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2011

Department of Basic Education WORKING TOGETHER FOR QUALITY EDUCATION

LOOKING FORWARD Action plan to 2014 – towards the realisation of schooling 2025

TEACHER LAPTOP INITIATIVE What you need to know

Becoming the best there is HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR SKILLS - EXCITING COURSES AND TRAINING FOR TEACHERS THE STARS IN EDUCATION AWARDS Find out how you can make a difference in your community and get the recognition you deserve.

Get your voice heard and wiN R5 000!


Your complete solution to all your educational needs Via Afrika Education is a leading publisher of educational textbooks and related material for South Africa and southern African countries. In order to meet the specific demands of each aspect of the diverse markets that Via Afrika Education serves, publishing takes place in five operationally independent businesses.

www.globecreative.co.za

• Via Afrika Publishers produces books and educational materials for schools (all grades and subjects) and FET colleges in South Africa. • Via Afrika Stimela produces materials for the adult education and training (AET) market. • Via Afrika Smile produces educational games and apparatus as well as science, mathematics and technology kits for schools in southern Africa. • Via Afrika Future produces digital learning materials and textbooks. • Via Afrika International manages and supports the Group’s educational publishing businesses in Botswana, Namibia and Zambia.

www.nva.co.za


THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME Teacher.org.za is an online platform where key stakeholders in the Education Arena can connect, collaborate and participate to make a discernible difference to the future of our children.

Drawing from research and development work that was used for the Education Handbook, www.teacher.org.za will provide an up-to date overview of the key issues and initiatives that influence education in South Africa. Featuring a real-time blog and regular updates, it is set to become the leading source of education-related information in the country. Most importantly, it will provide key role-players with a dynamic opportunity to pro-actively get involved, share ideas and identify solutions.

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We INSPIRE our youth to dream big, master their skill and achieve. We RECOGNIZE the role of teachers in our community. We MOTIVATE schools to get their learners future-focussed and study-fit. We help teachers, opinion leaders and thinkers to COLLABORATE on key issues to and streamline actions. We encourage society to demonstrate their SUPPORT by sharing stories of hope and transformation. Argo has been developing leading communication projects in the education arena for the past 13 years. We have established relationships and partnerships in all spheres of SA’s education community.

For more information about our products please visit www.argo.org.za


WIN A NOTEBOOK! To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

TABLE OF Contents Department of Basic Education: Working Together for Quality Education

6

Metropolitan: Leading the Way in Soccer Development for Over 21 Years

10

Stars in Education: Your Chance to let your Own Light Shine

14

How to enter the Stars in Education Competition

15

What makes a Winning Star Project?

16

Meet the 2010 Stars in Education Winner and Finalists

17

Research Survey: Win R5000!!

23

Teach SA: Teach Ambassador – Meurial Magaya

25

Department of Basic Education: Action Plan to 2014 – Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025

26

Becoming the Best there is – How to Improve your Skills

34

Bursaries for Teachers

35

Department of Basic Education: The Matric Pass Rate – When Should we Celebrate?

38

Capitec: The ABC of Credit

40

Avusa Education: Giving Learners a Head Sta

45

TLI: How Can Computers Help Us?

54

Websites to Support You

56

Department of Basic Education: The Grammar Debate

62

Published by Argo Web www.argo.org.za | Tel 021 865 2813 | Email info@argo.org.za Published in Stellenbosch, South Africa, April 2011.

www.globecreative.co.za

www.teacher.org.za Managing Editor: Sue Fontannaz Editorial team: Jeanne Reeder, Wendy Viljoen Production Manager: Jeanne Reeder Design and Layout: Limbik | Printing: Paarl Media

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .


• Every learner in Grades 1-6 must get a literacy and numeracy workbook • The workbooks must be handed out to learners and they must be allowed to take them home to do home work • All learners must write in their workbooks and use them to answer questions and practice reading, writing and numeracy • At the end of the year, the workbooks become the property of the learner and a record of the learner’s progress during the year • The books will be supplied for free to the schools or parents. They are entirely funded by the Department.

If schools have not received workbooks at all or received the wrong number or books in the wrong languages, principals should phone the following Departmental Toll Free number:

0800 202 933 or 012 357 4195

2

2011 National Teacher’s Guide


Let’s work together for quality education President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day. As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves to the following:

As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise to: •

teach, to advance the education and the development of learners as individuals;

respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice;

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober mind and body;

improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective;

maintain good communication between teachers and students, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents;

provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress;

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

3


2011 YEAR PLANNER January S

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01

 


Let’s work together fo

President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 m The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time teaching for at least seven hours a day.

As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the co to the following:

As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise •

teach, to advance the education and the development of learners a

respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice;

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober m

improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective;

maintain good communication between teachers and students, am

provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress;

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relations

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

LET US RECOMMIT TO TH 6

2011 National Teacher’s Guide


r for quality education

2011 made the following call: nd Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time,

e the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves

romise to:

arners as individuals;

ce;

f sober mind and body;

ective; Let’s work together for quality education

ents, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents;

ogress;

President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day.

As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves to the following:

As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise to:

elationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others; •

teach, to advance the education and the development of learners as individuals;

respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice;

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober mind and body;

improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective;

maintain good communication between teachers and students, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents;

provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress;

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

7


Gear up for 2011 with OXFORD! Oxford University Press Southern Africa offers many innovative teacher training workshops nationwide to empower teachers in the classroom. Teachers across South Africa can look forward to an extensive range of informative and interactive Oxford workshops in 2011.

Highlights Subject specific and Integrated CAPS for Foundation Phase Includes: • Subject specific overview of the new Curriculum Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) • Subject specific changes • Topic and Lesson Plans • Practical Lesson examples: content, methodology, assessment and remedial / extension • Tips on choosing the correct book for success

A Balanced Reading Approach at Foundation Phase

Oxford workshops are facilitated by specialist trainers – helping teachers to tackle the challenges of a changing curriculum with confidence and become the best they can possibly be.

Includes activities on: • high frequency words and phonics • word and sentence level work from Shared Reading to Shared Writing • Guided and Independent Reading • Reading for Enjoyment

Reading as a First Additional Language Includes: • activities on using a story to build vocabulary • classroom activities for teaching phonics, letters and sounds • a model lesson on Shared Reading, and Shared and Independent Writing

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Here is your chance to let your own light shine Enter the 2011 Stars in Education Awards and you could win R10 000 sponsorship towards your project! The Stars in Education Awards recognises the valuable role teachers play in shaping our communities for a better future. It’s about dedicated men and women, who go beyond the call of duty, take action into their own hands, and who lead projects that actively contribute to the social upliftment of our country. Read more about the 2010 winner and finalists that have already made a fundamental difference in their school and community. Send us your entry for the 2011 Awards so that we can show others what amazing work teachers are doing in our schools.

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .

Write to us and tell us why your school is a Star School! Win the opportunity to be filmed at your school and have your school form part of the Star School documentary! Post your story for free to The Stars in Education Awards, Star School, Freepost CB8152, PO Box 7177, Stellenbosch, 7599 (no stamp required). For more information, please contact info@argo.org.za | www.teacher.org.za

14

2011 National Teacher’s Guide


onal

HOW TO ENTER

WIN A NOTEBOOK! To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747.

LET YOUR LIGHT SHINE

Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

What you NEED to do • Send us a letter with your name, address, phone number and the school where you teach. • Describe your special extracurricular project which you are involved with that makes a difference to the lives of learners in your community. »» Tell us what the project is all about; »» What made you start the project; »» The challenges you faced; »» How you overcame those challenges; »» The success you’ve had; »» What you hope to achieve in the future. • Tell us how long your project has been running and how your project has grown. • Tell us what you would do with the R10 000 prize money. • It would be great if you could include artwork or photographs of you and the learners, project or the school.

What you could win The 10 finalists will each receive a R1 000 cash prize. The top 3 winners will each receive a R10 000 sponsorship towards their project. The projects will also be included in the 2012 edition of the National Teacher’s Guide which goes to over 100 000 teachers so you will be inspiring others to make a difference.

Rules of the Competition  •

The competition will be judged by educational professionals and the judges’ decision is final.

Enter now! This is your chance to get the recognition you deserve and take your hard work to the next level. Enter before 31 August 2011. Post your entry to The Stars in Education Awards, Freepost CB8152, PO Box 7177, Stellenbosch, 7599 (no stamp required). You can also register on www.teacher.org.za and submit your entry online. For more information, please contact info@argo.org.za | www.teacher.org.za

You are allowed to enter if you are running an existing project. STARS IN EDUCATION

15


WHAT MAKES A WINNING STAR PROJECT? Judges insightS The Stars Projects all show just how much teachers do in and for their communities. This makes it difficult to judge because the contributions are so different. When you put together the information about the project be sure to give as much information as possible. You can use these ideas:

1. Explain exactly what the project involved. Who? Why? What was done? How long has the project been running? How long will it keep going? 2. Say exactly what the project has achieved. You could include a case study about one of the people who benefited from the project. You should include evidence including photos, testimonials from people who benefitted from the project, and what other people have said about the project. 3. Make the information easy to read. Use clear headings. Check that there is a logical flow throughout. Make the judge want to read the information.

Via Afrika has been involved with the Stars project because we firmly believe that education needs more than good books – it needs committed teachers who are appreciated for all that they do. At Via Afrika we believe that our future lies with our teachers, and our participation here aims to show how much we value teachers.

16

2011 National Teacher’s Guide

Comments Judging the competition last year was as rewarding and as moving as it was the first time I was involved. Our teachers are amazing, and the teachers whose stories we read about make me realise just how critical teachers are to our future well-being as a nation.

The projects that have been started show a deep sense of community concern and I am pleased that I may be a part of honouring the men and women who are making such a difference. I am sure that the quality of the submissions is only going to improve in the years to come, and look forward to being part of it. BY: Christina Watson. CEO Via Afrika


winner 2010

MEET THE 2010 STARS IN EDUCATION WINNER Roslyn Narain New West Secondary School - Newlands West It is a profound honor and privilege to receive the 2010 Stars in Education Award. I would like to express my heartfelt appreciation to Argo and Via Afrika for affording me this wonderful opportunity.

More about myself My name is Roslyn Narain and I am a languages and Life Orientation educator at New West Secondary School in Newlands West. I have the opportunity of teaching the youth by day and elderly by night. I am the founder of RAFAL Roslyn’s Academy for Adult Learning - an academy for elderly people who have never been to school. I teach them how to read and write and to take their rightful place in society. I provide holistic education to all my learners, inclusive of the academic and the development of the learners’ social, spiritual and moral values. I maintain that South Africa doesn’t only need excellent academics, rather academics that will someday make a positive contribution! I engage my learners in community upliftment projects and provide assistance to the destitute, poor and needy, whilst at the same time improving my learners’ self-esteem.

you teach a child on an empty stomach or who witnessed domestic violence that very morning? It’s a real challenge, but one that I confront head on with compassion, dedication and commitment.

When were the projects established and why? My community projects began in 2006. I noticed that a learner was constantly absent from my class and asked to see him during lunch break. I was glad I sacrificed my lunch break because that day changed my life and my philosophy as an educator. I soon discovered that the learner’s parents were getting a divorce hence his depressed state. He had not been in school because he had attempted suicide and had been in hospital. I asked him what change he would like to see in his life and he answered: ‘Mam, I just want my dad to love me!’ Wow, all my years of training as an educator did not prepare me for this! Yes, I could help him, but how could I make his father love him? I new I couldn’t. This life changing moment was as if a light bulb had been switched on for me. continued on page 18

As an educator, in a society ridden with crime and social injustices, it’s certainly no easy task to ensure education within the classroom. How do

Get your voice heard and win R5 000! Complete the Research Survey at the end of this section and you can win with The Stars in Education. Post your survey for free to The Stars in Education Awards, Freepost CB8152, PO Box 7177, Stellenbosch, 7599 (no stamp required). Alternatively complete this survey on www.teacher.org.za. For more information, please contact Tel 021 865 2813 | Fax 021 865 2166 info@argo.org.za | www.teacher.org.za

STARS IN EDUCATION

17


continued from page 17

It was almost Christmas and so I got this young lad to assist me with a toy collection drive. He became the leader of this project and we collected 840 toys and distributed them to hospitals and children homes. What made this drive special was that this very ‘suicidal student’ dressed as Santa Claus, handed out the toys and made the children laugh. This was his life changing moment. He realized that even though he didn’t receive love at home, he had so much love to give to others. There were children that were worse off than him that he could help make a difference to. This boosted his self-esteem and made him happy and confident. And so the various community projects began, with the benefit of building the self-esteem of my learners and helping the community at large. We raised R20 000 to buy 500 blankets for needy families during winter, takkies for Aids orphans, food and clothing for families whose homes were ravaged by fire etc.

What is your greatest moment as a teacher?

A motto that I designed and firmly live by:

“TRUE SUCCESS IS MEASURED BY THE SIZE OF ONES’S HEART AND THE ABILITY TO USE THAT HEART TO AFFECT POSITIVE CHANGE IN SOCIETY!” Ms Roslyn Narain won R10 000 towards her project for entering the Stars in Education Awards.

My greatest moment as an educator was when my learner called me at 5am in the morning to say, ‘Mam, I passed” and he just got 40%. Well, to me it was not just 40%, it was how he grew as a person too. We, as educators, all need to strive to get this combination correct, because this essentially completes a child’s learning! My reason for establishing RAFAL is that I recognized a serious need amongst the elderly in my community who were desperate to learn, read and write and I seized this opportunity. I now have a class of 40 learners between the ages of 55 and 79 years old. It is a rewarding experience to watch them grow and develop mentally. To watch them sign their signatures for the very first time was an emotional achievement. They have a full school curriculum which includes a sporting program, excursions, a debutant ball and graduation.

Challenge posed to all educators My challenge to all educators Take the time to get to know ok to find out who they really the right direction and provide compassion and care! 18

in South Africa is: your learners. It’s are, steer them in that much needed

2011 National Teacher’s Guide

Above: Roslyn Narain (left) and Shiksha Lutchmipersadh (nominating learner).


2ND PLACE 2010

Vegetable Garden and Soul Buddies Mrs. Gumede Jabulile Gobhela Primary School – Hibberdene

Mrs Jabulile serves in a number of committees

How did you overcome those challenges?

which deal with the greening of her school, veg-

I have successfully applied for identity documents

Project descriptioN etable gardens, an environmental committee, regional and national science expo adjudicating, the sports committee and many more. As the Soul Buddies of the schools they collected blankets, non-perishable foods and donated them to the needy learners. The community, church and local businesses were involved in their campaign. They also cleaned the homes of some of their learners e.g. Meyiwa Lindokuhle’s which is headed by a blind old lady. Lindokuhle is a grade 7 learner and

for the Hadebe family, pension grant for Sebenzani Khumalo and taken out a funeral cover for them as well. The prize money will be used to buy building material for the construction of the Chiliza home. Some of it will be used to source officials to teach parents on home and financial management and for the vegetable gardening – starting with those that I have assisted.

What made you start the project?

Mrs Gumede Jabulile won R10 000 towards her project for entering the Stars in Education Awards.

I have a number of learners who were school drop-outs that I managed to bring back to the classroom, gave them love, food and clothing. Because many learners are orphans and vulnera-

Read more stories of hope on www.teacher.org.za

Mrs Jabulile managed to bring him back to the classroom from the street.

ble children and poverty stricken, I buy uniforms, pay for school fees and provide support to them through food parcels, shelter, clothing and counseling.

We have built a house for the Hadebe

family who were in need and we are now planning to build a home for the Chiliza family.

Tell us about some challenges you faced? Many of the learners do not have birth certificates or identification documents to apply for social grants that could help their living and school arrangements.

STARS IN EDUCATION

19


3RD PLACE 2010

4H, Soul Buddies, No Apologies & Counselling Ms. Fezisa Fikeni Intsingizi Junior Secondary School – Bizana

4H is a programme that allows Fezisa to provide

How did you overcome those challenges?

a fundamentally essential need to the needy chil-

We went to SASSA for food parcels which were

Project description dren of her school – providing them with food. Fezisa also implemented ‘Soul Buddies’ which allows students to perform to their full potential in context of their academic results and co-curricular activities.

What made you start the project? I started this programme after I attended a coun-

delivered two weeks later by our social worker Miss Matshini. Our foster grant application for those vulnerable children was approved, and after three months they received the grant. We admitted the orphans that were living in a dismantled shack with no clothes, food, schooling or water to our school with the help of the other teachers and the principal. We are still struggling to find a shelter. The municipality we applied at nothing has been done yet.

seling workshop. I started my counseling at school, specialising in learners who have lost their parents. This counseling programme extended to the point where I had to deal with the community members as well because I had to meet with people who were taking care of those orphans. Counseling was also extended to those learners who had a drug and alcohol problem, teenage

Ms. Fezisa Fikeni won R10 000 towards her project for entering the Stars in Education Awards.

pregnancies and all forms of abuse.

Tell us about some challenges you faced? A big challenge is the lack of funds. When we (me and the soul buddies) have visited families it’s in my interest to plant responsibility and care in the young ones. We have to leave food and clothing to the vulnerable families. Another challenge is not having a proper place here at school for counseling as I am sharing the room with someone else and so there is no confidentiality.

20

2011 National Teacher’s Guide

Read more stories of hope on www.teacher.org.za


4TH PLACE 2010

Orphans and Vulnerable Children Ms. Maria Malotsa Makubuketja Primary School – Mahwelereng Project description Ms Malotsa took children to the clinic and hospital when necessary. Other teachers in the school helped identify kids in need. Ms Malotsa was nominated by the principal to be trained on an OVC course at the Family Institute of South Africa (FISA). The light and life company also did the same for HIV & Aids matters. She designed information forms detailing learner’s situations so that their progress could be monitored. She did home visits and conducted her care jointly with other stakeholders e.g. home base careers, clinics, hospitals, social workers and the police.

What made you start the project?

How did you overcome those challenges? Established partnerships with other departments in order to obtain birth certificates and social grants for needy learners.

Ms Maria Malotsa won R10 000 towards her project for entering the Stars in Education Awards.

The number of abused and sick children in my community was increasing. It became my great concern when children come to school with empty stomach and become dizzy. With the help of a supportive principal, we requested donations from various companies, but they dragged their feet to assist us.

Tell us about some challenges you faced? Found it difficult to establish an OVC centre. The challenges I faced daily were of reaching my aims of the project: an increasing number of OVC, many of whom don’t have birth.

STARS IN EDUCATION

21


ISPA ‘SuperTeacher of the Year’ 2010 Mrs Melia Moeketsi of Maribe Primary School in Limpopo, trounced over 100 other educators from around South Africa to be named the ISPA ‘SuperTeacher of the Year’ in September 2010. This prestigious award is sponsored by the Internet Service Providers’ Association of SA (ISPA) and UniForum SA, the .co.za domain name administrators. Seven finalists were in the running and last year Limpopo scooped all the awards. Aside from the winner, Mrs Moeketsi, the runners-up, Lydia Moshupja, is from Boihutjong School, Limpopo. The finalists received certificates as acknowledgement of their achievement at the awards function hosted at ISPA’s iWeek 2010 in Johannesburg. The winner and runner-up received Blackberry cellphones donated by NetDay Association, as well as an all-expenses paid trip to Cape Town to the eSchools’ Network Innovate conference, sponsored by UniForum SA. Internet industry players were convinced that Mrs Moeketsi had best utilized her newly-acquired IT knowledge for the good of her school and local community, after participating in ISPA’s nationwide teacher training programme. Credits obtained from this training count towards a National Certificate in IT. As HOD of the Foundation Phase of Maribe Primary School, Mrs Moeketsi has computerized her department’s administration (lesson plans, test results, etcetera). Each learner receives 30 minutes of computer literacy classes daily, and both teachers and learners use the school’s ‘Co.Za Cares’ computer centre in the afternoon. Educators were trained on OpenOffice.org 2 by SETAaccredited facilitators provided by Avuxeni Computer Academy. NetDay Association was responsible for the installation of computers and educational content at the schools targeted for training. UniForum SA’s support, through its ‘Co.Za Cares’ project, has seen in excess of 2 500 computers donated and over 2 000 educators trained at more than 120 schools in 7 provinces since December 2001. ‘Co.Za Cares’ is the social development arm of UniForum SA promoting the use of Information Technology (IT) in under-resourced communities.

“The training has had a very real impact on the lives of the 2 000 participating teachers and their learners. In many cases, teachers run after-hours classes for their colleagues, their local communities and learners at their schools. This passes on the skills they have acquired even further.” Fiona Wallace, Director, UniForum SA, ‘Co.Za Cares’ CSI Project

Melia Moeketsi (2010 ISPA SuperTeacher) and Lydia Motshupja (2010 Runner-up)

ISPA thanks the following sponsors of its teacher training: • Adept • AeroSat • Afrihost • Avuxeni Computer Academy • Calvin Brown • eNetworks • Enyuka Internet • Flame Computing • FrogFoot • Future Foundation • Internet Solutions • MTN Business Solutions • Mweb • Neology • Neotel • NetDay Association • Reliable Sources • RSAWeb • Skyrove • Switch Telecom • WhereNext Physical Address: COZA House, Gazelle Close, Corporate Park, Midrand

Email: Phone: Fax: Web:

fiona@uniforum.org.za +27 (0)11 314 0077 +27 (0)11 314 0088 www.coza.net.za


RESEARCH SURVEY

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Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .

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Please complete this entry form and send it to us by post or fax by 30 November 2011. Post: Freepost CB8152, Argo, PO Box 7177, Stellenbosch, 7600 | Fax: 021 865 2166. Terms and Conditions: A draw will take place on 30 November 2011 and 5 lucky entrants will each receive R1000. The outcome of the draw is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

www.TEACHER.org.za


TEACH Ambassador

Meurial Magaya wins Physical Science Award On the 21st of January 2011, I was invited to a ceremony for the 2010 matric results (for schools under the Kathoras group) at the Meyersdal District offices in Alberton. Teachers and tutors who contributed to the success of their learners in Physical Science and Maths were given an award of R2000 for every A that their learners had achieved and R1000 for every B. I felt very humbled as I received the highest award in the function. I got R8000. My Grade 12 learners had achieved one level 7 and six level 6’s in Physical Science. I would like to thank the following people for their support during my two years of teaching at Erasmus Monareng secondary school:

• TEACH South Africa Founders and staff for giving me a vision to run with and all the on-going support that they gave us during those two years. • Dr Peter Glover (my TEACH South Africa mentor for his outstanding support), • Mrs Nong (the principal of Erasmus Monareng for her 100% commitment s a leader), • Mrs Nkushubana (the Science HOD for all the support), • Maths and Science centre for the material that they donated - it made Science to be funny as we were able to carry out experiments • The parents of learners for their support • The learners themselves for their effort and commitment to their schoolwork.

It was not easy, it was touching to see them dragging their feet into the morning and afternoon classes, but I promised them that one day that they will reap with joy. I told them that each one of them had a great potential to pass with flying colours and they listened. Out of the 69 Science learners 28 qualified for Bachelors... I am happy to say most of them are still in touch with me and they are very confident that they are going to make a difference in this world.

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .

25


The following captures where the DBE would like to be in 2025: Learners … Attend school on time, every day, and take their schoolwork seriously. They have access to computers, a good meal, sporting and cultural activities. They have respectful relationships with their friends and dependable teachers. Teachers … Are confident, well-trained, and continually improving their capabilities. They are committed to giving learners the best possible education, thereby contributing to the development of the nation. They enjoy job satisfaction because their conditions of service are decent and their pay comparable to that of other professions. School principals … Ensure teaching takes place as it should, according to the national curriculum. Through responsible leadership, they promote harmony, creativity and a sound work ethic within the school community and beyond. Parents … Are well informed about what happens in the school, and receive regular reports about how well their children perform against clear standards that are shared by all schools. They know they are listened to, and any concerns will be dealt with by education authorities at all levels. Learning and teaching materials … Are in abundance and of a high quality. Learners and teachers know how to use computers in the school to access information they need. School buildings and facilities … Are spacious, functional, safe and well-maintained. Learners and teachers look after their buildings and facilities because they take pride in their school.

26

2011 National Teacher’s Guide

1


Action Plan to 2014 This draft Action Plan is the DBE’s strategy to strengthen weak areas in the education system that have been identified as needing support. It has been developed in line with the Presidency’s 2009 national strategic planning, and draws direction from the guiding document Improving Government Performance: Our approach. By improving performance in these identified areas, learners will benefit from a higher quality education. The nation as a whole will also benefit as school graduates with better skills and knowledge levels enter further and higher education, and the workplace. This document summarises the draft Action Plan the improvements that can be expected, as well as what ordinary citizens can do to contribute towards better schooling.

Short-term goals, long-term vision The draft Action Plan sets out the goals that the national education system will be working towards, and the actions to achieve these goals, by 2014. These are the first steps towards realising the bigger, more long-term vision of quality education in schools by 2025. This vision is called Schooling 2025.

Everyone has a part to play As far as possible, the Action Plan indicates for each stakeholder in the system what activities they should be engaged in to realise each goal in the plan. It also suggests ways that those outside the education system can also provide resources or expertise in support.

Clear goals, flexible strategies The Action Plan sets out 13 goals to be achieved related to learning and enrolment. In addition, it sets out 14 areas in education which need to be improved to reach these goals. The DBE is not, however, telling people exactly what they must do to achieve these goals. The approach is to allow a degree of flexibility so that schools and their communities can come up with strategies that best suit their own situation.

Measuring progress: Annual National Assessments (ANA) Each year, all learners in Grades 1 to 6 will write national tests in languages (home language and first additional language) and mathematics at the end of the year. The purpose is to establish an objective national benchmark by which to measure literacy and numeracy achievement levels in primary schools, so that improvement can be accurately assessed, and appropriate interventions designed where additional support is needed.

Let’s work together for quality education

President Zuma,will in themark State of the Nation standardised Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: Teachers these tests according to instructions provided by the DBE. The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day.

As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves Parents will receive the ANA results in learners’ annual report cards at the end of the year. School Governing Bodies to the following:

(SGBs) will receive a district-wide ANA report, which will be shared by other parents of the school, to allow them to As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise to: compare their own ANA results with those of other schools in the district. •

teach, to advance the education and the development of learners as individuals;

respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice;

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober mind and body;

maintain good communication between teachers and students, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents;

The objective in making the results public is not to shame schools, or create perceptions of “winners” or “losers”, but rather to give schools and their parent communities an idea of how their achievements compare to those at other schools. • improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective;

• provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress; In 2011, ANA tests in languages and mathematics will be introduced for Grade 9 learners. •

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011



DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

27


The goals of the Action Plan The Action Plan has 27 goals. Goals 1 to 13 deal with outputs we want to achieve in relation to learning and enrolments. Output goals focusing on minimum quality standards 1 Increase the number of learners in Grade 3 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and numeracy competencies for Grade . 2009 baseline: +/- 48% (literacy) and 43% (numeracy); 2014 target: 60% for both subjects 2

Increase the number of learners in Grade 6 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and mathematics competencies for Grade 6. 2009 baseline: +/- 37% (literacy) and 19% (numeracy); 2014 target: 60% for both subjects

3

Increase the number of learners in Grade 9 who by the end of the year have mastered the minimum language and mathematics competencies for Grade 9. Baseline and targets will be determined after 2010 ANA.

4

Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who become eligible for a Bachelors programme at a university. 2009 baseline: +/- 110 000; 2014 target: 175 000

5

Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who pass mathematics. 2009 baseline: +/- 125 000; 2014 target: 180 000

6

Increase the number of Grade 12 learners who pass physical science. 2009 baseline: +/- 120 000; 2014 target: 170 000

Output goals focusing on improving average performance 7 Improve the average performance in languages of Grade 6 learners. 8 Improve the average performance in mathematics of Grade 6 learners. 9 Improve the average performance in mathematics of Grade 8 learners. Output goals focusing on access and progression 10 Ensure that all children remain effectively enrolled in school up to the year in which they turn 15. 2008 baseline: 97.4%; 2014 target: 99% 11

Improve the access of children to quality Early Childhood Development (ECD) below Grade 1. Indicator 1 (% Grade 1 learners who’ve received formal Grade R): 2008 baseline: 51%; 2014 target: 80%, but 100% if non-formal ECD is included. Indicator 2: The enrolment ratio of children aged 0 to 5 2008 baseline: 25%; 2014 target: 37%

12

Improve the grade promotion of learners through the Grades 1 to 9 phases of school. Indicator 1: % of children aged 9 who have completed Grade 3: 2008 baseline: 59%; 2014 target: 65% Indicator 2: % of children aged 12 who have completed Grade 6: 2008 baseline: 46%; 2014 target: 52%

13

Improve the access of youth to Further Education and Training beyond Grade 9. Indicator 1: % of youth who have received an NSC: 2008 baseline: 40%; 2014 target: 50% Indicator 2: % of youth who obtain FET qualifications. 2008 baseline: 41%; 2014 target: 65% 

28

2011 National Teacher’s Guide


Goals 14 to 27 deal with how to achieve the 13 output goals. Teachers 14 Attract in each year a new group of young, motivated and appropriately trained teachers into the teaching profession. 15 Ensure that the availability and utilisation of teachers is such that excessively large classes are avoided. 16 Improve the professionalism, teaching skills, subject knowledge and computer literacy of teachers throughout their entire careers. 17 Strive for a teacher workforce that is healthy and enjoys a sense of job satisfaction. 18 Ensure that learners cover all the topics and skills areas that they should cover within their current school year. Learner resources 19 Ensure that every learner has access to the minimum set of textbooks and workbooks required according to national policy. 20 Increase access amongst learners to a wide range of media, including computers, which enrich their education. Whole-school improvements 21 Ensure that the basic annual management processes occur across all schools in the country in a way that contributes towards a functional school environment. 22

Improve parent and community participation in the governance of schools, partly by improving access to important information via the e-Education strategy.

School funding 23 Ensure that all schools are funded at least at the minimum per learner levels determined nationally and that funds are utilised transparently and effectively. School infrastructure and support services 24 Ensure that the physical infrastructure and environment of every school inspires learners to want to come to school and learn, and teachers to teach. 25 Use the school as a location to promote access amongst children to the full range of public health and poverty reduction interventions. 26 Increase the number of schools which effectively implement the inclusive education policy and have access to centres which offer specialist services. 27 Improve the frequency and quality of the monitoring and support services provided by district offices to schools, partly through better use of e-Education.

Let’s work together for quality education

Action Plan to 2014: An invitation to have your say President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day.

As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves

to the following: The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has developed a detailed draft Action Plan to improve the quality of education in our public schools. As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise to:

teach, to advancePlan the education andhas the development of learners as individuals; This• draft Action 2014 already benefited from consultation with and input from key education stakeholders, • respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice; including provincial education departments and teacher unions. •

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober mind and body;

provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress;

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

This process of consultation and debate is continuing, and seeks to include your input, as well as input from school • improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective; communities (governing bodies, principals, educators, parents and learners); further and higher education institutions; • maintain good communication between teachers and students, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents; faith organisations; businesses; and education experts and NGOs.

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

4

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

29


FOCUSED ON

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ool k for Sch rship! A new loo nt & Leade Manageme new look edition of our

W

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2010

Supporting HODs, Principals and aspiring leaders with essential resources for good governance, legal compliance and leadership and management development in schools.

In this issue:

Research....................................2 Educator leave – the findings of an HSRC investigation News.........................................6 Claremont High: update DoE News..................................8 DBE action plan DoE News................................10 The government’s delivery agreement for the basic education sector Research..................................12 Systemic school improvement strategies that work Literacy....................................16 PIRLS 2011

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year by It seeks to provide of South African schools the leaders and relevant with current information policy, leadersh on issues of ip, manage governance. ment and

news.co.z

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LS N SCHOO Since 1994, aAFR ACT streamICA of national and provincial ICYlaws education and policies has SOU ION POL alteredTH the landscape CAT of South African schooling dramatically, EDU ACTreplacing the discriminatory IONAL CATORS and fragmented EDU NAT ALS ERI under OF legal framework apartheid with a uniform systemMEN D MAT the constitutional LOY aimed atTmakingNS right to education a reality & RELATE EMP for the people of South Africa. ULATIO REG AND Schools and the Law describes and explains the current legal framework governing our schools. It addresses the key legal and policy instruments affecting schools and covers the growing body of case law on schools and education.

The range of critical topics discussed in the book include: ! the impact of the Constitution ! school admission policies and practice ! language use and freedom of religion at schools ! the powers of school governing bodies ! state funding and school fees ! learner discipline, suspensions and expulsions ! learner safety, bullying and sexual harassment

Schools and the law A

PARTICIPANT

’S

GUIDE

The book includes the text of the core laws and policy instruments governing school education. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Brendan Barry is an attorney and director of the law firm Cheadle Thompson & Haysom Inc in Johannesburg. He specialises in legislative drafting and public administration law and has played a central role in drafting a range of education related laws since 1994, including the South African Schools Act, the Higher Education Act and various provincial laws on education. In the course of his legal practice he has advised a cross-section of participants in the school system, from education departments, parliamentary committees, teachers’ unions and professional bodies to school governing bodies, schools and parents.

ACT 84 OF

1996

ACT 27 OF

1996

ACT 76 OF

1998

UPDATED

APRIL 2010

BRENDAN BARRY

SM&L

A PARTICIPANT’S GUID E

PARTICIPANT’S GUID E

ip

Looking ba ck to 2010 and forwa rd to 2011

SM&L

NCE GOVERNA LAW AND SCHOOLS:

Managemen t & Leadersh

Schools and the law

: LAW AND SCHOOLS CE GOVERNAN ACT

A

NCE GOVERNA LAW AND SCHOOLS:

Schools and the law

this first hip. We are you will enjoy ment & Leaders you will e hope that Literacy....................................17 of School Manage out and hope that turned double edition The cost of illiteracy the way it has delighted with e sm. Literacy....................................20 educational landscapto share our enthusia to the current ly stuck, unable The cost of illiteracy – 20mm to issues related edition is devoted g system seems to be stubborn as we explain in some collateral findings Much of this Our schoolin the current position, 10, suggests that in this country. its past. Our analysis of page on g system’ from and learning Management..........................21 extract itself of our schoolin quality of teaching and the health to improve the of our schools, by contrast, Monitoring learner well-being and ‘School data inability our are top third lies with ent schools academic performance: the problem schools. The and independ third of our best of our public of the questions that needs the role of the class teacher/tutor in the bottom well and the One that perform world. to ce and expertise of continue the rest of the to the best in use the experien quality Managment............................22 comparable improve the is possible to t schools to they find is whether it excellen asked morass our be the The roles and responsibilities of to them from and good practices and to help extract of subject heads resides in the success in England n forming schools has been used with some ent of Educatio our underper that Departm ’s England It is a model orming schools Index to Volume 4.................25 themselves in. of the background to how of their best-perf For more we provide some process of using the leaders that perform worst. the those and results of leading schools’. has gone about Volume 4................................27 functionality ‘Schools to improve the Selected Index by Topic 2 and the article ul page to successf the turn on on this for the article that we some of the researchthose that underperform Cape. we were doing improve Western to the POLIC It was while in schools Y of excellent ’s besta similar vein Is published 10 times a year by initiative of use of leaders one of the province that is launch of an Ednews. It is editorially and financially rd High School, a new school learned of the for Westerfo bility see independent and it is not affiliated to nt will ent responsi called Claremo This initiative any organisation. It seeks to provide taking managem school, which is to be it was founded the leaders of South African schools performing schools, next year. The name when initial January college. in rd���s with current and relevant inform’ training due to open was Westerfo former teachers and refurbished ation on issues of policy, leadership, incidentally ............ issue: the site of a High, which ely altered Opinion............ management and governance. be housed on News.............. is not enough s are being extensiv enrolment of 500 pupils. in 1953, will 2 Motivation ........................ ve college building a planned SM&L P.O. Box 2612, Clareinch, 7740 • Tel: 021The 683future 2899 •ofFax 086 689 5971 • E-mail: .......................3 ...2editor@ednews.co.za www.ednews.co.za SM&L 1 The old training the new school, which has promising alternati News.............. Provincial ul offers a about his is the 2010 NSC Free State Results............ first edition to accommodate project, which if successf schools are launched. Read SAPAof Lies, damned School .........3 ce and also the Management in which new It is an exciting firstConferen we analyse lies and statistics – & Leadership official edition the 2010 NSC the current manner have jointly for 2011 in the new 32-page approach to developed with results become to a the News.............. format that we 4. Juta & new owners year by ........................ this on page in England refers National Teaching of Ednews,d 10 Compan n, five times ay (Pty) Ltd who publish of schooling ...4 nancially are to s in Educatio editions a year publishe Awards on the state Is ofpublishe the ly and r offiSM&L. ble 10 previous is editorial this extended Office for Standard , is responsi 2010 NSC report you read liated toWe plan Ednews. It editions a year to is not affi 32-page Results Almost every stands for the and it format title suggests provide nt Hats off to Limpopo .....................5 doing this of thedent rather than the Ofsted, which equivale shorter 12-to-16 body, as its It seeks to for a number indepen body called ... and of the cap to -pageschools ofany organisation. and Skills. This and quality. It is the English you, our reasons, African format. We Services the Western a doff includin South ’s subscrib of are nce g informcost ers, Children Cape savings. The ip, the leaders relevant also 2010 NSC up to3 30% more will include ng school performa on page not onlyand leadersh benefits to Results............ no policy,increase Continued and for monitori with current copy for 2010 NSC your issues of price for 2011 but beyond turn Code distributi .........8 Forgoverna to page 2. ation onmoney. more onnce. and averages and ons our plans for management 1 2011 2010 NSC examinations: news.co.za The release How the districts a www.ed of the National news.co.z rated great deal ofeditor@ed • E-mail: hype in schools, Senior Certificate results 689 5971 2010 NSC • Fax 086 always creates 2010 results Results............ with matricul 021 683 2899 The relations were ants and in the a .......10 7740 • Tel: hip in the pass rate, no exception. The big media, and the Clareinch, and performa between poverty Box 2612, surprise was nce SM&L P.O. the was so disrupted particularly in a year in which the academi7.2% increase News.............. teachers’ strike. first by the Soccer World ........................ c programme Claremo Cup We nt and .12 have used the High: The story then by the protracte to try to better data from the continues d understand what News.............. of the class the results tell DBE’s technical report of 2010 and Claremont High: .........................14 us about the the teachers their examina performance Murray Gibbon Interview with and schools tions. that prepared we have devoted You can read more them for about this in Management.. the special section ‘Lies, damned to the 2010 NSC examina ............ Getting done ............15 tions, starting lies what matters story of the 2010 and statistics’ – highligh with our article most ting results remains Management.. more clarity a little muddled our uneasiness that the ........................ on the subject-s The pros and cons . We are hoping 17 pecific results distributions of multitask to obtain for each subject once we have ing Professional obtained the that we have code requested from ACE: School Development.. ..19 The start of the DBE. does it have Leadership – the year a future? at our own personal is a time when it is good as a school Research.......... productivity topic. The fi leader to look and we have ............ The status of rst two articles languages .......... 23 represents good deals with multitasking, related to this in schools what News............... way in which or bad management practice. it means and whether we manage it Equal Educatio ...................... 26 The second our time and and routines n deals with the the that are part News............... of every principa daily round of tasks, meetings ...................... l’s working life. Eastern Cape 27 In this edition, Equal EducatioEducation Crisis: we also examine n pickets Parliame that have signifi cance for principa and provide summaries nt News............... the future of of two reports ......................2 the ACE: School ls and their schools. The National 8 The one deals offered by a Leadership Programme School Nutrition with number of universit qualification, in the Eastern is proposed which ies over the Cape to be News............... past few years has been principals. The an initial qualification and which ......................2 Eastern Cape for those who other looks at 9 aspire to become is or is not being the status of What it meanseducation in crisis: our official done to promote for those on their use in schools. languages and what the ground We hope, as always, that you will find informative read. this edition Is publishe an interestin d five times g and Ednews. a

S c h o o l 2011

marie Hattingh

za

GOVERNANCE FOR SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS

his, our final edition for 2010, includes articles on three important research-based reports that have been released over the past few months. These are a report by the Bureau for Economic Research (BER) of the University of Stellenbosch on the cost to this country of illiteracy, a report by the HSRC on educator leave-taking and its impact on schooling, and a report by McKinsey & Company on a second study that it has undertaken on school improvement efforts that have delivered results. We hope that our articles covering these reports will encourage all of our readers to get hold of copies of the full reports because of the wealth of data and insights that they provide on critical aspects of our schooling system and our own attempts to improve learner performance. Each of these reports is of interest in its own right. However, if you read them, as we have done, against the background of the performance agreement that Minister Angie Motshekga signed on behalf ..2 In this issue: ........................ of her department towards the end of October, you will better understand the Research..........schools -- a better ent Schools leading need for putting into practice some of the lessons that can be learned from these school improvem approach to ...4 reports. Our schooling system has been stuck in low-performance mode for ........................ News.............. to a schools off far too long with massive negative consequences for our economy and for the new Getting better start? ...6 majority of the children of this country. The McKinsey report suggests in its ........................ News..............foundations of findings that stalled improvement efforts can be triggered into movement and the Establishing School progress by one of three things: a socio-economic crisis, a ‘high profile’ critical Claremont High ..............7 ............ report on the performance of the system or a change in leadership. Perhaps the News..............UCT and Westerford ..8 release of the reports at this time will act as the trigger necessary to inject a ........................ ............ degree of energy into our own reform efforts. We also have a new DG in place best News.. the world’s UCT -- Amongst so let us hope that the combination of these two factors will at last provide the 9 universities ............ impetus for better performance that is so desperately needed. ............ Research..........the health of our and Finally a word of apology for the very late delivery of this and the previous School data system 3edition. We have been working hard behind the scenes to try and ensure the schooling ......................1 Opinion............ long-term sustainability of Volume School Management & Leadership and for this 5 – Numbe fixing our schools 4 How to start r1 .......................1 to happen we needed to find it a home or partner it with a larger and more Management..school year plan ACT established business entity. This and the last edition have been a joint effort your Developing ..19 . .. SCHOOLS a consequence CAN ACT of some teething ........................ with such an entity and the delays have been CY DoE News.. of NEEDUSOUTH AFRI ON POLI progress, however, has been CATI problems this arrangement. Recent 2 The birth pains EDUfrom Lresulting ............2 ONA ............ CATORS ACT NATIgood LSkinds ............ LEADE and we go into the EDU new year with greater confi denceERIA that these NSC..... OF Science results RSHIP Physical TED MAT OYMENT of the past MANA that 2009 NSC RELA EMPL & and of delays are a thingONS that School Management & Leadership explanation GEME NT GOVE LATI -- finally an REGU RNAN moreFOR regularly but that it will continue to provide our ANDwill 4 not only reach youCE makes sense SOUT H AFRICAN .......................2 SCHO readers with news, comment and advice on issues pertaining to the leadership, NSC................. OLS is an NSC? How good management and governance of this nation’s ..........28 Inschools. this

H AFRICAN CE FOR SOUT

GOVERNAN

MANAGEMENT

fessionalism

M. de Kock, Anne

M. de Kock, Annem arie Hattingh

LEADERSHIP

Numbe

LEADERSHIP

a unique pro

ert, Dorothea

www.juta.co.

Volume 4 Number 9 & 10 Double edition

The cost of illiteracy, systemic school improvement, and more!

Johannes A. Slabb

Johannes A. Slabbe rt, Dorothea

POLICY

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Volume 4

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The accom panyin examples forms g CD Rom with useful support materi an essential al and part of the book. The Brave ‘New’ World of Education • teachers is recommende and adult educat d for: • teacher ors educators and other • student lecturers teachers • education supervisors and mento rs. This book has been blind peer review and educat ed by experi ors. enced academ ics

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Supporting teachers with the most up-to-date reference tools for successful classroom practice in South Africa as well as international titles showcasing best practice across the teaching profession.

In his latest book, Five Minds for Howard Gardn the Future er writes: “We , out how to … have not prepare young figured sters so that can survive and thrive they in a world one ever known different from or imagined groundbreak before”. With World of Educat ing approa its ch, The Brave ion provid es a solutio educators ‘New’ to cultivate n to this challen excellence ge, enabling social, moral in learning and ethica quality within l consciousne a ss. The Brave ‘New’ World of Education: • explores the reason s why educat and swiftly ion needs to to face these change radica • identifies challenges lly of the future what essent ially needs • suggests to change - based on in education substantive change can research - how be implem this required ented succes • shows how sfully in practic teachers can e be educated change agents to become . effective Other key features of the book includ • addressing e: theory-practi ce gaps • principles, ideas and tools for design opportunitie ing power s ful learnin • creating g an awareness of selfhood transformatio and person n. al

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Building customised classroom libraries with the widest selection of children’s books from SCHOLASTIC, the world’s largest children’s books publisher. To arrange a Book Fair to raise funds for your school contact us at marketing@juta.co.za.

For all your school textbook, study material, digital and stationery requirements visit Juta Bookshops or go to www.jutaonline.co.za.

Contact a branch near you to join our schools incentive scheme to build your library resources. CLAREMONT Ground Floor, Sunclare Building, 21 Dreyer Street, Claremont, 7708 Tel: +27 21 670 6680, Fax: +27 21 670 6795, Email: claremontbooks@juta.co.za PAROW Shop 45, Shoprite Park Shopping Centre, 262 Voortrekker Road, Parow, 7500 Tel: +27 21 930 6202, Fax: +27 21 930 7962, Email: pabooks@juta.co.za

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BECOMING THE BEST THERE IS

WIN A NOTEBOOK! To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

The world is changing so fast that the skills that were good enough yesterday, need to be better today. Just like top athletes, we need to sharpen our skills to help us become the best that we can be.

UNISA

Up to now, the focus has been on getting the policy and the education system “fit for learning”. Now the time has come to build our skills so that we can take advantage of the new system, which will help us deliver the dream of creating a better future for all.

Tel: 011 670 9000 or 0861 670 411

There are so many options for building our skills that it is sometimes difficult to decide where the best place is to start. And sometimes, this stops us from making a decision. To help you make the right choice, the best places are profiled over the next few pages. There are contact numbers and some information to help you make your choice.

The UNISA school of education has 4 departments: primary, secondary and further teacher education and educational studies which focusses on inservice training. www.unisa.ac.za AIMSSEC The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences Schools Enrichment Centre (AIMSSEC) offers free, professional development courses for teachers. www.aimssec.aims.ac.za STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY They offer an advanced certificate in education (ACE), which offers a combination of contact and distance education. www.academic.sun.ac.za/education/faculty/

“I can’t change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.” Jimmy Dean

undergrad.html UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG They offers a range of courses, including diploma and certificate courses at the Department of Educational Management.

Where to go to improve your skills?

www.uj.ac.za/eduman/home/ NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY They offer an advanced certificate in

UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN

Education (ACE).

They offer an Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE)

www.uniwest.ac.za/faculties/edu/programmes

and a range of short courses. These courses offer a combination of in-service training, mentorship and

WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY

engagement with research.

They offer advanced diplomas and certificates

Tel: 021 650 3368 | Fax: 021 650 5330

in education, with a range of ACE programmes

www.sdu.uct.ac.za/apply/courses

ranging from educational management, English language teaching, Mathematics, General Science,

“I can proudly say that I am becoming a master of my subject”. ACE student

34

2011 National Teacher’s Guide

Environmental education and others. www.wsu.ac.za/faculties/education


Bursaries for Teachers Teachers are the largest single occupational group and profession in the country. Their role has strategic importance for the intellectual, moral, and cultural preparation of our young people. Conceptual, content and academic knowledge are necessary for effective teaching, together with the teacher’s willingness and ability to reflect on practice and learn from the learners’ own experience of being taught. These attributes need to be integrated, so that teachers can confidently apply conceptual knowledge-in-practice. It is clear that all teachers need to enhance their skills, not necessarily qualifications, for the delivery of the new curriculum. A large majority need to strengthen their subject knowledge base, academic content knowledge and teaching skills. A sizeable proportion need to develop specialist skills in areas such as health and physical education, HIV and AIDS support, diversity management, classroom management and discipline. Many need to renew their enthusiasm and commitment to their calling. The Education Department offers bursaries to teachers who want to improve their qualifications.

Bursary Requirements The bursaries are open to teachers with REQV 11, 12, 13 or 14 who are permanent employees of the Education Department. It covers the cost of tuition and books in any of the following two-year part-time courses: • A National Professional Diploma in Education (NPDE) (open to applicants with REQV 11, 12 and 13) • An Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE) (open to applicants with REQV 13 or 14)

Where You Can Study NPDE and ACE certificate studies can be done at universities throughout South Africa. Kindly contact the university you are interested in for more information on these programmes.

How to Apply The Education Department will send a circular out to all schools calling for applications at the appropriate time. Follow the instructions to apply.

Provincial Departments of Education Eastern Cape Steve Vukile Tshwete Education Complex, Zone 6, Zwelitsha. 040 608 4200 | www.ecdoe.gov.za Free State 55 Elizabeth Street, FS Provincial Government Building, Bloemfontein. 051 404 8000 | www.fsdoe.fs.gov.za Gauteng 111 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg. 011 355 0000 | www.education.gpg.gov.za KwaZulu-Natal 247 Burger Street, Pietermaritzburg. 033 846 5000 | www.kzneducation.gov.za Limpopo Corner 113 Biccard & 24 Excelsior Street, Polokwane. 015 290 7611 | www.edu.limpopo.gov.za Mpumalanga Building No. 5, Government Boulevard, Riverside Park, Nelspruit. 013 766 5000 www.mpumalanga.gov.za/education North West 2nd Floor Executive Block, Garona Building, Mmabatho. 018 387 3312 | www.nwpg.gov.za/education Northern Cape 09 Hayston Road, Harrison Park. 053 830 1600 | www.ncedu.gov.za Western Cape Grand Central Towers, Cnr Darling and Lower Plein Streets, Cape Town. 021 467 2000 | http://wced.wcape.gov.za

35


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We understand the importance of providing our children with a quality education. It is the key that unlocks a brighter future for all. Paarl Media has been associated with the provision of affordable learning material in South Africa over the past 100 years. We are committed, passionate and proud to be working closely with the government and the educational sector in the printing and delivery of educational textbooks to schools.

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PAARL MEDIA OFFERS:

PROACTIVE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT Paarl Media has heeded the government’s call in the President’s State of the Nation address for partnerships with industry to avail our capacity for developing the skills of our people. Skills development is central to job creation and productivity, empowering people for meaningful participation in society.

NATIONAL PRESENCE

• 10 printing plants across South Africa allows high

quality printing of large volumes under tight deadlines • Provides provincial economic empowerment and employment opportunities • Printed material can be delivered more cost effectively as it is printed closer to school distribution points • Reduced transport requirements minimise carbon footprint

Following a comprehensive study of international training programmes, Paarl Media has taken the lead in the development of a world class training facility, the Paarl Media Academy. It is set to raise the skills levels in the industry.

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South Africa benefits from investment, job creation and skills development • Implementation of world class technology and systems delivers books, printed at an international standard

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provider status • 125% of clients’ procurement spend applies towards their own BEE scorecards • Broad based BEE partners, LoveLife’s Kurisani Investments, and Naspers’ Welkom Yizani investment company • Over 1 000 jobs created through successful enterprise development initiatives

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Stewardship Council™) CoC (Chain of Custody) certification. This serves as an independent international verification that the products printed can be traced back from their point of origin to responsible well managed forestry, controlled and recycled sources • Industry leader in environmentally sustainable printing practices

PROVIDING CRITICAL SKILLS Existing outdated trade training curricula replaced by new apprenticeship programmes, developed to international standards Apprentices earn a wage while they learn on the 2 year theoretical and practical training programme The Academy offers Paarl Media employees technical, skills and leadership courses Drives personal excellence through development and performance management Additional value added courses offered to clients to facilitate design and preparation of material for print CERTIFIED QUALIFICATION Academy is an Institute of Sectoral and Occupational Excellence (ISOE) Accredited training provider with MAPPP/ FPM SETA International accreditation by City & Guilds, UK’s leading vocational awarding body CAREERS IN PRINT Paarl Media offers a full range of careers, including apprenticeship programmes, to learn, earn, grow and excel while you work. For more information, visit www.paarlmedia.co.za and click on Careers or contact us

10 Freedom Way Milnerton 7441 PO Box 37014 Chempet 7442 South Africa Tel +27 21 550 2500 Fax +27 21 550 6233 E-mail: info@paarlmedia.co.za www.paarlmedia.co.za

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The Matric pass rate When should we celebrate? The recent and unprecedented release by Umalusi, the body responsible for maintaining standards in the Matric exams, of the adjustments made to the 2010 scores has underlined how important it is to treat the Matric pass rate with care. Contrary to popular belief, the Matric pass rate on its own is not a good measure of academic achievement in the schooling system, nor was the pass rate ever designed for this. However, the pass rate can serve as a measure of the opportunities open to our youths. If these opportunities increase, then we should celebrate. The Matric pass rate, or the percentage of Grade 12 learners in public schools who obtain their National Senior Certificate, is understandably something that provokes lively debate and a fair amount of anguish every year. The fact that the pass rate went up from 60.6% in 2009 to 67.8% in 2010 made headlines. To provide some idea of previous trends, in 2001 the pass rate exceeded 60% for the first time since 1994, but following a peak of almost 75% in 2003, there had been a fairly steady decline.

2010 seemed to mark the beginning of a new upswing. But there were doubts. How could such a dramatic improvement follow the worst teacher strike the country had ever seen? Misgivings about the marks adjustment process prompted Umalusi to open to public scrutiny, for the first time ever, documents from the standardisation process. The documents appeared to reassure the public that there had not been any undue inflating of subject marks – Umalusi is only able to adjust subject marks, not the pass rate directly. They moreover confirmed that improvements in individual subjects were smaller than the improvement that was seen in the pass rate. As an example, of the eight most commonly taken non-language subjects, one subject saw no change in the average mark, two saw a decline in the average and five saw an increase. In the case of the five subjects with an increase, the average increase was 3.5 points out of 100. How, one may ask, is it possible to have increases of around 3.5 points in some subject averages whilst the overall pass rate increases by a whole 7.2 percentage points? A key factor is the spread of learners across subjects. When this changes, the pass rate can change, even if performance in individual subjects remains the same. In particular, if learners move to easier subjects, more learners pass. There was in fact a small shift from the harder mathematics to the easier mathematical literacy between 2009 and 2010. The percentage of learners taking mathematics dropped from 51% to 48% – learners must take one of the two subjects. Another important factor that influences the pass rate is the number of examination candidates. When this decreases, the percentage of well-performing learners tends to be higher, largely because the holding back of worse performing learners in Grade 11 in the previous year has been more widespread. 2010 in fact saw slightly fewer full-time candidates than 2009: around 559 000 against 581 000. This is almost certainly a factor that contributed towards the higher pass rate in 2010.

38

2011 National Teacher’s Guide


WIN A NOTEBOOK!

Comparing pass rates in different years is in fact not like comparing apples to apples. This is not a uniquely South African phenomenon. Examinations like our Matric are simply not designed to compare the performance of the schooling system across years. They are designed to test whether the individual learner qualifies for a certificate, based on the subjects the learner has chosen. If one wants to compare how well the system is doing, one should turn to testing systems like the international TIMSS and SACMEQ programmes, where South Africa has participated for some years.

To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

So is there any cause for celebration when our Matric pass rate improves? Yes, if this means that more youths have a certificate that provides access to further studies or employment. Moreover, the fact that the average mark in certain individual subjects should have increased, for instance from 35% to 38% in life sciences (formerly biology) between 2009 and 2010 does provide an indication that learners are learning better and this should also be celebrated. More learners need to pass Matric. This is very clear. In comparison to other similar developing countries, South Africa’s enrolment up to Grade 11 is above average. In Grade 12 enrolment is around average. But the number of Grade 12 Let’s work together for quality learners successfully finishing their grade, and education therefore secondary schooling, by obtaining their President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: Matric, is low by international standards. The The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day. pass rate needs to improve further, both through As part of the Quality Teaching and Learningtherefore Campaign, teachersperformance made the commitment to the better learning and inCode for Quality Education and committed themselves to the following: individual subjects, and through ensuring that learners combination ofI promise subjects that As a TEACHER,choose in line with the the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, to: maximises their opportunities. The latter is not • teach, to advance the education and the development of learners as individuals; easy. Better counselling is needed. But the Grade • respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice; 9 standardised assessments currently being intro• develop loyalty and respect for the profession; duced should partly be aimed atandgiving learners • be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, of sober mind and body; a better sense of where lie and • improve my own knowledge and skills their base to be strengths more effective; hence whatgood subjects should select the • maintain communication they between teachers and students, amongfor teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents; critical last regular three years of school. • provide information to parents on their children’s progress; •

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

39


The ABC of credit With so many attractive-looking credit offers on the market these days, the lure is just too tempting for many of us, and why not? It’s there to be used, isn’t it? Well, yes and no really, but we’ll get into that shortly. Used with restraint, credit can help you and offer financial independence, but it’s not necessarily always the solution so read on and empower yourself today.

Wants vs. needs The most important consideration when using credit – or finance as it is sometimes called – is your reason for choosing to do so. Not surprisingly, this is exactly what most of us struggle with. Consumers confuse trivial wants with basic needs, and the advertising that we’re exposed to doesn’t help. To be clear, a want is typically a luxury that you won’t miss if you don’t have it. Needs, however, are essential things that you absolutely cannot do without. You can try rationalise it another way, but you’re only fooling yourself at your own expense and you don’t deserve this burden. The truth is that if you don’t have savings or surplus cash to pay for something then you cannot afford it. It’s not what most people want to hear, but it’s true. The only option in such circumstances is borrowing money, or is it? You could plan ahead and try saving, which will save you money since you won’t need to pay all those additional fees associated with credit. You could also ask yourself whether you really need it. Be brutally honest, because that smiling salesperson certainly won’t.

Choosing a credit provider If you must use credit, you should only ever consider registered credit providers because it affords you protection from harmful and very often illegal practices. Registered credit providers are bound to adhere to the responsible lending principles set by the National Credit Act and therefore they must act in the consumer’s best interest.

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2011 National Teacher’s Guide

The NCA is the very reason why some consumers don’t qualify or get less than they expected when applying for credit. It’s all based on affordability assessments. In an effort to get cash at all costs, these consumers then approach the unregulated industry and expose themselves to far bigger risks. Use reputable, registered credit providers or be prepared to live with the consequences.

Credit scores and records A credit score is a measure of your credit risk based on your payment history (i.e. account behaviour). It’s a summary of positive and negative factors, including the information on your credit record.

A credit record is based on your credit score, payment history, judgments, credit enquiries and adverse listings. This helps credit providers assess you as a potential client, which is why it’s important to maintain a good credit record at all costs.

You may qualify for more credit, lower interest rates or favourable repayment terms if you have a good or improved credit rating. It can open doors for you and improve your lifestyle, like a bond so you can buy a house.

Further information

Call our 24hr Client Care Centre on 0860 10 20 43 or visit www.capitecbank.co.za.


Maintaining a good credit record • Spend less than you earn and only borrow what you can repay. • Pay the full instalment amount owing each month. • Pay accounts on or before the due date. Falling into arrears affects your credit record negatively. • Don’t ignore a letter of demand for payment. Contact your credit provider to see whether you can reach a solution or agreement. • Never ignore a court summons for non-payment because it will reflect on your credit profile. • Do not shop around for credit unless you need it. Each enquiry reflects on your credit profile, and this can have a negative effect on future applications.

Consequences of reckless borrowing If you cannot afford your monthly credit repayments you will end up paying for it one way or another. So what’s the big deal? How bad can things get if you default? Well, for starters, you will start receiving calls from collection agents reminding you about your financial obligations. If left, things will only get worse. Eventually your access to further credit will be severely restricted, if not discontinued, because you will be listed at the credit bureaus. This will make it very difficult for you to get finance for a bond, car or some other big dream that you may have. Ignoring matters will only compound your problems. Simplify your life and think before you act. Using credit is about making the right choices. This could be your reason for wanting credit or even the amount of credit that you apply for. Maintaining a good credit record can help you qualify for favourable credit terms (something everyone dreams of having). Start small. First try managing your finances on a small scale to get a feel for credit and what it involves. This will get your impressive credit profile started and make you a more desirable client for registered credit providers.

41


Avusa Education:

WIN A NOTEBOOK!

Giving learners a head start The education system in this country is characterised by a number of problems and Avusa Education is doing its part to contribute towards improving it. Access to relevant, free, curriculum-based content remains a major obstacle for school learners, particularly in poorer areas. Systematic evaluation of Grade 3 to Grade 6 pupils shows that, as a country, South Africa is a consistently poor performer when it comes to literacy and numeracy levels.

To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

The matric pass rates have constantly remained low and the standard of matric questioned. By leveraging its powerful newspaper brands, distribution networks and partnerships, Avusa Education’s publications have become valuable resource in classrooms across all education phases.

The Sunday Times Storybooks Children exposed to books from a young age, especially those written in their mother tongue, are more likely to develop a love of reading, a critical skill that underpins their education. But nearly 79% of South African schools do not have a library, making access to reading material difficult, especially for children living in poorer areas. The Sunday Times Story Book project will distribute 1 million storybooks this year free to more than 3 000 primary schools across the country. Each book contains ten stories translated into local languages such as isiZulu, Setwana, isiNdebele, Sepedi, Siswati, Tshivenda and Xitsonga. The programme supports government’s Foundation for Learning campaign which seeks to improve literacy and numeracy amongst South African school children. “Our involvement in education for the past 16 years inspired us to support this campaign by igniting a love for reading among our future leaders,” says Avusa Education Publisher, Patti McDonald. The story books are especially designed for Foundation Phase, Grades R to 3, and Intermediate Phase, Grades 4 to 6. With 7 million children currently in Grade R to Grade 6, the Storybook project aims to distribute at least one book for every two children or 3,5 million copies. “For as little as R4,50 a book, the project shows how sponsors, readers, educators, storytellers and publishers can come together to give the precious gift of reading to children,” says Ray Hartley, editor of The Sunday Times.

45


R U O Y P L E H LEARNERS GAIN A NEEDY

N O I T A C QUALIFI

e cial Aid Schem n a in F t n e d tu ational S ation.” ce from the N of further educ n ta ls a is s o s g a ir e ith th W “ achieve youth can now r o o p ) S A F S (N

order to government in e th y b d e h edy stablis financially ne to s e NSFAS was e ri a rs u b ns and d Further administer loa niversities an u lic b u p t a y frica. tud es in South A g students for s lle o C ) T E (F d Training Education an

Many learners have the potential to succeed but no money to study after school. These youth are often uninformed about the options available to them in terms of financial aid to pay for their tertiary education and many settle for low paying jobs or unemployment. Don’t let the learners in your school add to the negative status quo. You can help them by providing your pupils with information about study options, subject choices and financial aid that could lead them towards personal and economic success.

The reality is that our youth have a great deal of opportunity and untapped potential to venture into successful careers someday. They need role models, like yourself, to encourage them to make the most of their lives and to get an education that will help them find good jobs. Tell them about all that NSFAS has to offer. • Learners should apply for university using their Grade 12 June results. • Learners must find out about all the deadlines for applications for courses and financial aid.

FOR MORE INFORMATION contact NSFAS on 021 763-3232 or SMS your questions to 32261 (Mark it as “teacher”) Standard SMS rates apply. Email info@nsfas.org.za or visit www.nsfas.org.za

NSFAS is a registered credit provider in terms of the National Credit Act 34 of 2005 (NCRP 2655)


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7747502-10056

Saving for Education The Standard Bank Fundisa Fund Call the Fundisa Contact Centre on 0860 FUNDISA (3863472).

STATUTORY DISCLOSURE The Fundisa Fund is not a bank deposit, but a collective investment scheme (unit trust) which is generally a medium to long term investment. The value of your investment may go down as well as up during the period of investment. Past performance is not necessarily a guide to future performance. The Fundisa Fund is traded at a ruling price and can engage in borrowing and scrip lending. A schedule of fees and charges and maximum commissions is available on request from STANLIB Collective Investments Limited (“the Manager�) Commission and incentives may be paid and if so, would be included in the overall costs. Liberty is a full member of the Association for Savings and Investments of South Africa (ASISA). The manager is a member of the Liberty Group of Companies. Trustees: Absa Bank Ltd, 6th Floor, Absa Towers North (6E1), 180 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg, 2001. Telephone No. 011 350 4000. 9ZB075


PUTTING EDUCATION FIRST The Sunday Times aims to make the lives of teachers, parents and learners easier through our many education-focused publications. In 2011 we plan to produce the following publications: •

ReadRight is a 16-page magazine published 12 times a year and inserted into

the full run of the Sunday Times. It was launched more than 10 years ago to address a need for educational material for classrooms and homes. It is aimed at children aged between 6 and 13 years, the parents of these children and teachers of Grades R to 8. The magazine contains a pull-out-and-keep centre-spread poster ideal for use in the classroom, teacher tips and activities for the learner to do in the classroom. It also contains four pages that can be folded into a 16-page booklet filled with useful information, puzzles or fun facts on a particular topic. In 2011 ReadRight will be published on January 30, February 20, March 27, April 24, May 29, June 26, July 31, August 28, September 25, October 30, November 27 and December 18. For more information, contact: Sandra Fivaz on sandra.fivaz@avusa.co.za

•

The Sunday Times Storybook has been translated into all

11 official languages and is aimed at addressing the lack of reading resources in schools. Corporates, the Department of Basic Education and Sunday Times readers contributed to the printing and distribution of 650 000 storybooks in 2009/2010. In 2011 the Sunday Times will deliver another 500 000 copies to schools. For more information, contact: Patti McDonald on patti.mcdonald@avusa.co.za


The Sunday Times Career Quest

is a standalone 48-page tabloid supplement, which will be published on April 17, 2011. It is aimed at learners in Grades 9-12, taking them from their subject choice dilemmas in Grade 9, to tertiary education concerns and career queries in Grade 12. In the 2011 edition there will be a special focus on scarce skills and how learners can make themselves more employable by getting the skills the country needs. For more information, contact: Margie Harris on harrism@avusa.co.za

The Matric Q&A has been published since 2008 and contains Matric

exemplars and memoranda set by top teachers in their field. Each paper is checked for accuracy by curriculum advisers at the National Department of Basic Education. The Matric Q&A, which will be published in May, will give Grade 12 learners an opportunity to check their exam readiness during the June/July holidays, before they write their prelims. For more information, contact: Suzan Chala on chalas@avusa.co.za

The newspapers in education programme (NIE),

which was launched more than five years ago, trains teachers at no cost in how to use newspapers as an additional resource in their classrooms. About 2 000 teachers are trained a year and also receive free workbooks full of ideas of how to use newspapers at all education phases from Grades R to 12. If you would like to attend one of our NIE workshops, please contact Nozi Canca on 011 280-5374. For more information, contact: Phanuel Mnguni on mngunip@avusa.co.za

o The NIE programme runs the ReadRight Rockz Club, which has 22 000 members; the Planet Power Your Future Sowetan Education Club, which has 7 200 members; and the Teachers’ Club, which has 8 200 members. The Sunday Times sends regular SMSs to the teachers and learners who are members of these clubs to keep them up to date with our educational projects, events and the supplements published in Avusa newspapers. To join the Teachers’ Club, SMS the word TEACH followed by your name, grade you teach and school to 32545. SMSs are charged at R1 For more information, contact: Nozi Canca on nozi.canca@avusa.co.za

Grade 4 learners, taught by Happy Khukhama (above left), take turns to read from a ReadRight cut-out-and-keep storybook


HOW CAN COMPUTERS HELP US? Whilst information and communication technologies (ICT) are not a magic solution to providing access to education, they do offer the possibility of bridging distances and bringing expert teaching to remote areas. They also provide a ‘library’ of resources, which can support you in teaching and improving your skills for the future. There are some great websites to support you – take a look at www.teacher.org.za or www.thutong.org.za for ideas. And help your learners research their future study options on www.sastudy.co.za to make sure they make the right choice for their future.

THE TEACHER LAPTOP INITIATIVE The Teacher Laptop Initiative, spearheaded by the Department of Basic Education (DoBE), addresses South Africa’s need for a quality education system and forms part of the cohesive plan by the DoE and other stakeholders in education to improve the overall quality of education by making resources available to learners and teachers in the public education sector.

Frequently Asked Questions around ICT. 1. Question “To many of us, it looks as if the laptops are overpriced and would end up costing in the region of R 15 000 if taken over the 5 year period.”

Answer It is imperative to note that the monthly costs are not only for the laptop, but that it is the total costs for the complete packages. The packages includes the following: • Connectivity (250Mb – 1Gig per month usually worth about R140 to R290 p/m is included in the monthly package cost.) • Software: Office Enterprise, Adobe Digital

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Schools Collection and Presenter Package, Symantec Anti Virus to the total value of R15 000+. The ELRC TLI Task Team has managed to get all this for a total cost of only R668 and is covered in the monthly package cost. • Insurance • 5 year carry in warrantee • Finance costs If any teacher can find a laptop with the above included for cheaper than any offering by one of the accredited suppliers, they should contact the ELRC and bring the matter to our attention, as suppliers have guaranteed the exclusivity of their offerings for teachers.

2. Question Who qualifies and who is eligible for the laptop subsidy?

Answer Every public school-based educator employed in terms of the Employment of Educators Act and who occupies a permanent post on the establishment of the school would be eligible to qualify to participate in the initiative. The rollout of the TLI will be taking place in cohorts specific to the size and funds available to the individual Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). Government Gazette (GG) 32207 specifies that the PEDs will implement the allowance on a preference list of teachers based on seniority.

3. Question Where do I purchase my laptop? Who are the providers?

Answer In line with its mandate to serve the needs of the public education sector, the ELRC, in consultation with the DBE and the Combined Teacher’s Unions (CTU-SADTU and CTU-ITU) identified 12 accredited suppliers for the TLI, based on


the requirements as set in Government Gazette 32207 and the criteria as determined by the ELRC TLI Task Team. As the teacher will be contracting directly with the supplier, it is important to note that these suppliers were identified through public engagement and not a tender.

WIN A NOTEBOOK! To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

The 12 provisionally accredited consortia/suppliers participating in the first phase of the TLI are: Dell/Laptitude; Fujitsu; Hewlett-Packard; Lenovo; MTN, Pinnacle Technologies Holdings Limited; Sahara Systems; Telkom/Mustek; Vodacom, LG and Cell C. The provisionally accredited service providers have identified outlets or “one-stop shops” where a teacher may purchase the complete package (including the finance agreement). The provisionally accredited service providers have a “good, better, best” range of packages where the maximum all-inclusive monthly repayment will not exceed R390.00. The TLI website (www.teacherlaptop.co.za) and the suppliers directly, can be consulted in this regard.

4. Question I have never used a laptop before, will I be offered training?

Answer Yes. It is imperative that teachers be properly trained and coached to empower them to utilize the laptops and the accompanying applications to its fullest capacity and ultimately ensure quality learning and teaching in the classroom. To this extent the strategic partners to the initiative are reinvesting time and resources towards the training and development of teachers in ICT and Computer Literacy. A training and Development Committee had been established and together with our strategic partners, a Training and Development strategy had been formulated. The strategic partners to the initiative are the software suppliers Microsoft, Symantec and Adobe, as well as Cisco Systems, Intel, SchoolNet and Mindset who are reinvesting in the initiative towards the professional development and training of teachers. Information supplied by DOE

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WEBSITES TO SUPPORT YOU

HELP IS JUST A CLICK AWAY

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .o rg.za for more info on type of content required .

GENERAL WEBSITES Centre for Education Policy Development (CEPD) | www.cepd.org.za CEPD is a professionally autonomous Centre established in 1993 on the initiative of the mass democratic movement in order to start developing education policy for a democratic South Africa. Department of Education website | www.education.gov.za Education International | www.ei-ie.org Education International represents nearly 30 million teachers and education workers. Our 401 member organisations operate in 172 countries and territories. As the world’s largest Global Union Federation, and the only one representing education workers in every corner of the globe. Education Africa | www.educationafrica.com Education Africa, addresses two of the most critical educational issues facing South Africa’s marginalised communities: accessibility to quality education and relevance of education.

Global Campaign for Education South Africa | www.campaignforeducation.org/en/south-africa The Global Campaign for Education (GCE) is a civil society movement that aims to end the global education crisis. The GCE’s mission is to make sure that governments act now to deliver the right of every girl, boy, woman and man to a free quality public education. National Student Financial Aid Scheme of South Africa (NSFAS) | www.nsfas.org.za The National Student Financial Aid Scheme of South Africa (NSFAS) seeks to impact on South Africa`s historically skewed student, diplomate and graduate populations by providing a sustainable financial aid system that enables academically deserving and financially needy learners to meet their own and South Africa`s development needs. South African Institute for Distance Education (SAIDE) | www.saide.org.za/frontend The South African Institute for Distance Education was formed as an educational trust in July 1992. Its explicit brief is to assist in the reconstruction of education and training in South Africa. It promotes open learning principles, the use of quality distance education methods and the appropriate use of technology. South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA) | www.saasta.ca SAASTA is an agency of the National Research Foundation (NRF). The mandate is to advance public awareness, appreciation and engagement of science, engineering and technology in South Africa. SA History online | www.sahistory.org.za Rewriting history, critically examining our past and strengthening the teaching of history. 56

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...OR JUST CALL African Leadership Academy T: 084 241 1196 | E: fswaniker@ala.org www.theartherapy.co.za Argo - Multi-media Educational Publishers As an entrepreneurial company, we are focused on connecting with leaders to make a discernable difference in South Africa, by supporting achievers in times of critical change. T: 021 865 2813 | F: 021 865 2166 E: info@argo.org.za | www.argo.org.za Department of Education T: 0800 202 933 | www.education.gov.za Department of Science and Technology E: nhlanhla.nyide@dst.gov.za | www.dst.gov.za Education International (EI) E: info@ei.org.za | www.ei-ie.org Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) T: 012 663 0432 | E: gen.sec@elrc.co.za www.elrc.co.za Education Rights Project (ERP) T: 011 717 3076 | E: salim.vally@wits.ac.za www.erp.org.za E-School Network (ESN) T: 021 683 8719/ 9140 E: jenny@esn.org.za www.esn.org.za Extra-Mural Education Project (EMEP) E: info@emep.org.za | www.emep.org.za Government Employee Medical Scheme (GEMS) T: 08600 4367 | M: 083 450 4367 E: enguiries@gems.gov.za | www.gems.gov.za Home Language Project T: 011 646 3070 | www.hlp.org.za Learningthings Africa T: 011 719 4100 | E: susan@learnthings.co.za www.learnthigs.co.za National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) T: 0800 202 933 / 012 312 5911 E: Ngqengelele.L@doe.gov.za www.education.gov.za

Opening Learning Systems Education Trust (OLSET) T: 011 339 5491/7 | E: van@mail.ngo.za www.olset.org.za Planned Parenthood Association of South Africa T: 011 523 1400 | E: martham@ppasa.org.za www.ppasa.org.za Project Literacy T: 012 323 3447 | E: info@projectliteracy.org.za www.projectliteracy.org.za READ Educational Trust T: 011 496 3322 | E: info@read.co.za www.read.co.za Resources Aimed at the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (RAPCAN) T: 012 712 2330 | E: info@rapcan.org.za www.rapcan.org.za SAstudy.co.za SAstudy.co.za is South Africa’s most comprehensive database of all undergraduate qualifications which helps learners and students to make the right decisions about what to study, who to contact, where to stay and what’s needed for a successful student life. T: 021 865 2813 | F: 021 865 2166 E: info@argo.org.za | www.sastudy.co.za Schoolnet T: 011 403 5777 | E: info@schoolnet.org.za www.schoolnet.org.za Teacher.org.za Teacher.org.za is an online platform where key stakeholders in education can connect, collaborate and participate to make a discernible difference to the future of South Africa. Regularly updated with the latest education-related news, it also provides a dynamic opportunity for teachers to pro-actively get involved, share ideas and suggest solutions. T: 021 865 2813 | F: 021 865 2166 E: info@argo.org.za | www.teacher.org.za 57


IT Learners and Teachers benefit Information Technology learners and teachers benefit from the Mindset Learn and UniForum SA partnership. In 2010 Mindset Learn developed Information Technology (IT) Grade 11 materials sponsored by UniForum SA, the co.za domain name administrator. The materials have been distributed free of charge to over 425 government and independent schools, benefitting up to 25 000 learners studying IT for Grades 10 and 11. The materials comprise 9 hours of video content (also broadcast on DStv & Toptv Channel 319), 25 hours of computer-based interactive multimedia content, as well as associated print content. Theo Kramer, Chair UniForum SA and Boy Gauteng Education HOD Boy Ngobeni received Ngobeni, HOD Gauteng Department of Education the Mindset Learn materials from UniForum SA Chair Theo Kramer at a launch attended by representatives of various government education departments, schools and the media at the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre in Newtown, Johannesburg in November 2010. Mr Kramer said, “The nature of UniForum SA’s business means that we are in the perfect position to witness first-hand the growing importance of the online world while appreciating the absolute necessity of joining it. Our investment in South African IT education continues to grow every single year thanks to a very fruitful partnership with Mindset Learn.” Mr Ngobeni added, “It is truly impressive that non-profit entities like UniForum SA continue to collaborate with NGOs like Mindset Learn in securing South Africa’s future in this new century.” Mindset Network CEO, Roith Rajpal agreed with the HOD, “We have always believed in partnerships with like-minded corporates. Through such partnerships, Mindset Learn has developed curriculum-aligned content for Grades 10 to 12 in critical subjects. The IT Grade 10 materials are already in use and the Grade 12 materials will be ready for distribution by September 2011.” Mindset Learn’s relationship with UniForum SA goes back a long way, the latter having now funded the development of IT support materials from Grade 10 to Grade 12. In 2012, Mindset Learn will receive further funding from UniForum SA to develop CAT support materials for the FET phase. Mindset Learn is aimed at high school learners and educators in the FET band (Grades 10, 11 and 12). The programme strives to assist learners and teachers in their schooling through multi-media content. Content is aligned to the curriculum in the subjects of English, Mathematics, Physical Sciences, Information Technology and Mathematical Literacy. Altogether 112 schools receive on-demand content while over 2 million homes in Southern Africa receive broadcast content via South African satellite television (DStv and Toptv both on channel 319).

Contacts: www.mindset.co.za/learn | Email: info@mindset.co.za | Tel: 086 100 6463


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Let Heinemann help you with CAPS From 2012 South Africa will implement the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) in Grades 1, 2, 3 and 10. The current materials won’t match the CAPS, and schools will need to select new books from a national catalogue. So put on your thinking “CAPS” and choose Heinemann’s hugely popular courses to ensure you get the best possible support! Every Heinemann course offers • a comfortable teaching experience • an enjoyable and effective learning experience • top academic results • complete curriculum coverage Heinemann partners with teachers and subject experts to make sure we provide everything that teachers and learners need in a clear, easy-to-use format.

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2011/02/24 3:29 PM


THE GRAMMAR DEBATE

WIN A NOTEBOOK! To enter, sms ‘notebook’ plus your email to 34747. Each sms costs R2. Deadline: 30 Nov 2011. T&C’s apply.

by Sarah Murray

The headlines trumpet “Grammar to go!” It would be worrying if this was true, but it isn’t. Commentators in the recent furore about the status of grammar in the curriculum have seen one document, that for English Home Language Grades 10 to 12. NAPTOSA president, Ezrah Ramasehla, makes the point that, “for the majority of learners in South Africa, the language of learning and teaching is English, which in most cases is their second, or even third, language.” And he quite rightly expresses the view that the development of their competence in English grammar is therefore crucial for their education in all their other subjects. For students learning additional languages there are strong arguments for the explicit teaching of grammar and other important aspects of language such as vocabulary. However, it must be borne in mind that grammar teaching alone will not improve learners’ use of the language, especially if grammar is taught in an isolated, meaningless and decontextualised way. Learners’ ability to understand, read and write with confidence in their additional language depends largely on the opportunities they have to use the language for a wide range of purposes. Most importantly, they need to read a great deal both for pleasure and information. Nevertheless, grammar does play an important role in learning an additional language. For grammar teaching to be effective, it should be taught with a focus on meaning as well as form. It should be taught in context as part of both reading and writing lessons. Learners should attend to how grammar is used to express meaning in written texts, and they should be taught to proof-read their own writing. Teachers should give learners feedback on their use of grammar, and should plan lessons around common errors. There also needs to be a systematic programme of grammar teaching. In Grades 10 to 12, this would include both revision and the introduction of new grammatical structures necessary to communicate complex ideas. Mr Ramasehla will, I hope, be pleased to learn that all these aspects of grammar are covered in the National Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for First Additional Language in Grades 10 to 12. So all the students he is concerned about will have extensive exposure to formal grammar. Furthermore, the explicit teaching of grammar is first introduced in Grade 3, so learners should enter Grade 10 with a reasonable command of their additional language, provided of course that teachers have the required knowledge and training to put the curriculum into practice.

Teaching grammar in a home language is different. The teacher can assume that learners have a knowledge of the grammar of their home language. However, learners need to become more aware of how grammar makes meaning and how to use this as a tool in their own writing.

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In home language curricula worldwide grammar is generally included in sections dealing with listening and speaking, reading and writing skills rather than treated as a separate item in the curriculum. The CAPS for Home Language Grades 10-12 also adopts this approach. Detailed sections on word choice, register, spelling and punctuation, sentence construction and paragraph writing are included under headings dealing with listening and speaking, reading and writing. However, the Home Language CAPS also includes a separate, detailed list of language structures and conventions to be taught in context and, if necessary, explicitly with time set aside for this. This approach is different from traditional ways of teaching grammar and will be new to untrained teachers, so they will require support to put it into practice. There may be a role for the teacher unions in this respect. With regard to the assessment of languages in Grades 10 to 12, there are now two written exam papers, one for ‘reading and viewing’ and another for ‘writing’. There is a third oral examination in ‘listening and speaking’. The formal assessment tasks carried out during the year include language use and summary writing as part of ‘reading and viewing’, and it is to be hoped that this will be the pattern in the end of year examinations as well. There is some danger that when something in the curriculum is not formally examined, it may assume less importance for both teachers and learners. So I would expect that assessment of grammar is built into the formal assessments. For someone like myself, involved in language teacher education, it is very encouraging to see people taking such a lively interest in the languages curriculum. I’ve heard people expressing their views about the ‘grammar debate’ on radio talk shows, and I’ve read fascinating on-line discussions on the topic. It demonstrates the active involvement of professional organisations and ordinary people, and reflects an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the curriculum and its central role in education. May this continue!

Sarah Murray is a senior lecturer in the Education Department at Rhodes University, specialising in language and literacy.

Let’s work together for quality education President Zuma, in the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2011 made the following call: The focus in basic education this year is Triple T: Teachers, Textbooks and Time. We reiterate our call that teachers must be at school, in class, on time, teaching for at least seven hours a day.

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .

As part of the Quality Teaching and Learning Campaign, teachers made the commitment to the Code for Quality Education and committed themselves to the following:

As a TEACHER, in line with the SACE Code of Professional Ethics, I promise to: •

teach, to advance the education and the development of learners as individuals;

respect the dignity and rights of all persons without prejudice;

develop loyalty and respect for the profession;

be punctual, enthusiastic, well prepared for lessons, and of sober mind and body;

improve my own knowledge and skills base to be more effective;

maintain good communication between teachers and students, among teachers themselves; and between teachers and parents;

provide regular information to parents on their children’s progress;

eliminate unprofessional behaviour such as teacher-pupil relationships, drunkenness, drug use, assault, sexual harassment and others;

make myself available to provide extra-mural activities

LET US RECOMMIT TO THESE PROMISES IN 2011

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

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A STORY ABOUT THE POWER OF GETTING A GOOD EDUCTATION Oliver Tambo’s Story The following is an edited version of a speech Doron Isaacs (coordinator of Equal Education) delivered at Equal Education’s first “reading”, held at The Bookery – Home of the Equal Education Book Drive, on 6 and 7 March 2011. OLIVER TAMBO is a South African hero. Tambo served as ANC President for 27 years, from 1963 until 1990. Tambo came from a poor household but was fortunate enough to receive a good education, which allowed him to escape poverty and realise his full potential.

Tambo’s Story Oliver Tambo was born in Pondoland in the Eastern Cape in 1917. At first, he didn’t enjoy going to school. His father knew this, so would sometimes lend him his horse to ride to school, which he enjoyed doing. People in the village would tease Tambo’s father for letting Tambo and his brothers go to school, while he stayed at home and looked after the cattle. They had all their sons stay at home and look after the cattle. But Tambo’s father was determined that he and his brothers get an education. Tambo’s family was poor and couldn’t afford the school fees. The two brothers almost had to stop going to school, but luckily two women from England, Joyce and Ruth Goddard, agreed to sponsor them. The women couldn’t afford the whole amount of their fees though, so Tambo’s older brother, who worked as a coal miner in Natal, paid the rest of the boys’ school fees. Luck was not always on Tambo’s side. He had to move schools many times and this resulted in him having to repeat Grade 8 three times. During his third year in Grade 8 he also developed TB in his chest, and had to undergo surgery which confined him to hospital for a while. Tambo completed the majority of his high school years in Johannesburg. The standard of education there was much higher than that in Pondoland, and this motivated him to work even harder.

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Tambo began to enjoy school and was particularly good at Maths and Science. In 1936 Tambo wrote his school leaving examinations. He and his friend, Joe Mokoena, achieved First Class First Division passes. That year only one other boy in the whole Transvaal region was able to match that – and he was white. Tambo went on to study Maths and Science at the University of Fort Hare University in the Eastern Cape.

CONCLUSION Today, there are many young people as bright as Tambo who never get that lucky break. The reason Equal Education exists is to give everyone a chance to use their talents. When that happens, humanity benefits, because we don’t lose out on the contributions of the many other potential Olivers. Article supplied by Equal Education.

Get Pub lished! Call for writers in Natio Teacher’ nal s Guide and Educati on Hand book. Email in fo@argo .org.za for more info on type of content required .

OLIVER TAMBO is a South African hero. Tambo served as ANC President for 27 years, from 1963 until 1990.


National Teacher's Guide