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Opioid Epidemic - Call to Make Naloxone Easily Available Gets Louder U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams wants Americans to carry naloxone, the overdosereversing drug, for combatting the opioid epidemic. The life-saving drug can revive a person from an overdose in little time and right now it is available only with first responders. As the battle against opioid menace intensifies, Adams is vouching for wider availability of naloxone across communities and states to reduce overdose deaths. Florida is one of the worst hit states by the opioid epidemic. Despite a fair number of drug abuse facilities providing effective drug abuse rehabilitation programs, overdose cases are on the rise. As per the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, in 2016, opioid-related deaths rose by 35 percent in the state where 3.6 million residents were given prescription opioids. In 5,725 cases, opioids were identified to have caused the death or were present in the decedent’s system, up from 1,483 in 2015. Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency last year and even suggested some best practices to address the problem. The state received a two-year grant of $54 million for addiction treatment using methadone, counseling services and medication to reverse the overdose. It will receive $27 million from the federal government this year as well to deal with the opioid crisis. Last year, more than $17.7 million was spent on methadone and buprenorphine treatment and nearly $4 million on Vivitrol, a drug that blocks the opioid effects. In addition, approximately $1.7 million grant money was used for buying naloxone kits. Getting naloxone in Florida is easier than other states Naloxone, sold under the brand name Narcan, can be purchased in Florida from a pharmacist without a prescription, as per a state law passed in 2016. The law is an expansion of the Good Samaritan law passed in 2016 that protects the person giving naloxone from being sued afterward for negligence.

www.floridadrugaddictionhelpline.com


While the protocols and prices may vary across different pharmacies in Florida, the recent grants have made it accessible at no cost, even without an insurance. The drug can be given in the form of an injection or a nasal spray. The latter is the cheapest and easiest way to use. Understanding the need for naloxone Naloxone is a medicine designed to immediately reverse the effects of an overdose. It acts on the opioid receptors in the brain and restores normal breathing in people who overdose on fentanyl, heroin and other prescription opioids. Its effects last between 30 to 90 minutes, enough to get medical attention. The drug should be carried by active drug users, people who stay with drug users, people on methadone or buprenorphine, people coming out of treatment, high risk patients, people coming out of prison or detox programs, people who use public bathrooms, or places where drug users congregate, like malls, parking areas, etc. These people Should get training about the know-how of using naloxone kits. Naloxone comes in different forms. If a person is using a spray, known as Narcan, he or she should tilt the head of the patient and spray it into the nose, wait for three minutes, give rescue breathing and then provide the second dose in the absence of any response. Injectable naloxone is given intramuscularly by injecting it into thigh, arms or buttocks. If there is no response within three minutes, a second dose should be given right away. Get help Opioid addiction is treatable if help is sought in time. An accidental overdose can cost a person his or her life. Therefore, one must seek timely drug addiction therapy for it. If you or your loved one is struggling with an addiction to any drug, seek help from the Florida Drug Addiction Helpline. You can call our 24/7 helpline 855-982-2401 to know about the best drug rehab center in Florida where patients are treated through a combination of traditional treatment plans and time-tested experiential therapies.

www.floridadrugaddictionhelpline.com

Opioid epidemic—call to make naloxone easily available gets louder  

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams wants Americans to carry naloxone, the overdose-reversing drug, for combatting the opioid epidemic. Th...

Opioid epidemic—call to make naloxone easily available gets louder  

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams wants Americans to carry naloxone, the overdose-reversing drug, for combatting the opioid epidemic. Th...

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