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Form 36 Version 6.1

Draft for Public Comment

DPC: 05/30140420 DC

Head Office 389 Chiswick High Road London W4 4AL

Date: 13 October 2005 Origin: European

Telephone: +44(0)20 8996 9000 Fax: +44(0)20 8996 7001

Project no.: 2005/02622

Latest date for receipt of comments: 31 January 2006 Responsible committee:

DS/1 Dependability and terotechnology

Interested committees:

DS/1/1

Title:

Draft EN 15341 Maintenance - Maintenane Key Performance Indicators

Supersession information: If this document is published as a standard, the UK implementation of it will supersede NONE and partially supersede NONE . If you are aware of a current national standard which may be affected, please notify the secretary (contact details below). WARNING: THIS IS A DRAFT AND MUST NOT BE REGARDED OR USED AS A BRITISH STANDARD. THIS DRAFT IS NOT CURRENT BEYOND 31 January 2006. This draft is issued to allow comments from interested parties; all comments will be given consideration prior to publication. No acknowledgement will normally be sent. See overleaf for information on commenting. No copying is allowed, in any form, without prior written permission from BSI except as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patent Act 1988 or for circulation within a nominating organization for briefing purposes. Electronic circulation is limited to dissemination by e-mail within such an organization by committee members. Further copies of this draft may be purchased from BSI Customer Services, Tel: +44(0) 20 8996 9001 or email orders@bsi-global.com. British, International and foreign standards are also available from BSI Customer Services. British Standards on CD or Online are available from British Standards Publishing Sales Limited. Tel: 01344 404409 or email bsonline@techindex.co.uk. Information on the co-operating organizations represented on the committees referenced above may be obtained from the responsible committee secretary. Cross-references The British Standards which implement International or European publications referred to in this draft may be found via the British Standards Online Service on the BSI web site http://www.bsi-global.com.

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a


Introduction This draft standard is based on European discussions in which the UK took an active part. Your comments on this draft are welcome and will assist in the preparation of the consequent British Standard. If no comments are received to the contrary, then the UK will approve this draft and implement it as a British Standard. Comment is particularly welcome on national, legislative or similar deviations that may be necessary. Even if this draft standard is not approved by the UK, if it receives the necessary support in Europe, the UK will be obliged to publish the official English Language text unchanged as a British Standard and to withdraw any conflicting standard. UK Vote Please indicate whether you consider the UK should submit a negative (with reasons) or positive vote on this draft. Submission The guidance given below is intended to ensure that all comments receive efficient and appropriate attention by the responsible BSI committee. Annotated drafts are not acceptable and will be rejected. All comments must be submitted, preferably electronically, to the Responsible Committee Secretary at the address given on the front cover. Comments should be compatible with Version 6.0 or Version 97 of Microsoft® Word for Windows™, if possible; otherwise comments in ASCII text format are acceptable. Any comments not submitted electronically should still adhere to these format requirements. All comments submitted should be presented as given in the example below. Further information on submitting comments and how to obtain a blank electronic version of a comment form are available from the BSI web site at: http://www.bsi-global.com/Standards+Development/Drafts/index.xalter

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Amend to read ‘... so that the mains connector to which no connection ...’

(General/ technical/editorial)

3.1

1st definition

Editorial

Definition is ambiguous and needs clarifying.

6.4

§2

Technical

The use of the UV Delete reference to UV photometer as an alternative photometer. cannot be supported as serious problems have been encountered in its use in the UK.

OBSERVATIONS OF THE SECRETARIAT

Microsoft and MS-DOS are registered trademarks, and Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

b


EUROPEAN STANDARD NORME EUROPÉENNE

DRAFT prEN 15341

EUROPÄISCHE NORM September 2005 ICS

English Version

Maintenance - Maintenance Key Performance Indicators

This draft European Standard is submitted to CEN members for enquiry. It has been drawn up by the Technical Committee CEN/TC 319. If this draft becomes a European Standard, CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this European Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. This draft European Standard was established by CEN in three official versions (English, French, German). A version in any other language made by translation under the responsibility of a CEN member into its own language and notified to the Management Centre has the same status as the official versions. CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. Recipients of this draft are invited to submit, with their comments, notification of any relevant patent rights of which they are aware and to provide supporting documentation. Warning : This document is not a European Standard. It is distributed for review and comments. It is subject to change without notice and shall not be referred to as a European Standard.

EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION COMITÉ EUROPÉEN DE NORMALISATION EUROPÄISCHES KOMITEE FÜR NORMUNG

Management Centre: rue de Stassart, 36

© 2005 CEN

All rights of exploitation in any form and by any means reserved worldwide for CEN national Members.

B-1050 Brussels

Ref. No. prEN 15341:2005: E


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Contents

Page

Foreword..............................................................................................................................................................3 1

Scope ......................................................................................................................................................3

2

Normative references ............................................................................................................................3

3

Terms and definitions ...........................................................................................................................3

4

Maintenance Performance ....................................................................................................................4

5 5.1 5.2

System of indicators .............................................................................................................................4 Objectives...............................................................................................................................................4 Architecture of key indicators ..............................................................................................................5

6 6.1 6.1.1 6.1.2 6.1.3 6.2 6.2.1 6.2.2 6.2.3 6.3 6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3

Indicators................................................................................................................................................5 Economical Key Indicators...................................................................................................................6 LEVEL 1 ..................................................................................................................................................6 LEVEL 2 ..................................................................................................................................................6 LEVEL 3 ..................................................................................................................................................7 Technical key indicators .......................................................................................................................8 LEVEL 1 ..................................................................................................................................................8 LEVEL 2 ..................................................................................................................................................8 LEVEL 3 ..................................................................................................................................................9 Organisational indicators ...................................................................................................................10 LEVEL 1 ................................................................................................................................................10 LEVEL 2 ................................................................................................................................................10 LEVEL 3 ................................................................................................................................................10

7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4.1 7.4.2 7.4.3 7.4.4

Methodology for the selection and use of key performance indicators for maintenance ...........12 Defining the objectives which characterise the maintenance management process ..................12 Selecting the relevant indicators .......................................................................................................13 Defining and collecting the necessary basic data ...........................................................................13 Calculating the indicators and selecting the type of representation .............................................14 Frequency of calculating of the indicators .......................................................................................14 Type of presentation ...........................................................................................................................14 Test and validation ..............................................................................................................................14 Analysis of the results ........................................................................................................................14

Annex A (normative) Key Indicators Factors List..........................................................................................15

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Foreword This document (prEN 15341:2005) has been prepared by Technical Committee CEN/TC 319 “Maintenance”, the secretariat of which is held by UNI. This document is currently submitted to the CEN Enquiry.

Introduction This European Standard provides the “Maintenance Key Performance Indicators” to support management in achieving maintenance excellence and utilize technical assets in a competitive manner. The majority of these indicators are applicable to all industrial and supporting facilities (buildings, infrastructure, transportation, distribution, networks, etc). The indicators should be used to: a)

measure the status;

b)

compare (internal and external benchmarks);

c)

diagnose (analysis of strengths and weaknesses);

d)

identify objectives or goals;

e)

plan improvement actions;

f)

continuously measure the changes over time.

1

Scope

This European standard describes a system for management of Key Performance Indicators to measure maintenance performance in the framework of the influencing factors such as the economical, technical and organizational aspects, to appraise and to improve efficiency and effectiveness in order to achieve a excellence in maintenance of Technical Assets.

2

Normative references

This European Standard incorporates by dated or undated reference, provisions from other publications. These normative references are cited at the appropriate places in the text and the publications are listed hereafter. For dated references, subsequent amendments to or revisions of any of these publications apply to this European Standard only when incorporated in it by amendment or revision. For undated references the latest edition of the publication referred to applies (including amendments). EN 13306:2001, Maintenance-Terminology.

3

Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this standard the terms and definitions included in EN 13306 apply together with those listed in Annex A.

3


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

4

Maintenance Performance

Maintenance Performance is the result of the utilization of resources in providing actions to retain an item in, or restore it to, a state in which it can perform the required function. It can be expressed as an achieved or expected result. The Maintenance Performance is dependent upon both external and internal influencing factors such as: location, culture, transformation and service processes, size, utilization rate and age and is achieved by implementing corrective, preventive and improvement maintenance, using labour, information, materials, organisational methodologies, tools and operating techniques. Maintenance Performance is an outcome of complex activities which can be evaluated by appropriate indicators to measure both the actual and expected results.

5

System of indicators

This system of key performance indicators is structured into three groups (economic, technical and organisational) in order to cover all aspects of maintenance. Any indicator can be evaluated as a ratio between factors (numerator and denominator) measuring activities, resources or events, according to a given formula. The indicators are used to measure any quantitative aspect or characteristic of an indenture level and for homogeneous comparison. Whenever a factor is defined by using the words “internal” or “external”, the derived indicator, should also be used only for “internal” or “external” influences, as appropriate.

5.1

Objectives

When the actual or expected performance is not satisfactory it encourages the management to define objectives and strategies to improve from an economic, technical or organisational point of view using this system of indicators which allows the organisation to: a)

measure the status;

b)

evaluate the performance;

c)

compare performance;

d)

identify strengths and weaknesses;

e)

set objectives;

f)

plan strategies and actions;

g)

share the results in order to inform and motivate people;

h)

control progress and changes over time.

The indicators can be used: 

on a periodic basis, for instance by preparing and following-up a budget, and during the assessment of the performance:

on a spot basis, for instance within the framework of specific audits, studies and/or benchmarking.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

The period of time to be considered for measurement depends on the company policy and management approach.

5.2

Architecture of key indicators

The following matrix illustrates the external and internal factors that influence maintenance performance and consequently the three groups of key indicators: External factors are variable conditions outside of the company management control. Internal factors are referred to group, company, factory, plant outside of the maintenance management control, but inside of the company management control. When using the key maintenance performance indicators, it is important to consider these influencing factors as prerequisites in order to avoid misleading evaluations and comparisons through not having homogeneous conditions.

Maintenance Influencing Factors and Maintenance Key Performance Indicators External influencing factors

Indicator Level

Location Society Culture National Labour Cost Laws Regulations Sector / Branches

Market Situation Company Culture Process Severity Product Mix Plant Size Utilization Rate Age of Plant Criticallity

6

Indicator Group

Internal influencing factors

Economic indicators Technical Indicators Organizational Indicators

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6

E7 E8 E9 E10 E11 E12 E13 E14

E15 E16 E17 E18 E19 E20 E21 E23 E24

T5 T6

T7 T8 T9 T10 T11 T12 T13 T14 T15 T16 T17 T18 T19 T20 T21

O9 O10

O11 O12 O13 O14 O15 O16 O17 O18 O19 O20 O21 O22 O23 O24 O25 O26

T1 T2 T3 T4

O1 O2 O3 O4 O5 O6 O7 O8

Indicators

When calculating the indicators, denominator and numerator factors shall be referred to the same activity/item and to the same period of time (year, quarter, month, etc.). These factors are explained in the terminology sheet at the end of this document. Most of the indicators can be used at different levels, depending on whether they are used to measure the performance of a plant production, one production line, or a given equipment or item, etc.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

The indicators in this standard are structured in levels which represent their breakdown structure. Indicators below level one are a detailed description of indicators at higher level. The indicators in this standard are numbered by level as a means of identification and not as an indication of importance. These indicators can be referred to the internal maintenance, external maintenance or both. The term “Time” is in general used to describe time units related to the equipment and its performance. The terms “Hours” or “Man hours” describe the hours delivered to the maintenance activities.

6.1 6.1.1

Economical Key Indicators LEVEL 1

E1

Total Maintenance Cost Assets Replacement Value

x 100

E2

Total Maintenance Cost Added value plus external costs for maintenance

x 100

E3

Total Maintenance Cost Output of operations

E4

Total Maintenance Cost Production transformation cost

E5

Total Maintenance Cost + unavailability costs related to maintenance Output of operations

E6

6.1.2

x 100

Availability related to maintenance Total Maintenance Cost

LEVEL 2

E7

Average inventory value of maintenance materials Asset Replacement Value

x 100

E8

Total internal personnel cost spent in maintenance Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

E9

Total external personnel cost spent in maintenance Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E10

Total contractor cost Total maintenance cost

x 100

E11

Total cost of maintenance materials Total maintenance cost

x 100

E12

Total cost of maintenance materials Average inventory value of Maintenance materials

E13

Cost for indirect maintenance personnel Total Maintenance Cost

E14

6.1.3

= Warehouse turnover x 100

Total Maintenance Cost Total Energy Used

LEVEL 3

E15

Corrective maintenance cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E16

Preventive maintenance cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E17

Condition based maintenance cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E18

Predetermined maintenance cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E19

Improvement maintenance cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

E20

Maintenance shutdown cost Total Maintenance Cost

x 100

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

E21

Cost of training for maintenance Number of maintenance personnel

E22

Total Mechanical maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs

E23

Total Electrical maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs

E24

Total Instrumentation maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs

6.2 6.2.1

T1

Technical key indicators LEVEL 1

Total Operating time Total Operating time + Down time due to maintenance

T2

T3

T4

6.2.2

Achieved up time during required time Required time

x 100 (availability related to maintenance) x 100 (operational availability)

Number of failures due to maintenance creating environmental damage Calendar time Number of injuries for people due to maintenance Calendar time

LEVEL 2

T5

Total operating time (Total operating time + Down time related to failures)

T6

Total operating time (Total operating time + Down time related to planned and scheduled maintenance)

8

unit of value / person

x 100

x 100


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

6.2.3

LEVEL 3

T7

Preventive maintenance time causing down time Total down time related to maintenance

x 100

T8

Predetermined maintenance time causing down time Total down time related to maintenance

x 100

T9

Condition based maintenance time causing down time Total down time related to maintenance

x 100

T10

Number of failures causing injury to people Total number of failures

x 100

T11

Number of failures causing potential injury to people Total number of failures

x 100

T12

Number of failures causing damage to the environment Total number of failures

x 100

T13

Number of failures causing potential damage to environment x 100 Total number of failures

T14

Total Operating time Number of maintenance work-orders causing down time

T15

Total Operating time Number of maintenance work-orders

T16

T17

T18

T19

T20

Total operating time Number of failures

=

MTTF

Number of failures Asset Replacement Value Number of systems covered by a critical analysis Total number of systems

x 100

Man hours used for planning in a systematic maintenance planning process (Initial planning) Total internal maintenance personnel man hours Planned and scheduled maintenance time causing production down time Planned and scheduled total maintenance time requiring down time

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

T21

6.3 6.3.1

Total time to restore Number of failures

=

MTTR

Organisational indicators LEVEL 1

O1

Number of internal maintenance personnel Total internal employees

x 100

O2

Number of indirect maintenance personnel Number of internal maintenance personnel

x 100

O3

Number of indirect maintenance personnel Number of direct maintenance personnel

x 100

O4

Production operator maintenance man hours Total direct maintenance personnel man hours

O5

Planned and scheduled maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours available

x 100

O6

Number of injuries to maintenance personnel Total maintenance personnel

x 10000 (frequency rate)

O7

Man-hours lost due to injuries for maintenance personnel Total man hours worked by maintenance personnel

O8

Internal man-hours used for continuous improvement Total internal maintenance personnel man hours

6.3.2

x 10000

LEVEL 2

O9

Production operator maintenance man hours Total production operators man hours

x 100

O10

Direct maintenance personnel on shift Total direct maintenance personnel

x 100

6.3.3

O11

10

LEVEL 3

Immediate corrective maintenance time Total down time related to maintenance

x 100

(severity rate)


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

O12

Internal mechanical man hours Total internal direct maintenance personnel man hours

x 100

O13

Internal electrical man hours Total internal direct maintenance personnel man hours

x 100

O14

Internal instrumentation man hours Total internal direct maintenance personnel man hours

x 100

O15

Number of internal Multi-skilled maintenance personnel Number of internal maintenance personnel

x 100

O16

Corrective maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

x 100

O17

Immediate Corrective maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

x 100

O18

Preventive maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

x 100

O19

Condition based maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

x 100

O20

Predetermined maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

x 100

O21

Overtime internal maintenance man hours Total internal maintenance man hours

x 100

O22

Number of work orders performed as scheduled Total number of scheduled work orders

x 100

O23 Number of maintenance internal personnel man hours for training Total internal maintenance man hours O24

O25

x 100

Number of direct maintenance people using software Number of internal direct maintenance personnel Total man hours spent by direct personnel on planned and scheduled activities Total man hours planned and scheduled to direct personnel

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

O26

Number of the spare parts supplied by the warehouse as requested Total number of spare parts required by maintenance

7 Methodology for the selection and use of key performance indicators for maintenance 7.1

Defining the objectives which characterise the maintenance management process

In order to select relevant indicators, the first step is to define the objectives to be reached at each level of the enterprise. At the company level, the requirement is to identify how maintenance can be managed in order to improve global performance (profits, market shares, competitiveness etc). In this case, the most efficient means of maintenance improvement shall be determined. At the systems level and production lines, the maintenance objectives can address some particular performance factors, which have been identified through previous analysis, such as: 

improvement of availability;

improvement on cost-effective maintenance;

retaining the health, safety and environment preservation;

improvement in cost-effective management of the value of the maintenance inventory;

control of contracted services;

etc.

At the equipment level, machines or types of machines, better control of the following may be desirable: 

reliability;

costs;

duration of stops;

etc.

The objectives may also consist of giving advice for decisions concerning: 

investments;

the duration of utilisation;

the choice of a strategy such as the recourse to contractors;

etc.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

7.2

Selecting the relevant indicators

When the objectives have been defined, and the performance parameters to be measured have been identified, the next step is to find the indicators which allow measuring these parameters. When selecting the indicators for maintenance management, the system could for example include: 

the capacity of maintaining the equipment which includes:

the maintainability of the equipment;

the logistic support (spare parts, tools, documentation, …);

the work organisation;

the reliability of the equipment;

the efficiency of the maintenance activities;

the safety;

etc.…

An indicator is relevant when its value, or its evaluation is correlated with the evaluation of the performance parameter to be measured. A relevant indicator shall be one element of decision making. That means that the data which constitute this indicator shall have a relation to the defined objective. This link can be proved by analysis or through interview of experts. Statistical techniques can also be utilised in order to ascertain correlations between indicators. In the search for relevant indicators, two approaches are possible: 

the first consists of choosing from amongst list of existing indicators those, which after analysis, fulfil the requirements;

the second starts from the following methods which begin with the evaluation of the various processes of maintenance which can be obtained through functional analysis.

In practice, both approaches can be used.

7.3

Defining and collecting the necessary basic data

It is necessary to precisely define: 

the data to be collected in order to determine the values required for the indicator;

the measurement method (operating mode);

the tools required for the measurement (documents, counters, sensors, analysers, computerized maintenance management system, etc.).

In order to make the possible evaluation and comparisons easier, it is obligatory that the collected data are in conformity with the standardised definitions when they exist (see EN 13306). If the definition does not exist, it will be necessary to derive such a definition.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

7.4

Calculating the indicators and selecting the type of representation

7.4.1

Frequency of calculating of the indicators

Independently from the collection of the data, the frequency of the calculation could be predetermined. (For instance, it is possible to evaluate a quarterly indicator with monthly collected data) The frequency of data collection shall be adapted to: 

the availability and time delay of the relevant data;

the changes over time (gradient, seasonality, etc.) of the measured performance;

the reactivity of the system to the actions undertaken.

7.4.2

Type of presentation

The utilisation of indicators generally requires a graphical presentation according to the required utilisation and to the importance of the series of data. 7.4.3

Test and validation

Before the calculation is used as a routine, each indicator will be calculated by using a representative sample during a significant period which will allow validation of: 

the methods of collecting and processing the data;

the methods of calculation and making graphical presentation;

the analysis and utilisation of these indicators.

7.4.4

Analysis of the results

The next steps, that are outside the scope of this standard, are to build scorecards to analyse and to take the required actions.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Annex A (normative) Key Indicators Factors List

Indicators

Factors

Total Maintenance Cost

E1

Definitions Total Maintenance Cost (often on annual base and related only to the Maintenance activities performed on the asset/item) includes costs referred to: • Wages, salaries and overtimes for managerial, supervision, support staff and direct staff • Payroll added costs for the above mentioned persons (Taxes, Insurance, Legislative contributions) • Spares and materials consumables charged to maintenance (including freight costs) • Tools and equipments (not capitalized or rented) • Contractors, rented facilities • Consultancy services • Administration costs for maintenance • Education and training • Costs for maintenance activities carried out by production people • Costs for transportation, hotels, etc • Documentation • CMMS (software) and Planning Systems • Energy and utilities • Depreciation of maintenance capitalized equipments and workshops, warehouse for spare-parts Exclusions:  Costs for product changeover or transaction time (e.g. Exchange of dies)  Depreciation of strategic spare parts  Downtime costs

Asset Replacement Value (Plant Replacement Value)

The Asset Replacement Value (ARV) is defined as the amount of capital that would be required to replace the Asset. This is not the book value nor the current cost accounting value nor the cost to build a state-of-the-art replacement. ARV is an estimate of the current costs to replace in kind what now exists. (In industry ARV is usually the Plant Replacement Value) (ARV can be equivalent to the insurance value.)

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

E2

E3

Total Maintenance Cost

(see E1)

Added value plus external costs for maintenance

Production value less the value of raw materials-utilitiesservices purchased plus external cost of maintenance.

Total Maintenance Cost

(see E1)

Output of operations Total Maintenance Cost

E4

Definitions

Factors

Production transformation cost

Quantity of output issued by an asset/item (tons, litres, etc.). (see E1) Total cost required by an asset/item to transform a material incoming into a product/service, excluding raw materials and packaging auxiliary materials. (see E1) for Total Maintenance Cost The unavailability costs related to maintenance is Down time due to maintenance multiplied with the average value of a time unit of lost production/service of the asset/item.

E5

Total Maintenance Cost + unavailability The unit value of time of lost production can be extra costs related to production cost for production at a later stage/time, or/and maintenance the value or the lost income from production during the asset/item’s Down state due to maintenance. (Value of the “hidden plant� due to maintenance) Output of operations (See E3)

E6

The time an item has been able to be in a state to perform a required function under given conditions at a given instant of time or during a given time interval, assuming that the required external resources are provided. (Note 1. This Availability related to ability depends on the combined aspects of the reliability, maintenance the maintainability and the maintenance supportability. Note 2. Required external resources, other than maintenance resources, do not affect the availability of the time.) (According to EN13306) Total Maintenance Cost

E7

(See E1)

Average inventory Average inventory value of maintenance materials (spare value of Maintenance parts, consumables, materials) on the respective period. materials Replacement Value (See E1) of respective Assets

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

Definitions

Factors

Cost of internal personnel engaged in maintenance activities. The internal personnel cost (including payroll added costs as shown in E1) spent on maintenance are composed by:

E8

a) Total internal personnel cost spent in maintenance b)

c)

Total Maintenance Cost

E9

Total contractor cost

E11

E12

E13

Total Maintenance Cost Total cost of maintenance materials

Costs of maintenance production people

activities

carried

out

by

(See E1)

(See E1) Sum of contractor invoices billed for their maintenance activities spent on the asset/item. (See E1) Costs of the maintenance materials (spare parts, consumables, materials) consumed in a period.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Total cost of maintenance materials

(See E11)

Average inventory value of Maintenance (See E7) materials Cost for indirect maintenance personnel Total Maintenance Cost

E14

Indirect Personnel (Managers, Staff and clerks, Supervisors, Maintenance engineering personnel, Planning and scheduling personnel, Tools store men, Warehouse and store workers

Total external Cost of external personnel engaged in maintenance personnel cost spent activities. in maintenance Total Maintenance Cost

E10

Direct personnel are personnel working in the field, or workshops performing maintenance activities (usually referred to as “blue collar workers�)

Total Maintenance Cost Total Energy Used

Total cost related to indirect personnel (see E8, pos b.)

(See E1) (See E1) Power + gas + fuel oil + any other energy (energies measured all in kcal or all in MJoule as preferred)

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

E15

E16

E17

E18

E19

E20

E21

E22

Factors

Definitions

Corrective maintenance cost

Total cost for maintenance carried out after fault has occurred and intended to put an item into a state in which it can perform a required function.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Preventive maintenance cost

Cost for maintenance carried out at predetermined intervals or according to prescribed criteria and intended to reduce the probability of failure or the degradation of the functioning of an item.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Condition based maintenance cost

The value of maintenance activities for condition based maintenance measured in terms of costs.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Predetermined maintenance cost

Cost of preventive maintenance carried out in accordance with established intervals of time or number of units of use but without previous condition investigation.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Improvement maintenance cost

Cost of maintenance carried out to improve the availability of the item, without changing the required function.

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Maintenance shut down cost

Costs of maintenance performed during shutdowns (outage scheduled for maintenance) of a plant or a factory (annual shutdown for example).

Total Maintenance Cost

(See E1)

Cost of training for maintenance

Cost for training for direct and indirect maintenance personnel (direct and indirect: see E8)

Number of maintenance personnel

Number of Direct Personnel plus number of Indirect Personnel (see E8).

Total Mechanical maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs

E23

Total Electrical maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs

18

Sum of the costs for the mechanical contractors activities

Sum of the costs by contractors for the mechanical, electrical and instrumental contractors activities. Sum of the costs for the electrical contractors activities.

(See E22)


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

E24

Total Instrumentation Sum of the costs for the instrumentation contractors activities. maintenance contractor costs Total maintenance contractor costs Total operating time

T1

Definitions

Factors

Down time due to maintenance

(See E22) The time interval during which an item is performing its required function (see EN 13306:2001, Clause 9.3). Time interval during which an item is in a down state due to maintenance (see EN 13306:2001, Clauses 9.2 and 9.3). Up time: Time interval during which an item is in up state (See EN 13306:2001, Clauses 9.1 and 6.7).

Up state: State of an item characterized by the fact that it can perform a required function, assuming that the external Achieved up time during required time resources, if required, are provided (see EN 13306:2001, Clause 6.7)

T2

To easily understand this definition with the support of a figure, please refer to EN 13306.

Required time

The time interval during which the user requires the item to be in a condition to perform a required function (see EN 13306:2001, Clause 9.11) To easily understand this definition with the support of a figure, please refer to EN 13306.

T3

Number of failures due to maintenance creating environmental damage Calendar time

T4

Number of injuries for people due to maintenance Calendar time

Numbers of failures caused by maintenance or lack of maintenance that have caused damage to the environment.

Time interval (years, months). Numbers of failures caused by maintenance or lack of maintenance that have caused injuries for people. Time interval (years, months).

Total operating time (See T1)

T5

Down time related to Total down time lost due to failures. failures Total operating time (See T1)

T6

Down time related to The total time of planned and scheduled maintenance works, which requires down time. planned and scheduled maintenance down time

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

T7

T8

T9

Factors

Definitions

Preventive maintenance time causing down time

Time interval during which an item is in a down state due to preventive maintenance.

Total down time related to maintenance

Time interval during which an item is in a down state due to maintenance.

Predetermined maintenance time causing down time

Time interval during which an item is in a down state due to predetermined maintenance.

Total down time related to maintenance Condition based maintenance time causing down time Total down time related to maintenance Number of failures causing injuries for people

(See T7)

Time interval during which an item is in a down state due to condition based maintenance. (See T7)

Number of failures that cause an injury for people which will result in one or more lost working days. Total number of failures.

T10 Total number of failures

Failure: termination of the ability of an item to perform a required function. NOTE 1: After failure the item has a fault, which may be complete or partial NOTE 2: "Failure" is an event, as distinguished from "fault", which is a state

T11

Number of failures causing potential injuries for people Total number of failures

T12

Number of failures causing potential damages for environment Total number of failures

20

(See T10)

Number of failures Number of failures that cause damage for environment. causing damages for environment Total number of failures

T13

Number of failures that could cause an injury for people.

(See T10) Number of failures that could cause damage for environment.

(See T10)


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

Definitions

Factors Total operating time (See T1)

T14

It includes corrective and preventive maintenance workNumber of maintenance work- orders, as well as improvement work-orders, causing down orders causing down time. time Total operating time (See T1)

T15

Number of maintenance workorders

It includes all corrective and preventive maintenance workorders, as well as improving work-orders.

Total operating time (See T1)

T16

T17

T18

Total number of failures

(See T10)

Total number of failures

(See T10)

Assets Replacement (See E1) Value Number of systems analyzed and covered by a Number of systems methodology with the purpose to assess and reduce risk. covered by a critical For the definition of “system”, please refer to the specific analysis methodology used. Total number of systems

T19

Man hours used for planning in a systematic maintenance planning process. (Initial planning)

Total number of systems. For the definition of “system”, please refer to the specific methodology used. Planning means hours used for initial planning in a managed process. The planning process is performed according to a predefined procedure. Planning: Activities are defined in such a way that safety considerations, special tools or procedures, tolerance standards, required replacement parts or materials are defined with an estimate of the downtime and man hours required to complete the work. All this information is available to the first line maintenance staff performing the work before it starts.

Number of hours carried out by internal maintenance Total internal personnel. maintenance personnel man hours

T20

Planned and scheduled maintenance time causing production down time

This is the total calendar time spent on planned and scheduled maintenance works causing production down time.

Planned and scheduled total maintenance time requiring down time

The total time of planned and scheduled maintenance works which requires down time.

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

T21

This term is defined as the total time to restoration, Total time to restore regardless of planned or unplanned corrective maintenance. Total number of failures

O1

Number of internal maintenance personnel Total internal employees

O2

O3

O4

Definitions

Factors

(See T10) Internal (direct and indirect: see E8) maintenance personnel. Total internal personnel in the asset.

Number of indirect maintenance personnel

Number of internal indirect (see E8) maintenance personnel.

Number of internal maintenance personnel

(See O1)

Number of indirect maintenance personnel

(See O2)

Number of direct maintenance personnel Production operator maintenance man hours

Number of direct (see E8) maintenance personnel.

Maintenance man hours carried out by a user or operator.

Number of hours carried out by direct (see E8) Total direct maintenance personnel. maintenance personnel man hours Man hours by direct (see E8) maintenance personnel to be used on planned and scheduled activities (internal and external).

O5

Planned and scheduled maintenance man hours

Planning: Activities are defined in such a way that safety considerations, special tools or procedures, tolerance standards, required replacement parts or material are defined with an estimate of the downtime and man hours required to complete the work before it starts. Scheduling: To establish a time schedule, or the number of units of use, indicating when maintenance should be performed. (Planned and scheduled man hours could be man hours used for corrective maintenance, conditioned-based maintenance, performed maintenance and improvement maintenance).

Number of maintenance man hours (internal and external) Total maintenance available for maintenance activities (excluding holidays, man hours available training, etc‌).

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

O6

O7

O8

Definitions

Factors Number of injuries for maintenance personnel

Number of injuries occurred to internal maintenance personnel, preventing them to further work for a day or more.

Number of internal maintenance personnel

(See O1)

Man-hours lost due to injuries for maintenance personnel

Internal maintenance man-hours lost due to injuries for internal maintenance personnel.

Total man-hours worked by maintenance personnel

Internal man-hours used for continuous improvements

Number of internal maintenance man hours actually produced.

Internal (direct and indirect: see E8) maintenance man hours used for continuous improvements, that is hours used for systematic critical analysis, for identification of improvement, for participation in projects and their preparations, as instructor for training and education internally and externally, or, finally, for safety, quality or environmental audit or schemes.

Number of hours carried out by internal maintenance Total internal personnel. maintenance personnel man hours

O9

Production operator maintenance man hours

Maintenance man hours carried out by a user or operator. (Thus maintenance carried out by people not under the maintenance department)

Total production Hours carried out for whatever activities by a user or operators man hours production operator. Direct maintenance personnel on shift

O10

O11

O12

Total direct maintenance personnel

It regards the direct (see E8) maintenance personnel that “work on shift�, on plant and services (on operation). Number of direct maintenance personnel.

Maintenance, which is carried out without delay after a Immediate corrective fault, has been detected to avoid unacceptable maintenance time consequences. Total down time related to maintenance Internal direct mechanical man hours

(See T7) It is referred to man hours from internal maintenance mechanical personnel.

Total internal direct Number of hours carried out by internal direct (see E8) maintenance maintenance personnel. personnel man hours

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prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

Definitions

Factors

Internal direct It is referred to man hours from internal maintenance electrical man hours electrical personnel.

O13

O14

O15

O16

O17

Total internal direct (See O12) maintenance personnel man hours It is referred to man hours from internal maintenance Internal direct instrumentation man instrumental personnel. hours Total internal direct (See O12) maintenance personnel man hours Number of internal multi-skilled maintenance personnel

Number of internal direct (see E8) maintenance personnel that operate as multi skill (at least more than one skill) maintenance personnel.

Number of internal maintenance personnel

(See O1)

Corrective maintenance man hours

Hours spent on corrective maintenance activities (internal and external).

Total maintenance man hours

Number of man hours carried out by internal and external maintenance personnel.

Immediate Corrective Man hours spent on immediate corrective maintenance maintenance man activities (internal and external). hours Total maintenance man hours

O18

Preventive maintenance man hours Total maintenance man hours

O19

O20

Man hours spent on preventive maintenance activities (internal and external). (See O16)

Condition based maintenance man hours

Man hours spent on condition-based maintenance activities (internal and external).

Total maintenance man hours

(See O16)

Predetermined maintenance man hours

Man hours spent on predetermined maintenance activities (internal and external).

Total maintenance man hours

24

(See O16)

(See O16)


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

O21

Definitions

Factors Overtime internal maintenance man hours

Number of man hours carried out by internal maintenance personnel during overtime.

(See T19) Total internal maintenance personnel man hours Number of work order which are technically complete in a Number of work orders performed as timeframe less than a given time after the estimate of its conclusion. scheduled

O22

O23

O24

Total number of scheduled work orders

Number of work order scheduled. Scheduling: To establish a time schedule, or the number of units of use, indicating when maintenance should be performed.

Number of hours used in training for all personnel (direct Number of and indirect: see E8) of maintenance service. maintenance personnel man hours for training Total maintenance man-hours

(See O16)

Number of internal direct maintenance personnel using software

Number of direct (see E8) maintenance personnel using maintenance software for any maintenance or asset management means (work-orders flow, bills of materials, planning, spare-parts warehousing, etc‌).

Number of internal direct maintenance personnel

Internal direct (see E8) maintenance personnel.

Number of man hours spent by direct (see E8) personnel on planned and scheduled activities. Total man hours spent by direct personnel on planned and scheduled activities

Planning: Activities are defined in such a way that safety considerations, special tools or procedures, tolerance standards, required replacement parts or material are defined with an estimate of the downtime and man hours required to complete the work before it starts.

Total man hours planned and scheduled to direct personnel

Planning: Activities are defined in such a way that safety considerations, special tools or procedures, tolerance standards, required replacement parts or material are defined with an estimate of the downtime and man hours required to complete the work before it starts.

O25

Scheduling: To establish a time schedule, or the number of units of use, indicating when maintenance should be performed. Number of man hours planned for direct (see E8) personnel to planned and scheduled activities

Scheduling: To establish a time schedule, or the number of units of use, indicating when maintenance should be performed.

25


prEN 15341:2005 (E)

Indicators

O26

Factors Number of the spare No need of definition. parts supplied by the warehouse as requested No need of definition. Total number of spare parts required by maintenance

26

Definitions


BSI EN 15341