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Students aim to green Greek Row DAVID WEISSMAN Arizona Daily Wildcat

Students for Sustainability is working to make Greek Row a little bit greener. The program is currently in talks with the Delta Delta Delta sorority to improve recycling in the sorority’s house, and have also been negotiating with the Chi Omega sorority to set up a composting program, said Nicholas Rossi, an intern with Students for Sustainability. Rossi came up with the idea of a recycling initiative in fraternity and sorority houses after working in the Delta Delta Delta house’s kitchen. “We want to implement the program in two houses by Halloween,” Rossi said.

“Once we have one or two houses, we can use those as a model to present to the rest of Greek Life, and get everyone else on board.” According to Rossi, a number of sororities have recycling services available to them but do not utilize the services. He said he wants to place proper receptacles and signage in the houses to improve those initiatives. He also stressed the importance of introducing composting in order to recycle food waste. After recycling is installed in the houses, Rossi said he wants to focus on other aspects of sustainability, such as reducing energy use. He also said that education is central to the project. This includes instructing organizations as to what kind of materials can be recycled, as well as the benefits of

recycling. Jake Barman, a senator with the Associated Students of the University of Arizona, a business sophomore and member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, said that plans are also in progress with waste management to figure out the logistics associated with implementing a new recycling project for other members of Greek Life. Barman ran for ASUA Senate on a platform that included increased recycling programs. Jordan Woollard, the marketing project manager of Students for Sustainability and a business senior, stressed the importance of encouraging organizations to participate in the program. This could include a benefits program for participating houses, though the details are still a work in progress.

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

“Recycling’s great and all, but you need both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation,” he said. “Some people would be motivated just because they want to be more sustainable. Others, it takes an incentive, a little more convincing. The project is so new, so we’re still working on what would be the best way to do that.” Barman, meanwhile, emphasized the benefits that chapters would see by recycling. “It’s cheaper to get recycling pickup, so why are we paying all this extra money when we can be saving so much more by recycling?” he said. “You’re not only saving money for your chapter, you’re also helping the environment and getting the campus to go green.”

ASUA senatorial candidates talk plans, platforms

A monthly class held at the Student Recreation Center teaches students healthy cooking techniques

RACHEL MCCLUSKEY Arizona Daily Wildcat

Eight candidates for ASUA’s open senatorial seat wiped the sweat off their brow as they prepared for their first interview for the ASUA special election. Students were invited to come to the public forum prepared by the organization on Tuesday night. Candidates had their first interview for the position with officials from the Associated Students of the University of Arizona officials and about 20 students.

Jeffrey Rightnowar

The pre-business sophomore said the biggest problem on campus is student retention rates. With more than 40,000 students at the UA, Rightnowar said it’s easy for students to feel lost in bigger classes and not find their niche. To help students find the right major, he said he would push for a shadow program to be implemented, allowing students to sit in on some classes and speak to students within a particular major. To include students in more activities on campus, Rightnowar said he wants to host collegiate Olympics at the Student Recreation Center that will some day

NOELLE HAROGOMEZ/ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT

JEFFREY BRAGG AND BRYCE SCHULER, students in Campus Rec’s Cooking on Campus program learn how to make chicken and shrimp paella. See the story, page 4.

ASUA, 2

ASA kicks off effort to increase registration of student voters DAVID WEISSMAN Arizona Daily Wildcat

ASA held its annual Vote 2012 kickoff event Tuesday night in the Modern Languages building to promote student voter registration for the upcoming elections and Proposition 204. The kickoff focused on the importance of registering to vote, as well as encouraging students to get peers to register. This year, the registration effort has a

particular focus on promoting Proposition 204, which aims to make a temporary onecent per dollar increase in the sales tax, passed in 2010 and is set to expire in 2013, permanent. According to Dan Sullivan, the communications director of the Arizona Students’ Association, the proposition would allocate $300 million directly to universities in Arizona. Half of that money would go to fund financial aid. The event was led by Arizona Students’

Association interns and members. The event opened with an introduction by the ASA campus organizer for the event, Tess Korbesmeyer. A video was then shown giving a brief history of voting and voting rights in the United States. After the video, the interns broke students up into several groups and asked them how ASA could better engage students and get students to register to vote.

KEVIN BROST/ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT

ASA, 2

STUDENTS AND ASUA MEMBERS interview the eight candidates running in the senatorial special election. Polls will open Oct. 3.

Frats donate fees to crisis center WORTH

NOTING

MATT BURNS Arizona Daily Wildcat

TURKI ALLUGMAN/ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT

THE UA INTRAFRATERNITY Council presented $12,000 to the Emerge! Center for Domestic Violence on Tuesday.

The ring of a gong signified the donation of $12,000 to Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse from the UA’s Intrafraternity Council at a presentation ceremony on Tuesday afternoon. After Council President Trevor Cohen presented the check, he was embraced by Kimberly Thompson, the center’s vice president of philanthropy. “We’re thrilled to be able to do this,” Cohen said after the ceremony. The donation is a portion of the $30 recruitment fees collected at the beginning of the fall semester, and amounts to $2,000 more than what was donated from last fall’s recruitment. Cohen attributes the additional money to an increase in students participating in fall recruitment. This year, 1,060 students registered, up from the typical 700 students. The partnership between the council and the center began March 22, 2011, with the signing of a resolution outlining the motives and intentions behind the partnership. According to the document, the partnership was started in response to the high rate of rape and sexual assault and other violent domestic crimes

DONATION, 2

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• Arizona Daily Wildcat

News •

wednesday, september

26, 2012

More cooks getting into the kitchen Campus Rec hosts culinary class for students looking to learn basic techniques hair and washing cutting boards to avoid cross-contamination. The class taught basic pan skills and worked to make students more outhwatering smells of comfortable with basic proteins. cultural food filled the Student Recreation Center A chicken and shrimp paella recipe was featured as a recipe that as students cooked up healthy, focused on preparing a meal in one homemade meals during the pan for a quick, easy clean up. Cooking on Campus program. “This really is the first advanced The program is offered through meal I have cooked,” said seven different class sessions at Meezan Mir, a freshman studying the Rec Center, and aims to teach philosophy, politics, economics students how to cook healthy and law. “I have learned a lot from recipes and learn the basics of my class.” cooking techniques. In the past four semesters of Chefs began by introducing offering the class, the program has themselves to the students and improved the services they provide introducing the recipes. Students to students. This semester, an were taught to practice safe, sanitary practices, such as washing additional four tables were needed to meet the number of the students, hands, wearing gloves, tying their RACHEL MCCLUSKEY Arizona Daily Wildcat

M

compared to only having two tables in previous years, said Gale Welter, campus health nutrition services coordinator. The program offers different skills and recipes at each class, meaning no class is the same. This semester is more skill-based. The meetings used to be once a month but have progressed to being two times a month. Students used to have to sit and watch the main chef cook a meal, whereas now they get to experience hands-on participation by cooking a meal in groups. Students were able to taste their food after it was made, but some students felt like the class could be even more personable in the future. “I would’ve liked it more if it was me personally cooking from

Epsilon Pi fraternity, Abraham has had previous leadership experience. By being a member of Greek Life, from page 1 Abraham can use his connections to include Arizona State University and collaborate with ASUA to bring Spring Fling to campus this year. Northern Arizona University.

ASUA

Michael Truty

Regents set to weigh contract extensions

Alex Barbee

Residence Life plans to request approval from the Arizona Board of Regents, during this week’s meeting in Flagstaff, to purchase land to expand office and storage space. The board will also consider extensions on a number of employee contracts. A piece of property situated at 411 S. Plumer Ave., several miles southeast of campus, is being looked at by Residence Life as a potential location for offices and storage, according to the regents’ meeting agenda. The more than 21,000-square-foot piece of land is being offered to the university at $550,000 and the UA has also obtained an appraisal for the land that supports the purchase. According to the regents’ board book, the intended use of the land includes “office and warehouse space, which is currently not available on campus for Residence Life staff to utilize while supporting students and residential facilities.” While funding for the project will come from “additional funds,” board policy requires the regents’ approval for any purchases of property exceeding $500,000. Administrators will also request that the board approve the appointment of Andrew Comrie as the interim senior vice president for academic

Christopher Chavez

Devin Bembnister

Jake Broido

that occur on college campuses. The goal of the partnership is to provide assistance to the center in the form of donations and resources, while the center provides education and awareness about domestic violence to UA students. Emerge! was formed in 2008, and provides services to domestic violence victims such as temporary shelter, long-term housing, intervention, counseling and educational programs, according to the center’s website. Though the center assists domestic abuse victims in multiple ways, the money donated by the council will go specifically to a new program that the center will launch Oct. 1 to help house domestic abuse victims who would be unsafe at home, Thompson said. “When people are in shelter, they’re still homeless,” she said. “If they don’t have a place to go

News Tips: 621-3193 The Daily Wildcat is always interested in story ideas and tips from readers. If you see something deserving of coverage, contact news editor Kyle Mittan at news@wildcat. arizona.edu or call the newsroom at 621-3193.

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A single copy of the Daily Wildcat is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of mutiple copies will be considered theft and may be prosecuted. Additional copies of the Daily Wildcat are available from the Student Media office. The Daily Wildcat is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.

Sports Reporters Luke Davis Iman Hamdan Kyle Johnson James Kelley Emi Komiya Cameron Moon Evan Rosenfeld

Columnists Dan Desrochers Andres Dominguez Hollie Dowdle Nyles Kendall

was still under 50 percent. Jaime Aguirre, a freshman studying pre-pharmacy and nutritional science, was surprised by how informative the event was. “I wasn’t really expecting it to be like this,” she said. “I thought it was going to be informative, come vote, stuff like that. I actually took back a lot more information than I thought I would, and it wasn’t boring.” All of the ASA interns are new volunteers. Will Palmer, an ASA intern and family studies junior, was particularly enthusiastic about being involved. “I’ve been in college for two or three years now, and I wanted to do something other than party,” he said. “You know, you get to that age, where you’re just going through the motions, and I wanted to do something worthwhile.”

ASA INTERN WILL PALMER speaks to UA students about the importance of voting during the Vote 2012 Kickoff event on Tuesday.

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Arts & Life Writers Teresa Altonaga Andrew Conlogue Alyssa DeMember Greg Gonzales Grant Hull Hayden Jorde Cece Marshall Kate Newton Paige Pollara Alex Whelan Jeannie Wood Sophia Zeno

— Andy Lopez, baseball — Fred Harvey, track and field — Vicky Maes, women’s tennis — William Ryden, gymnastics — James Anderson, men’s golf

Sullivan stressed the importance of student voter registration, and said that ASA is trying to make this year’s campaign the most successful yet. “We’re doing so much voter registration so elected officials will listen to the issues that matter to students and take action on them,” he said. According to Korbesmeyer, the association has registered 3,300 students to vote in Arizona so far, with 1,450 at the UA. However, ASA interns said they still want to increase student voter registration significantly. Even though a record number of students voted in the 2008 election, the percentage of eligible student voters who voted

after the shelter, they’re homeless again, or they might have to go back to the abuser and it puts them back in a violent situation. We try to get them into their own safe home and then wrap our services around them … so they can put down roots, so they can put their kids in school.” Although the donation is the most significant component of the partnership, the collaboration between the council and the center extends beyond oncea-year donations, as Emerge! provides a variety of educational programs and events for fraternities on campus, according to Jeremy Zilmer, intrafraternity council adviser. Events can range from meeting and talking about services to discussing domestic violence. “There are numerous ways that they educate, [and] that’s part of the partnership,” Zilmer said. “They always have events where they need volunteers, so … our fraternities will help them with different events that they need assistance with.”

News Reporters Yara Askar Matt Burns Stephanie Casanova Corina Gallardo Brittny Mejia Yazmine Moore Sarah-Jayne Simon David Weissman

ABOR will consider renewing the employment contracts for the following head coaches:

from page 1

Editor in Chief Kristina Bui Managing Editor Bethany Barnes News Editor Kyle Mittan Sports Editor Zack Rosenblatt Perspectives Editor Kristina Bui

The Daily Wildcat is an independent student newspaper published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters at the University of Arizona. It is distrubted on campus and throughout Tucson with a circulation of 10,000. The function of the Daily Wildcat is to disseminate news to the community and to encourage an exchange of ideas. The Daily Wildcat was founded under a different name in 1899. All copy, photographs, and graphics appearing in the Daily Wildcat are the sole property of the Wildcat and may not be reproduced without the specific consent of the editor in chief.

Awaiting renewal

ASA

Morgan Abraham

from page 1

affairs and provost. Comrie was appointed to the position over the summer following Jacqueline Mok’s departure, and will take the position for a year while administrators search for a permanent replacement. Comrie’s salary for the next year will be $300,000, and he will revert to senior vice president of research at a salary of $190,000 on July 1 next year. The employment contracts of a number of athletics coaches will also be up for approval during the meeting. Check DailyWildcat.com on Thursday and Friday for live blog updates and stories during the regents’ meeting.

KYLE MITTAN Arizona Daily Wildcat

Dylan Peterson

donation

equipment. “We believe in it so much,” Welter said. “All the partners involved, just say, ‘OK, we know we’re not making money on this’ — which would be nice, but we never will. But we love offering this to our students.” Previous events included knife skills and mastering your microwave. Knife skills highlighted dicing, mincing, the batonnet, chiffonade and julienne techniques, as well as the proper way to sharpen a knife. The “master your microwave” course consisted of lessons for students when they are limited in cooking utensils and making a zucchini bread and salmon with corn and avocado salsa. The next class, “Wok Your World,” will be offered on Oct. 9.

INSIDE ABOR

History junior Barbee is the only woman in the race. Her platform advocates for better disability access, a 24-hour coffee shop at the library and raising textbook sellback prices. After spending six months in a wheelchair after a car accident that left her with a shattered pelvis, Barbee said she has seen firsthand how hard it is for students with disabilities to get around campus. Barbee said that half of the The accounting junior has been wheelchair buttons don’t work and the cycling club’s president for two more elevator inspections are needed. years and said he has yet to see an ASUA senator come to the one of his Chavez is a biology freshman that club’s meetings. His frustration with the lack of transparency of ASUA has came to the UA from a private Catholic motivated him to run on the platform high school, which he said he was able of improving relations between ASUA to attend due to private donors and tax credits. Chavez wants to push to work and students. with Scholarship Universe to offer something similar to UA students. Chavez added that he also wants Bembnister is a political science sophomore advocating to lower to create a mandatory survey for textbook costs, diversify scholarships freshmen to find out their hobbies in order to present students with clubs and have a UA yard sale. Bembnister plans to lower textbook that are compatible to them. costs by mandating that professors who require textbooks they have Broido is a pre-law junior running authored agree to be monitored by the UA administration to keep track of how on a platform of increasing job outreach for students, promoting the often the textbook is actually used. The UA yard sale idea incorporates use of the Sun Link Tucson Modern students paying a small fee for a space Streetcar, and to increase school spirit. on the UA Mall to sell, barter, swap and By holding small speaking events with buy furniture and textbooks from other alumni, students will have a chance to students with the leftover items going follow up with the speaker and have a mentor throughout college. to goodwill. Another idea of Broido’s is to hold a barbecue on the Mall where students The engineering management can meet the athletes at the school. junior wants to increase parking Polls for voting on the seat will open at the Rec Center, increase alumni networking and have Spring Fling held at 8 a.m. on Oct. 3, and close at 8 p.m. Election results will be announced at on campus. As the president of the Alpha 6 p.m. the following day. Truty is a philosophy freshman running on a platform of more accessibility and responsibility for ASUA. He added that students have a responsibility to the earth and that he would fight to implement the use of paper bags among the facilities at the UA.

beginning to end,” said Shanan Immel, a microbiology sophomore. The teaching technique also changed this semester to allow one main chef to teach the classes with a microphone, while the rest of the student chefs help each individual student. Meghann Miller, main chef for the past three semesters of the program and a dietics senior, works 10 hours a week for $10 an hour. She plans the recipes two weeks prior to the scheduled class. “Sometimes I will look up stuff online for inspiration and tweak it to make it healthier,” Miller said. “It definitely challenges me.” The initial investment of the program was $5,000 and the fees for the classes help supply the

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Driverless vehicles to be tested on Calif. roads MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Google co-founder Sergey Brin and Gov. Jerry Brown carpooled to work Tuesday in a white Toyota Prius, but no one was driving. One day, in the not-so-distant future, you can join them. Brown hitched a futuristic ride to Google’s Mountain View, Calif., headquarters to sign landmark legislation that will allow self-driving cars to hit California streets by 2015. The governor had a look of utter amazement as he walked out of Google’s “autonomous” Prius after a test-drive with Brin, who is so used to the robot car that he’s tired of driving regular ones. How’d it go? “Great,” the governor said. “Only way to go, guys.” Supporters hailed it as the day science fiction starts to become reality, though it will be at least a few years before the first driverless cars reach the market. Backers envision a time when chains of robot cars will travel closely together and never make mistakes, thereby eliminating traffic and accidents. “I expect that self-driving cars are going to be far safer than human-driven cars,” Brin said to an audience of reporters and Google workers, who gave their boss the biggest roar of applause when he said: “Self-driving cars do not run red lights.” The search giant pushed the driverless car bill, overwhelmingly approved by the Legislature last month, as major automakers such as Ford, Audi and BMW and researchers at places such as Stanford work on developing the cars for consumers. The process will have two parts under the bill, SB 1298. First, automakers will have to get their

driverless cars approved by the DMV. Second, drivers will need to obtain a separate operating permit and sit behind the wheel of the car in case its computer crashes and a human needs to take control. Google’s autonomous Priuses, which have logged more than 300,000 test miles, also stop and require human operation in situations like construction zones that are hard for computers to navigate — much to Brin’s chagrin. “I really quickly got really sick of that,” Brin said. He’d tell the car, “No, you drive!” Beyond the technical challenge of teaching a computer to navigate a system of roads that can frustrate even the most seasoned drivers, there are many other concerns that still need to be worked out. Auto manufacturers opposed the bill because of confusion over who would be legally liable if someone alters a car after it’s sold to make it autonomous — and it then gets into a crash. And some consumer groups charge that Google and other companies are really just interested in using the onboard computers to track people’s movements like they do on the Web. “There is all kinds of potentially sensitive information that would be gathered from a person using the vehicle, and there is no assurance that it won’t be used for other purposes, like setting insurance rates or advertising,” said John Simpson, privacy project director at Consumer Watchdog, a nonprofit based in Santa Monica, Calif. Brin called building the cars “very hard and fascinating,” while Brown cited his refrain that California should lead the way in innovation. “These self-driving cars,” Brown said, “are another step forward in the long march of California pioneering the future.”

MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

A DRIVERLESS CAR IS on display in Mountain View, Calif., on Tuesday. California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill allowing driverless cars to be operated on public roads for testing purposes.

PETA fights to end N.C.’s annual tradition MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

RALEIGH, N.C. — For 20 years, the jubilant citizens of Brasstown, N.C., have welcomed the new year by catching a wild opossum, placing it in a Plexiglas cage draped with tinsel and slowly lowering it over a cheering crowd as fireworks explode in the night sky. But last December, this mountain-town tradition caught the eye of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, who have since fought to stop Brasstown’s annual possum drop for the sake of the tree-dwelling, nocturnal marsupials and the animal lovers who cherish them. “Possums are very shy,” said Martina Bernstein, director of litigation for PETA. “They don’t run up to people. They run away. They have no way to hide. They are wild

animals. You can’t explain to them that you just want to have fun.” On Tuesday, Senior Administrative Law Judge Fred Morrison Jr. denied the state’s motion to dismiss PETA’s case. That guarantees this debate will rage on at least another month and it could put this year’s possum drop in jeopardy. Over the next few weeks, the question of just what can and can’t be done to a woodland creature will persist. “The whole thing is moot,” argued Norman Young, assistant attorney general. “The possum is back running around in the woods somewhere for all we know.” “But he could have trauma,” Morrison noted. “He could have been eaten by a bigger animal for all we know,” Young said.

Start the Year a Winner!

The case revolves around Clay Logan, who holds the possum drop at his country store in the small town near the Georgia border about 100 miles west of Asheville. He received a permit from the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission that spelled out the size of the cage and terms of its release. “I tried to figure out what I could do to get attention without going to jail,” Logan said in a 2010 videotape shot by photographer Charles “Stretch” Ledford. Logan’s event draws national attention for its offbeat take on the Times Square apple drop in New York, and the Brasstown crowds swell into the thousands. “I think they have a musketry demonstration and some kind of male beauty contest to pick the possum queen,” Young said in Tuesday’s hearing, describing

the goings-on at the alcohol-free show. PETA filed a lawsuit in December, seeking a temporary restraining order, which was denied. Now, the group’s petition sits with the Office of Administrative Hearings, where the parties agreed Tuesday to seek summary judgment. Further appeals are likely. In her argument Tuesday, Bernstein said PETA’s case will not rest on whether the possum endured cruelty. “To us, it’s clear that the possum suffers,” she said. “Other people may not see that, and it’s hard to find experts.” Rather, she said, PETA will argue that wildlife is for everyone in North Carolina to enjoy, and such enjoyment is curtailed if a government agency allows animals to be held captive without special requirements being met.

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Editor: Kristina Bui letters@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-7579

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Editorial Pass/Fail

The Arizona Daily Wildcat puts the issues to the test. Do they make the grade? Check back soon for a fully functioning ASUA

In its usual fashion, the Associated Students of the University of Arizona is lagging, this time in maximizing accessibility to information on the special election to fill the seat of former Sen. Claire Theobald. As of Tuesday, the same night of the candidate Q & A, no candidate platforms had been released on the special elections website. Instead, at the bottom of the page, a note read, “Check back soon for the candidates’ pictures and platforms!” To ASUA’s credit, the candidates’ names have been posted, at least, so if you’re one of the few voters we expect to participate, you can make a selection based on who has the coolest name. Senatorial candidate Jake Broido has a lot of potential for nicknames, probably. But we’d rather you be able to vote based on candidates’ platforms. We’re not really interested in why the platforms aren’t on the special election website or when they finally will be, although we do hope they appear before voting actually starts. In much the same way professors don’t really care if you fell asleep or had other commitments, no excuse will stop ASUA from getting a fail for not being timely with special election information. The fact is that, five days after candidates were named, no one knows what those names stand for. Your vote should be about who you believe will represent you best and keep your interests at heart. But it sure is hard to tell who that person is if all you have to go by are some names.

F

PTS keeps heavy traffic, road rage under control

Construction on the Sun Link Tucson Modern Streetcar has made walking, biking or driving to and from class a little hectic, especially in high-traffic areas of campus like Second Street, east of Second Street Parking Garage. Pedestrians never look both ways, the bikes never stop and the cars are just too aggressive. And, while people are always going when they shouldn’t, the rest of traffic is always backed up. Getting around the construction is stressful enough without also feeling like everyone is blocking your way. That’s why we’re delighted to know Parking and Transportation Services personnel or University of Arizona Police Department officers will be out on Second Street in the afternoon during heavy-traffic times, reminding everyone to look both ways and yield to stop signs. A pass goes to efforts that will make the journey to class a little easier on all of us. It’s nice to know someone is out there, helping us take turns and get to class in one piece.

P

SAT tests patience, not college preparedness

Average SAT scores fell two points this year — one point in critical reading and one in writing. The drop in scores is smaller than last year’s six-point decrease, but the College Board’s annual report says the drop can be attributed to American students not taking high school classes that properly prepare them for college. The board also finds that a substantial achievement gap persists between different racial and ethnic groups, in addition to those from different socioeconomic backgrounds. In perhaps the most serious finding of the report, released Monday by the College Board, which owns the SAT, only 43 percent of 2012 high school graduates are prepared for success in college. Still, an incomplete goes to this finding. To be deemed ready for college, students have to meet a benchmark score set by the board. But other factors contribute to predicting student success, such as stability at home and accessibility to better high school courses. The SAT is just one factor that indicates college readiness, as the board itself noted, and the reliability of standardized testing in general is questionable.

I

— Editorials are determined by the Daily Wildcat’s editorial board and written by one of its members. They are Bethany Barnes, Kristina Bui, Jason Krell and Alex Williams. They can be reached at letters@wildcat.arizona.edu or on Twitter via @WildcatOpinions.

The Daily Wildcat editorial policy

Daily Wildcat staff editorials represent the official opinion of the Daily Wildcat staff, which is determined at staff editorial meetings. Columns, cartoons, online comments and letters to the editors represent the opinion of their author and do not represent the opinion of the Daily Wildcat.

Medicaid numbers highlight state Legislature’s ineptitude These women have no choice were quick to place blame on but to give birth now that the depraved, low-income contraception mothers who are services have having children been practically out of wedlock. The increase in outlawed. “It’s a sad Nyles Kendall Medicaid-covered Conservative commentary Arizona Daily Wildcat births has less to doctrine tells that women are mothers that they choosing through do with feckless, Appropriations Committee, in should carry their circumstance or fertile women and an interview with the Republic. whatever reason child to term more to do with “There clearly is a serious irrespective of to go ahead and cultural problem in this state the economy. their financial have sex prior to and this nation if the numbers situation, but marriage or to have risen.” once these mothers give birth, not have a commitment to the What’s amazing is that a other person to get married and they are vilified for receiving the $200 million program was take care of this child,” said Sen. government assistance needed overlooked by the same to ensure the health and wellLinda Gray, R-Glendale and Legislature that took pride in chairwoman of the senate public being of their newborn. capping AHCCCS payments In essence, once the child safety and human-services to hospitals and freezing survives nine months of committee, to the Republic. Medicaid enrollment. Just two In reality, a place where Gray gestation, its life is no longer years ago, in the state’s haste to does not reside, the increase in worth protecting. slash entitlement benefits, two Such is the state of Medicaid-covered births has Medicaid recipients were denied less to do with feckless, fertile conservative ideology as potentially life-saving organ women and more to do with the it concerns childbirth and transplants and died as a result. economy. It’s only natural for socioeconomic status, and The fact that, for years, the like Arizona’s $200 million people to rely more on public millions of taxpayer dollars in Medicaid-covered births, services like Medicaid when used to fund Medicaid-covered they are unable to make ends the hypocrisy is likely to go births went unaccounted for is meet and the job market is less unnoticed. both a blessing and a testament than stellar. to the ineptitude of those — Nyles Kendall But Gray’s comments are charged with handling the is a political science senior. He even more laughable given the state’s finances. can be reached at fact that her party has done True to form, the letters@wildcat.arizona.edu everything in its power to conservative politicians or on Twitter via limit the accessibility of safe responsible for this oversight @WildcatOpinions. abortions and birth control.

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rizona’s latest Medicaid numbers are in, and to the chagrin of many conservative, budgetary hawks, taxpayers are footing the bill for 53 percent of the state’s births. According to cost estimates compiled by The Arizona Republic, the share of births paid for by the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System has increased on an annual basis and is now costing the state more than $200 million. Despite the Legislature’s aggressive efforts to decrease spending on public services, the ballooning cost of Medicaidcovered births has surprisingly gone unnoticed. In fact, many of the state’s legislators were caught unaware when the program’s exorbitant price-tag was pointed out to them. “I had no idea that the number had grown to that ridiculous level,” said Rep. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, chairman of the House

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Your views

In response to “Anti-American sentiment in Middle East is cause for self-reflection” (by Andres Dominguez, Sept. 17): So … I believe he was making the point of where the line should be drawn. I think he is well aware of the Constitution, no need to be condescending. However, where and how do we as a “civilized” society draw the line? How do we stand by idly while people spew hatred that causes the deaths of others? While free speech is one of our most fundamental and treasured rights as United States citizens, you can’t blame those of us who are tired of the rhetoric and havoc that hate brings about to the innocent. — Mita Almeida

usual attitude by groups of people partying down here, I’ll ask once and then I’ll call the police. If they’re not going to respect someone asking courteously, then they can deal with the repercussions. — Mac In response to “Despite promising enrollment numbers, UA still has work to do” (by Andres Dominguez, Sept. 25): You could always offer a minor in hip-hop. — rdiggity1

In response to “From the newsroom: ‘Illegal’ versus ‘undocumented’ in immigration debate a conversation worth having” (by Bethany Barnes, Sept. 24): First of all, civil offenses are certainly violations of law and are just as illegal as murder or robbery. We call a violation a “civil offense” simply because the punishment prescribed by law involves less than 30 days in jail, and because the determination of guilt can be made by a simple magistrate without the need for a jury and a full trial in front Mita writes, “While free speech is one of our most fundamental and of a judge. treasured rights as United States citizens, you can’t blame those of us Usually civil offenses are minor crimes that can be punished with who are tired of the rhetoric and havoc that hate brings about to the a fine. Putting too much into your IRA account results in an illegal innocent.” contribution. A car that is too far from the curb is “parked illegally.” Mita, that’s exactly the opposite of my point. Freedom of speech We say a driver made an “illegal left-hand turn” if he fails to signal. cannot be shut down because you are tired of it or its consequences on Finally, a business is “illegally located” if it violates the zoning laws. a people who cannot handle it. All these are examples of civil violations. Such crimes are treated What Islam needs is freedom of speech. It might help it understand differently mainly to save the taxpayers’ money and keep the regular just how flippin’ backwards it is. courts from getting swamped with caseload. There are certainly ­— Arafat worse things a person can do, but the fact remains that crossing our international borders without proper permission, is wrong and is a In response to “Students, near-campus residents must compromise serious violation of American law. on housing conflicts” (by Dan Desrochers, Sept. 20): Persons guilty of this behavior are rightfully called “illegal aliens” or Last time I had an issue with my neighbors, who are sophomores, “illegal immigrants.” They are jumping the que and making an illegal I went over at 2 a.m., knocked on their door and when one of them end run around the immigration limits set by Congress. Law-abiding answered and I asked them to keep it down because I could hear them Americans rightfully resent and despise line jumpers in any situation. from my bedroom through two walls and a closed door. I was told to The offense should not be sugar coated or treated as something it is “f*** off.” Not the first time I’ve heard that from these people, either. not. Am I saying every situation is like that? Of course not — but given the — Hacim Obmed

CONTACT US | The Daily Wildcat accepts original, unpublished letters from all of its readers. • Email letters to: letters@wildcat.arizona.edu 

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• Letters should include name, connection to the university (year, major, etc.) and contact information. 

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A University of Arizona Police Department officer saw a DAILY WILDCAT red Mitsubishi Eclipse turn into a parallel lane on Highland Avenue at 2:18 a.m. on Sunday, nearly crashing into ELEMENTS TO A SUCCESSFUL another vehicle which was turning right. As the Mitsubishi turned left, traveling about 37 mph in a 30 mph zone, it crossed the lane divider. AFT PLA ER TH 15.28 YE E CATat Euclid Avenue and Fifth AFT WD The officer stopped the car ILD +1 OM RS, B DEPA W PLA ER TH RT A N’S OTH Y DAP EA +2 THE URE O WO YERS, E DE LASKETW TIN IB DAIL spoke with the driver, he smelled G TY Street. As the officer ADAMEN’S BOTH PARTU BAL MEN’SF KEY +5 O PTIN BAS THE RE O NEW L TIE THE A N K A G T ETB MD MEN F K A B DNA LEAL S AR D A O E marijuana coming from the vehicle, and asked both the ASK DER C EA OF NEW LL TE ’S AN Y E S A H T IP COA TBAL ELEMENTS FOR YOUR MODERN FAMILY LEA MS A D DER RE CH L A A LO driver and her passenger to step out of the vehicle. SHIP RO OK NEWUND T H N E P The man claimed he had earlierFa IYA ACB 1 WbeenGwithFrhis friend Al Gr U 2 THE ROA TTS 2011 ARIZ D TO ’ who had been smoking marijuana. The officer didn’t notice ON -12 35 A E P ARI R Z INSID 9-23-11 either the man or woman showing symptoms of marijuana EVIE ONA BA 2 E—A T O N use. W G SKETBALL TS TO — A3 EVEN S : N C T M S D L R R A D RETU UID — A3 CALEN After searching the vehicle the officer didn’t find any ILBUR TEES MER W INDUC E DAILY WILDCAT A FOR FAME — A4 F K marijuana, but did find a loaded Browning 9 mm pistol O E E L L THE W W HA LOO under the front passenger seat. Under the driver’s seat, the DAIL NE SNAPSHYOATLTSYONFOMINEERSEV—IE7W — 13 K Y W RO G GAME P officer found a black, plastic BB pistol without a gas cylinder FOR ING TH I COMIN A B E DNA HOMELDC or ammunition. ASK O A F AT COAETBAL CH L A A LO Both the man and the woman claimed the weapons RO OK NEWUND T H NIYA PAC E weren’t theirs, that they didn’t know who they belonged to -12 THE ROA BUTTS 2011 ARIZ D TO ’ and that they were unaware of how the weapons got in the ON 1 2 A P ARI R vehicle. EVIE ZONA BA The driver said she is the only one who drives the vehicle, W G SKETBALL UID but that a lot of people ride in her car. The man admitted E DAILY WILDCAT that he is a convicted felon and is therefore not allowed to DAILY WILDCAT possess weapons. LOO K The officer took the weapons for safekeeping and ELEMENTS FOR YOUR MODERN FAMILY FOR ING ELEMENTS TO A SUCCESSFUL SSFUL evidence, and gave the driver a case number if she happened A W G Fr Al Gr Fa to determine the owner of the weapons. The driver was E INSIDand released A2 given a warning for traffic violations with her — E T TO NO A3 VENTS vehicle and the passenger at the scene. NS — R: E 15.28 AFT 3 RETUR ENDA

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Two UAPD officers went to the Apache-Santa Cruz Residence Hall to respond to a report about the smell of 35 burning marijuana coming from the second floor at 12:35 9-23-11 a.m. on Monday. Upon arrival, officers spoke with the resident assistant on duty who had reported the smell. As soon as the officers entered the residents’ room on the second floor, they could smell marijuana and dryer sheets. Both roommates were in the room at the time, and both identified themselves with Arizona driver’s licenses. At first, both residents claimed they didn’t have marijuana in their room, but later they said they had a small amount after one of the officers pointed out the rolling papers on one of their desks. One of the residents reached into a printer on the floor under his bed and gave the officers a small plastic bag, T containing 1.8 grams of marijuana. Then the resident ILDCA ILY W DAsmall handed the officers another bag, which contained amounts of “shake,” the small, leftover bits of marijuana. ELEMENTS EL NTS FOR YOUR MODERN FAMILY F Both residents were cited for unlawful possession of marijuana. The resident who brought out the bags from W G Fr Al Gr Fa under his bed was cited with an additional charge of unlawful possession of narcotic paraphernalia due to the fact that the rolling papers were on his desk. C T M S D L

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A UAPD officer noticed a student, surrounded by five other men, leaning over the 2-foot high cement wall in front of the Coronado Residence Hall at 1:30 a.m. on Sunday. When the officer approached the scene, the five men standing around him immediately stepped away. The student was vomiting over the wall. He appeared unable to stand. His breath smelled like alcohol and his eyes were bloodshot and watery. The officer noticed the student was unable to keep his eyes open for the most part and he couldn’t answer questions. He admitted to the officer that he had been drinking beer before the officer arrived. After the Tucson Fire Department arrived to medically assist the student, the officer referred him to the Dean of Students Office for minor in possession of alcohol in body, and he was cleared to return to his room.

Police Beat is compiled from official University of Arizona Police Department reports. A complete list of UAPD activity can be found at www.uapd.arizona.edu.

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Masks’: Learn about Chinese movie director Wu Tianming and his films with professor and scholar Tan Ye from the University of South Carolina. Free screening of the award winning film “King of Masks” by director Wu Tianming. Sept. 26, 3:30 - 6:30p.m. Student Union Memorial Center South Ballroom

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of Music presents “Beyond the Etudes: A Time T Traveler’s M Master S Class D with L Carl Czerny” featuring guest artist Eckart Sellheim, fortepiano. Hosted by Regents’ Professor of Music Paula Fan, this promises to be a delightful and ear-opening evening. Eckart Sellheim appears as the maestro, who will share his experiences as pianist and composer, reminisce about Beethoven, Liszt and other musical luminaries, and coach UA piano students as they perform on his 1810 Rosenberger fortepiano. Sept. 26 from 7-8:30pm. TRADITION

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Graduate Writing Workshop-‘Creating an Effective Proposal: This Graduate Writing Workshop is part of a semesterlong series of workshops conducted by Victoria Stefani of the Writing Skills Improvement Program. This weekly series Uapresents: Bonnie Raitt: “The hippest is designed to address the central chalthing an artist can do these days is cover faced by academic writers in all Klenges EY Bonnie Raitt,” proclaimed Yahoo! Music. NEW L TE AM AND A nine-time Grammy winner and Rock Bicycle Safety and Education Campaign: LEADERSSHAIPRfiE elds. All workshops are free and open to everyone. No advanced registration is and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, she has The University of Arizona Police Department, required – just show up! Sept. 26 @4-5pm. changed the landscape of soul, rock and in conjunction with Parking and TransFo llo blues music with her unique style, inimitable portation Services, would likewto on take this The Ripple Effect Workshop SeriesT ww witt E and soulful vocals. She returns slide opportunity to encourage your wsupport .po er @U ‘Love Your Body and Treat It Right’: SIDguitar int o IN f A gu ard Poin to the spotlight after — A2 a seven-year hiatus with and participation in the Bicycle Safety and u.c t NOTE om GuarThe Ripple Effect is a weekly health and dU 3 TS TO – her EVEN Education Campaign.The Bicycle Safety S — A19th album. Rolling Stone N wellness series focused on topics that LENDAR: Slipstream R U T A3 R RE CA said “sheer EES — verve and skill” make WILBURaitt’s and Education Campaign is designed to T R C E affect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgenU M D E IN 4 A FOR F FAM K — Atwo women among their one of only E educate community members on UniverE der, queer and questioning individuals.EW HALL Oher W THE N TS O S—7 ofF “100 Guitarists of All Time.” sity regulations and Arizona state laws EEGreatest Co-sponsored by LGBTQ Affairs, Cam- SNAPSHOlist OMIN — 13 LTY Nperformance VIEW is the UApresents 2012A Y This O relating to bicycle traffic while providing R E PRE pus Health Service, Pride Alliance, Delta M A G ING important tips for safeguarding bicycles Lambda Phi and SPRITE, these workshops HOMECOM2013 season opener on Sept. 26 at 7:30pm against theft. Sept 26 from 9am-11am. are led by trained professionals who will Sustainable Landscapes Tour: As the oldest Main Campus on Olive Ave and Second St.. cover the ins and outs of health in a fun, continually maintained public green space educational way. Sept. 26 from 5:30-7pm. in Arizona, the University values landscape Lecture-‘Chinese Cinema And Director Wu management practices that ensure we will Tianming’ with Free Screening of ‘King of Piano Performance: The U of A School ".

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Public Reading by Renowned Austrian Novelist and Essayist Josef Haslinger Renowned Austrian novelist, dramatist and essayist Josef Haslinger will do a public reading in English and German. Haslinger’s works include the political thriller “Opera Ball” and the collection “Tsunami: A Report from Phi Phi Island.” An engaged spokesman on the relationship between creative writing, literary culture and public affairs, Haslinger teaches at the University of Leipzig’s Institute for German Literature. Please join an AFTwith this engaging and rare bilingual reading PLA ER TH YER E S, B DEP OM Poetry honored guest. Sept. 26, 4-6 pmAWUA A DAP EN’S B OTH T RTURE A H G T SKETB E ME OF Center, 1508 E. Helen St. RubelTINRoom N’S AL O

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thrive in the future. Visit key campus locaU tions and learn how we are implementing sustainable practices. This tour begins at the UA Visitor Center Sept. 26, 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. UA Visitor Center, 811 N. Euclid Ave.

Tucson

Arizona Theatre Company Presents ‘Next to Normal’: Arizona Theatre Company presents an award-winning musical that explores how one suburban family copes with crisis. The southwest premiere at Temple of Music and Art follows a long Broadway run. The event is ongoing until Oct. 6. 330 S. Scott Ave. Please see website for times and admission. 520-622-2823

ELEMENTS FOR YOUR MODERN FAMILY

Desert Initiative – ‘Looking Across the Border’: The Louis Carlos W Bernal G Gallery’s Fr artAl exhibition presents innovative investigations of the desert, at Pima Community College, West campus. Event is ongoing until Oct. 5. C Mon./Wed. T M10:30S 2202 W. Anklam Road. am-5pm, Tue./Thu. 10am-5pm, Friday, 10 am-3pm. Free admission. 520-206-6942

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TRADITION

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San Xavier Mission Guided Tours Sept. 11,— (No End Date): 1950 W. San Xavier Road, 520-294-2624 Docents lead 45-minute tours of Mission San Xavier del Bac, thew National Historic Landmark, Monday - Saturday, and explain the mission’s rich history and ornate interior. www.patronatosanxavier.org/

To sponsor this calendar, or list an event, email calendar@dailywildcat.com or call 621.3425 Deadline 3pm 2 business days prior to publication


SPORTS

 Editor: Zack Rosenblatt sports@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 626-2956

Page 6

TWITTER.COM/WILDCATSPORTS

SCOREBOARD:

MLB Philadelphia 6, Washington 3

Detroit 2, Kansas City O

Toronto 4, Baltimore O

Nicholson fighting through injuries for UA EMI KOMIYA Arizona Daily Wildcat

Junior libero Candace Nicholson is a pivotal member of the Arizona volleyball team, as she is the only player on the team with two years of program experience. At the moment she is fighting through a rib injury, but that hasn’t let that keep her off the court. Arizona athletics trainer Emily Johnson said Nicholson’s rib inflammation is likely to persist until the end of the season. She said that multiple irritated muscles cause Nicholson’s ribs to shift out of place. Nicholson has been the starting defensive player for every match this season, an impressive feat despite her injury. During matches, a heating pad is prepared for Nicholson every time head coach Dave Rubio calls a time out. “Sometimes she’ll hit the floor and I won’t think that she might get up, but then she always does,” sophomore outside hitter Taylor Arizobal said. The team relies heavily on a solid defense to compete in the Pac12. Nicholson leads the team with 199 digs this season and averages 4.33 digs per set, more than double any of her fellow teammates. A full-time starting position along with an average of 10 hours of

Larry hogan/arizona Daily Wildcat

LIBERO Candace Nicholson’s experience and willingness to fight through injuries has been a vital part to the Wildcats’ early success.

practice each week can take a toll steadily gotten more painful and uncomfortable in the last month. on strained muscles. “I started having back probNicholson said her rib bruising and chronic back problems have lems spring of my freshman year

and then, just as college has gone on, it’s gotten worse,” Nicholson said. ““It doesn’t stop me from doing anything, so I’ve just kind of

learned to deal with it.” Nicholson’s teammates are also taking notice of her tougness and good attitude. “Candace is definitely a fighter,” junior setter Chanel Brown said. “She has a lot of things that go on with her body, but you would never tell if she’s in a game or in practice. She never complains about it, no matter what her body is not allowing her to do. So it’s good for our team to see how hard she works, even through pain.” Nicholson said that despite the major discomfort she feels every time her muscles are strained, she will continue to play. She doesn’t anticipate any long-term damage once she is done playing volleyball. “It’s because we practice so much. You never get a chance to let anything heal, so it’s just overuse,” Nicholson said. Along with back pains, which are improving, and her irritated ribs, Nicholson will also have to undergo wrist surgery sometime in the future after two seasons of playing injured. “Candace is by far one of the toughest student athletes I’ve ever worked with,” Johnson said. “Volleyball is very unforgiving but she still get out there and it’s my job to make sure she’s as comfortable as possible.”

Wildcats work overtime to fix receiving woes ZACK ROSENBLATT Arizona Daily Wildcat

In the opening moments of the fourth quarter against Oregon on Saturday, the way things were going, Arizona didn’t have much of a chance of coming back from a 28-0 deficit. Quarterback Matt Scott was in the midst of his worst game of the season. But, on the first play of the fourth quarter, things almost turned around. Scott had sophomore receiver Tyler Slavin one-on-one with Oregon defensive back Troy Hill and threw a perfect ball at the front of the left side of the end zone, away from the defender. All Slavin had to do was secure the ball, and the Wildcats would have scored their first points of the game. Instead, the ball hit his hands and went to the ground. Arizona ended up losing 49-0. Receivers drop balls all the time, but in recent weeks (and in particular against the Ducks) it has been a reoccurring problem. “We have to clean it up,” receivers coach Tony Dews said. “None of us are happy with the way everything went. We did not play particularly well as a group, in my opinion. There’s certainly a lot of room to grow and a lot of room to make corrections.” On numerous occasions Scott did not appear to be on the same page as

the receivers. It might not have been a factor on every one of his three interceptions or 22 incompletions, but it certainly didn’t help Arizona’s chances of winning the game. “In a hostile place like Autzen Stadium — we had some miscommunications on some routes,” Scott said. “I thought some guys were going deep and they pulled up and I thought guys were going to pull up and they went deep. We just have to get that fixed this week, and we will.” “We just all weren’t on the same page,” receiver Richard Morrison added. “We just were unfocused and weren’t doing what we were taught to do. “It didn’t have anything to do with the environment [at Autzen Stadium], it was all us. ” So, Morrison and other receivers have taken to the JUGS machine, which fires footballs at a rapid rate from different angles to help wideouts practice catching the ball, to fix the problem. Morrison in particular struggled in the first two weeks with drops, and he said the main issue with himself and the rest of the receiving corps is a lack of concentration. Against Toledo in week one, Scott and the offense were moving the ball up the field on the first drive of

Larry hogan/arizona Daily Wildcat

ARIZONA RECEIVERS have struggled recently with catching the ball in key situations, in particular at or near the red zone. Receivers coach Tony Dews is working with players like Richard Morrison and Austin Hill (pictured) to remedy the situation.

the game before Morrison dropped a potential touchdown, forcing the UA to settle for a field goal. Then, against Oklahoma State in week two, Morrison had another drop in the first half. As he dove for a potential touchdown grab, the ball slipped through his hands. Still, despite the drops, Scott continued to show confidence in the junior receiver as he was targeted 20 times in the first two weeks and is third on the team with 18 receptions for 141 yards and a team-best two touchdowns.

Morrison feels like the drops do stick with him, but he’s forcing himself to catch 50 balls for every catch he missed in a game using a JUGS machine. “It sticks in the back of my mind. It’s failure to me, a missed drop,” Morrison said. “If you wanna be an All-Pac-12 player you can’t drop balls, that’s how I look at it. I hate to miss balls, so if I miss them I really harp on myself about it.” During games, when it comes to coaching a player that just dropped a potential touchdown, Dews tries to

avoid getting too angry at receivers because they already know they’ve made a mistake. “Last thing they need is you to remind them,” Dews said. “So it comes back to, ‘OK, it’s over. You gotta move on to the next play.’” The coaching staff keeps track of drops in each game, and Dews isn’t particularly happy with the team’s number this season. “One drop is too many,” Dews said. “You don’t get so many opportunities in games so we need to take advantage of the opportunities we have.”

Arizona hockey looks to end losing streak against ASU JAMES KELLEY Arizona Daily Wildcat

Arizona Daily Wildcat file photo

ARIZONA has lost 24 games in a row to ASU after winning 64 consecutive games before that.

After the UA’s 12-year, 64-game winning streak, the Sun Devils turned the tables, and Arizona hasn’t won once against ASU in 24 games. The Wildcats will try to put a stop to that streak this weekend when they take on ASU on Friday and Saturday at Oceanside Arena in Tempe, Ariz. “It’s always a huge rivalry between the two schools and it’s kind of flip-flopped in the past few years,” said assistant coach Dave Dougall. “We’re looking to claw back into it.” Dougall, UA captain and forward Brian Slugocki and Arizona head coach Sean Hogan said ASU’s rise was in large part due to recruiting. The Sun Devils are ranked No. 4, are a national championship favorite and will play Penn State, an NCAA Division I opponent, this year. “They now put a different type of player on the ice than they used to,” said Dougall, who played for the UA and was a captain when it won the national championship in 1985. The Wildcats’ losing streak against the Sun Devils’ started while Jeremy Goltz coached ASU from 2008 to 2010. Goltz, who won national coach of the year in 2010, led ASU to only its sixth appearance in the national tournament at the time and its second win there. “[Goltz] was a part of that whole transition for sure,” Hogan said. “He worked really hard to bring that program up a level too.” After Goltz left, current head coach Greg Powers

turned the Sun Devils into a national competitor. Those accomplishments made Powers into a finalist for the American Collegiate Hockey Association Coach of the Year award last season. ASU has played in the national tournament seven times, 1996, 1997, 2004, 2007 and 2010 to 2012. They originally qualified in 2008, but were ruled ineligible for using a community college student and were replaced by the UA. The UA has been to the national tournament 21 times, but only once since 2003 in 2006. ASU also didn’t beat Arizona until 1996. During that time, ASU hockey was a Division II team. Now the hockey program has teams at all three ACHA levels. “They went from basically being nonexistent to a national championship contender under [Powers in] the last three or four years,” Hogan said. The changing of the guard was gradual. During the 2003-04 season ASU won the season series for the first time, and during the 2009-10 season ASU swept the season series. Arizona’s last win against its rival was a 2009 shoot-out win at home. Last year, however, five of the eight losses were by two goals or less, one a shoot-out loss. “It sucks. it’s just frustrating because we’ve been so close in those games,” Slugocki said. “It’s been one little odd bounce here and there. That’s kind of what costs us and we want to end that this weekend, but they’re a good team and it is going to take everything we got to beat them.”


Sports •

wednesday, september

Arizona Daily Wildcat •

26, 2012

7

Football Notes

David Richards emerging as key receiver KYLE JOHNSON Arizona Daily Wildcat

The crushing 49-0 defeat No. 2 Oregon handed Arizona last weekend won’t be one to remember for most players, but redshirt freshman receiver David Richards will at least have some positives to take away. Richards, who had just two catches for 14 yards coming into the game, made his first career start and ended up being one of the few bright spots on an otherwise awful night offensively for the Wildcats. “I think I did all right,” Richards said. “I could have executed a little better on my plays and did better on my blocking.” With senior Terrence Miller out, a spot was open at outside receiver and Richards stepped in. He had team-highs in both catches and yards, with seven receptions for 50 yards, despite the overall lack of production in the passing game. “He comes out and he works very hard every day,” receivers coach Tony Dews

said. “So him having a chance to play was good for him and he obviously took advantage of some opportunities to help the team.” Head coach Rich Rodriguez said Richards’ role will depend on the health of some of the other receivers, but he’s still considered part of the regular rotation. “He’s been playing pretty well,” Rodriguez said. “Smart guy, knows both outside receiver positions … He’s had a pretty good three or four games so far.” The biggest thing that’s helped Richards this season is his movement from inside receiver, where the previous coaching staff had him, to the outside, which is a more possession-oriented position. “I think I like this coaching staff a little better,” Richards said. “They care about us and treat us better, so I like playing for them.”

Now that a matchup with the state’s other team, No. 18 Oregon State, is coming up, a relationship again exists between the two head coaches. “I’ve known Mike [Riley] for a long time,” Rodriguez said of Oregon State’s head coach, “but we haven’t spent a lot of time talking X’s and O’s and anything like that.” Riley runs a much more conventional offense at Oregon State, at least compared to the Wildcats’ first three opponents, but he and Rodriguez have known each other for more than a decade. The two met through a mutual friend, Pittsburgh’s coach Paul Chryst, who worked first with Rodriguez at West Virginia in 1989 and then worked with Riley at several stops including the Canadian Football League and the San Diego Chargers. Chryst introduced the two, and while the styles never rubbed off, there is a great deal of respect between the two coaches. “(Riley’s) a really good guy,” A lot was made last week about the Rodriguez said, “Good coach. He makes philosophical connection between the adjustments to his players and he’s been offenses Rodriguez and Oregon’s head very successful at what he’s doing for a coach Chip Kelly run. long time in a lot of different leagues.”

Playing an old friend

Larry hogan/arizona Daily Wildcat

RECEIVER DAVID RICHARDS readies to lay out for a catch against South Carolina State on Sept. 15. Due to injuries to other players, Richards has played a larger role recently.

Second-year coach aims for last season’s success EVAN ROSENFELD Arizona Daily Wildcat

Arizona Daily Wildcat FILE PHOTO

UA SWIMMER Kevin Cordes is one of the Wildcats’ top returning swimmers this season.

Despite taking over for the legendary Frank Busch as head coach of the UA swimming and diving program last year, Eric Hansen was still able to have a bit of his own success. After 12 seasons of coaching at the University of Wisconsin, Hansen returned to Tucson where he had attended graduate school and won a national championship in the 100m backstroke in 1990. With Hansen in charge, the men’s team earned a fourth place finish at the NCAA championship, while winning five individual national titles. “We returned a handful of national champions who are all looking to repeat again this year,” Hansen said. “Giles Smith, Kevin Cordes and Mitchell Friedemann are going to lead our team and help us compete this year.” The new season kicks off Oct. 19. Cordes, one of the team’s top competitors, looks to add to an impressive freshman campaign in which he was a four-time AllAmerican and national champion. He also broke two American records after finishing the 100 breast in 51:32 and the 200 medley race in 1:23.53, along with competing at the Olympic Trials and finishing third

WHAT’S GOING ON? DAILYWILDCAT. DAILY DAILYWILDCAT WILDCAT.COM WILDCAT. COM On your phone, computer, and tablet The Arizona Daily Wildcat is the UA’s main source of campus news. Published Monday through Friday, the award winning Wildcat is produced by students who are in touch with what you need to know.

in the 100m breast finals, and 12th in the 200m breast semifinals. Assistant coach Geoff Hanson enters his second season as an assistant coach for the Wildcats and will primarily work with Arizona’s distance freestyle and medley swimmers in addition to recruit. “I think our second year will be vastly improved over our first year,” Hanson said. “We definitely have some highly recruited freshmen who we feel will make severe impact despite their level of experience.” The Wildcats look to add depth to their squad this year with the addition of freshmen like Andrew Sovero, Hayden Sells and Andrew Porter. “They have already brought a lot of energy and enthusiasm,” Hansen said. “If you combine that with coachibility, we are going to have a really good freshman class.” During the summer, several Wildcat swimmers competed at the Olympic games in London while the rest of the team began conditioning for NCAA competition. “We are aiming to be the best we can be,” Hansen said. “We are focused on the process. We are all pulling in the same direction and pushing for the same thing and are confident that we are capable of something special this year.”

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egg donors needed! Healthy females ages 18-30. Donate to infertile couples some of the many eggs your body disposes monthly. COMPENSATION $5,000. Call Reproductive Solutions. (818)8321494. http://donor.eggreproductive.com Reproductive Solutions abides by all federal and state guidelines regarding egg donation, as well as all ASRM guidelines

! construction, landscaping, property maintenance helper wanted. P/T, flexible schedule. No tools/ experience necessary. Must have vehicle. Campus area. terrydahlstrom@volkco.com !!!! bartending !!!! up to $250/ DAY. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING AVAILABLE. AGE 19+ OK. CALL 800965-6520 EXT.139

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canvas manager supervise canvassers going door to door, drive them to neighborhoods, train them to set appts for FREE estimates *No SELLING* Pay: 25k to 35k D.O.E. MUST HAVE: VALID driver’s license, clean DMV record. Contact Kathy 520-795-4104 ext 106 earn money in a Sociology Experiment! For more information and to sign up visit www.u.arizona.edu/~mwhitham/1.html good Job for ENGINEERING STUDENTS or other technically minded people. We design and manufacture mass flow controllers and are looking for full or part time help in our production area. The work environment is pretty relaxed, we are flexible around student obligations, and we have friendly engineers who are glad to answer questions and impart some real life experience. Pay is $10-12 per hour. Cortaro/I10. Email johnhach@alicat.com for more info. leasing professionals Wanted for new student housing community in Tucson. Part-time. Send resume to jobs@landmarkproperties.com looking for ballet instructions for a gymnast. Text or call for more information 445-9436 noW Hiring dining ROOM SERVERS Seeking full-time/per diem servers w/ experience. Asst living exp as plus. Hours/days vary. Fax resume or apply online at www.handmaker.org/apply-online/ Or apply in person at : HANDMAKER 2221 N. ROSEMONT Fax 520-322-3888 EOE/NON-SECTARIAN part time marketing/ Desktop publishing on MAC Pages & Adobe. Design brochure & flyer templates. Creativity & skill required! 624-1701. servers Wanted!!! don pedro’s peruvian bistro has immediate openings for servers. must be bilingual (spanish/english). looking for reliable, sociable, and responsible people. pt/ft available. flexible schedules. great pay! email resumes to Jocelyn at jgonzvar@hotmail.com studentpayouts.com paid survey takers needed in Tucson. 100% FREE to join! Click on surveys.

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1block from ua. Furnished or unfurnished.1BD from $610, 2BD from $825. Pool/ laundry. 746 E 5th St. Shown by appointment 7514363 or 409-3010 apartment for rent 2BD/ 1BA available, excellent for serious graduate students in quiet community. No smoking. ${625.00} + deposit, 1-yr lease. Glenn & Columbus. (520)9751283. available october 1bdrm unfurnished apartment. 5th & Country Club, 1mi to campus. Small quiet complex, mature landscaping, large pool, covered parking, storage and laundry. Terra Alta Apartments, 3122 E. Terra Alta #K 623-0474 www.ashton-goodman.com large studios 6blocks UofA, 1125 N. 7th Ave. Walled yard, security gate, doors, windows, full bath, kitchen. Free wi/fi. $395. 977-4106 sunstoneapts@aol.com roommate matcH & indv. leases. FREE dish & WIFI. Pets, pool, spa, fitness & game rooms, comp. lab, cvrd park & shuttle. 520-623-6600. www.gatewayattucson.com sandpiper apts 1montH free close to UofA.$199 Move in. 520795-2356 studios from $400 spacious apartment homes with great downtown location. 884-8279. blue agave apartments 1240 n. 7th ave. speedway/ stone. www.blueagaveapartments.com

!!! mountain/ adams. large remodeled 1bdrm duplex. $650/mo. A/C, polished concrete floors, new kitchen, new windows, no pets, security patrolled, quiet. 299-5020 624-3080 www.uofahousing.com 2br 1ba, Walking distance, 1323 N. First Ave., water paid, internet access, $650/mo, +deposit, flexible terms. Call 520-370-8588 or 886-1445 first ave and Ft Lowell. Quiet, clean studio. AC, shared W/D, water paid, no pets. Lease $360/mo. 629-9284.

studio/ guest House, all tile, small, Country Club/Glenn, $325 if paid early APL 747-4747 mattress sale! 2 piece Mattress & Box Spring set. Twin sets $99. Full sets $115. Queen sets $135. Warranty available. Will match any price. Delivery available. Visa/MC/Disc. Tucson Furniture, 4241 E. Speedway, 3236163 Se Habla Español. Queen pilloWtop mattress brand new w/warranty for $100. Call/text Steve 907-2622

mini fridge- 2.7 cu. ft. Brand New In Box Factory Packaging. Dry Erase Board front. 9 available $90 local p/u. 520.777.5499 Wildcat restaurant & nigHtclub 1801 N. Stone Ave, Tucson. 10,000sf building, +4ac of land. Includes all furniture, fixtures, equipment, and liquor license. $2M 805-898-9779

9/26 ! utilities paid. sublet special. $350 Mountain & Adams. 1Rm studio, no kitchen, refrigerator only, quiet, no pets, security patrolled. 299-5020, 624-3080 www.uofahousing.com 1bd/ 1ba, storage, small yard, Broadway/ Euclid, $505 if paid early, APL 747-4747

!!! 3 -4 bedroom House VERY close to Campus. Available now! Call for more details Tammy 520398-5738/ 520-440-7711 !!!! 6bdrm 6.5batH each has own WHIRLPOOL tub-shower. Just a few blocks from campus. 5car GARAGE, walk-in closets, all Granite counters, large outside balconies off bedrooms, very large master suites, high ceilings. TEP Electric discount. Monitored security system. 884-1505 www.MyUofARental.com !!!!!!!!! absolutely gorgeous New 5Bedroom houses @ $2300/ mo ($460/ bdrm). Reserve for December 2012. 2550 E. Water (Grant and Tucson Blvd). Washer/dryer, A/C, Alarm, http://www.UniversityRentalInfo.com/water-floorplans.php Call 520747-9331 *** 8 bedroom 6 batH across the street from Campus, A/C, 2 W/D, LOTS of private parking! Available now. Will lease to group or do individual leases per bedroom. 520-398-5738

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26, 2012

Publisher’s Notice: All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

1bedroom guest House. $495/month. Water paid. Large fenced yard. Storage. W/D hookups. 1 pet ok. Mountain/ Prince. 235-6587. 1br House a/c, Washer/Dryer, Ceramic Tile, Community Pool, Fenced Yard, $400 ALSO 1BR Loft A/C Washer/ Dryer Carpet & Tile Gas & Electric Included $530 For More Information Please Call Real Estate Direct, Inc at 520-623-5710 or visit our website at http://www.azredirentals.com/ 2bd/ 2ba in beautiful updated historic building, secured entry, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, assigned off-street parking, 745 E 1st St $1350 REDI Management 520-623-2566

5bd/ 3ba, sam HUGHES! 2413sqft, pool table, built in BBQ, dbl garage, A/C, washer/dryer, 2000 E 10th St $1895 REDI Management 520-623-2566 bike to uofa 3bedroom 2bath Quiet, tile throughout, upgraded kitchen, laundry room, gated carport, big back yard, dog ok $950/mo 481-1350 campbell - prince adobe brick Home on 2lots 3bedrooms 2batH porcelain floors 2car garage a/c refrigerator WasHer dryer disHWasHer fireplace fenced. $2000, 10% off no pets or smoking. 8876966, 327-7494

2br House a/c Washer/Dryer Fenced Yard Close to UofA $575 ALSO 2BR House A/C Carpet Garage Water Included $650 For More Information Please Call Real Estate Direct, Inc at 520-6235710 or visit our website at http://www.azredirentals.com/

individual leases available in these incredible houses located from 1-5 blocks of Campus! Prices ranging from $300-$490 per bedroom, with total access to the whole house. Please call Tammy for more info 520-4407711

3bd/ 2ba, close to campus, A/C, wood floors, all appliances including washer/dryer, avail 08/01/2012, 2807 E Lee $1295 REDI Management 520-623-2566

roommate Wanted for immediate move-in. Brand new beautiful house at 222 E. Elm #2. A/C, state of the art appliances, W/D, luxurious bathroom, MUST SEE! $575/mo +utilities. Call Gloria anytime 520-885-5292 or 520-8412871.

3bdrm/ 2ba uofa/umc Central AC, tile, W/D, huge fenced yard, off street parking. $995/mo 10month lease available, won’t last Tim 795-1499 timaz2000@cox.net 3br House ceramic Tile Storage Shed Fenced Yard $675 ALSO 3BR House Ceramic Tile Security Doors Mountain Views $695 For More Information Please Call Real Estate Direct, Inc at 520-623-5710 or visit our website at http://www.azredirentals.com/ 4 - 5 bedroom houses available, SUPER close to Campus, available now. A/C, W/D, Private parking. 520-398-5738 4bd/ 2ba, all appliances, no pets, close to UofA, Euclid/Speedway, $1600 if paid early, APL 7474747 4bedroom 2.5 batH, speedWay/ Alvernon. Carport, large yard, cable ready, ceramic tile. Quiet, minutes from UofA. $1200 +$1000 deposit. Dora 321-4036 4br a/c WasHer/dryer CeramicTile Storage Shed $800 ALSO 4BR 2BA House A/C Washer/Dryer Wood Blinds Ceramic Tile Near UofA $1100 For More Information Please Call Real Estate Direct, Inc at 520-623-5710 or visit our website at http://www.azredirentals.com/ 5tH and country Club, 2BDRM, 2BATH 2STORY HOME. WASHER/DRYER HOOKUPS, AC, FIREPLACE, FENCED YARDS, VERY CLEAN, CLOSE TO BIKE PATH AND BUS ROUTE. QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD. $900.00/MO CALL OR TEXT LIZ @(520)237-1656. AVAILABLE NOW.

!!!!#1 uofa/umc, furnished room, w/private bath & entrance. No kitchen but refrigerator & microwave, internet & utilities included. Non-smoking. Clean, quiet, secure. $400/mo, no lease required. Tim 795-1499. timaz2000@cox.net 2 rooms available, House, Tucson Blvd and 22nd. $275/mo per room, all but electric included. Central AC. 520-604-6360 Brent.

are you looking for a mover? Same day service? Student rates available. 977-4600

adoption-your option NY couple offers your newborn hugs, laughter, financial security, tons of TLC. Family comes first. Expenses paid as permitted. Legal/confidential. Call Peggy and Sonu anytime toll-free 1-888-9625022.

i am looking for a tutor for my 7th grader who needs help with language arts. Possibly two days a week in the late afternoons or early evenings. We can meet at a library or someplace quiet? Please contact me at carriewilkinson@mac.com. looking for gre Tutor. Call Jorge 520-271-7396.

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we are here

***1bedroom room for rent available now, VERY close to Campus. Prices starting at $400. For more info, please call Tammy 520-398-5738

A Guide to Religious Services Church of Christ Campus Ministry Ambassadors for Christ (A4C) Campus Minister Jesse Warren a-4-c.org 2848 N. Mountain Ave 390-8115 Episcopal Campus Ministry Sunday 6pm Eucharist Wednesday 6pm Fellowship 715 N. Park Ave http://ua-canterbury.org (520)878-8774 First Christian Church Spiritually Growing & Socially Active. Church School 9am, Worship 10:30am 740 E Speedway 624-8695 Lutheran Campus Ministry At Campus Christian Center. Wednesday nights @6pm, dinner and vespers/discussion. Sunday worship @10:30am. www.lcm-ua.org 715 N. Park Ave.

Presbyterian Campus Ministry Tuesday Nights at 6pm. Free dinner, great friends, fun worship! Campus Christian Center 715 N. Park Ave. www.pcmarizona.org Rising Star Missionary Baptist Church Sunday 9:00am & 11:00am Young Adult Bible Study Wednesday 7:00pm 2800 East 36th Street (520)791-3068 www.risingstarbaptist.org L.D.S. Church- Institute of Religion. Sundays 9am, 11am, 1pm; Classes M-F www.ldsces.org/tucson (520)623-4204 To be a part of our Guide to Religious Services, contact Samantha Motowski (520) 621-3425 or email classifieds@wildcat.arizona.edu


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER

26, 2012

Bear down times

DAILY WILDCAT •

9

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2602 E. Grant Rd. Tucson AZ 85716

WILDCAT SPECIALS

Falafel $1.99 Falafel w/Hummus $2.50 Falafel w/Baba Ganoush $2.50

Chicken Shawarma Beef Shawarma Gyro

520-319-5554

1800 E. Fort Lowell Suite. 168

$3.99 $3.99 $3.99

15%OFF

with student ID

valid through May 2013

etc.

“Gee Brain, what are we going to do tonight?” “The same thing we do every night, Pinky...

...Read today’s Daily Wildcat!”

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1235_AZTNI

10

• Arizona Daily Wildcat

wednesday, september

Fresh Food. Famous Low Prices.

26, 2012

Prices Effective: Wed., Sept. 26 through Tue., Oct. 2, 2012 Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

26 27 28 29 30 1

Tue.

2

www.frysfood.com

Introducing

A NEW Natural and Organic Brand Over 200 Items, with more arriving in-store everyday

USDA Choice Roast Sale

Bottom Round, Sirloin Tip, Eye of Round, Top Round, Beef Chuck or Shoulder

Buy One, Get One Of Equal or Lesser Value

FREE

Simple Truth Organic Salad Blends Select Varieties, 5-9 oz

Save Up To $5.99 lb With Card

2$ for

5

429

Simple Truth Natural Boneless Chicken Breasts Fresh, USDA Grade A, All Natural

lb

With Card

Simple Truth Organic Milk Select Varieties, Half Gallon

269

With Card

2$

Simple Truth Natural Cage Free Eggs Grade AA, Brown, 12 ct

for

5

With Card

SHOW YOUR

COURAGE

Fry’s Milk

TOGETHER WE CAN BEAT BREAST CANCER

Vitamin D, 2%,1% or Skim, Gallon, Limit 2

1

59

Amanda Nabor Fry’s Services Clerk

Learn how our associates are leading the fight at

WWW.SHARINGCOURAGE.COM

With Card Russet Potatoes 5 lb Bag

Save instantly at checkout when you Mix and Match participating products All items must be purchased in same transaction with card. Limit 4 rewards per transaction.

BUY 2, SAVE 2 $

PARTICIPATING ITEM

99

SAVE All items must

FINAL COST

be purchased in the same transaction. Limit 4 rewards per transaction.

Look for these tags on participating items!

¢

With Card

When you buy 3 in the same transaction with card. Limit 1 reward per transaction. Additional quantities priced at $4.99 each with card

599 -100

ea

4

99

Tide Laundry Detergent

Select Varieties, Liquid, 50 oz or Powder, 22-30 Load

Final Cost when you Mix & Match 2 participating items with Card.

Michelina’s Entrées Select Varieties, 4-9.5 oz

88

R1

With Card

With Card

¢

499 -100

ea

Downy Fabric Softener

Select Varieties, Liquid, 48-60 Use or Tide Pods, 16 ct

3

When You

BUY 3

With Card

99

FINAL COST

Pepsi or 7UP Select Varieties, 12 pk, 12 oz Cans or 6 pk, Plastic Bottles

Final Cost when you Mix & Match 2 participating items with Card.

10

3$ for

With Card

Ocean Spray 100% Juice

Campbell’s Chunky Soup

Minute Maid Orange Juice

Select Varieties, 64 oz

Select Varieties, 18.6-19 oz or 100% Natural, 12-19 oz

Select Varieties, 59 oz

1

99

With Card

4$ for

5

With Card

2

29

With Card


September 26, 2012  

In this issue of the Arizona Daily Wildcat: - Students aim to green Greek Row - ASA kicks off effort to increase registration of student vo...

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