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2016 Arkansas

STATE PARKS GUIDE

Park Descriptions, Facilities & Fees • Camping Cabins & Lodges • Day-use Facilities • Interpretive Programs • Camping Discounts • State Map


T he S tate P arks of A rkansas The Natural State


Arkansas is a place of pristine natural beauty and scenic splendor to explore and experience.

Contents: Interpretive Programs & Watchable Wildlife Facilities Chart State Map Quick Reference Park Descriptions, Facilities & Fees General Information & Services Cabins & Lodges Camping Camping Discounts Pavilions & Swimming Park Rules

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Visit ArkansasStateParks.com Facebook.com/StateParksofArkansas

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C onnect to the

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M ountains


Half of Arkansa s is covered by mountains including the Ozarks, Ouachitas, and distinctive mesas in the Arkansas River Valley.

C edar C reek C anyon , P etit J ean S tate P ark 3


C onnect to the

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W ater


Arkansas has over 600,000 acres of lakes and 9,000 miles of rivers and streams.

D e G ray R esort L odge and C onference C enter

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C onnect to the P arks W eb sites

ArkansasStateParks.com will connect you to the 52 state parks and the park system's other websites.

I nterpretive P rogr ams

Arkansas State P

The state’s natural and historic sites provide dramatic settings for interpretive programs, available throughout the year. Deepen your sense of place and make memories of a lifetime as you take a guided hike, feel the breeze on a lake cruise, walk through the past at a historic site tour, enjoy the ambience of a campfire program, experience a living history demonstration, play nature games, see the splendor of spring wildflower walks, learn new skills at outdoor workshops, and more. Most parks offer wildlife watching and birding opportunities with trails, observation blinds, checklists, interpreter-led walks, and lake tours. The binocular logo notes parks in the Arkansas Watchable Wildlife program.

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A pps iPhone

Android

Arkansas State Parks' On-The-Go Park Guide for iPhone or Android will help you find just the right park for you.

Facebook.com/StateParksofArkansas #ARStateParks

e Parks programs create memorable experiences for you.

Many of our 50,000 programs and events are listed at ArkansasStateParks.com/events, or call 1-888-287-2757 for a printed copy.

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Other Interpretive Facilities Programs

Trails

Other Activities

Water

Camping Cabins Lodge Group Lodging Restaurant Pavilion Visitor Center/ Store Interpretive Programs Historic Site Museum Hiking/ Backpacking Equestrian ATV Mountain Biking Paved/ADA Lake River/ Stream Boat Rental Boat Ramp Pool Beach Marina Tennis Golf Playground

Camping & Lodging

Ark. Museum of Natural Resources Arkansas Post Museum Bull Shoals-White River Cane Creek Conway Cemetery Cossatot River Crater of Diamonds Crowley's Ridge Daisy Davidsonville DeGray Lake Resort Delta Heritage Trail Devil's Den Hampson Archeological Museum Herman Davis Historic Washington Hobbs Jacksonport Jenkins Ferry Battleground Lake Catherine Lake Charles Lake Chicot Lake Dardanelle Lake Fort Smith Lake Frierson Lake Ouachita Lake Poinsett Logoly Louisiana Purchase Lower White River Museum Mammoth Spring Marks' Mills Battleground Millwood Mississippi River Moro Bay Mount Magazine Mount Nebo Ozark Folk Center Parkin Petit Jean Pinnacle Mountain Plantation Agriculture Museum Poison Springs Battleground Powhatan Prairie Grove Battlefield Queen Wilhelmina South Arkansas Arboretum Toltec Mounds Village Creek White Oak Lake Withrow Springs Woolly Hollow

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Hobbs

49

Wit

FAYETTEVILLE

Prairie Grove Battlefield Devil’s Den

Lake Fort Smith

40 FORT SMITH

Mount Magazine

71 Queen Wilhelmina

270 Cossatot River Daisy

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ⓦ AVAILABLE IN PARK NOTE: All state parks remain open year-round; however, some facilities close on certain days of the week or seasonally. Unless demand dictates, bathhouses are closed December-February. Contact the individual state park for details.

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D

Cra

His Wa

Millwood

HOP TEXARKANA

Conway Cemetery

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State Parks, Recreation and Travel Commission

Mike Mills, Chairman • Jim Dailey, Vice Chairman • Bill Barnes • Jay Bunyard • Le Bob Knight • Weston Lewey • Montine McNulty • Ness Sechrest • 8


T he S tate P arks You are invited to experience one of the finest systems of parks and museums in the nation. The parks offer something for everyone and endless opportunities for exploring Arkansas's natural beauty and history. We hope you take time to enjoy the State Parks of Arkansas. Mammoth Spring EUREKA SPRINGS

s

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HARRISON

Bull ShoalsWhite River

Withrow Springs

Crowley’s Ridge

Lake Charles Ozark Folk Center

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Powhatan

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mith

y

Davidsonville

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Jacksonport Lake Poinsett

167 Lake Dardanelle

5 CONWAY

Petit Jean

Lake Ouachita

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167

7 White Oak Lake Poison Springs

EL DORADO

55 WEST MEMPHIS

Louisiana Purchase HELENA Delta Heritage Trail

Cane Creek

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Marks’ Mills

Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources Logoly

Village Creek

Hampson

Mississippi River

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79

Parkin

Herman Davis

PINE BLUFF Arkansas Post Museum

Jenkins Ferry

A

82

Toltec Mounds

ARKADELPHIA

Crater of Diamonds

HOPE

Plantation Agriculture Museum

LITTLE ROCK

HOT SPRINGS Lake Catherine

Historic Washington

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Lower White River Museum

Pinnacle Mountain

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DeGray Lake Resort

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Woolly Hollow

RUSSELLVILLE MORRILTON

Mount Nebo

Lake Frierson JONESBORO

Moro Bay South Arkansas Arboretum

425

Lake Chicot

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Relief map provided by Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

• LeRoy Dangeau • Danny Ford • John Gill • Shash Goyal • Kalene Griffith st • Jim Shamburger • Cindy Smith • Mike Wilson • Randy Wolfinbarger 9


Quick Reference

Book Online! Reservations for Arkansas state park

campsites, cabins, and lodge rooms can be made online at ArkansasStateParks.com. This icon 8 notes each park where online reservations apply. You can also make your reservations by phoning or visiting the state parks.

Parks 10

wit h c a m psit e s

Bull Shoals-White River State Park Cane Creek State Park Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area (tent only) Crater of Diamonds State Park Crowley’s Ridge State Park Daisy State Park Davidsonville Historic State Park DeGray Lake Resort State Park Delta Heritage Trail State Park (tent only) Devil’s Den State Park Jacksonport State Park Lake Catherine State Park Lake Charles State Park Lake Chicot State Park Lake Dardanelle State Park Lake Fort Smith State Park Lake Frierson State Park Lake Ouachita State Park Lake Poinsett State Park Logoly State Park (tent only) Millwood State Park Mississippi River State Park Moro Bay State Park Mount Magazine State Park Mount Nebo State Park Petit Jean State Park Queen Wilhelmina State Park Village Creek State Park White Oak Lake State Park Withrow Springs State Park Woolly Hollow State Park

Page 14-15 16 18 19-20 21 22 23 24-26 27 28-29 34 35-36 37 38 39 40 41 42-43 44 45 48 49 50 51-53 54 58-60 65-66 69-70 71 72 73


Parks

wit h a lo d g e

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DeGray Lake Resort State Park Mount Magazine State Park Petit Jean State Park Queen Wilhelmina State Park

24-26 51-53 58-60 65-66

Parks

Parks

wit h c a b i n s Crowley’s Ridge State Park Devil’s Den State Park Lake Catherine State Park Lake Chicot State Park Lake Fort Smith State Park Lake Ouachita State Park Moro Bay State Park Mount Magazine State Park Mount Nebo State Park Ozark Folk Center State Park Petit Jean State Park Village Creek State Park

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wit h a g o l f c o u r s e

DeGray Lake Resort State Park Lake Catherine State Park—play at Diamondhead Village Creek State Park

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A r ka n s a s S tat e P a r k s W e b sit e s ArkansasStateParks.com CraterofDiamondsStatePark.com DeGray.com HistoricWashingtonStatePark.com MountMagazineStatePark.com OzarkFolkCenter.com PetitJeanStatePark.com QueenWilhelmina.com T he L odge at M ount M agazine S tate P ark

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Stories

of

of

Black

Gold

A rkansas M useum N atur al R esources

3853 Smackover Highway, Smackover, AR 71762 870-725-2877   n Fax: 870-725-2161 Email: MuseumNaturalResources@Arkansas.com   n AMNR.org Museum GPS: 33.337028, -92.71433 Featuring state-of-the-art exhibits inside, and working oil field equipment outside in its adjacent Oil Field Park, this museum shares the fascinating stories of this region’s natural resources with emphasis on petroleum and brine recovered for bromine extraction. Explore the museum and stroll along the streets of a 1920s Arkansas boom town, or travel back 200 million years ago to discover the origins of oil. Take a chance drilling to see if you will become an oil tycoon, or go flat broke. Learn how 95 percent of the products we use daily are made of, or with, oil or brine, two of Arkansas’s natural resources. Admission to the museum is free. The museum is on Ark. 7 two miles south of Smackover. Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Monday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

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Information in this guidebook is carefully compiled to ensure accuracy at time of publication. Conditions, services, and rates may change due to unforeseen circumstances. Contact the individual parks or the Arkansas State Parks director’s office in Little Rock for the most current information. State park special notices are posted at: ArkansasStateParks.com/park-announcement. Applicable state and local taxes will be added at time of sale.


Life

on

the

Grand

Pra i r i e

A rkansas P ost M useum 5530 Highway 165 South, Gillett, AR 72055 870-548-2634 Email: ArkansasPostMuseum@Arkansas.com Museum GPS: 34.031704, -91.373288 Explore this complex of five exhibit buildings and learn about life on, and the history of, Arkansas’s Grand Prairie and Delta from 1877 to modern times. The Main House serves as the entrance to the complex, and visitor information, a gift shop, an audiovisual room, and programming are provided here. The Summer Kitchen showcases early cookware and utensils. The Peterson Building interprets life on the southern end of the Grand Prairie and the Delta through exhibits that include military memorabilia, agricultural implements, a general store, and a large collection of toys from the 1920s and 1930s. Two buildings on the museum grounds are original to the Grand Prairie. The 1877 Refeld-Hinman Loghouse, a dog-trot cabin furnished in the style of the 1800s, is an example of how houses were built on the prairie and throughout the Delta. The 1933 Carnes-Bonner Playhouse, a miniature built-to-scale version of the Carnes’ family home, displays scale children’s furnishings, accessories, and toys. Admission to the museum is free. The museum is six miles south of Gillett at the junction of U.S. 165 and Ark. 169. Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

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Where

Wa t e r

Generates

Life

B ull S hoals -W hite R iver S tate P ark 8 153 Dam Overlook Lane, Bull Shoals, AR 72619 870-445-3629 n Fax: 870-445-3645 Email: BullShoalsWhiteRiver@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 36.369634, -92.576798 The scenic Ozark Mountains are home to one of the nation’s finest fishing and boating combinations—the White River and Bull Shoals Lake. Mid-America’s premier trout stream, the White River is renowned for its record rainbow and brown trout. A dam on the river forms 45,440-acre Bull Shoals Lake. Anglers and water sports enthusiasts are drawn to the lake’s clear waters and surrounding natural beauty. Located above and below the dam, Bull Shoals-White River State Park stretches along the riverside and lakeshore. The park features 103 campsites along or near the river (34 Class AAA, four Class A, 45 Class B, 20 Tent Sites with no hookups), one Rent-A-Camp, and three Rent-An-RV. [See page 75] Other park facilities include picnic areas, standard pavilions, playgrounds, and hiking and mountain bike trails. A marina/store offers boat rentals, and supplies, equipment, and gifts for sale. Park interpretive programs, workshops, and nature camps are offered throughout the year. Situated on a high point, the park visitor center offers sweeping views of the White River, Bull Shoals Dam, and Bull Shoals Lake. The center's Exhibit Hall, lobby, gift shop, and Johnboat Theater share the history and tell of the fish these waters hold. From Mountain Home, travel six miles north on Ark. 5, then go eight miles west on Ark. 178. 14


Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Marina Johnboat (20 ft.) w/15 hp Motor (fuel extra) $90/one-half day, $120/day Commissary Johnboat (20 ft.) w/15 hp Motor (fuel extra) $100/one-half day, $130/day Canoe or Kayak (for river float/haul back included) $60/day Canoe (for use in immediate park area during low water) $20/one-half day, $25/day Solo or Tandem Kayak $7.50-$8/hour, $10-$15/one-half day, $18-$25/day Shuttle Service (for a private canoe) $45/day Mountain Bike $4.50/hour, $8/two hours, $15/one-half day, $25.50/day Special Interpretive Programs Johnboat Float Trip on the White River [1-1 1/2 hour]: two persons/boat—$20/person/trip Interpretive Lake Tour Adult—$12 each; Child (age 6-12)—$6 each [under 6 free] Interpretive Kayak or Canoe Tour Adult—$20 each; Child (age 6-12)—$10 each *Interpretive Tour of Bull Shoals Dam $6/person; $18/family (children age 5 and younger cannot participate due to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers safety regulations) *NOTE: Tours of the dam are offered Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day.

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One

Pa r k .

Tw o

Na t u ra l

D i v i s i o n s.

C ane C reek S tate P ark 8 50 State Park Road, Star City, AR 71667 870-628-4714  n Fax: 870-628-3611 Email: CaneCreek@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.913024, -91.764742 Located where the rolling terrain of the West Gulf Coastal Plain and the alluvial lands of east Arkansas meet, this park offers you the opportunity to experience both natural divisions in one visit. Hike or bike in the park’s 2,053 acres of woodlands in the Coastal Plain. Paddle or fish on 1,675-acre Cane Creek Lake, a timbered Delta lake. Just across the lake, explore Bayou Bartholomew, the world’s longest bayou. Interpretive programs include guided walking, biking, kayaking, and birding tours. Facilities include 29 campsites (11 Class A and 18 Class B) and one Rent-An-RV [See page 75], picnic sites, a screened pavilion, enclosed climate-controlled pavilion, visitor center with exhibits and gift shop, launch ramp, barrier-free fishing piers, a bathhouse, restrooms, and playground. The park rents boats and bicycles (not mountain bikes). Hiking and multi-use trails, and a kayak trail, offer adventure including birding and wildlife viewing opportunities. The 15.5-mile multi-use and 2.5-mile trails go through rolling terrain, along the lake, and across bridges including three suspension bridges. From Star City, travel five miles east on Ark. 293 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Boat Rentals: Fishing Boat (15 ft.)—$12/one-half day, $17/day Fishing Boat (15 ft.) w/Trolling Motor—$30/one-half day, $52/day Canoe $15/one-half day, $20/day Kayak: Solo—$10/one-half day, $15/day / Tandem—$15/one-half day, $20/day Guided Kayak Lake Tour (two hours): Adult—$15; Child (age 6-12)—$10 Guided Kayak Bayou Tour (1 1/2 hour): Adult—$20; Child (age 6-12)—$15

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First

Governor’s

Final

Resting

Place

C onway C emetery S tate P ark GPS: 33.101973, -93.683578 When Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836, James Sevier Conway (1796-1855) took office as Arkansas’s first governor. This 11-acre historic site preserves Conway’s final resting place. The cemetery was the family plot located at the former Conway homesite, a large cotton plantation named Walnut Hill. [Visitor services are not available at this historic site.] From Bradley, travel two miles west on Ark. 160 to the town of Walnut Hill, then turn south on County Road 9 and go 1/2 mile to the park.

For a complete listing of A rkansas S tate P arks programs, special events, fees and charges, go to ArkansasStateParks.com 17


Flowing

S tate

Wa t e r,

a

Corridor

of

Life

C ossatot R iver P ark -N atur al A rea 1980 Highway 278 West, Wickes, AR 71973 870-385-2201 n  Fax: 870-385-7858 Email: CossatotRiver@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.294231, -94.17741

This park-natural area extends for 12 miles along the wild and scenic Cossatot River. The river forms Cossatot Falls, a rugged rocky canyon that challenges experienced canoeists and kayakers with its Class IV rapids. In this watershed basin, flow levels are dependent on rainfall. Floatable river levels are usually limited to late-fall, winter, and spring. For river stage in feet from the Ark. 246 access, call 870-387-3141 or visit the U.S. Geological Survey website for real time data at http://waterdata.usgs. gov/nwis/uv?07340300. No floater services are provided. The Brushy Creek Recreation Area at the Hwy. 246 bridge offers picnic sites, restrooms, and river access. Tent Sites (no hookups) are at the Cossatot Falls Area (six sites), Sandbar Area (15 sites), and Ed Banks Area (one site). Cost per site is $14/day. Undeveloped camping space is at the U.S. 278 Area. Primitive group camping (tents only) is available by reservation at the River Ridge Group Camp ($75). Hikers can enjoy the 14-mile River Corridor Trail and 3.5-mile Harris Creek Trail. The visitor center features exhibits, a wildlife observation room, two classrooms, and a gift shop. Exhibits and interpretive programs offered throughout the year tell of the geology, flora, and fauna in this remote and protected river corridor. The visitor center is on U.S. 278 eight miles east of Wickes near where the highway crosses the Cossatot River. The park is south of Mena. North route: Ark. 246 between Vandervoort and Athens. South route: U.S. 278 between Wickes & Umpire. Weyerhaeuser roads provide river access. 18


A

C r ater

Field

of

Dreams

D iamonds S tate P ark

of

8 209 State Park Road, Murfreesboro, AR 71958 870-285-3113 n  Fax: 870-285-4169 Email: CraterOfDiamonds@Arkansas.com CraterOfDiamondsStatePark.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.032262, -93.670188 Crater of Diamonds offers park visitors a one-of-a-kind experience—the adventure of hunting for real diamonds. You’ll search over a 37 1/2-acre plowed field that is the eroded surface of an ancient, diamond-bearing volcanic crater. It is the world’s eighth largest in surface area. If you find a diamond, it is yours to keep. Begin your visit at the park visitor center to view diamonds in the rough and explore its interactive exhibits that explain why diamonds are present here at Arkansas's diamond site. Then, pass through the Diamond Discovery Center on your way to prospect in the diamond search area. Exhibits, interpretive programs, and a video show you the various ways to search for diamonds and identify rough diamonds as you prospect. Diamonds come in all colors of the rainbow. The three colors found here at the park are white, brown, and yellow, in that order. Park staff provide free identification and certification 19


Crater of Diamonds State Park (continued)

of diamonds found here. Amethyst, garnet, jasper, agate, quartz, and more are also found here making the park a rockhound's paradise. Digging tools are available for rent. Diamonds were first discovered here in 1906 by John Huddleston, the farmer who at that time owned the land. Since then, over 75,000 diamonds have been unearthed at this site. Of all these diamonds, 30,000 were found by park visitors after the Crater of Diamonds became an Arkansas state park in 1972. Notable diamonds from this site include the 40.23-carat Uncle Sam, the largest diamond ever unearthed in the U.S.; the 16.37-carat Amarillo Starlight; the 15.33-carat Star of Arkansas; Diamond Springs aquatic playground the stunning 8.52-carat Esperanza; and, on display at the Crater of Diamonds State Park in the park visitor center, the flawless Strawn-Wagner Diamond. Originally weighing 3.03 carats in the rough, this splendid stone was cut to a 1.09-carat gem and graded D Flawless, 0/0/0 ("Triple 0"), the highest grade a diamond can achieve. A diamond this perfect is so rare that many gemologists and jewelers never see one. The park also includes 47 Class AAA campsites and five Walk-in Tent Sites, an enclosed pavilion with air-conditioning, picnic sites, cafe, gift shop, trails, laundry, and the Diamond Springs aquatic playground, a play pool for visitors of all ages. From the courthouse square in downtown Murfreesboro (North Washington Avenue), travel two miles southeast on Ark. 301 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Admission to Diamond Search Area/day: Adult—$8 each; Child (age 6-12)—$5 each Group Rates (15 or more with advance notice)—1/2 above fees Diamond Springs: $6/person 42 inches in height and above; $4/person under 42 inches in height; Chaperone—$2; Pool Pass (up to 20 admissions)—$90

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Recreation

in

a

Historic

Setting

C rowley ’ s R idge S tate P ark 8 2092 Highway 168 North, Paragould, AR 72450 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 870-573-6751 CABIN/GROUP LODGING RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2405 Email: CrowleysRidge@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 36.044303, -90.666293 Native log and stone facilities built by the CCC set the mood this park’s rustic warmth. Facilities include a group lodging area with five bunk cabins, kitchen/dining hall, and bathhouse; four cabins with kitchens and fireplaces [in two duplex units]; 26 campsites (18 Class B and eight Tent Sites); picnic areas; snack bar; trails; standard pavilions; 31-acre fishing lake (electric motors); and 3 1/2-acre swimming lake. The park offers fishing boat, kayak, and pedal boat rentals. Join the programs by park interpreters. From Paragould, travel nine miles west on U.S. 412, then two miles south on Ark. 168. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens): (Winter) Jan., Feb. & Dec. Each additional person $12/day One-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Thurs. $75/two adults/day, Fri.-Sat. $85/two adults/day Two-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Thurs. $75/four adults/day, Fri.-Sat. $95/four adults/day (Spring & Fall) March through Memorial Day Weekend / Tues. after Labor Day through November One-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Thurs. $80/two adults/day, Fri.-Sat. $85/two adults/day Two-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Thurs. $85/four adults/day, Fri.-Sat. $95/four adults/day (Summer) Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day One-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Sat. $85/two adults/day Two-bedroom (fireplace): Sun.-Sat. $95/four adults/day Group Cabins: $200/day for 1-20 persons; $10/person/day for 21 or more / Dining Hall only: $85/use Swimming (Lake): $2.75/person (age 6 and up); $1.50/child (age 2-5)

21


Sparkling

Wa t e r s

and

Ouachita

D aisy S tate P ark 8 103 East Park, Kirby, AR 71950 870-398-4487 Email: Daisy@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.233767, -93.740953 In this scenic setting in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains, Lake Greeson, the Little Missouri River, and Daisy State Park make a winning combination for outdoor recreation and adventure. Lake Greeson, 7,000 acres of clear waters surrounded by mountain scenery, delights water sports enthusiasts. Catches of black and white bass, stripers, crappie, catfish, and bluegill account for the lake's popularity with anglers. The Little Missouri and four other float streams in the area offer spring and early summer trout fishing. Situated on Lake Greeson, Daisy State Park features 103 campsites (26 Class A, 56 Class B, and 21 Tent Sites), picnic areas, a standard pavilion (screened) with restrooms, launch ramps, hiking trails, a motorcycle/mountain bike/ATV trail, and playground. Rent a solo or tandem kayak. Guided lake tours are offered on a regular basis or upon advance requests. The park is 1/4 mile south of Daisy off U.S. 70. Campsite Fees & Discounts

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See pages 75-76

Mountain

Beauty


Old

Stories

and

Ne w

Discoveries

D avidsonville H istoric S tate P ark 8 8047 Highway 166 South, Pocahontas, AR 72455 870-892-4708 Email: Davidsonville@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 870-892-0480 Visitor Center GPS: 36.15835, -91.056892 This park preserves the site of historic Davidsonville, established in 1815, that included the Arkansas Territory’s first post office, courthouse, and land office. Bypassed by the Southwest Trail, an overland route from St. Louis to Mexico, the town faded by the 1830s. Archeological excavations here are uncovering streets, foundations, and objects that tell of life on the American frontier following the Louisiana Purchase. Fishing is a major activity here. The park borders the Black River (boat launch ramp) and a 12-acre fishing lake (no launch ramp) with barrier-free fishing pier. Anglers can also choose from the nearby Spring and Eleven Point rivers. Facilities include 34 campsites (one Class A, 23 Class B, and 10 Tent Sites), picnic areas, two standard pavilions (screened), playgrounds, trails including a selfguided trail through the historic townsite, and visitor center with exhibits and gift shop. From Pocahontas, travel two miles west on U.S. 62, then go nine miles south on Ark. 166; or from U.S. 63 at Black Rock, take Ark. 361 and go six miles north. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Boat Rentals: Fishing Boat—14 ft. $11/one-half day, $17/day Solo Kayak or Canoe $5/hour, $8/one-half-day, $15/day Pedal Boat $7/hour Canoe Trip (includes haul back) [Requires 24-hour notice] $35/canoe

23


Arkansas’s

Golf

and

Wa t e r

Sports

Resort

D e G r ay L ake R esort S tate P ark 8 2027 State Park Entrance Road, Bismarck, AR 71929 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 501-865-5810 LODGE RESERVATIONS: 800-737-8355 (TDD) or 501-865-5850 Email: DeGrayLakeResort@Arkansas.com  n DeGray.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.253632, -93.132267 Lodge GPS: 34.245707, -93.147901 Arkansas’s resort state park lies on the north shore of DeGray Lake, a 13,800-acre fishing and water sports paradise in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. Here resort amenities combine with plenty of outdoor fun and adventure. DeGray Lake Resort offers a 96-room lodge with conference center, 113 campsites (Class B) and three Rent-A-Yurt, championship golf, swimming, tennis, trails, bicycling, basketball, disc golf, and guided horseback trail rides. The full-service marina offers tackle, dock space, fuel, and a variety of boat rentals including party barges, kayaks, and pedal boats. DeGray Resort Lodge and Conference Center features sweeping views of DeGray Lake from its secluded island setting. Amenities include a heated swimming pool, indoor hot tub, fitness room, business center, and playground. The lodge’s Shoreline Restaurant offers a full menu, plus banquet catering services. The meeting rooms and 300-seat conference center are popular settings for meetings, retreats, weddings, and reunions. Custom-fit meetings and family reunions are this resort lodge’s specialty. DeGray’s 18-hole public, golf course includes a driving range and practice green. The championship course features TifEagle Bermuda greens. The Pro Shop offers refreshments, cart and club rentals, and golf equipment and apparel for sale. 24


Swimming beaches, boat launches, pavilions, bicycle rentals, and an amphitheater round out DeGray’s offerings. Join park interpreters for sunset cruises, snorkeling trips, guided hikes, nature programs, and recreational activities. Outdoor workshops and special events are held throughout the year. Each January, the Eagles Et Cetera Weekend celebrates the bald eagles that winter on DeGray Lake. Take Exit #78 off I-30 at Caddo Valley/Arkadelphia and go seven miles north on Scenic 7 Byway to the park; or from Hot Springs, go 21 miles south on Scenic 7 Byway. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 DeGray Resort Lodge and Conference Center (96 guest rooms) January – February & November – December: *Rate is for two adults/day Resort View Room: Sun. - Thurs. *$85/day / Fri. - Sat. *$95/day Lake View Room: Sun. - Thurs. *$100/day / Fri. - Sat. *110/day March – October: Resort View Room: Sun. - Thurs. *$100/day / Fri. - Sat. *$110day Lake View Room: Sun. - Thurs. *$130/day / Fri. - Sat. *140/day Each additional person over age 12 $12/day Lodge Conference Center Individual Conference Rooms: Lodge occupancy (46-96 rooms) No charge Lodge occupancy (16-45 rooms) $210/use Lodge occupancy (1-15 rooms) $260/use Outside groups $310/use Total Conference Center, Lake Terrace, or Golf Course Patio: Lodge occupancy (72-96 rooms) No charge Lodge occupancy (36-71 rooms) $350/use Lodge occupancy (11-35 rooms) $450/use Lodge occupancy (1-10 rooms) $650/use Outside groups $750/use Small Meeting Rooms: Lodge occupancy (25 rooms or more) No charge Lodge occupancy (Less than 25 rooms) $110/use Outside groups $235/use

25


DeGray Lake Resort State Park (continued) Golf Course For tee times and tournament reservations, call the Pro Shop at: 501-865-5830. 9 holes 18 holes Weekday Greens Fee (with or w/out 1/2 cart) $27/$19 $35/$23 Weekend/Holiday Greens Fee ( " " " " ) $32/$24 $41/$29 Senior Citizen Greens Fee (age 65 and over) [Monday-Friday] (with or w/out 1/2 cart) $23/$15 $30/$18 Junior Golf (age 16 and under) [without cart] Weekday Greens Fee $7.50 $10 Weekend Greens Fee $12 $14.50 Annual Greens Fee $850-$1,700/person; $1,250-$2,100/family Pull Cart: Weekdays $3/use; Weekends/Holidays $5/use Driving Range $5/bucket Guided Horseback Trail Ride $30/person Marina Call marina at 501-865-5840 to reserve a motorized boat. The Service Dock sells fuel, bait, tackle, ice, and snacks. Fuel extra on motor rentals. Large Craft Covered Slip (no elec.)—16' x 20' $130/month Large Craft Covered Slip (with elec.)—11' x 34' $173/month Uncovered Slip—16' x 20' (no electricity) $100/month (with electricity) $125/month Houseboat Covered Slip—16' x 40' $200/month Transient Covered Slip—11' x 34' $20/day, $70/week Mooring Buoy $50/month Towing/Service Charge (one-hour min.): Small craft—$30/hour Medium craft—$40/hour Large craft—$50/hour Fishing Boat—16 ft. $15/one-half day, $22/day w/15 hp Motor $70/one-half day, $85/day Party Barge (25 ft.) w/Upper Deck $269/one-half day, $351/day; Dep.—$200 Deck/Ski Boat (24 ft.) w/Motor $280/one-half day, $375/day; Dep.—$200 Canoe $6/hour; $15/one-half day; $25/day Solo Kayak or Paddleboard—$6/hour; $15/one-half day; $25/day Tandem Kayak—$8/hour; $20/one-half day; $30/day Pedal Boat $10/hour Water Tube $25/one-half day, $40/day Wake Board $25/one-half day, $40/day Interpretive Lake Tour Adult—$10 each Child (age 6-12)—$6 each; (under 6)—Free

26


Hiking

and

Biking

in

the

Arkansas

Delta

D elta H eritage T r ail S tate P ark 5539 U.S. Highway 49, West Helena, AR 72390 870-572-2352  Email: DeltaHeritageTrail@Arkansas.com Park Office GPS: 34.554222, -90.7586 This rail-to-trail conversion is being developed in phases along the former Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way stretching from one mile south of Lexa (six miles west of Helena) to Rohwer, and extending via the Mississippi River levee to Arkansas City. In the northern portion, the first 21 miles of trail have been completed from Helena junction to Elaine. Trailheads are located at Helena junction near Lexa, Walnut Corner at the U.S. 49 overpass, Lick Creek (Ark. 85 just south of Barton), Lake View, and Elaine. The compacted, crushed rock trail leads through a shaded canopy of native hardwoods, alongside agricultural fields, and across streams. Wildlife viewing and birdwatching opportunities abound along the route. When completed, the trail will also offer views from bridges that span the Arkansas River and the White River. The park visitor center is on U.S. 49 in Barton. Here you will find a gift shop, trail maps, restrooms, and picnic sites. Check at the visitor center for scheduled interpretive programs. At this trailhead are five campsites [Class D (no hookups) Tent Sites]. Class D (no hookups) Tent Sites $12/day Bicycle Rental $2/hour, $6/one-half day, $10/day *Guided Bike or Kayak Tour (two hours) Adult—$15/each; Child (age 6-12)—$10 each *Guided Bike and Kayak Tour (four hours) Adult—$25/each; Child (age 6-12)—$15 each *These tours are through the cypress grove at Old Town Lake near the Lake View trailhead.

27


CCC

Masterpiece

in

a

Picturesque

Ozark

Va l l e y

D evil ’ s D en S tate P ark 8 11333 West Arkansas Highway 74, West Fork, AR 72774 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 479-761-3325 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2417 Email: DevilsDen@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 479-761-3676 Visitor Center GPS: 35.779945, -94.250033 Lee Creek Valley, a picturesque setting in the Ozark Mountains, was selected as this park site in the 1930s. The Civilian Conservation Corps used native materials to build the park’s rustic-style wood and stone structures that mirror the surrounding natural beauty. In the heart of the park, an impressive rock dam spans Lee Creek forming Lake Devil. This eightacre lake is a serene setting for fishing, canoeing, and pedal boating. The park's hiking, backpacking, and mountain bike trails lead to backcountry in the surrounding Ozark National Forest. Devil's Den includes 17 cabins with kitchens and fireplaces. The park also offers 143 campsites (44 Class AAA, *12 Class B, *13 Class C, 24 Class D [no hookups], eight Hike-in [tent only], and 42 sites with w/e hookups in the Horse Camp that includes a bathhouse and access to the horse trails). [*NOTE: Eighteen of these campsites are scheduled for renovation in 2016.] The park's cafe is open seasonally. The pool is open in summer only. Devil’s Den also has a store, group camp, standard pavilion, meeting room, and playground. Canoes and pedal boats are available for rent. A variety of interpretive programs are presented in the park throughout the year. Join park interpreters on hikes along trails including the 15-mile Butterfield Hiking Trail. 28


Travel eight miles south of Fayetteville on I-49 to Exit #53 (West Fork), then go 17 miles southwest on Ark. 170; or exit I-49 at Exit #45 (Winslow) and go seven miles west on Ark. 74. [NOTE: TRAILERS LONGER THAN 26 FT. SHOULD TAKE EXIT #53.] Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Studio (fireplace): $114/two adults/day One bedroom (fireplace): $134/two adults/day Two bedrooms (fireplace): $149/four adults/day Three bedrooms w/one bathroom (fireplace): $189/six adults/day Three bedrooms w/one and one-half bathrooms (fireplace): $189/six adults/day Three bedrooms w/two bathrooms (fireplace): $189/six adults/day Each additional person (no rollaways available) $12/day Group Camp Area: $85 minimum [75-person maximum] Swimming (Pool): $5/person (age 6 and up); $4/child (age 2-5)

29


Connections

to

a

Pre h i s t o r i c

Civilization

H ampson A rcheological M useum S tate P ark P.O. Box 156, Wilson, AR 72395 870-655-8622  n Fax: 870-655-8061 Email: HampsonArcheologicalMuseum@Arkansas.com GPS: 35.570243, -90.040311 Hampson Museum exhibits a nationally renowned collection from the Nodena Site Mississippian culture, a civilization of art, religion, political structure, and trading networks developed in this area from A.D. 1400 to 1650. The collection's preservation is due to the efforts of Dr. James K. Hampson and his family. A picnic area and playground are located in the park near the museum. Admission to the museum is free. The park is in Wilson at the junction of U.S. 61 and Lake Drive. Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

30


Honoring

an

American

Hero

H erman D avis S tate P ark

GPS: 35.87307 -90.166028 Herman Davis grew up hunting near Manila and became a scout and sharpshooter in World War I. He was on General John J. Pershing’s list of World War I’s 100 great heroic stories. Private Davis received the Distinguished Service Cross, Croix de Guere, and Medaille Militaire awards from the American and French governments. This historic site preserves Davis' final resting place. The park is in Manila at the corner of Ark. 18 and Baltimore Street.

31


Arkansas’s

Pre m i e r

Frontier

E xp e r i e n c e

H istoric W ashington S tate P ark P.O. Box 129, Washington, AR 71862 870-983-2684 Email: HistoricWashington@Arkansas.com HistoricWashingtonStatePark.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.773607, -93.684359 From its establishment in 1824, Washington was an important stop on the Southwest Trail. James Bowie, Sam Houston, and Davy Crockett traveled through here. James Black, a local blacksmith, is credited with creating the legendary Bowie Knife at his forge. The town became a major service center for area planters, merchants, and professionals. From 1863-1865, it served as the Confederate capital of Arkansas. This historic park, established here in 1973, interprets Washington from 1800-1900. The park is conserved and interpreted by Arkansas State Parks in conjunction with the Pioneer Washington Restoration Foundation. The 1874 Courthouse serves as the park visitor center. See the Blacksmith Shop, Weapons Museum, Print Museum, 1836 Courthouse, and other historic locations hosted by park staff in first and third person characters. The tour locations vary each day. Southern home cooking is served for lunch daily in the 1832 Williams’ Tavern Restaurant. The gift shop and Candle Shop include local handmade crafts. Group facilities in unique historic settings can be rented for weddings, family reunions, and other events. Catering options are available. Take Exit #30 off I-30 at Hope and travel eight miles northwest on U.S. 278. Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily Closed—New Year’s Day and Christmas Day *Washington Frontier Experience Tour Adult—$9 each; Child (age 6-12)—$5 each *NOTE: Other tour options are available. Contact the park or park website for details.

32


A d v e n t u r e . . . D i s c o v e r y. . . I n s p i r a t i o n

H obbs S tate P ark C onservation A rea

20201 East Highway 12, Rogers, AR 72756 479-789-5000  n Fax: 479-789-2151 Email: Hobbs@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 36.284877, -93.93883

Arkansas’s largest state park in land area, Hobbs covers a 12,056acre tract of diverse Ozark landscape along the southern shore of Beaver Lake. The visitor center's interactive exhibits and orientation video interpret the park's natural resources, limestone environment, and history. Experience the park along hiking, horseback riding, and biking trails. Choose from a 1⁄2-mile, barrier-free historical trail; 3/4-mile visitor center nature trail; 8 1/2-mile backpacking trail with primitive tent sites; 24-mile multi-use trail; and others. The park includes a public outdoor shooting range, regulated seasonal hunting, and undeveloped access to the lake. Interpretive programs and workshops are offered throughout the year. The park is managed jointly by Arkansas State Parks, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, and Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. [NOTE: Campsites on Beaver Lake are managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.] The park is 10 miles east of Rogers on Ark. 12. 33


Stories

of

a

River

To w n

J acksonport S tate P ark 8 205 Avenue Street, Newport, AR 72112 870-523-2143 Email: Jacksonport@Arkansas.com  n Fax: 870-523-4620 Visitor Center GPS: 35.639638, -91.310353 In the 1800s, steamboats made Jacksonport a thriving river port. During the Civil War, the town was occupied by both Confederate and Union forces because of its crucial locale. Jacksonport became the county seat in 1852. Stories of this historic river port are shared in the park’s 1872 courthouse. Admission to the courthouse is free. The park offers 20 Class A campsites (50 amp service) [See page 75], a swimming beach on the White River, standard pavilion, picnic sites, and a playground. Stroll alongside the river on the Tunstall Riverwalk Trail and see a wide variety of colorful wildflowers. The park is on Ark. 69 in Jacksonport. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76

34


Where

Mountains

Meet

the

Wa t e r

L ake C atherine S tate P ark 8 1200 Catherine Park Road, Hot Springs, AR 71913 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 501-844-4176 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2422 Email: LakeCatherine@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.437945, -92.917989 In the Ouachita Mountains on the shore of 1,940-acre Lake Catherine, one of the popular Diamond Lakes in southwest Arkansas, this peaceful park features native stone and wood facilities constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s. Twenty fully-equipped cabins with kitchens are spaced along the lakeshore. Some are rustic-style, and others are modern designs. Most feature one bedroom. The park’s two-bedroom cabin is a barrier-free design including a large stone patio overlooking the lake and access to the lake from its own private, barrier-free fishing pier. Overnight choices also include two rustic studio cabins with kitchenettes in a duplex unit on the lakeshore that was created when the park's historic CCC barrack was restored. The park offers 70 campsites (47 Class AAA and 23 Class B), six Primitive Tent Sites, one Rent-A-Camp, and one Rent-A-Yurt [See pg. 75]. Many sites are on the lakeshore. The park marina, open in summer only, sells bait and fuel. However, boats are available for rent at the park throughout the year. The park also includes a launch ramp, standard pavilion, picnic sites, playgrounds, and trails. Gifts, groceries, snacks, and ice are available for sale daily at the visitor center that overlooks the swimming area and nature center (open summer only). Park interpreters offer hikes, lake tours, and programs during summer or by advance request in other seasons. Guided horseback trail rides are available in the summer. Take Exit #97 off I-30 near Malvern and go 12 miles north on Ark. 171 to the park. 35


Lake Catherine State Park (continued)

Falls Creek Falls, Lake Catherine State Park Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Studio (with kitchenette) [in a duplex unit] $92/two adults/day One bedroom [in a fourplex unit] $89/two adults/day One bedroom duplex (fireplace) $97/two adults/day One bedroom rustic-style (fireplace) $112/two adults/day Two bedroom w/spa tub (fireplace) $187/four adults/day Each additional person $12/day (Rollaway—$10/day) Marina Fishing Boat—14 ft. $15/one-half day, $20/day; 16 ft. w/Motor $45/one-half day, $60/day; Dep. $50 Bass Boat w/40 hp Motor—17 ft. $150/one-half day, $195/day; Dep.—$150/use Party Barge—21 ft. $150/one-half day, $195/day (fuel extra); Dep.—$150/use Party Barge—24 ft. $185/one-half day, $250/day (fuel extra); Dep.—$150/use Party Barge—25 ft. $225/one-half day, $300/day (fuel extra); Dep.—$150/use Tandem Kayak, Canoe, Pedal Boat, Water Bike, or Row Boat $10/hour, $20/one-half day, $30/day Solo Kayak $8/hour, $15/one-half day, $25/day Guided Horseback Trail Ride $30/person

36


C a m p i n g,

Tr a i l s

and

Fish

Ta l e s

L ake C harles S tate P ark 8 3705 Highway 25, Powhatan, AR 72458 870-878-6595 Email: LakeCharles@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 870-878-6348 Visitor Center GPS: 36.065476, -91.152838 Anglers and nature lovers will enjoy this peaceful park on the shore of Lake Charles, 645 acres of creek-fed waters in the northeastern foothills of the Ozark Mountains. The lake offers fishing for bass, crappie, bream, and catfish. The park features 60 campsites (23 Class AAA and 37 Class B), one Rent-A-Yurt, and two Rent-An-RV. [See page 75.] Nearby are the swimming beach, picnic sites, a standard pavilion (screened with ceiling fans), playground, and launch ramp. For hiking enthusiasts, the park offers four trails. The gift shop in the visitor center includes gift items, camping supplies, live bait, and snacks for sale. During summer months, choose from the variety of interpretive programs offered in the park. From Hoxie, travel eight miles northwest on U.S. 63, then go six miles south on Ark. 25. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Self-guided Kayak Tour (three hours): Tandem—$15/kayak Solo—$10/kayak Special Interpretive Programs Lake Tour: Adult—$7 each; Child (6-12)—$3.50 each Guided Kayak Tour (1 1/2 hour): Adult—$10 each Child (6-12)—$5 each

37


An

Oasis

in

the

Delta

L ake C hicot S tate P ark 8 2542 Highway 257, Lake Village, AR 71653 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 870-265-5480 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2430 Email: LakeChicot@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 870-265-3162 Visitor Center GPS: 33.371939, -91.195783 Arkansas’s largest natural lake, a 20-mile long oxbow lake, is a scenic setting for fishing, boating, and birdwatching. Fishing for crappie, bass, and bream is popular, especially on the lake’s upper end during spring and fall. Year-round fishing for catfish is great. Located in the Mississippi Flyway, the park offers some of Arkansas’s best year-round birding. Park interpretive programs include lake tours and levee tours. Nestled in a pecan grove are the park’s 122 campsites (28 Class AAA, 16 Class AA, 11 Class A, and 67 Class B including several sites with Class C options). The park also offers 14 cabins [in seven duplex units] with kitchens, fireplaces and patios; a swimming pool (open in summer); picnic sites; standard pavilions (screened); a climatecontrolled meeting hall with kitchen; playground; and laundry. The store/marina includes food, gifts, fuel, and bait for sale; boats and motors for rent; and a launch ramp. The park is on Ark. 144 eight miles northeast of Lake Village. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Each additional person $12/day One-bedroom lake view (fireplace) $99/two adults/day (Mar.-Nov.), $89 (Jan., Feb. & Dec.) Two-bedroom woods view with spa tub (fireplace) $119/four adults/day (March-Nov.), $109 ( " " ) Swimming (Pool): $4/person (age 6 and up); $3/child (age 2-5) Fishing Boat Rental—15 ft.: $12/one-half day, $17/day with 9.9 hp Motor $15/hour, $30/one-half day, $45/day Solo Kayak $5/hour, $9/one-half day, $17/day

38


Outdoor

Adventure

on

the

Arkansas

River

L ake D ardanelle S tate P ark 8 100 State Park Drive, Russellville, AR 72802   n 479-967-5516 Email: LakeDardanelle@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 479-890-3670 Visitor Center GPS: 35.283041, -93.203093

This park offers two areas on Lake Dardanelle, a 34,300-acre reservoir on the Arkansas River. The Russellville (main park) and Dardanelle locations offer camping (74 sites: Russellville Area—16 Class AAA, 13 Class AA, and 27 Class B; Dardanelle Area—18 Class B), launch ramps, standard pavilions, picnic sites, and bathhouses. In addition, the Russellville Area features a barrier-free fishing pier, trail, fishing tournament weigh-in pavilion, interpretive programs, kayak rentals, and a visitor center with sweeping views of the lake. Exhibits and touch screen computers share information about the park, the area’s water resources, and its history. Six aquariums hold fish from the waters of Lake Dardanelle, the Arkansas River, and nearby streams. Join a park interpreter for a lake tour by party barge or kayaks. Privately-owned marinas and boat docks are located in both park areas. To reach each area: 1) Russellville Area—Take Exit #81 (Ark. Hwy. 7) off I-40 at Russellville. Turn south, then immediately turn west on Ark. 326 and go five miles. 2) Dardanelle Area—Travel four miles west of Dardanelle on Ark. 22. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Kayak: Solo—$8/hr., $14/one-half day, $20 day / Tandem—$10/hr., $17/one-half day, $25/day Guided Kayak Lake Tour (1 1/2 hour): Adult—$12/each; Child (6-12)—$6 each

39


Gateway

to

Adventure

in

the

Boston

Mountains

L ake F ort S mith S tate P ark 8

P.O. Box 4, Mountainburg, AR 72946 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 479-369-2469 CABIN/GROUP LODGING RESERVATIONS: 888-695-3526 Email: LakeFortSmith@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.695346, -94.118733

In a scenic valley of the Ozarks' Boston Mountain Range, this park on 1,490-acre Lake Fort Smith offers camping, fishing, kayaking, and hiking and mountain bike trails. For backpackers, it is the western terminus for the 165-mile Ozark Highlands Trail. The park offers campsites [20 Class AAA and 10 Class B], 10 cabins, a pool, marina with boat rentals, pavilion, picnic sites, and group facilities including a dining hall and two group lodges with kitchenettes. The visitor center features exhibits and a meeting/classroom. Park interpreters offer programs including hikes and lake tours. Take I-49 Exit #29 at Mountainburg and go east on Ark 282 for 1.8 mile to U.S. 71. Go north 7.5 miles to Ark. 400 (Shepherd Springs Rd.), then east on Ark. 400 two miles to park. [Alternate: Take I-49 Exit #34 at Chester and go east on Ark. 282 to U.S. 71 North.] Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Each additional person $12/day One bedroom with one bathroom/spa tub (fireplace) $134/two adults/day Two bedrooms with two bathrooms/spa tubs (fireplace) $149/four adults/day Group Lodge with kitchenette (28 to 32 persons) $330/day Group Dining Hall: with group lodge rental—$190/day; without group lodge rental—$310/day

40


Recreation

and

Relaxation

L ake F rierson S tate P ark 8 7904 Highway 141, Jonesboro, AR 72401 870-932-2615 Email: LakeFrierson@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.972563, -90.716169 On the shore of 335-acre Lake Frierson, this park is a peaceful place to relax and enjoy the year-round fishing for bream, catfish, crappie, saugeye, and bass. The park campground features seven campsites [four Class C with water and electric, and three Class D (no hookups)] with tables and grills, and restrooms. Nearby are picnic sites, an enclosed climate-controlled pavilion, playground, hiking trails, launch ramp, and barrier-free fishing pier. The visitor center includes exhibits and a bait shop. Fishing boats, kayaks, and pedal boats are available for rent here. The park is 10 miles north of Jonesboro on Ark. 141. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Enclosed Climate-controlled Pavilion $80/use, $110/day Fishing Boat—14 ft. $5/one-half day, $9day with 2 1/2 hp Motor and Trolling Motor $19/one-half day, $34/day Solo Kayak $6/hour, $12/one-half day, $20/day Pedal Boat $3.50/one-half hour, $4.50/hour

41


Clear

Wa t e r s

and

Ouachita

Mountain

Scenery

L ake O uachita S tate P ark 8 5451 Mountain Pine Road, Mountain Pine, AR 71956 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 501-767-9366 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2441 Email: LakeOuachita@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.61864, -93.177295 Surrounded by the Ouachita National Forest, 40,000-acre Lake Ouachita is the largest lake within Arkansas’s borders. Scenic beauty and the clarity of the water make it a water sports favorite for swimming, skiing, scuba diving, boating, and fishing. Bream, crappie, catfish, stripers, and largemouth bass fishing can be enjoyed in open waters or quiet coves. Including lakeside campsites, the park’s campgrounds feature 93 campsites (58 Class AAA, 23 Class D, and 12 Hike-in Tent Sites). Camping enthusiasts can also choose from four new Rent-A-Camper-Cabin. The park offers eight fully-equipped cabins with kitchens; seven overlook the lake. Other facilities include picnic areas; trails; two swimming areas; and marina with boat rentals, bait, and supplies. Historic Three Sisters’ Springs, natural spring water accessible through a springhouse, features exhibits. The visitor center includes exhibits and a store/gift shop. From Hot Springs, travel three miles west on U.S. 270, then go 12 miles north on Ark. 227 to the park.

42


Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Jan., Feb., & Dec. March-November Two bedrooms with spa tub (fireplace) $159/four adults/day $190/four adults/day $199/six adults/day $240/six adults/day Three bedrooms (fireplace) Three bedrooms with spa tub (fireplace) $199/six adults/day $240/six adults/day Each additional person (no rollaways available) $12/day Marina (Fuel extra on all motor rentals) [501-767-9367] Covered Slip: 9' x 18' (electricity)—$95/month 10' x 22' (no electricity)—$100/month 11' x 30' (electricity)—$140/month Uncovered Slip: 10' x 20' (no electricity)—$90/month 14' x 30' (electricity)—$125/month Transient Slip (no electricity) $17/day Mooring Buoy $55/month, $605/year Fishing Boat: 16 ft.—$15/one-half day, $25/day w/15 hp Motor—$60/one-half day, $85/day; Dep.—$50 Ski Boat (20 ft.) w/Motor $150/two hours, $275/one-half day, $350/day; Dep.—$200/use Party Barge: 25 ft. w/Upper Deck & 90 hp Motor $268/one-half day, $350/day; Dep.—$200/use 25 ft. w/Upper Deck & 115 hp Motor $278/one-half day, $360/day; Dep.—$200/use 29 ft. w/Upper Deck & 115 hp Motor $287/one-half day, $375/day; Dep.—$200/use 29 ft. w/Upper Deck & 150 hp Motor $306/one-half day, $400/day; Dep.—$200/use Pedal Boat or Canoe $6/hour, $15/one-half day, $25/day Kayak Solo—$15/one-half day, $25/day / Tandem—$20/one-half day, $30/day Water Skis or Wake Board $35/day Tube $40/day Interpretive Lake Tour Adult—$10 each Child (age 6-12)—$6 each Guided Kayak Tour (1 1/2 hr.) Adult—$15 each Child (age 6-12)—$10 each

43


Pe a c e f u l

Camping

and

Fishing

L ake P oinsett S tate P ark 8 5752 State Park Lane, Harrisburg, AR 72432 870-578-2064   n Fax: 870-578-5011 Email: LakePoinsett@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.532516, -90.687171 Anglers find peaceful 640-acre Lake Poinsett on Crowley’s Ridge in northeast Arkansas a special getaway for bass, bream, catfish, and crappie fishing. Your gateway to this lake, the park offers 29 campsites (four Class A, 22 Class B, and three Tent Sites); picnic areas; a standard pavilion (screened with restrooms); playground; hiking trails; launch ramp; boat, canoe and kayak rentals; and a visitor center with gifts and bait for sale. Programs by park interpreters include trail walks, guided canoe and kayak tours, birding and watchable wildlife excursions, Dutch oven cooking workshops, fishing derbies, and other activities. From Harrisburg, travel one mile east on Ark. 14, then go two miles south on Ark. 163 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Boat Rentals Fishing Boat—14 ft. $10/one-half day, $15/day Canoe $12/one-half day, $20/day Solo Kayak $10/one-half day, $15/day Special Interpretive Program Guided Kayak Tour (1 1/2 hour): Adult—$12 each Child (6-12)—$6 each

44


Na t u re

and

Knowledge

L ogoly S tate P ark 8 P.O. Box 245, McNeil, AR 71752 870-695-3561   n Fax: 870-695-3729 Email: Logoly@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.347055, -93.183652 Here at Arkansas’s first environmental education state park, interpreters present workshops on ecological/environmental topics. The park’s natural resources provide a living laboratory for students and visitors. Most of Logoly’s 368 acres comprise a State Natural Area that includes unique plant species and mineral springs. Park facilities include six Group Tent Sites (no hookups), a bathhouse with hot showers, standard pavilion (free to educational groups), picnic sites, playground, and trails. [NOTE: Educational groups have preference for the tent sites and must make reservations. Individuals can use these sites on a first-come basis, but must vacate for groups.] A temporary office will serve park visitors during part of 2016 until a new visitor center under construction in the park is completed. From U.S. 79 at McNeil, travel one mile east on County Road 47 (Logoly Road) to the park. Group Camp (Six tent sites—no hookups) $3/person/day Minimum daily charge $12/site

45


Where

the

American

We s t

Began

L ouisiana P urchase S tate P ark GPS: 34.645680, -91.053970 This National Historic Landmark preserves the initial point from which all surveys of property acquired through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 initiated. An elevated boardwalk above the surrounding headwater swamp leads to the granite monument marking the survey’s initial point. Wayside exhibits share the story of the Louisiana Purchase, which opened up the American West, and interpret the swamp’s flora and fauna. The park is open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. From I-40 at Brinkley, take U.S. 49 and travel 21 miles south, then go two miles east on Ark. 362 to the park.

Stories

of

the

White

River

L ower W hite R iver M useum S tate P ark

2009 Main Street, Des Arc, AR 72040 870-256-3711 n Fax: 870-256-9202 Email: LowerWhiteRiverMuseum@Arkansas.com GPS: 34.976875, -91.516584

Discover the role of Arkansas’s White River, with emphasis on the Lower White, as a vital transportation route for early settlers on the Arkansas frontier. Museum exhibits interpret the river’s influence on settlements during the steamboat era and the expansion of commerce from its roots in hunting and fishing into shelling, timber, and agriculture. Admission to the museum is free. The museum is in Des Arc at the western end of Main Street. Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

46


Arkansas’s

Na t i o n a l

Na t u ra l

Landmark

M ammoth S pring S tate P ark P.O. Box 36, Mammoth Spring, AR 72554 870-625-7364 Fax: 870-625-3255 Email: MammothSpring@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 36.495785, -91.535031

A National Natural Landmark, Arkansas’s largest spring flows nine million gallons hourly. Forming a 10-acre lake, the waters of Mammoth Spring then flow southward as the Spring River, a popular Ozark trout and float stream. The park’s 1886 Frisco depot will take you back in time to an early 1900s train station. Parked just outside the depot, a Frisco caboose is also available to tour free of charge. The depot and caboose are closed on Monday (except Monday holidays). Remnants of a mill and hydroelectric plant also reflect Mammoth Spring’s history. Other facilities include a park information center/Arkansas Welcome Center featuring exhibits on the area’s history and natural resources, a pavilion, picnic sites, trail, ballfield, and playground. The park is on U.S. 63 in Mammoth Spring. Solo Kayak or Pedal Boat $5/one-half hour, $7/hour Tandem Kayak $7/one-half hour, $9/hour 47


Fishing

and

Wildlife

Viewing

M illwood S tate P ark 8 1564 Highway 32 East, Ashdown, AR 71822 870-898-2800   n Fax: 870-898-2632 Email: Millwood@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.677265, -93.987378

A series of boat lanes meander through submerged timber, marshes, and oxbow cutoffs making Millwood Lake a fishing favorite. A bass tournament hot spot, this 29,260acre lake abounds in largemouth bass, catfish, and crappie. Birdwatching is also popular here because of the lake’s variety of year-round inhabitants that include bald eagles. The park features 105 campsites (29 Class AAA, two Class A, 71 Class B, and three Primitive). Nearby are picnic sites, a standard pavilion, self-guided trail, and bicycle trail. A marina offers gift items, groceries, bait, and gas for sale, and rental fishing boats, canoes, kayaks, pedal boats, and hydro bikes. Slip rentals are available throughout the year. From junction I-30 and U.S. 71 at Texarkana, travel 19 miles north on U.S. 71 to Ashdown, then go nine miles east on Ark. 32. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Marina [870-898-5334] Boat (16 ft.) w/Motor (fuel & deposit extra) $40-$60/one-half day, $55-$75/day Kayak Solo—$12/one-half day, $18/day Tandem—$18/one-half-day, $28/day Pedal Boat or Water Bike $6/hour Covered Slip (no electricity): 12' x 16'—$80/month; 6' x 16'—$60/month Covered Transient Slip (no electricity)—6' x 16' $13/day, $65/week

48


Where

the

River

Meets

the

Ridge

M ississippi R iver S tate P ark

2955 Highway 44, Marianna, AR 72360 870-295-4040   n Fax: 870-295-4044 Email: MississippiRiver@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.75558, -90.722324

Arkansas State Parks is developing Mississippi River State Park within the St. Francis National Forest in eastern Arkansas through a special use permit from the U.S. Forest Service. The visitor center staffed by Arkansas State Parks and U.S. Forest Service personnel is located on the north edge of the forest near Marianna. Exhibits interpret the Mississippi River, Crowley's Ridge, and the Delta. A multi-use facility adjacent to the visitor center serves as a venue for meetings, family reunions, and other activities. Interpretive programs include guided hikes, kayak tours, and van tours along the Crowley's Ridge Parkway and the Great River Road. Also on the forest's north end is Bear Creek Lake. Accessed from Ark. 44 is Beech Point Campround that is situated on a wooded pensinsula in the lake. The 17 campsites [14 Class AAA and three Class D Walk-in Tent Sites] featuring views of the lake are surrounded by prime wildlife and birding habitat. Two courtesy docks provide access to this lake known for its bream and bass fishing. Nearby are a swim beach, hiking trail, fishing pier, boat ramp, and picnic sites. More campsites are at Lone Pine Campgroud and the Maple Flats Campground for groups. The south side of the forest near Helena/West Helena features Storm Creek Lake that includes primitive campsites, a swim beach, bathhouse, fishing pier, boat ramp, and rentable pavilion. Hornor Neck Lake includes a boat ramp and wildlife viewing trail. From Marianna, take Ark. 1B to Ark. 44 (Great River Road/Crowley's Ridge Parkway) and go three miles southeast to the visitor center, six miles to Bear Creek Lake Recreation Area. Campsite Fees & Discounts

See pages 75-76

49


Where

R i v e r,

Lake

and

Bay

Meet

M oro B ay S tate P ark 8 6071 Highway 600, Jersey, AR 71651 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 870-463-8555 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 866-994-0324 Email: MoroBay@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.300773, -92.349634 Enjoy this fishing and water sports area in south central Arkansas where Moro Bay and Raymond Lake join the Ouachita River. Park facilities include 20 campsites (five Class A and 15 Class B), a marina with boat and slip rentals and gas pump, store, trails, picnic sites, standard pavilion (screened), playground, and the Moro Bay Ferry exhibit. Each of the park's five, fully-equipped cabins features two bedrooms, two baths, a kitchen, and screened deck and outdoor living area overlooking Moro Bay. The park offers boat, kayak, pedal boat, and bicycle rentals, and summer interpretive programs. The park is 29 miles southwest of Warren on U.S. 63; or 23 miles northeast of El Dorado on U.S. 63. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms) $132/four adults/day $12/day Each additional person over age 12 Fishing Boat (16 ft. w/15 hp Motor) $45/one-half day, $60/day

50


Arkansas’s

High

Po i n t . . . A n

Island

in

the

Sky

M ount M agazine S tate P ark 8 16878 Highway 309 South, Paris, AR 72855 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 479-963-8502 n Fax: 479-963-1031 LODGE/CABIN RESERVATIONS: 877-665-6343 (TDD) Email: MountMagazine@Arkansas.com   n MountMagazineStatePark.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.17476, -93.618707 Lodge GPS: 35.163916, -93.646736

High atop 2,753-foot Mount Magazine, the state’s tallest mountain, this scenic Arkansas state park was developed in the Mount Magazine Ranger District of the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests through a special use permit from the U.S. Forest Service. Sweeping vistas of broad river valleys, deep canyons, and distant mountains welcome outdoor enthusiasts to Arkansas’s high point. Mount Magazine State Park is a place to enjoy sightseeing, exploring the mountain, and nature study. The park is a destination for outdoor sports and extreme adventure enthusiasts that offers rock climbing, rappelling, hang gliding, mountain biking, horseback riding, backpacking, and ATV adventure. An ATV guide service is available. Mount Magazine is the state park system’s most dramatic location for technical rock climbing. The park also offers overlooks, hiking trails, a picnic area with restrooms, pavilion, and visitor center with an exhibit gallery and gift shop. A wide variety of programs led by park interpreters highlight the mountain’s natural diversity and unique species. For camping enthusiasts, the park offers 18 campsites [two Class AAA and 16 Class AA with tent only options]. Campsite Fees & Discounts

See pages 75-76

51


Terrace at The Lodge at Mount Magazine

The Lodge at Mount Magazine, the park’s mountain resort lodge, features 60 guest rooms, the Skycrest Restaurant with a menu of classic Southern cuisine, a conference center, business center, indoor heated swimming pool, fitness center, and game room. From its setting on the mountain’s south bluff, the lodge offers breathtaking views of the Petit Jean River Valley and distant Blue Mountain Lake. Forty-three guest rooms offer balconies and 17 feature spa tubs. The dramatic bluff setting and first-class facilities combine to make the lodge a destination for unforgettable vacations, getaways, business meetings and conferences, corporate retreats, weddings, and other events. The conference/ meeting facility can be divided into three meeting rooms or opened up to accommodate banquet seating for up to 192 at 24 eight-person tables. The Skycrest Restaurant seats up to 125. Thirteen fully-equipped cabins share the same bluff and sweeping view of the valley as the lodge. Featuring one-, two- and three-bedroom designs, the cabins offer fully-equipped kitchens, fireplaces, a bathroom for each bedroom, and covered decks with outdoor hot tubs facing the view from the bluff. The park is on Scenic Highway 309 approximately 16 miles south of Paris; or from Danville, travel nine miles west on Ark. 10 to Havana, then go 10 miles north on Scenic Highway 309.

52


The Lodge at Mount Magazine Winter Spring, (60 guest rooms) (1/1-2/29 & Summer & Fall 12/1-12/31) (3/1-11/30) *This rate is for two adults/day ▼ ▼ Weekend (Friday-Saturday) Queen Standard *$108 *$158 Deluxe Queen *$118 *$178 Single King *$138 *$188 Suite (with gas fireplace) *$168 *$228 Weekday (Sunday-Thursday) Queen Standard *$108 *$128 Deluxe Queen *$118 *$158 Single King *$138 *$168 Suite (with gas fireplace) *$168 *$198 Each additional person over age 12 $12/day (No rollaways available) Winter Spring, (1/1-2/29 & Summer & Fall Cabins (with kitchens, fireplaces & hot tubs) [13 cabins] 12/1-12/31) (3/1-11/30) ▼ ▼ Weekend (Friday-Saturday) One bedroom w/one bathroom (two adults) $202 $298 Two bedroom w/two bathrooms (four adults) $272 $398 Three bedroom w/three bathrooms (six adults) $352 $478 Weekday (Sunday-Thursday) One bedroom w/one bathroom (two adults) $193 $218 Two bedroom w/two bathrooms (four adults) $263 $298 Three bedroom w/three bathrooms (six adults) $343 $398 Each additional person over age 12 $12/day (No rollaways available)

53


Vistas

of

the

Arkansas

River

Va l l e y

M ount N ebo S tate P ark 8 16728 West State Highway 155, Dardanelle, AR 72834 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 479-229-3655 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2458 Email: MountNebo@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.228063, -93.255477 Rising 1,350 feet, Mount Nebo offers sweeping views of the Arkansas River Valley. The Civilian Conservation Corps constructed many of this mountaintop park’s rusticstyle cabins, pavilions, bridges, and 14 miles of trails. The park offers 34 campsites (24 Class B and 10 Hike-in Tent Sites) and 15 cabins, including many on the bluff. Other facilities include a swimming pool, tennis courts, picnic areas, extra-large enclosed and standard open pavilions, and visitor center with exhibits and gift shop. [NOTE: Private residences are also on the mountain. Park boundaries are marked.] The park is seven miles west of Dardanelle on Ark. 155. [Ark. 155 ZIGZAGS WITH HAIRPIN CURVES. TRAILERS OVER 24 FEET SHOULD NOT ATTEMPT THE CLIMB.] Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens) Each additional person $12/day Rustic-style/One queen bed (fireplace) $115/two adults/day; (wood stove) $115/two adults/day Rustic-style/One queen bed with spa tub (fireplace) $125-$145/two adults/day A-Frame/Two bedroom with spa tub (fireplace) $153/four adults/day Modern/Three bedroom with spa tub (fireplace) $195-$235/six adults/day

54


An

American

Cultural

Tr e a s u r e

O zark F olk C enter S tate P ark 8 1032 Park Avenue, Mountain View, AR 72560 PARK OFFICE: 870-269-3851 CABINS AT DRY CREEK: 800-264-3655 (TDD) or 870-269-3871 Email: OzarkFolkCenter@Arkansas.com   n OzarkFolkCenter.com Administration Building GPS: 35.881369, -92.118414 Located in Mountain View, a town dubbed Folk Music Capitol of the World, the Ozark Folk Center is an American cultural treasure. This is the only park founded to perpetuate the music, crafts, and lore of the Ozarks. These living traditions continue today, with string band music passed from person to person and life skills crafts taught hands-on. Plan to spend time at the park enjoying the music, watching the artisans at work, strolling through the herb garden, and talking with the people who make these hills their home. Craft Village: Open March 29-November 26 [Tuesday-Saturday], from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit working artisans as they demonstrate more than 20 crafts and create handmade items. Purchase these unique Ozark crafts directly from the craftsperson. In addition, special interpretive programs are offered daily for youths up to age 14. Music Auditorium: Enjoy live entertainment April 15-September 30 [WednesdaySaturday] / October 1-29 [Tuesday-Saturday] at 7 p.m. Artists from the region and across the nation perform the acoustic music that is synonymous with Ozark folk culture. Home of Ozark Highlands Radio. Heritage Herb Garden: Planted throughout the park, the garden features natives and herbs of the world that were and still are used in daily life. Herbal education and gardening techniques are available in the garden and in classes. 55


Special music shows, festivals, contests, workshops, and craft exhibitions are held throughout the year. Contact the park for a schedule or visit OzarkFolkCenter.com for details on daily activities, special events, and concerts including the Ozark Folk Center's Featured Concert Series. The Homespun Gift Shop (open March 29-Nov. 26) sells Ozark themedbooks, music, and locally handcrafted work including pottery, knives, brooms, oak baskets, loom work, and preserves. Heirloom quality works can also be purchased in the artisans’ shops. Stay in one of The Cabins at Dry Creek (60 units). The park’s cozy overnight accommodations nestle together in a peaceful setting within easy access to the park and the Court Square in downtown Mountain View. Enjoy Southern cooking in the Skillet Restaurant, or try the Smokehouse in the Craft Village. The Center offers conference/meeting facilities for groups large and small, and specializes in business retreats and family reunions. The Music Auditorium features 1,000 seats and the White Oak Theater in the Administration Building offers 150 seats. Three individual conference rooms are nearby. The Bois D'Arc Conference Center in a quiet woodland environment offers a large meeting room and outside gathering space. Call park for details and reservations. The park is in Mountain View at 1032 Ozark Folk Center 2016 Hours of Operation Park Avenue off Hwys 5, 9, and 14. Craft Village March 29-November 26 [Tuesday-Saturday], The Skillet Restaurant Mar. 10-Nov. 26—Open daily: 7 a.m.-8 p.m. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. [NOTE: The restaurant will also be open Music Auditorium for Thanksgiving and special groups after April 15-September 30 [Wednesday Saturday], 7 p.m.-9 p.m. the Ozark Folk Center's 2016 regular season ends. Contact park or check online.] October 1-29 [Tues.-Sat.], 7 p.m.-9 p.m. The Cabins at Dry Creek (60 overnight studio duplex cabins) Open throughout year Cabin (two adults/day): Sunday-Wednesday—$67; Thursday-Saturday—$72 Cabin with deck (two adults/day): Sunday-Wednesday—$72; Thursday-Saturday—$77 Each additional person (no rollaways available) $12/day Special rates for groups of 15 or more. Conference packages available. Admission to Music Auditorium Adult—*$12 each; Child (age 6-12)—*$7 each; Child under age 6—No charge; Family—$29.50 Admission to Craft Village (Craft tickets purchased after 3 p.m. are good for next day.) Adult—$12 each; Child (age 6-12)—$7 each; Child under age 6—No charge; Family—$29.50 Combo Ticket [Crafts & Music or Two days Crafts or Two days Music (Except Featured Concerts)] Adult—*$19.50 each; Child (age 6-12)—*$10.25 each; Child under age 6—No charge; Family—$45 Three-Day Combination Ticket—any three days in a seven-day period (Crafts & Music): Adult—*$45 each; Child (age 6-12)—*$25 each; Child under 6—No charge; Family—$115 Individual Season Ticket (Crafts & Music) Adult—*$75 each; Child (age 6-12)—*$35 each *Special rates for Featured Concerts: Craft Village tickets will be discounted if purchased with Featured Concert tickets on day of the concert. Discounted admission: Adult—$7 ea.; Child (age 6-12)—$5 ea. LocoRopes Open Mar.-Nov. [LocoRopes.com]

56


Journeys

Through

Ti m e

P arkin A rcheological S tate P ark P.O. Box 1110, Parkin, AR 72373-1110 870-755-2500    n    Email: Parkin@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.276923, -90.555073 This National Historic Landmark preserves and interprets the site of a Mississippian Period American Indian village located here from A.D. 1000 to 1550. Archeologists believe the Hernando de Soto expedition visited this village in 1541. Arkansas State Parks and the Arkansas Archeological Survey manage this archeological site and research station. Park interpreters offer site tours, educational programs, scout patch activities, workshops, and special events throughout the year. The park also interprets the Northern Ohio Lumber and Cooperage Company that had a mill on this site in the early 20th century. The Northern Ohio School, a historic one-room schoolhouse, can be toured. Admission is free for self-guided site tours and the visitor center featuring an orientation video, exhibits, and a gift shop. Nearby are the picnic area, playground, and enclosed pavilion. A boat ramp provides access to the St. Francis River. The park is in Parkin at the junction of U.S. 64 and Ark. 184 north. Archeological Site Guided Tour Adult—$3.50 each; Child (age 6-12)—$2.50 each; Family Admission—$12 Adult Group Rates (15 or more with advance notice)—$.25 off above fees Bona Fide School Groups (with advance notice)—$2/student Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed— Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day.

57


Cedar Falls, Petit Jean State Park

The natural beauty and ancient geology of legendary Petit Jean Mountain inspired the creation of Arkansas’s state park system. Petit Jean State Park mirrors the mountain’s rugged beauty with its rustic-style, native log and stone facilities constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) beginning in 1933. These historic treasures stand as a tribute to the craftsmanship and conservation achievements of the "Tree Army" of Franklin D.Roosevelt’s New Deal created during the Great Depression. The focal point of this Adirondack-style park architecture is historic Mather Lodge, the park’s mountain lodge. Featuring 24 guest rooms, a restaurant, small meeting rooms, and a swimming pool, the lodge is on the bluff of scenic Cedar Creek Canyon. The lodge's westward view across the canyon offers breathtaking scenery highlighted by a dramatic sunset each evening. Near the lodge are 33 fully-equipped cabins (21 with kitchens). Another cabin (with kitchen) is a short drive away. Many cabins are along the bluff and offer views of the canyon. Some cabins are CCC/Rustic-style, and others are modern duplex designs. Cedar Creek Canyon is the work of Cedar Creek that cascades as Cedar Falls, the park's spectacular 95-foot waterfall. Upstream, a CCC rock dam forms Lake Bailey, 100 acres for fishing, kayaking, and pedal boating. The boathouse offers a snack bar; 58


Arkansas’s

First

State

Pa r k

P etit J ean S tate P ark 8 1285 Petit Jean Mountain Road, Morrilton, AR 72110 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 501-727-5441 LODGE/CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2462 (TDD) or 501-727-5431 Email: PetitJean@Arkansas.com   n PetitJeanStatePark.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.127462, -92.919266 Lodge GPS: 35.117581, -92.938257 fishing boat, pedal boat, canoe, and kayak rentals; and supplies for sale during summer months. The park campsites (125 sites including 35 Class AAA and 90 Class B) are near Lake Bailey. Other camping choices include a Group Camp Area, Rally-style Area, and four Rent-A-Yurt. The park airport includes five Fly-in Tent Sites with electricity and water. For information about the airport or these tent sites, call: 501-374-5022. The park also offers picnic areas, playgrounds, pavilions, a recreation hall, launch ramp, swimming pool, lighted tennis courts, and an amphitheater. Hiking trails lead through forests, canyons, meadows, and along streams and mountainsides. Park interpreters host programs and special events throughout the year highlighting the natural and historic resources of this unforgettable state park. Petit Jean Mountain is also home to the Museum of Automobiles, a showcase of antique and classic cars. Take Exit #108 off I-40 at Morrilton and travel nine miles south on Ark. 9, then go 12 miles west on Ark. 154; or take I-40 Exit #81 at Russellville and travel Ark. 7 south 10 miles to Centerville, then go 16 miles east on Ark. 154 to the park. 59


Petit Jean State Park (continued) Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 *Cabins (with kitchens) [four to six adults maximum depending on cabin size] Rustic-style/One bedroom (fireplace) $118/two adults/day Rustic-style/One bedroom with hot tub (fireplace) [two-night minimum] $188/two adults/day Cedar Creek Cabin (one bedroom) with hot tub (fireplace) [two-night minimum] $188/two adults/day Three bedroom w/two bathrooms $198/six adults/day Duplex/One bedroom (fireplace) $118/two adults/day Each additional person $12/day *Cabins (without kitchens) Overnight Duplex/Studio Cabin (fireplace) $88/two adults/day Each additional person (no rollaways available) $12/day *Cabin rentals include use of lodge swimming pool. Mather Lodge (24 guest rooms) Two double beds (four persons maximum) $83/two adults/day Queen or One double bed (two persons maximum) $78/two adults/day Each additional person $12/day Lodge Conference Rooms $80-$200/day Group Camp (tents only) [50 persons maximum] Reservable—Open throughout the year $85/day Rally Style & Overflow Area (w/e with limited A/C use) Reservable by groups—$14/unit/day Rent-A-Yurt $55/day (sleeps up to six); Dep.—$55 Recreation Hall (no heat or A/C) $160/use, $235/day Swimming (Pool) $4/person (age 6 and up) $3/child (age 2-5) Boat Rentals (summer only) Fishing Boat—14 ft. $9/one-half day, $15/day w/Motor $20/one-half day, $31/day; Dep.—$25/use Canoe/Solo Kayak $8/hour, $16/one-half day Tandem Kayak $10/hour, $20/one-half day Pedal Boat $5/one-half hour, $7/hour

60


From

C y p r e s s- l i n e d

Streams

to

Mountaintops

P innacle M ountain S tate P ark 11901 Pinnacle Valley Road, Little Rock, AR 72223 501-868-5806 Fax: 501-868-5018 Email: PinnacleMountain@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.844683, -92.462611 At this day-use park dedicated to environmental education, recreation, and preservation, park interpreters and volunteers help visitors and students understand man’s relationship to the environment. The diversity of habitats, from bottomlands along the Big and Little Maumelle rivers, to high upland peaks, provide educational and outdoor recreational opportunities. Interpretive programs include canoe and boat tours. The park includes picnic sites, two standard pavilions with restrooms, launch ramps, guided horseback rides, and hiking and mountain bike trails. The visitor center features views of the Arkansas River, exhibits, audiovisual programs, a meeting room, and gift shop. Located below Pinnacle Mountain along the Little Maumelle River, the 71-acre Arkansas Arboretum includes native flora representing the state’s six, major natural divisions. The arboretum includes a .6-mile barrier-free, interpretive trail. Camping is available at nearby Maumelle Park two miles east on Pinnacle Valley Road. Take Exit #9 off I-430 at Little Rock and travel seven miles west on Ark. 10, then go two miles north on Ark. 300 to the park. Canoe or Solo Kayak $10/hour, $30/one-half day, $40/day [Haul back: $40] Pedal Boat $7/one-half hour, $10/hour Guided Horseback Trail Ride $25 (one hour)

61


When

Cotton

Wa s

King

P lantation A griculture M useum P.O. Box 87, Scott, AR 72142  n 501-961-1409 Email: PlantationAgriMuseum@Arkansas.com Museum GPS: 34.695251, -92.097111 Exhibits and programs interpret the history of cotton agriculture in Arkansas from statehood in 1836 through World War II when agricultural practices quickly became mechanized. Learn about growing and picking cotton, as well as ginning and storing the seeds. Tour the 1912 museum building, Dortch Gin Building, and Seed Warehouse #5. Admission is free. The museum is in Scott at the junction of U.S. 165 and Ark. 161. Take Exit #7 off I-440 and go south on U.S. 165 five miles. Historic Site Guided Tour: Adult—$4 each; Child (age 6-12)—$3 each; Family—$14 Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday) 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

62


River

To w n

on

the

Currents

of

History

P owhatan H istoric S tate P ark P.O. Box 93, Powhatan, AR 72458 870-878-6765  n Email: Powhatan@Arkansas.com Powhatan Courthouse GPS: 36.082145, -91.118793 Throughout the 1800s, this busy port on the Black River was one of the chief shipping and distribution points for northeast Arkansas. In 1888, on a hill overlooking the busy riverfront, a Victorian courthouse was built from bricks made on site. This courthouse is the park’s dominant feature. Admission is free. Exhibits interpret the commerce, politics, and lifestyles that shaped north Arkansas. They illustrate the history of Lawrence County, the mother of about 30 north Arkansas counties, from its beginning to the early years of the 20th century. Take a guided tour through five buildings that tell the stories of domestic and commercial life here in the 1800s. Visit the historic Powhatan Courthouse, Powhatan Jail, Log House, Commercial Building, and Powhatan Male and Female Academy, a two-room schoolhouse. The park is on Ark. 25 in Powhatan. Guided Townsite Tour: Adult—$5 each; Child (age 6-12)—$3 each; Family—$15 Hours of Operation [See Plantation Agriculture Museum]

63


Heroic

D e e d s. . . H a l l o w e d

Ground

P r airie G rove B attlefield S tate P ark 506 East Douglas Street, Prairie Grove, AR 72753 479-846-2990 Email: PrairieGrove@Arkansas.com Battlefield Museum GPS: 35.983137 -94.310686 Prairie Grove is recognized as one of America’s most intact Civil War battlefields. This 838-acre park protects the battle site of the Battle of Prairie Grove, where on December 7, 1862, the Confederate Army of the Trans-Mississippi clashed with the Union Army of the Frontier in a day of fierce fighting resulting in 2,700 casualties. This marked the last major Civil War engagement in northwest Arkansas. Park exhibits, tours, and programs interpret and detail the Battle of Prairie Grove. Explore the Battlefield Museum where exhibits share stories about the battle, how the landscape affected and shaped the strategic decisions made by both armies, and the Civil War's devastating local effect. Admission to the museum is free. Walk along the ridge and in the valley where the heaviest fighting took place. Follow the one-mile Battlefield Trail or the park’s five-mile Driving Tour. Visit the historic structures in the Ozark village. Arkansas’s largest Civil War battle reenactment takes place here biennially (on even-numbered years) the first weekend in December. The park is on U.S. 62 in Prairie Grove. Guided Tour of Historic Buildings Adult—$5 each; Child (age 6-12)—$3 each; Family—$15

64


Cloud-capped

Mountain

Scenery

Q ueen W ilhelmina S tate P ark 8 3877 Highway 88 West, Mena, AR 71953 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 479-394-2863 LODGE RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2477 (TDD) or 479-394-2863 Email: QueenWilhelmina@Arkansas.com   n Fax: 479-394-0061 QueenWilhelmina.com   n Lodge GPS: 34.684606, -94.369173 Travel the Talimena National Scenic Byway to this park near the western edge of the state on 2,681-foot Rich Mountain, Arkansas’s second highest peak. Enjoy the breathtaking panoramic views from this lofty setting here in the Ouachita Mountains, the southermost mountain range in Arkansas. This site is as rich in history as it is in scenery. In the late 1800s, a resort hostelry of Victorian splendor named Wilhelmina Inn to honor the young Queen of The Netherlands was built here by the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf Railroad. Two inns followed the original “Castle in the Sky.” The latest is today's park lodge, the crowning attraction at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Following a recent renovation, the 40-room lodge features a new look, upgrades, an elevator, and larger windows framing the views. Enjoy the Southern fare in the Queen's Restaurant. A meeting room with private balcony accommodates up to 114. The park includes 41 campsites [eight Class A, 27 Class B, five Tent Sites (with water), and one Hike-in Tent Site], picnic areas, and trails. Park interpretive programs highlight Rich Mountain's fauna and unique flora, and will connect you to the fascinating history of the three inns that have graced this mountaintop site. Open seasonally are a miniature train and mini-golf course (admission fees apply). The park is 13 miles west of Mena on Ark. 88. [For an alternate route from Mena, go six miles north on U.S. 71, nine miles west on U.S. 270, and two miles south up Ark. 272.] 65


Queen Wilhelmina State Park (continued)

Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Queen Wilhelmina Lodge (40 rooms) Each additional person $12/day Queen Room (two beds) or King Room (one bed) $95/two persons/day King Room with spa tub $125/two persons/day; (with gas fireplace) $145/two persons/day King Suite $165/two persons/day

66


R ed R iver C ampaign Four

Pa r k s.

Four

S t o r i e s.

Poison Springs Battleground State Park GPS: 33.6393, -93.004706 Marks’ Mills Battleground State Park GPS: 33.78103, -92.256905 Jenkins Ferry Battleground State Park GPS: 34.211887, -92.548002 Historic Washington State Park GPS: 33.773607, -93.684359 In the spring of 1864, three Civil War battles took place in south central Arkansas that were part of the Union Army’s Red River Campaign. The three state historic sites commemorating these battles—Poison Springs, Marks’ Mills, and Jenkins Ferry—and the 1836 Courthouse at HISTORIC WASHINGTON State Park which served as Arkansas’s Confederate capitol—comprise the Red River Campaign National Historic Landmark. The first battle occurred at POISON SPRINGS (April 18) when Confederate troops captured a supply train and scattered Union forces. On April 25 at MARKS’ MILLS, Confederate troops captured another supply train. With the loss of two supply trains and the onslaught of wet weather, the Union Army retreated toward Little Rock. On April 29 and 30, Union troops fought off an attack by the Confederates and, using an inflatable pontoon bridge, crossed the flooded Saline River at JENKINS FERRY. The parks feature outdoor exhibits and picnic sites. Jenkins Ferry offers a pavilion (no electricity), swimming, and a launch ramp on the Saline River. Poison Springs is 10 miles west of Camden on Ark. 76; Marks’ Mills is at the junction of Hwys. 97 & 8 southeast of Fordyce; and Jenkins Ferry is 13 miles south of Sheridan on Ark. 46.

S outh A rkansas A rboretum A

Wa l k

in

the

Pa r k

P.O. Box 7010, El Dorado, AR 71731 GPS: 33.218348, -92.685501 This 12-acre wooded site adjacent to the former El Dorado High School site features plants native to Arkansas’s West Gulf Coastal Plain and exotic species including flowering camellias and azaleas. Managed by the South Arkansas Community College, the arboretum offers marked paved walking trails, a rental pavilion, rental gazebo, restrooms, and parking. To schedule an event here, or reserve the pavilion or gazebo, call: 870-864-7160. From Ark. 82B in El Dorado, turn north on North Timberlane Drive and go one mile. Open—8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Monday-Saturday); 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Sunday) [During Daylight Saving Time hours extend to 7 p.m. daily.] / Closed—Christmas Day

67


18

M o u n d s.

Limitless

D i s c o v e r i e s.

T oltec M ounds A rcheological S tate P ark 490 Toltec Mounds Road, Scott, AR 72142 501-961-9442  n Email: ToltecMounds@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 34.645878, -92.060408 A National Historic Landmark, Toltec Mounds is one of the largest and most impressive archeological sites in the Lower Missisisippi River Valley. This archeological site/research station is managed by Arkansas State Parks and the Arkansas Archeological Survey. Arkansas's tallest American Indian mounds are preserved here. Three mounds remain where 18 once stood surrounded by an earthen embankment eight to 10 feet in height; a portion is still visible today. These ancient earthworks are remains of the late-Woodland thru early-Mississippian Period ceremonial and governmental complex inhabited here from A.D. 650 to 1050. The visitor center features exhibits, including artifacts from the site, an A/V theater, and archeological research laboratory. Admission to the visitor center is free. A meeting room and enclosed pavilion with restrooms are for rent. Take a self-guided tour on the 3/4-mile barrier-free trail or 1.6-mile turf trail, or join a guided tour by reservation. From Little Rock, take Exit #7 off I-440 and go 10 miles southeast on U.S. 165, then go 1/4-mile west on Ark. 386 to the park. Guided Archeological Site Walking Tour Adult—$4 each; Child (age 6-12)—$3 each; Family—$14 Guided Archeological Site Tour By Tram (by reservation) Adult—$6 each; Child (age 6-12)—$5 each; Family—$22 Open—8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday); 1 p.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday) Closed—Monday (except Monday holidays), New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Eve through Christmas Day

68


A

Na t u ra l

Wo r l d . . . Wo r l d - C l a s s

Recreation

V illage C reek S tate P ark 8 201 CR 754, Wynne, AR 72396 PARK/CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS: 870-238-9406 CABIN RESERVATIONS: 800-264-2467 Email: VillageCreek@Arkansas.com  n Fax: 870-238-9415 Visitor Center GPS: 35.163358, -90.718844 Explore the unique geology and hardwood forest of Crowley’s Ridge along seven miles of hiking, and 25 miles of multi-use, trails. Fish in Lake Austell and Lake Dunn. Launch ramps, boat docks, bait, fishing boats, electric motors, kayaks, and pedal boats are available late-spring through Labor Day. Lake Austell features a sandy beach. The park includes 96 campsites [24 Class AAA, five Class A, and 67 Class B sites (for RVs, tents, and horse campers)] near Lake Dunn. On a nearby ridge are the park's 10 cabins. Other facilities include standard pavilions (one enclosed), playgrounds, baseball/ multi-use fields, and horse stalls. The visitor center features an A/V theater, store, gift shop, and bicycle rentals. Park interpreters present a diversity of nature programs. The park's 27-hole golf course designed by Andy Dye features a PGA-caliber championship layout. The rolling terrain of Crowley’s Ridge, including dramatic elevation changes, makes for challenging play at this outstanding public course. Take Exit #242 off I-40 at Forrest City and go 13 miles north on Ark. 284 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Cabins (with kitchens & fireplaces) Sunday-Thursday One bedroom $95/two adults/day Two bedroom duplex $100/four adults/day Two bedroom $103/four adults/day Three bedroom $135/six adults/day Each additional person (no rollaways available) $12/day

Friday-Saturday $100/two adults/day $103/four adults/day $108/four adults/day $140/six adults/day

69


ays lid o /H s ds ay rs. en . u kd k h e e n We n.-T We i.-Su Mo Fr Golf Course 18 holes with 1/2 cart* $39 $45 9 holes with 1/2 cart* $29 $35 Extended play with 1/2 cart* $12 $15 Twilight 4 p.m. with 1/2 cart* $29 $35 18 holes Nov. 1 - Mar. 31 w/1/2 cart* $29 $35 9 holes Nov. 1 - Mar. 31 w/1/2 cart* $19 $25 Junior Rates (age 17 & younger) $11.50 $15.50 Junior Golf Cart Fee 1/2 cart included w/paid adult player $12 w/non-playing adult driver Senior Discounts (age 65 & over)—20% off full rate only [not applicable weekends, holidays, extended play, or during November 1-March 31]

* All paid greens fee players must share a golf cart. Players choosing to not share a cart, or players who have a non-golfing rider, will be charged an additional $12 cart fee. The full-service clubhouse includes a pro shop, dressing rooms, snack bar, and full driving range. Call the clubhouse at 870-238-5226 for tee times at this 27-hole championship course, or book online at: TheRidgesAtVillageCreek.com.

70


C a m p i n g,

F i s h i n g,

Birding

and

Mountain

Biking

W hite O ak L ake S tate P ark 8 563 Highway 387, Bluff City, AR 71722 870-685-2748 or 685-2132 Fax: 870-685-9913 Email: WhiteOakLake@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 33.689776, -93.1146 Adjacent to Poison Springs State Forest, this park is on Lower White Oak Lake, 1,700-timber-filled acres for bass, crappie, catfish, and bream fishing. Watchable wildlife and birding opportunities also abound here. The park offers sightings of great blue heron, egret, osprey, and green heron, and in wintertime, migrating bald eagles. Park facilities include 45 campsites (four Class A, 37 Class B, and four Tent Sites); a visitor center with exhibits; store with supplies, bait, and gifts for sale; marina with boat rentals; launch ramp; standard pavilion (screened); picnic sites; and a playground. Bicycles can be rented at the visitor center. Hiking trails and a mountain bike trail lead through a diversity of environments, ranging from marshlands to Beech-covered ridges. During summer, enjoy a variety of interpretive programs that include guided hikes. From I-30 at Prescott, travel 20 miles east on Ark. 24, then go south on Ark. 299 approximately 100 yards, then go two miles southeast on Ark. 387 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Marina Fishing Boat (16 ft.) $10/hour, $15/one-half day, $20/day Boat (16 ft.) w/Motor $15/hour, $45/one-half day, $66/day Pedal Boat $6/hour Canoe $5/hour, $15/one-half day, $25/day Kayak: Solo—$10/one-half day, $15/day / Tandem—$15/one-half day, $20/day

71


Where

Pe a c e f u l

Wa t e r s

Flow

W ithrow S prings S tate P ark 8 33424 Spur 23, Huntsville, AR 72740 479-559-2593 Email: WithrowSprings@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 36.15463, -93.736269 In the heart of the Ozarks nestled in a narrow valley cradled by the limestone bluffs of War Eagle Creek, Withrow Springs is a peaceful setting for camping, hiking, and river floats. The park offers a put-in point to this north flowing stream that is usually floatable from March to mid-June, depending on rainfall. Floating and angling for catfish, bream, perch, and bass in this Class I, easy level stream is relaxation at its best. The campground features 30 Class AAA campsites. Choose from three trails of various lengths. Other choices include the park swimming pool, tennis, baseball, and softball. The park includes picnic sites, a pavilion, snack bar, and gift shop. The park is five miles north of Huntsville on Ark. 23 (or 20 miles south of Eureka Springs on Ark. 23.) Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Swimming (Pool) $4/person (age 6 and up); $3/child (age 2-5) Canoe or Solo Kayak (put-in & haul back included)—$30/one-half day, $45/day

T he F our S easons of A rkansas S tate P arks

72


F a m i l y- f r i e n d l y

Fun

W oolly H ollow S tate P ark 8 82 Woolly Hollow Road, Greenbrier, AR 72058  501-679-2098 Email: WoollyHollow@Arkansas.com Visitor Center GPS: 35.287233, -92.286635 Here in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, enjoy swimming, fishing, and floating in the peaceful waters of 40-acre Lake Bennett. The park offers canoes, kayaks, pedal boats, and fishing boats for rent, and a launch ramp. [No commercial docks are on the lake, so bring bait and fishing supplies.] A snack bar and bathhouse with showers are near the swim beach. The park also features 30 Class AAA campsites and 10 Tent Sites without hookups, a picnic area, standard pavilion, gift shop, hiking trail, and mountain bike trail. The 1882 Woolly Cabin, home of the area’s first settlers, offers a historic perspective to the park. Interpretive programs are offered spring through fall. Take Exit #125 off I-40 at Conway and travel 12 miles north on U.S. 65, then go six miles east on Ark. 285 to the park. Campsite Fees & Discounts See pages 75-76 Swimming (Lake) $2.75/person (age 6 and up); $1.75/child (age 2-5) Fishing Boat—14 ft. $10/day Kayak $6-$8/hour; $10-$15/one-half day; $18-$25/day

73


General Information

and

Services

The state parks of Arkansas are open throughout the year; however, some facilities are closed seasonally or on certain days of the week. Contact the individual parks for details. Park staff serve visitors, maintain park resources and facilities, and enforce rules. Uniformed park employees are on call 24 hours a day. Park details, maps, and photos are featured online at ArkansasStateParks.com. Maps and details are also featured in individual park brochures available at each state park and Arkansas Welcome Center. Arkansas State Parks offers a brochure detailing park barrier-free facilities. To order this brochure, contact the state parks director's office at: Arkansas State Parks, 1 Capitol Mall, Little Rock, AR 72201; 888-287-2757 (TDD). A variety of fees are charged in the parks for designated facilities, activities, interpretive programs, and special events. Arkansas State Parks is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability in employment or the provision of services.

Cabins

and

Lodges

Make reservations by phoning or visiting the parks during business hours or online at ArkansasStateParks.com. Reservation desks at DeGray Lodge, The Lodge at Mount Magazine State Park, Mather Lodge at Petit Jean State Park, and Queen Wilhelmina State Park Lodge are open 24 hours daily. Individual reservations can be made up to 12 months in advance, and group reservations can be made up to two years in advance, commencing from the date the reservation is made. Specific cabins can be requested. Advance deposits required. Cancellation notices are required for deposit refunds. A 48-hour notice is required for individual lodge rooms, a five-day notice for cabins, and a 30-day notice for group reservations, in advance of scheduled arrival date. Lodge rooms and cabins are limited to one 14-day stay within a 30-day period (April-October). Reservation requests for one night only on a Friday or Saturday will not be considered more than one week in advance. Park facilities are rented to visitors age 18 and above. Most rates are based on a two-person occupancy of the room or cabin per day. Each extra person charge is $12/day. Children age 12 and under stay free with an adult. Check in time is 4 p.m. Check out is 11 a.m. No pets are allowed in these facilities except service animals. EXCEPTION: Fourteen parks offer designated dog-friendly cabins or lodge guest rooms [non-refundable $40/dog fee (max. two dogs) collected at check-in]. Fireplaces for fall/winter use are in many cabins, four suites at The Lodge at Mount Magazine, and four King Rooms at Queen Wilhelmina Lodge. Group meeting facilities are at DeGray Lodge, The Lodge at Mount Magazine, Ozark Folk Center, Mather Lodge at Petit Jean, Queen Wilhelmina Lodge, and several park visitor centers. Group facilities with bunk beds are at Crowley’s Ridge (overnight cap. 60) and Historic Washington (overnight cap. 54). Lake Fort Smith has two group facilities (overnight cap. 28-32) with single beds and a nearby dining hall. Advance deposits required.

Camping

Thirty of Arkansas’s 52 state parks offer camping. Campsites are available by reservation or on a first come, first served basis. It is necessary to register at the park visitor center before occupying campsite. Campers can request a specific campsite if it is available. The registering attendant will assign all campsites. Camping is limited to one 14-day stay within a 30-day period. The camping rules and regulations policy (P.D. #3015)

74

Background: Cossatot River


is available online at: www.adptfoi.com/parks. Group camping areas are at Cossatot River, Devil’s Den, Logoly, Mississippi River, and Petit Jean. Rent-A-Camps are offered at Bull Shoals-White River and Lake Catherine during spring, summer, and fall. Each Rent-A-Camp offers a tent (already set up), two cots, a lantern, stove, and ice chest. Rent-A-Camper-Cabin is offerd at Lake Ouachita. RV and yurt rentals are listed below.

Individual Campsites The majority of campsites have water and electric hookups, picnic tables, grills, and lantern hangers. Some are combination RV/tent sites. Flush toilets, hot showers, and dump stations are located in most areas. Tent and hike-in sites are also available. Overflow areas are not designated campsites. These spaces in open fields, parking lots, and similar areas may be assigned when all developed campsites are occupied. CAMPSITES (e=30 amp electric; 50 amp=50 amp electric; w=water; s=sewer) Class AAA (with 50 amp/w/s) $32/day Class AA (with e/w/s) $28/day Class A (with 50 amp/w) $25/day Class B (with e/w) or Lake Dardanelle Self Pay (with e/w) $20/day Class C (with e or w) $16/day Class D (no hookups) or Tent Site $12/day Class D Walk-in Tent Site (no hookups) [Mississippi River] $12/day Tent Site [Cossatot Self Pay or Delta Heritage Trail Self Pay] $14/day Tent Site [Jacksonport] or Overflow (with e) [Jacksonport & Lake Catherine] $15/day Tent Site [Mount Magazine] $19/day Overflow $11/day Petit Jean Rally-style or Petit Jean Overflow $14/day Petit Jean Airport Fly-in Tent Site (with e/w) $22/day Group Camp (tent only) [See Cossatot River, Devil’s Den, Logoly, and Petit Jean] Group Area (for RV's or tents) Primitive, no hookups, vault toilet [Miss. River] $30/day Horse Camp: Devil’s Den $16/day; Village Creek $20/day Rent-A-Camp: Bull Shoals-White River or Lake Catherine—$40/day; Deposit—$40 Rent-An-RV: Bull Shoals-White River—$85/day; Cane Creek—$80/day; Lake Charles—$75/day (A trailer with heat & air-conditioning, private bath with shower, deck with gas grill, refrigerator, microwave, stove, and TV. Cooking and eating utensils are included. Linens are not furnished. The RV is permanently set up at a park campsite offering e/w/s hookups.) [Sleeps up to eight] Rent-A-Yurt [DeGray, Lake Catherine, Lake Charles or Petit Jean] $55/day (A round, high walled tent with electricity, wood floors, screened windows, and a door with lock. Equipped with cots, a lantern, stove, and ice chest. Linens not furnished.) Dep.—$55 [Sleeps up to six] Rent-A-Camper-Cabin [Lake Ouachita] $60/day; Deposit—$60 (Equipped with bunk beds, heat and air, but does not include kitchen or bathroom. Linens not furnished.

Campsite Reservations Park campsites can be reserved by phoning or visiting the park visitor center during business hours or online at ArkansasStateParks.com. Reservations can be made up to 12 months in advance of the scheduled arrival date. Single night reservations can be made for Sunday through Thursday. Weekend reservations will be taken for a minimum of two nights. A three-night minimum will be required when a holiday

75


causes a three-day weekend. High demand sites must be reserved for a minimum of three nights (Thursday-Saturday), and four nights (Thursday-Sunday), on holiday weekends. Payment of a non-refundable reservation fee of one night’s basic camping fee will be required by credit card or debit card at the time campsite reservation is made by phone. No refunds for early departure. A personal check will be accepted only when the reservation is made in person. Guaranteed reservations will be held until 10 a.m. the day following the scheduled arrival date. Campsite occupancy is limited to eight persons and one camping unit of no more than two structures.

Camping Discounts Senior

and

Disability Discounts

• Current Arkansas residents age 62 and over will be admitted to campgrounds at one-half the regular campsite fee Sunday through Thursday nights, and at a 25% discount weekends and holidays. [NOTE: A government issued photo identification with date of birth is required as proof of age.] • Out-of-state residents age 62 and over will receive a 25% discount Sunday through Thursday nights and no discount on weekends or holidays. [NOTE: A government issued photo identification with date of birth is required as proof of age.] • U.S. citizens with 100% total and permanent disability will be admitted to camp- grounds at one-half the regular campsite fee throughout the year. Current written proof of 100% total and permanent disability is required. Document must specify “Permanent and Total Disability” or indicate an individual is “100 percent Disabled.” For veterans, this should be a copy of the Awards letter (dated within the last two years) from the Veterans Administration Regional Office or an Arkansas license plate with the letters DV or DAV. For non veterans, a qualifying document would be a letter from a personal physician, Railroad Retirement, or Civil Service (federal or state government) dated within the last two years stating “100 percent disabled” and/or “permanent and total disability.” Arkansas State Parks accepts the America the Beautiful-Access Pass and Golden Access Passport as proof of disability and age. • The discounts offered to senior citizens and disabled citizens do not apply to rental camping facility options.

Government Rate

The current maximum federal and state rate is applicable to lodge rooms during Sunday through Thursday for persons on official government business. Current rates can be viewed at: www.gsa.gov.

Pavilions

and

Swimming

Pavilions, recreation halls, and group areas are available by reservation. Advance payment and cleanup deposit required. For reservations, contact the parks.

Pavilions: (Sunday through Saturday)

Pavilion Use Periods: Extra Large $190/use; $350/day Per use—8 a.m. to 2 p.m., or 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Large $55/use; $90/day Per day—8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Standard $30-$65/use; $45-$105/day—For groups of 51 & over an add. $20 fee applies. Small $30-$35/use; $45-$50/day Enclosed climate-controlled $65-$80/use; $90-$110/day ($35-$40/hour) [NOTE: Standard pavilions are available weekdays for $15-$35/hour.]

76


Swimming No charge for children under age two (Limited to three children per paying adult). Children age 10 and under must be accompanied by a paying adult 18 years or older. Hours of operation for swimming pools and swimming beaches vary per park. Reduced rates are applicable after 5 p.m. Contact the park for details. Swimming pools can be rented for private parties after closing hours (not after dark). Lifeguards are furnished by the park. Minimum rental time is two hours. Pool rental charges (for up to 20 persons) vary per park. Contact the park to make arrangements.

For

your

Safety

All park playgrounds, swimming beaches, and trails (except backpacking) close each day one hour after sunset and reopen at sunrise. This excludes posted hours of operation, staff guided hikes, special events, and programs.

Park Rules

For your safety and to protect park facilities and resources, rules are posted and enforced throughout the parks. We welcome the opportunity to explain our park policies. Below are some commonly consulted rules. We look to you to be responsible for your actions. n PETS: Pets must be kept on a leash, caged, or otherwise restrained to protect the pets and avoid disturbing visitors. Pets are not permitted in public buildings, swimming beaches, pools, lodge rooms, or cabins (except designated dog-friendly cabins or lodge guest rooms at 14 parks); however, service animals are welcome. n DISORDERLY CONDUCT: Disorderly conduct, indecent attire, and abusive language are prohibited. n QUIET HOURS: Quiet is observed from 10 p.m. to sunrise. Any undue disturbance will result in ejection from the park and loss of unused fees. n STATE PROPERTY: The destruction, defacing, or removal of any public property is unlawful including the injury or defacing of trees, removal of plants, or destruction of signs, buildings, or equipment.

SPECIAL NOTE: To

ensure you enjoy your state park experience , be aware of the natural world . T here are some areas which are potentially hazardous to all visitors . S ince it is impractical to post signs at all danger points , use caution when approaching such areas as cliffs , caves , heavily wooded areas , swamps , streams , and lakes . Adults are responsible for children in their care. If unsure about possible hazards , check at the visitor center .

Interpretive Programs

(See pages 6-7.) Many of our 50,000 programs and events are listed online at ArkansasStateParks.com/events, or call 1-888-287-2757 for a printed copy. For teachers and students, State Parks is Arkansas’s largest, resource-based education organization. Park interpreters can provide hands-on, curriculum-based programs where students apply classroom learning. Contact the individual parks for details and reservations. The State Park Explorer Program is for youth ages 6-14 who care about nature, history, safety, and fun, and want to earn a special badge and certificate. Inquire at any park visitor center to obtain an Explorer Field Guide and get started. Front cover: Petit Jean State Park / Back cover: Delta Heritage Trail State Park Graphic Artist: Kimberly Fite Pawelczak / Project/Design Coordinator: Joan Ellison Photographers: A.C. Haralson, Bernie Jungkind, Drew Harris, Joan Ellison, Jay Miller, Joe Jacobs, Karen Jacobs, BT Jones, Milestone Construction, Kim Murphy, Joe David Rice

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Arkansas State Parks 1 Capitol Mall • Little Rock, AR 72201 ArkansasStateParks.com


2016 Arkansas State Parks Guide