80437-4357, (800-962-1643) and on the internet at TrailsIllustrated.com. We recommend the rider contact the Buffalo National River before their trip to check water levels on the river and get other pertinent information.

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Lake Ouachita Vista Trail

USDA Forest Service Multi-use Trails OUACHITA NATIONAL FOREST

The Ouachita National Forest offers a variety of multi-use trails in every district of the forest. Several of the trails in the system have gained national recognition for the experience they offer the user. Most of the trailheads are located in or near recreation areas in the forest which makes for greater access. WEBSITE: www.fs.usda.gov/ouachita

Bear Creek Horse Trail (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Jessieville Ranger District, P.O. Box 189, Jessieville, AR 71949; PHONE: 501-984-5313; (19 miles north of Hot Springs on Hwy. 7)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Steve; Nimrod S.W. • LOCATION: The Bear Creek Horse Trail can be reached by taking Hwy. 7 to Forest Service Road 11 West, then following Forest Service Road 772 to the trailhead. • LENGTH: 60.6 miles; TIME: 10-20 hours; DIFFICULTY: More difficult • DESCRIPTION: Marked with yellow rectangles and Carsonite signs, the Bear Creek Horse Trail is located in a beautiful forested setting covering varied terrain. Its eastern loop enters the Deckard Mountain Walk-in Turkey Hunting Area, which is closed to motorized vehicles. The trail surface is gravel in some places, unsurfaced in others. In addition to horseback riding, the trail is also suitable for day hiking, overnight backpacking and mountain biking. • SITE AMENITIES: Ponds and streams supply drinking water for horses, but none is available for human consumption. • CAMPING: Camping is allowed in this area, although no sites exist. • LODGING: Available in Hot Springs • SPECIAL NOTE: Bring your own drinking water or treat water from springs and streams before drinking; none is available on site.

Earthquake Ridge Trail (E-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Mena Ranger District, 1603 U.S. 71 North, Mena, AR 71953 PHONE: 479-394-2382; (north of Mena on U.S. 71 North)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: Mena • LOCATION: From Mena, travel north on Hwy. 88 (the Talimena Scenic Byway) for 2 miles to the Mena U.S. Forest Service Visitor Information Station. • LENGTH: 6.8 miles; TIME: Varies depending on loops; DIFFICULTY: Easy to moderate • DESCRIPTION: The Earthquake Ridge Trail parallels the Talimena Scenic Byway on the north and south sides of Rich Mountain and crosses the Talimena Scenic Byway in two places. There are several interesting rock formations found here—including the one for which the trail is named, as well as a variety of plant and animal life. The Orchard Trail is a paved, half-mile interpretive trail located within the Earthquake Ridge Trail.

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Earthquake Ridge Trail (Multi-Use) PAGE 204

USDA Forest Service Multi-use Trails

There are several loops in this trail system to make the experience a challenge for most mountain bikers. • SITE AMENITIES: Restrooms and drinking water are available at the East End Visitor Information Center. • CAMPING: There is a developed campground nearby at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. • LODGING: Lodging and dining facilities are available nearby in Mena and at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. • SPECIAL NOTE: Be alert for oncoming traffic when crossing Hwy. 88.

Fourche Mountain Trail (E-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Poteau Ranger District, P.O. Box 2255, Waldron, AR 72958 PHONE: 479-637-4174; (Junction of U.S. 71 and Hwy. 248)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Y-City; Buck Knob • LOCATION: Located five miles east of Y-City on U.S. 270. • LENGTH: 27 miles; TIME: 5-10 hours; DIFFICULTY: Varies by section of trail. Easy to most difficult (Please refer to map). • DESCRIPTION: This trail offers breathtaking views of Fourche Mountain and Buck Knob. Points of interest include beautiful streams in steep ravines, several spectacular views of the Ouachita Mountains, rock glades, and uncommon plant life. The trail network provides horseback riding, day hiking/backpacking, mountain biking, and ATV opportunities. • SITE AMENITIES: Enclosed pavilion with full kitchen; restrooms with showers. • CAMPING: Primitive camping. • LODGING: Idle Nook Horse Camp, LLC, is located 3 miles away. ATV users are permitted. ATVmust be transported by trailer to and from camp. ATV use inside the camp is not allowed. The camp has 22 sites with W/E and 2 bunkhouses. For more information visit www.idlenook.com or call 870-356-3655; or 501-276-9013. • SPECIAL NOTE: Treat water from springs and streams before drinking. EARTHQUAKE RIDGE TRAIL

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Fourche Mountain Trail (Multi-Use) The Arkansas Adventure Guide

PAGE 205

Lake Ouachita Vista Trail (E-3)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Caddo-Womble Ranger District, 1523 U.S. 270 East, Mount Ida, AR, 71957 PHONE: (870) 867-2101; WEBSITE: www.lakeouachitavistatrail.com

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: McGraw Mountain • LOCATION: (From the West) Take U.S. 270 east from Mt. Ida about 10 miles to Shangri-La Road, turn left and go one block to Trail’s End Road and take another left. Go to the end of the road at the lakeshore where you will find the southern trailhead parking area. (From the East) Take U.S. 270 west from Hot Springs about 25 miles from last stop light. Turn right onto Shangri-La Road; go one block; turn left onto Trail’s End Road and then to the end of the road at the lakeshore. Trailhead is to the left of the parking lot. • LENGTH: The trail extends 44 miles. TIME: Can be mountain biked in one day or sectored into several day hikes via various trailheads; DIFFICULTY: Moderate-Strenuous • CAMPING: Tent camping is available at Hickory Nut trailhead. • DESCRIPTION: The Lake Ouachita Vista Trail (LOViT) includes over 40 miles of hiking and mountain biking trails along the shores of Lake Ouachita. The trail is a joint effort of many groups in the area to link the resorts and campgrounds around Lake Ouachita together via a trail system. The trail meanders through the Ouachita National Forest with spurs providing lake vistas and a more challenging hike up to the top of Hickory Nut Mountain for a view of the lake. Trailheads are located at Denby Bay, Homestead, Shangri La, Joplin, Hickory Nut, Crystal Springs and Bear Rifle Range. FOURCHE MOUNTAIN TRAIL Mill Creek Recreation Area i.

Y

5m City,

Mill Creek

Easy More Difficult Most Difficult Parking Camping Fourche Mountain Trail Ouachita Trail Unpaved Road Paved Road Water 179 Forest Road 7 Trail Junction Marker

270

932

1.2 mi.

11

Gate

13

10

009 Spring B

0.7 mi.

218

172

0.7 mi.

2.8 mi.

0.7 mi. 1

12

r.

k Rock Cree

Turner Creek

1.3 mi.

N

2.7 mi. 2.4 mi. 2

0.4 mi. 3

2.8 mi.

7 9

0.2 mi.

0.9 mi.

8

1.4 mi.

Ro

ck

Buck Knob

1.6 mi.

Cre

1.2 mi.

6

ek

5.6 mi.

O

ita ch ua

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Trail

5

(h

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4

0.9 mi.

76A

76

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PAGE 206

USDA Forest Service Multi-use Trails

Little Blakely Trail System (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Jessieville Ranger District, P.O. Box 189, Jessieville, AR 71949 PHONE: 501-984-5313; (19 miles north of Hot Springs on Hwy. 7)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Mountain Pine; Hamilton • LOCATION: The Little Blakely Trails are accessed from Forest Service Road 30200, north of Lake Ouachita State Park. • LENGTH: 19.6 miles; TIME: 4-10 hours per loop; DIFFICULTY: More difficult • DESCRIPTION: The Little Blakely Trails are a series of five unsurfaced loop trails of varying lengths (see map) which are open for use by hikers and mountain bikers. The travel time for each loop varies from 4 to 10 hours, depending on length. Trail marking consists of white rectangles. LITTLE BLAKELY TRAIL SYSTEM

Parking Trail Trail on Unpaved Road Unpaved Road Paved Road 179

Forest Service Road

A Nail: Mileage/Location D

0.3 mi. E 0.9 mi.

Rocky Ridge Loop Morgan Hollow Loop

LAKE OUACHITA

3.5 mi. H

1.4 mi.

Glades Loop

1.5 mi. F C

0.1 mi.

G

0.3 mi. 0.4 mi.

L

0.8 mi.

N

0.1 mi. J

North Loop

2.5 mi.

K 2.9 mi.

0.6 mi.

South Loop

I 0.7 mi.

LAKE OUACHITA

0.3 mi. 0.8 mi.

B

A

30200

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The Arkansas Adventure Guide

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These trails offer spectacular views of Lake Ouachita, stately old-growth pines and hardwoods and unusual rock formations. The hardwoods are especially beautiful during the autumn color change, and in spring wild flowers display an array of brilliant colors. • SITE AMENITIES: Lake Ouachita State Park is located near the trail system and provides full-service camping facilities with lake access. Lake Ouachita, one of the state’s largest and most beautiful lakes, offers excellent swimming, boating and fishing. • CAMPING: Lake Ouachita State Park • LODGING: Available at various locations on nearby Lake Ouachita • SPECIAL NOTE: Carry plenty of water and treat water from springs, streams and lake before drinking.

Possum Kingdom Bike Trail (E-4)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Jessieville Ranger District, P.O. Box 189, Jessieville, AR 71949 PHONE: 501-984-5313; (19 miles north of Hot Springs on Hwy. 7)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAP: Avant • LOCATION: From Hwy. 7, travel west on Hwy. 298 for 12.5 miles to Harper’s Grocery at Forest Road J47 West. Travel west on Forest Road J47 to parking at Forest Road J45. POSSUM KINGDOM TRAIL

Avant Buckville

1.7 mi.

J 28B

127 37120

J25A

1.3 mi. 1.5 mi. 811 Rifle Range

N

J 44E

298

R if le R a

J 45T

1.0 mi.

nge Rd

3.0 mi.

.

1.7 mi. 5232

179

J 45

0.5 mi.

Cedar Four

ch

d.

43

LAKE OUACHITA

eR

83

Parking Possum Kingdom Trail Trail on Paved Road Trail on Unpaved Road Paved Road Unpaved Road State Highway County Road Forest Road Trail Mileage Points

J 47

J 47

Harper’s Grocery

Cedar Fourche Landing

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Index Marker for Map (NO PRINT): Viles Branch Trail (Multi-Use) PAGE 208

USDA Forest Service Multi-use Trails

• LENGTH: 10.7 miles; TIME: 3-4 hours; DIFFICULTY: More difficult • DESCRIPTION: The Possum Kingdom Trail offers a variety of road types, including gravel, paved and unsurfaced. Vegetation consists of pure pine forests and mixed pine and hardwood stands of diverse ages. The trail is marked with white rectangles and Carsonite signs. • SITE AMENITIES: There are no developed facilities. Bring your own water. • CAMPING: Nearby campsites are available at the Buckville Recreation Area managed by the Corps of Engineers. Private campgrounds are also located in the Hot Springs area. • LODGING: Motel rooms are available in Hot Springs. • SPECIAL NOTE: State laws govern the sections of the trail along paved roads. Bring your own drinking water; none is available on site. VILES BRANCH TRAIL 38 38

38

25

Shady Lake Recreation Area

246

38

38

Parking Day Use Area Recreation Area Viles Branch Trail Trail on Unpaved Road Other Trails Unpaved Road 83 State Highway 43 County Road 179 Forest Road Trail Mileage Points

Bard Springs Recreation Area

502

3F

B2

84

3.8 mi.

2.3 mi.

53800

106

8.5 mi.

AthensBigfork Trail

25

5.4 mi. Little Missouri Hiking Trail

Little Missouri Falls 1.3 mi. 8

0.8 mi.

106

Albert Pike Recreation Area

43 43

73

2106

N

369

Langley, 3 mi.

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Sugar Creek Multi-Use Trail (E-2)

REGION: Ouachita Mountains (Ouachita National Forest) FOR INFORMATION: District Ranger, Poteau/Cold Springs Ranger District, P.O. Box 2255, Waldron, AR 72958 PHONE: 479-637-4174 (Waldron); or 479-675-3233 (Booneville)

• USGS QUADRANGLE MAPS: Sugar Grove; Freedom Mountain; Golden City; Bee Mountain • LOCATION: From Hwy. 23, near Booneville, take Hwy. 116 East of County Road 19. Turn south for 8 miles to Knoppers Ford Recreation Area. Go south, past Knoppers Ford for 0.5 mile to Road S30; turn left. Go approximately 1.25 miles to the trailhead parking area. • LENGTH: 36.7 miles; DIFFICULTY: Varies by section of trail. Easy to most difficult. • DESCRIPTION: The Sugar Creek Multi-Use Trail is a network of looping trails that winds over various types of terrain and through a variety of tree types. Rides ra