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PUBLISHER Area Woman Publishing, LLC EDITORS IN CHIEF Mike Sherman Becky Sherman EDITORS Kim Malakowsky Amy Peterson DESIGN Kelsey Reeves

AREA WOMAN

ADVERTISING Mike Sherman Anna Hettenbaugh

MAGAZINE FIND US areawoman.com facebook.com/areawomanmagazine pinterest.com/areawomanmag READ IT ONLINE issuu.com/areawoman

PHOTOGRAPHY Skyloft Photography Scherling Photography Ockhardt Photography Haney’s Photographyt 5Foot20 Design Lounge Timeless Images Photography

Area Woman is a proud member of the Fargo/Moorhead Chamber of Commerce. It is published bi-monthly by Area Woman Publishing, LLC and printed in the U.S.A. ©2013 Area Woman Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from AW. Area Woman is a trademark registered at U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Area Woman Publishing assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs and does not necessarily agree with content or advertising presented.


AREA W CONTENTS 10 16 26 28 30 32 36

Contributors Area Events Calendar Featuring Fargo: Paws Walk Event Helping Them Find A Family Achieving Peak Performance Swordfight in Fargo Fashion Reboot

38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 56 60 68 70 74 76 78 82

Photography We Love: Weddings Photography We Love: Children From The Kitchen: Recipes for Fall Where to Dine Finding Common Ground Back to Square One Where to Shop: Smart. Local. F-M Sparkling New: Riddle's New Store All in the Family with White Banner Five Financial Strategies More Than Survival Messages of Hope One Foot In Front of the Other Local to Global Amy Nash and A Labor of Love On the Cover: The Art of Life with Jessica Wachter

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S R O T U B I R T N O C N A M O AREA W

82

Jill N. Kandel

Kim Malakowsky

36

Alicia Underlee Nelson

Courtney Weatherhead

52

76

Jessi Larson

Janelle Brandon

78

48

LETTER FROM THE

EDITOR Summer has truly come to an end in this part of the country. The hot rays of sunshine have given way to falling leaves all too quickly. John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.� We can bask in the memories of summer and make the most of the final days before the snow flies because we know the sting of winter. But as temperatures drop and we find ourselves amidst a different kind of warmth in the homes of family and friends, we anticipate a joyous holiday season on the horizon, and suddenly winter doesn't seem so bad. And as the days grow shorter, there is no shortage of happenings in the Fargo/Moorhead to coax you out for an adventure. It is my hope that this issue of Area Woman will help you keep up with all that is happening in the area as you dig out your sweaters, gather wood for the fireplace, and wrap your fingers around warm mugs of tea and cocoa.

Amy Peterson


Gabberts designers provide the full spectrum of creative services and work in any lifestyle. Be it an entire home or a tiny bedroom, we have the resources to help you achieve the home of your dreams. As designers, we: • listen carefully to your wants and needs • Advise from a professional point of view • Collaborate closely with you • Present creative and intelligent possibilities Combining our professional expertise with the fact that, like you, we are part of the Fargo community, enables us to not only meet but exceed your expectations. Call for a consultation.

FARGO 23rd Avenue SW • 701.433.3899 EDINA Galleria • 952.927.1500 SIOUX CITY 4th Street • 712.258.1300 SIOUX FALLS South Louise Avenue • 605.782.1919

www.gabberts.com


Looking for a WILD place to hold your holiday party?

Consider the Red River Zoo!

Carousel Pavilion and Wolf Cabin Holiday Rental Venues available. 701.277.9240 ext. 311 events@redriverzoo.org redriverzoo.org â—?

â—?

4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo


AREA WOMAN

LIFE


AREA EVENTS

CALENDAR Have an event for our next issue’s calendar? Send it to us at design@areawoman.com

Now - October 28

PUMPKIN PICKIN’

Enjoy a fun-filled day at the local Pumpkin Patch. Bring your family and pick out the perfect pumpkin. Buffalo River Pumpkin Patch East of Glyndon on Highway 10 buffaloriverpumpkinpatch.com

October 13

BRIDAL FANTASY

Have the chance to visit with vendors, view their offerings, check prices and availability, sample products and book your event. Prizes are awarded throughout the event. Ramada Plaza & Suites 1635 42nd Street South, Fargo bridalfantasyshow.com

October 25

HARVEST MOON FLING

The Rape & Abuse Crisis Center presents their annual event including wine tasting, silent auctions, hors d’oeuvres and live entertainment. 7:00 - 11:00 pm Courtyard by Marriott-Moorhead 1080 28th Avenue South, Moorhead 701.293.7273 // raccfm.com

November 2 October 26

MOONLIGHT MONSTER MASH

Vampires, witches, ghosts and skeletons are welcome. Explore the haunted attic, play games, and trick-or-treat. Parental supervision required. 6:30 - 9:00 pm Fargo Youth Commission 2500 18th Street South, Fargo fargoparks.com/events-calendar

October 29

4 LUV OF DOG RESCUE’S SILENT AUCTION & GALA

Our largest fundraiser of the year will feature hundreds of auction items, live music, hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and door prizes throughout the evening. 4 Luv of Dog Rescue is a volunteer-run non-profit with 501(c)(3) status. All proceeds go to provide care for the dogs in the Rescue. 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm Hilton Garden Inn 4351 17th AVenue South, Fargo 701.205.0190 // 4luvofdog.org

FULL MOON 5K

The Full Moon 5K is back! A full moon will be out and so will the ghosts and goblins. 7:00 pm Centennial Elementary School 4201 25th Street South, Fargo fargorunningcompany.com

November 1

JUNIOR LEAGUE JUBILEE

Decorated tables by local businesses, silent auction, appetizers and live music by Eighth Hour. Tickets: 7:00 pm, $30; 10:00 pm, $10 The Venue at the Hub 2525 9th Avenue South, Fargo fmjrleague.org/fundraising 701.235.8815

November 3

DISNEY LIVE! THREE CLASSIC FAIRY TALES

Prepare to step into a world of wonder where wishing is only the beginning and dreams really do come true. Join Mickey, Minnie, Donald and Goofy as they bring the fairy tale adventures of Cinderella, Beauty & the Beast and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to life. 1:30 pm or 4:30 pm Fargodome 1800 North University Drive, Fargo 701.241.9100 // fargodome.com


November 9 & 10

HOLIDAY HOMES OF HOPE TOUR

An open house of six Historic 8th street homes decorated for the holidays as well as a boutique held in the Clara Barton Gymnasium. Benefits the Cystic Fibrosis Association of ND.

November 7

LADIES’ NIGHT

Join us for a spectacular evening of unique shopping from the area. Exhibitors will include everything from clothing, fashion accessories and jewelry, spa and skin care products, makeup and hair care, food products, health and wellness products, photography, home decor, and so much more! 4:30 - 9:00 pm Hilton Garden Inn 4351 17th Avenue South, Fargo fmladiesnight.com

November 8

GET HITCHED

Are you getting hitched? Check out this wedding event and cocktail party for the modern bride. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, drinks and desserts while you chat with local wedding vendors. 6:00 - 9:00 pm Plains Art Museum 704 1st Avenue North, Fargo gethitchednd@gmail.com

Saturday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Sunday 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm Tickets: $15 at Hornbachers facebook.com/holidayhomesofhope

November 16

TREES PLEASE!

What better way to celebrate the oncoming winter season than learning about how trees and the animals that inhabit them work together to prepare for it! 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm $10 members; $15 non-members Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo redriverzoo.org // 701.277.9240

November 28-29

THANKSGIVING & BLACK FRIDAY SHOPPING

Enjoy your family and have your fill of holiday turkey. Head to bed early so you can join in the shopping frenzy on Black Friday. Shop locally at tons of participating stores, shoppes and boutiques around Fargo-Moorhead! Check with your favorite local vendors to see their specials and sales on Black Friday!

November 29

FRASER, LTD. PRESENTS COOKIES WITH CLAUS FAMILY

Bring your camera for a picture with the Claus Family, sleigh rides, holiday art, Games Galore, and more. 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm Fargodome 1800 North University Drive, Fargo 701.232.3301 // fraserltd.org

November - December

SANTA VILLAGE November 26

HOLIDAY LIGHTS PARADE

A Christmas Tradition in F-M. Pack a thermos of hot cocoa and head Downtown to enjoy the holiday lights parade.

Santa and Mrs. Claus open the village at Rheault Farm with elves, reindeer, sleigh rides and more. For specific dates and times visit their website. Rheault Farm 2902 25th Street South, Fargo fargoparks.com/event-detail/santa-village

Downtown Fargo 701.241.1570 // downtownfargo.com View or share this online at issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/16

AREAWOMAN.COM 17


December

CHRISTMAS DOESNʼT HAVE TO HAPPEN IN DECEMBER THIS YEAR...

SANTA FLY IN

Santa flies in at the Fargo Air Museum to visit with children about their wish list. For specific dates and times visit the Fargo Air Museum website. Fargo Air Museum 1609 19th Avenue North, Fargo 701.293.8043 // fargoairmuseum.org

December 7

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US JANUARY, FEBRUARY OR MARCH CALL APRIL AT 701.232.1336

WWW.FARGOAVALON.COM

CHRISTMAS ON THE PRAIRIE

Our annual celebration of Christmas Tradition! The beautifully decorated village is complete with holiday carolers, horse drawn wagon rides, Christmas desserts and drinks, Christmas stories, demonstrators, photos with Santa, and more! 1:00 - 7:00 pm Bonanzaville 1351 West Main Avenue, West Fargo 701.282.2822 // bonanzaville.org

December 7

JINGLE BELL RUN

Chosen as one of the most incredible themed races, Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis is a fun and festive way to kick off your holidays by helping others! Wear a holiday themed costume, tie jingle bells to your shoelaces and raise funds to fight arthritis, the nation’s leading cause of disability. 9:00 am Courts Plus Community Fitness 3491 South University Drive, Fargo 701.388.1988 // arthritis.org

December 7

4TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY VENDOR FAIR

More than twenty-five vendors, food, beverages and door prizes. Come and see what we have to offer. All proceeds go towards the new Rectory. 10:00 am - 3:00 pm Admission: One canned food item Holy Cross Catholic Church 1420 16th Street East, West Fargo (next to Gordman’s) 701.277.9681


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AREAWOMAN.COM 19


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October 5 & 6

FM STUDIO CRAWL

October 27 October 25

BRAS ON BROADWAY

Throughout October, raise money to support the efforts of Bras on Broadway. Any old bra and a minimum $5 donation helps create the Bra Garland that is strung at the Hotel Donaldson the week of October 22. All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society.

P!NK

“Pop’s biggest spectacle,” said The Hollywood Reporter. Doors at 6 pm, Show at 7:30 pm Tickets: inforumtix.com Fargodome 1800 North University Drive, Fargo 701.241.9100 // fargodome.com

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During the two-day event, the public is invited into the studios of many of the area’s working artists. 701.298.3936 // fmva.us

October 10-12

NDSU HOMECOMING

NDSU kicks off homecoming! Wear yellow and green and Be Herd! Tailgating: 8:00 am, Kick-off: 1:00 pm Fargodome 1800 North University Drive, Fargo ndsu.edu/homecoming

Bra Art Event: 6:00 pm Hotel Donaldson 101 Broadway, Downtown Fargo brasonbroadway.com (Photo by Britta the Photographer)

October 25

FARGO FORCE VS. TEAM USA

It’s Family Fun Night! Dollar hotdogs and sodas will be served up throughout the entire game! 7:05 pm Scheels Arena 5225 31st Avenue South, Fargo 701.364.3672 // fargoforce.com

November 17

PRETTY LIGHTS

Pretty Lights has cutting-edge beats that fill venues with energy and send dance floors into frenzies. Doors at 7:00 pm, Show at 8:00 pm Tickets: Tickets300 The Venue at the Hub 2525 9th Avenue Southwest, Fargo 866.300.8300 // jadepresents.com


November 19

LADY ANTEBELLUM

In 2012, Lady A hosted over one million fans across the globe. See them live at the Fargodome. Doors at 6:30 pm, Show at 7:30 pm Fargodome 1800 North University Drive, Fargo 701.241.9100 // fargodome.com

November 22

FARGO FORCE VS. OMAHA

It’s Ladies’ Night at the Scheels Arena! Ladies enjoy a $15 bottomless mug. 7:05 pm Scheels Arena 5225 31st Avenue South, Fargo 701.364.3672 // fargoforce.com

December 13 - 14

HOLIDAY POPS CONCERT

Enjoy holiday classics performed by a full symphony orchestra. Friday: 7:00 pm, Saturday: 2:00 pm Fargo Theatre 314 Broadway, Downtown Fargo 701.478.3676 // tickets.fmsymphony.org

December 19-22

THE BLENDERS

The Blenders feature a unique style of vocal, harmony-based music. 7:30 pm Fargo Theatre 314 Broadway, Downtown Fargo 701.205.3182 // tickets300.com

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AREAWOMAN.COM 21


CLASSES & WORKSHOPS October 11

TASTE OF FRANCE 6 COURSE + 6 WINE DINING EXPERIENCE

Experience dining in a new way! Each course you will be invited into the kitchen to see a demonstration of how it was prepared and ask questions! A truly delightful way to spend the evening. The following menu will be prepared by Chef Rosey: Coq au Vin, French Onion Soup, Steamed Mussels with Pomes Frittes, Shrimp Thermidor, Crepes and Lemon Thyme Creme Brulee. Each course will be paired with wine. Doors at 6:00 pm, Dining Experience 6:30 - 8:30 pm Square One Kitchens 1407 1st Avenue North, Fargo squareonekitchens.com

October 25

HALLOWEEN CAKE POP CLASS

‘Tis the season for spooks, pumpkins and adorable scary cake pops! In this class you will learn how to make four terrifyingly terrific cake pops – Pumpkins, Mummies, Traditional and Crawly Spider! Take home eight of your own BOO-tiful creations in a gift box. 7:00 - 8:30 pm Square One Kitchens 1407 1st Avenue North, Fargo squareonekitchens.com


October 19

ROOM PLANNING

Home furnishings can be a significant investment. Having a long range plan can help you achieve your goals. Cyndee Engberg will share ways of creating a master design plan in order to ensure that the home looks good and works well for you. 1:00 pm Gabberts 4601 23rd Avenue Southwest, Fargo 701.433.3899 // gabberts.com

October 10 & November 14

MAKE IT YOURSELF CLASS

Learn to make your own lip balm or body scrubs! Pre-registration is recommended for classes. October 10 at 7:00 pm, Lip Balm November 14 at 7:00 pm, Body Scrub Moorhead Public Library 118 5th Street South, Moorhead 218.233.7594

October - November

SANFORD PRESENTS: BETTER CHOICES, BETTER HEALTH

Better Choices, Better Health is a 6-week free workshop for adults with any chronic health conditions. Various topics and skills are presented to help participants make small steps towards a healthier lifestyle. 1:00 - 1:30 pm Multiple Locations 701.234.5570 // sanfordhealth.org

October - November

DIY WOOD STUDIO

Offering classes for everyone from beginners to seasoned professionals, DIY Wood Studio gives you the opportunity to create your own masterpiece! Join us for workshops on basic woodworking, children’s furniture, wooden board games, coffee tables, cutting boards, benches and more!! Leave with a handmade piece. Dates, times and prices vary. Register online. DIY Wood Studio 3231 4th Avenue South, Studio A, Fargo 701.293.1310 // diywoodstudio.com/classes

QUOTABLE "For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harmyou, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Then you will seek me and find me: when you seek me with all your heart, I will be found by you, declares the Lord. " — JEREMIAH 29: 11-14

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AREAWOMAN.COM 23


COMING EVENTS

5K Run or Walk

Thursday, November 7th NDSU Alumni Center * 6pm-9pm Tickets $50 - To reserve yours call the Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead 701-239-0077, ext. 4

Courts Plus Community Fitness - Fargo, ND

December 7, 2013 Run/Walk Begins at 9:00 a.m. Register online today at

www.arthritis.org/jinglebellrun Presented By

Nationally Sponsored By


COMING EVENTS Come & find the perfect holiday gift!

November 2+3 Sat.10 am - 6 pm, Sun.10 am - 5 pm

Red River Valley Fairgrounds Hartl Ag Building in West Fargo

Early-Bird tickets: thefestiveflea.com presented by Funk’d Up Junk

27th ANNUAL SHOWCASE

Homes for the Holidays NOVEMBER 2 & 3 Noon - 5 pm

View beautiful holiday decor at area homes. Select local artisan handcrafts at the F-M Visitors Center. Advance $20 tickets available at these locations: Holland’s

1201 Center Avenue, Moorhead

Prairie Petals

210 North Broadway, Fargo

Scheels Home & Hardware

3202 13th Avenue South, Fargo

F-M Convention & Visitors Bureau

2001 44th Street Southwest, Fargo

ReDOUX

213 NP Avenue, Fargo

Shotwell Floral

4000 40th Street South, Fargo

scandesign

110 North Broadway, Fargo

Unglued

408 North Broadway, Fargo

Sponsored by NDSU Alpha Gamma Delta Alumnae. Proceeds will be shared with F-M Sheltering Churches homeless housing project.


RUDY THE RESCUE DOG LEADS 23RD ANNUAL PAWS WALK BY JANELLE BRANDON >> 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

Mix 104.7’s dog-loving Ryan Kelly emceed the Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead’s 23rd PAWS WALK Stride for Strays September 14. Rudy the Rescue Dog, an alum of the Humane Society FargoMoorhead, served as the Grand Marshal for the event along with his family KFGO personality Mike McFeely, his wife Michelle, and daughter Emma. Rudy joined the McFeely family last summer. “Rudy has changed our home in a positive way,” said McFeely. “He makes it fun around here, he’s always upbeat and happy, he gives our family something to rally around, something we have in common.” The title sponsor, Jordahl Custom Homes, matched all donations of $75 or more and presented the Humane Society FargoMoorhead with a check for $15,000. “We are truly grateful to everyone who helped make this event possible,” said Heather Klefstad, Special Events/PR Coordinator for the Humane Society Fargo Moorhead. “Thank you to the community for supporting the animals of the Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead while they are awaiting their forever family.” The Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead raised $48,735 at this year’s event which fell a bit short of last year’s efforts. However, the walkers and their pets bravely strode through rain showers which shows the community’s commitment to this cause. The Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead’s Paws Walk began 23 years ago to raise much needed funds to provide care for the shelter animals as they wait for their adoptive families. [AWM]

26 AREA WOMAN

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nike

blowfish

hootie

Clooney

stella

skechers Harvey

Chachi

Angel

Big PAw

mona

humanesocietyfargomoorhead.org >> facebook.com/fmhumanesociety >> 701.239.0077. 28 AREA WOMAN


HELPING THEM FIND A

FAMILY

TIMELESS IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY

The Humane Society of FargoMoorhead is primarily a pound rescue organization dedicated to rescuing dogs and cats at risk of being euthanized at local impounds. Each year, we adopt out hundreds of wonderful pets that just need a second chance at finding a “forever” home. We have a variety of pets available for adoption, from puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between, and almost any breed, including purebreds. Next time you’re considering adopting a pet, please check out our shelter and consider giving a pet in need a home.

Play Hard. Nap Hard.

eddieandbarkus.com canine daycare, grooming and hotel 3060 thunder road, south fargo | 701.492.9364

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AREAWOMAN.COM 29


ACHIEVING PEAK

PERFORMANCE EXPERTS AT CASSLETON VETERINARY SERVICE OFFER COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT PLANS BY ALICIA UNDERLEE NELSON >> OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

When the patients at Casselton Veterinary Service see the doctor at the comfortable facility in Casselton, North Dakota, they receive comprehensive and integrated care, much like their human parents do when they go to the clinic. That’s because clinic owner Dr. Laurie Huckle and her staff took systems that worked for human patients and applied them to animal medicine. The clinic has expanded since Huckle became an owner in 2008, and boasts an in-house team of doctors that concentrate on everything from dental care to orthopedics. This approach is convenient for pet owners and allows the doctors to collaborate and work together to treat the whole animal. “We see animals that are making it into their teens,” said Dr. Laurie Huckle. “They’re more active and as a result, you see wear and tear just like in the human world.” The traditional method focuses on the bones and joints, but an integrated

approach considers how the animal’s whole body works together. “The whole body is tied into it,” said Huckle. “It’s just like you or me. If you have a sore hip, you start walking goofy and then your knee or ankle hurts. They can’t tell you what’s wrong, so you have to go by how they react. And then you just eliminate as many problems as possible and get them feeling better faster.” Huckle often consults with co-owners Dr. Brad Bartholomay and Dr. Darin Peterson, who are the only two animal chiropractors in the state (Bartholomay is also certified in veterinary acupuncture) or suggests pet owners learn massage techniques they can do at home from certified rehab technician and certified massage therapist LaRessa Mattson. It was Mattson who encouraged Huckle to acquire a canine rehabilitation certificate, making her the only doctor in North Dakota to have this particular level of expertise. The canine rehabilitation program is adapted from human treatment models and was first implemented in veterinary science in the highly competitive world of horse racing. Dogs may be treated for a variety of reasons. “We do a lot of post-operative rehab recovery after surgery, just like in the human world where you have surgery and two weeks later you see a physical therapist,” said Huckle. “We also work with geriatric patients if they’re losing their ability to walk, we do some conditioning for agility or hunting dogs – especially in the fall – and then there’s sports injuries, for agility dogs or field trial dogs who aren’t up to their peak performance. That’s kind of like going to sports medicine – you try to figure out what’s going on and how to get them back to a high performance level.”


SOUTH CREEK CENTER 32ND AVENUE & 25TH STREET

(STARBUCKS CORNER)

701.282.8180

They can’t tell you what’s wrong, so you have to go by how they react. And then you just eliminate as many problems as possible and get them feeling better faster.

Dr. Huckle uses a variety of medical devices to get dogs back in top form including an underwater treadmill for conditioning and building up muscle mass, an e-stim machine to conduct electrical impulses to atrophied muscles and non-thermal laser therapy to increase blood flow to muscles and decrease inflammation. The hard work is all worth it. “It’s fascinating when you see positive results,” said Huckle. “When you see these animals who came in and they’re not using their leg and then three months later they’re flying around the arena, it’s pretty amazing.” Casselton Veterinary Service 910 Governor’s Drive, Casselton 701.347.5496 cassvetservice.com Find them on Facebook as Casselton Veterinary Service, Inc. [AWM] VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/30 AREAWOMAN.COM 31


SWORDFIGHT IN FARGO

FM FENCING CLUB OFFERS UNIQUE FORM OF EXERCISE

BY JANELLE BRANDON 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

Enrique Alvarez, an electrical engineer at North Dakota State University in Fargo, first tried fencing when he was 14 in his hometown of Oviedo, Spain. The rest was history. Now the FM Fencing Club Coaching Director and Fargo resident since 2006, Alvarez has the benefit of 16 years of experience to offer Fargo’s youth and adults. In fact, he is one of only 100 maestros in the U.S. This means he has the highest level of coaching certification to teach beginners through high-level fencers that are training to fence competitively. The FM Fencing Club began as a nonprofit public charity focusing on youth development and has quickly grown to offer a unique physical and mental workout for area youngsters and the young at heart. In the three years since the FM Fencing Club opened, it has grown from 20 to 50 fencing members. “When we started, we had about 20 kids in the all-school program,” said Alvarez about the students ages 12 to 18. “Now we have kids as young as seven on up to adults.” In the movies, fencing is depicted as a highly artistic, choreographed sport. That’s not all there is to it. “Fencing is more than a sport,” said Mason Tacke, 15, a member of the FM Fencing Club’s High School Team. “It’s a puzzle that involves both mind and body and figuring out how to solve it is the best part.” Fencing does indeed prove to be a unique sport that fits any age or size. Both epee (classic swordfighting) and foil (a lighter sword with a more artistic fighting approach) are taught at the club. Contrary to popular belief, fencing is tremendously safe and students wear full protective gear. “Mason seems so much more focused now,” said Beth Tacke, Mason’s mother. “Whether he’s playing music, working on a project, or finishing homework, he doesn’t distract as easily. I attribute a lot of that focus to the two years he’s been fencing.” Some of the benefits for kids and adults in the fencing program include endurance, flexibility, heightened reflexes, and mental agility. Fencing creates a great sense of responsibility in one’s self to continually improve form and performance. It’s also a great way to release aggression in a safe, calculated, intelligent way. “We’re an entirely volunteer-run organization,” said Alvarez. “It’s been so great to see the look of accomplishment on the faces of the kids as they grow ready and then place in competitions.”

It’s a puzzle that involves both mind and body and figuring out how to solve it is the best part.


This year, the club placed three finishers at the Minnesota High School Fencing Championships and are training for the 2014 USA Fencing National Championships. Alvarez and the other coaches also hope to soon offer Paralympic wheelchair fencing for adults in the Fargo area, especially wounded warriors. The FM Fencing Club is located within Grace Lutheran School at 1025 14th Avenue South in Fargo. Rates for classes vary, but all new members must take the Intro to Fencing Class which is $65 for six weeks. To learn more about signing up for a class, or to make a donation to this charity dedicated to youth development, visit www.fmfencing.com. [AWM]

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AREA WOMAN

STYLE


fashion Reboot BY KIM MALAKOWSKY >> IMAGES PROVIDED BY LOCAL RETAILERS

>> FUSION BOUTIQUE, SCHEELS HOME AND HARDWARE

>> MAINSTREAM BOUTIQUE


>> STABO SCANDANAVIAN IMPORTS

F

all is the perfect time for mixing older closet favorites with new items for a fresh, stylish look.

First up in the line of autumn “must haves” is leather. Beyond the biker jacket, leather is showing up in trousers, jackets, straps and belts along with fullleather dresses. This season’s leather is luxurious and alluring, in colors from intense reds

>> MAINSTREAM BOUTIQUE

>> FUSION BOUTIQUE, SCHEELS HOME AND HARDWARE

and purples to Kelly green and sultry nudes. Glossy for evening or subtle matte for day, pick the perfect pieces to accent your wardrobe.

Harper’s Bazaar’s number one tip on their “10 Tricks to Update Your Style” is to pair a high-volume top with slim pants. It’s time to reignite a love affair with the sweater.

Sweaters this season are diverse with many colors appearing from black, gray and beige to shades of pink and vivid colors such as emerald, blue and red. Materials are mixed and details include everything from feathers to fringe.

A little closet reboot will keep you on-trend and chase off the winter chills. [AWM]

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>> HANEY’S PHOTOGRAPHY

>> OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

>> OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY


>> HANEY’S PHOTOGRAPHY

>> SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

>> SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

>> SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

>> SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

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>> OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

>> 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

>> HANEY’S PHOTOGRAPHY

>> SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

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>> SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

>> OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY


2538 S. University Dr. Suite A, Fargo 701.232.1148 | holmandds.com

Kids Are Our Specialty

MY DEAR, I AM YOUR PARENT, YOU ARE MY CHILD. I AM YOUR QUIET PLACE, YOU ARE MY WILD. I AM YOUR CALM FACE, YOU ARE MY GIGGLE. I AM YOUR WAIT, YOU ARE MY WIGGLE. I AM YOUR DINNER, YOU ARE MY CAKE. I AM YOUR BEDTIME, YOU ARE MY WIDE AWAKE. I AM YOUR LULLABY, YOU ARE MY PEEKABOO. I AM YOUR G'NIGHT KISS, YOU ARE MY I LOVE YOU.

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FROM THE KITCHEN

RECIPES THAT ARE SURE TO KEEP YOU WARM AND SATISFIED THIS WINTER

RECIPE AND PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ND BEEF COMMISSION

Mexican Beef Stew Total Recipe Time:  2.5 hours Makes 6-8 servings 3 pounds beef Stew Meat, cut into 1 inch pieces 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup ready-to-serve beef broth 1 cup prepared thick-and-chunky salsa

2 medium zucchini, halved, sliced (3/4-inch) 1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed, drained 1/2 cup frozen corn 2 tbsp cornstarch dissolved in 3 tbsp water

Toppings (optional): Chopped tomato, chopped fresh cilantro, dairy sour cream 1. Heat oil in stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown beef in batches; pour off drippings. Return beef to pan; season with salt. 2. Stir in broth and salsa; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly and simmer 1-1/2 hours. Stir in zucchini, beans and corn; continue cooking, covered, 15 to 20 minutes or until beef is fork-tender. 3. Stir in cornstarch mixture; cook and stir 1 minute or until thickened. Serve with toppings. 42 AREA WOMAN


Mom’s Apple Crisp (Courtesy of Kirsten Knutson) Makes 9-12 servings 6-8 medium apples Butter 1/2 rounded cup sugar 1 rounded teaspoon cinnamon Topping: 3/4 cup flour 1/2 cup sugar 1/3 cup butter 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1. 2. 3. 4.

Butter 9x9 Pan  Peel and slice apples into pan Mix together sugar & cinnamon Sprinkle over apples in pan

Topping: 1. Mix flour, sugar, butter & cinnamon 2. Stir until crumb like consistency.  3. Sprinkle & pat over apples. Bake at 350° for 30 – 40 minutes or until bubbly

Rice Pudding (Courtesy of Bruce Larson) 1/2 cup rice 1 qt whole milk 1/4 cup butter 1/2 tsp salt 4 egg yolks 1/2 cup sugar 2 tsp vanilla Cinnamon 1. Combine rice, milk, butter, and salt in top of double-boiler, cover and cook over boiling water, stirring frequently until mixture is thickened, two hours. 2. Remove from heat. Beat egg yolks until thick, add sugar and beat until mixed. Fold into rice mixture, add vanilla and sprinkle with cinnamon.

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WHERE TO DINE:

EXPERIENCE SOME OF THE BEST FOOD AND DRINKS IN THE AREA MONTE’S DOWNTOWN

HODO RESTAURANT

CARINO’S

Monte’s Downtown is Fargo’s original fine dining destination.  Offering brunch, lunch, and dinner, Monte’s Downtown is the perfect choice for any occasion.  The extensive wine list, comprehensive martini selection, and artisan cocktails round out the culinary brilliance of Executive Chef Christian D’Agostino.  In the heart of downtown Fargo, Monte’s is the ideal stop before or after a show at the Fargo Theater, or a wonderful break from the boutique shopping trip.  The Monte’s experience is also available through it’s catering program - offering catering solutions for events of any size and style.  Monte’s Downtown is truly something unique.

Please join us! HoDo Restaurant - North Dakota’s only AAA 4 Diamond Restaurant. We create house made dishes using the finest ingredients with a local, sustainable and organic focus; seasonal menu, daily specials, fish of the moment or create your own tasting menu. Amidst a casual, come-as-you-feel, find dining atmosphere, our experienced team is committed to creating memorable experiences.

What does Carino’s bring to the table? For starters, our complimentary and highlycoveted bread loaves will tide you over as you sip on your favorite drink, from cold beers to a diverse wine selection. Next, choose from a variety of Italian dishes, from the classics like our 16 Layer Homemade Lasagna and unrivaled Tiramisu, to cuisine with a signature Carino’s twist, like Italian Nachos or Five Meat Tuscan Pasta. And during the week enjoy specials like half-price Family Platters on Mondays and half-price wine bottles on Wednesdays. If it’s a unique and memorable dining experience you’re after, you want Carino’s.

Mention Area woman when you dine with us in October and we’ll treat you to a glass of wine from our Wine Spectator award winning list, a craft beer or a cup of our really good coffee and teas.

THE BEEFSTEAK CLUB

An inviting and energetic bar staff greets you as you walk into The Beefsteak Club. Enjoy fresh fruit cocktails, an enticing list of bloody Mary’s, and $5 wines by the glass during happy hour. The innovative lunch menu warrants multiple visits (even if you choose the chicken and waffles every time!) While the signature dry aged steaks make dining an affordable luxury.

SEASONS AT ROSE CREEK

There’s no place like Seasons for the Holidays! Every room has a view and is beautifully decorated. Whether it be a quiet dinner for two or a gathering of friends and family to a group of 150 - Seasons has it all. Superb food, great service and the festive atmosphere you are looking for. Book your Holiday party now! Upcoming events are a “Wine Dinner” in October hosted by the Mirassou winery and a “High Tea” on November 30. Please call for details.


UNCORKED

By the glass, by the bottle, or by the batch, Uncorked is a quaint custom winery featuring nearly 50 wines made on-site in beautiful downtown Fargo. The wine/beer bar and deli menu, featuring homemade food from Oven Door Catering, will make your visit deliciously relaxing. Customers are welcome to start their own batch of favorite wine complete with custom labels. Uncorked carries wine making supplies, gifts, and accessories. The Event Room is available for private parties as well.

OSAKA

For an unforgettable, entertaining dining experience, sit at our hibachi grill and see our teppanyaki chefs put on a show for the entire family. For sushi lovers, our sushi bar offers many daily specials or ask our sushi chefs to prepare your own custom roll right before your eyes. For a traditional Japanese dining experience, relax in our dining room.

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FINDING COMMON GROUND

ARTICLE & PHOTO COURTESY OF COMMONGROUND

SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT ON THE FOOD WE CONSUME

F

amily farms in North Dakota, and across America, have helped build the safest and most affordable food supply in the world. Women from these rural farms play a vital role in running the farm and growing the nation’s food supply. That’s why North Dakota soybean and corn farmers continue to support the movement CommonGround in North Dakota.

CommonGround is a grass-roots movement to foster conversation among women — on farms and in cities — about where our food comes from. The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA), the United Soybean Board (USB) and their state affiliates developed CommonGround to give farm women the opportunity to engage with consumers through the use of a wide range of activities. USB and NCGA provide support and a platform for the volunteers to tell their stories. CommonGround is now in 17 states and growing. “The CommonGround program grew out of a new demand from consumers for food information,” says Karolyn Zurn, farmer and volunteer coordinator of CommonGround for the North Dakota Soybean Council and North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. “The goal of CommonGround is to be a resource to provide moms with facts and information that can help them make informed food


choices. As a farmer and a mother, I want individuals to feel empowered to make food choices based on facts and not fear.” As each calendar year flips over, millions of Americans get a new beginning by looking to live healthier lifestyles. In addition to extra hours at the gym, many grocery shoppers will also spend more time ensuring their carts are filled with healthier options to feed their families. Today’s plethora of labels and buzzwords that adorn food packaging only makes the trip to the market even more daunting. In fact, many of the labels, such as “grass-fed” and “organic,” that often suggest food is healthier refer only to how it was raised, not to the nutritional content.

As a farmer and a mother, I want individuals to feel empowered to make food choices based on facts and not fear.”

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Confused? You aren’t alone. Volunteer farmers with the CommonGround want to help shoppers demystify several common food labels and make their trip to the market a little less stressful. We are truly blessed to have so many food choices available to us at the grocery store. With so many food options available, we want moms to feel good about their food choices and know that farmers share many of the same values and priorities when it comes to feeding our own families. Ninety-six percent of the farms are still owned and operated as a family farm. So what exactly do all of the labels mean? That is a question that the CommonGround women can fill you in on at our many events and on the CommonGround website at findourcommonground. com. Look for our state wide events on CommonGround North Dakota’s Facebook page at - facebook.com/ CommonGroundNorthDakota. [AWM] VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/46 AREAWOMAN.COM 47


Back to

Square One BY JANELLE BRANDON >> 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

C

asey Steele, armed with a degree in architecture from NDSU in 2009, did something a little unexpected following graduation; she took a job at the YWCA taking care of children. After working there for awhile, she asked if she could take advantage of the YWCA’s commercial kitchen as she’d started her side business Love in the Oven Bakery, a special occasion, treats-on-demand operation. “I have a really supportive husband who has always been by my side,” said Steele. “After a few years at the YWCA, I knew that I needed my own kitchen space, but wanted to offer others the ability to use the “I think I caught the entrepreneurial bug from my parents,” said Steele. kitchen for their businesses, too.” Her parents own and operate homes in central Minnesota for the developmentally disabled. “I’m stubborn and I enjoy making my own Steele’s husband, Matt, is an business decisions.” electrical engineer at Applied Engineering and loves his job. Steele didn’t want the kitchen space to be intimidating to businesses and This stability has allowed Steele other renters. That’s why she created two fully-stocked, straightforward to research and finally open kitchens and a dedicated area for packaging and decorating food products. Square One Rental Kitchen and The space also boasts an event center perfect for hosting business after Event Center earlier this year. hours, team-building events, and small celebrations. “These are everybody’s kitchens,” added Steele. “We have the first of its kind in the state and our space offers the flexibility that businesses need.” Several of the businesses currently taking advantage of the kitchens include Libby’s Cupcakes, Jen’s Breads, Lush Lola’s, Rose Cheesecakes, Bob’s Quality Catering, Joe Sandwich, Romo’s Tacos, Gigi’s Ice Lollies, Buttercream Bliss, Four Seasonings, and Mauii Sauce. “I’ve watched these clients become tight-knit and develop a sense of camaraderie just by working in the same kitchen space,” observed Steele. “Even if they’re competing food businesses, they work well together here!” NDSU has hosted speakers and events in the event center that seats up to 40 people. It is a perfect location for a groom’s dinner, a baking-themed birthday party, or a one-of-a-kind bachelorette soiree. “There’s no need to bring anything other than the food,” said Steele, of hosting a party in the event center. The center offers full silverware and


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plateware service. “And you don’t even have to bring that if you’re planning to have the food or treats catered!” The kitchen incubator, with its distinctive model, reflects Steele’s vibrant personality and knack for running a business. Steele also offers cooking classes to help increase comfort in the kitchen for a variety of participants. “I have been empowered and supported throughout the process of launching this space for my community,” said Steele. “Now I want to do the same for other businesses as well as groups looking for a unique way to celebrate or bring their food product to market.” Square One Kitchen Rental and Event Center is located at 1407 1st Ave N in Fargo. Learn more at squareonekitchens.com. [AWM] VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/48 AREAWOMAN.COM 49


WHERE TO SHOP: SMART. LOCAL. FARGO-MOORHEAD.

Stephanie Dawn is fun, functional, fresh! In a variety of colors and patterns, these bags are made for all ages. Only at FUSION BOUTIQUE.

Scheel’s Home & Hardware 3202 13th Avenue South, Fargo scheelshomeandhardware.com 701.232.8903

Welcome back! Show your school spirit with style!

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Longer, thicker, lashes while you sleep with Latisse™! We have moved! Find us in our beautiful new store located across the street from West Acres Mall near Hornbacher’s.

Riddle’s Jewelry

4055 13th Avenue South, Fargo riddlesjewelry.com 701.277.1494

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Montana West designs western handbags featuring hand tooled leather, camouflage, rhinestones, buckles, concealed carry styles and more. From $45

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Create endless unique jewelry combinations when you mix and match any of the hundreds of interchangeable pieces in the Lenny & Eva jewelry line.

Aquablue LOCAL • FRESH • NATURAL Scarves, handbags and funky vintage jewelry.

4955 17th Avenue South, Fargo, aquabluefm.com 701.281.6465

holland’s 1201 Center Ave, Moorhead hollandslandscapingandgarden.com facebook.com/hollandsgarden.mn 218.233.6131

Blooming with harvest cheer and undeniable beauty. This pumpkin container full of roses, carnations, daisies, lilies and greens is perfect to send your warmest wishes for the fall season. $34.99 Trollbeads Artisan Event, October 18th from 1- 5 pm. Come and watch a beadmaking demonstration by a Trollbead Artisan! You won’t want to miss this! Spark up your fall wardrobe with a new mixed print infinity scarf and turquoise jewelry from

My best friend’s closet

1617 32nd Avenue South, Fargo 701.212.1567

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Stabo scandinavian imports

DALBOL FLOWERS 1450 25th Street South, Fargo dalbolflowersfargo.com 701.235.5864

West Acres Mall, Fargo stabo-imports.com 701.282.0421

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sparkling & new

Riddle’s New Store Brings Creativity and Convenience to Customers Riddle’s Jewelry made the move from West Acres Mall to a freestanding store just across the street and Regional Manager Peggy Johnson hasn’t looked back. “Now we’re more of a destination,” said Johnson. “And we can offer so much more space and selection.”

That means more spacious aisles, a soothing neutral color palette and gracefully winding display cases filled with glittering diamonds, silver, gold and precious gems that sparkle in a space flooded with natural light.

The move more than doubled Riddle’s Jewelry’s square footage and allowed the company to carry more inventory. The store has always stocked loose diamonds and a wide selection of mountings, but the new location helped them pick up new product lines, expand their repair service and showcase their merchandise in the most desirable setting.

“We’re getting some more pieces in that are a little more ‘wow’,” said Store Manager Amy Sylskar. “We have the best selection of Pandora jewelry in Fargo-Moorhead. We’ve been getting in a fantastic selection of high-end bridal.


There’s no place like Seasons during the Holidays. “We are all lit up”

Join us for an elegant afternoon of tea, wine, savories and desserts. Saturday, November 23 at 3 pm at Seasons at Rose Creek *Reservations Required*

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1500 Rose Creek Parkway East, Fargo 701.235.5000 ● seasonsatrosecreek.com

BY ALICIA UNDERLEE NELSON SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

And vintage and antique-inspired pieces are still really popular.” Riddle’s Jewelry also manufactures their own jewelry line at their corporate base in Rapid City, SD, which keeps prices down and gives the Riddle’s Jewelry customer even more options. “The store has something for every customer, from $25 items on up,” said Johnson. The

Riddle’s

Jewelry

customer


is looking for something unique, from delicate rose gold to smart and practical Swiss watches to glistening pearls from the South Seas of Tahiti. Johnson and Sylskar say their customers appreciate unusual diamonds as well.

WE’RE SEEING A LOT OF THE COLORED DIAMONDS, THE PINKS, THE CHOCOLATE, THE BLACK DIAMONDS ... THEY’RE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT SO THEY CAN MAKE IT THEIR OWN.

who can custom design any gold or silver piece that a customer can dream up.

We’re seeing a lot of the colored diamonds, the pinks, the chocolate, the black diamonds,” said Johnson. “They’re looking for something different so they can make it their own.”

They repair, clean and check any piece of gold or silver jewelry (whether it was purchased at Riddle’s Jewelry or not) and reset stones, which is a popular option for customers who want to update an engagement ring on a milestone anniversary, replace a lost diamond in Grandma’s ring or make a necklace or earrings new again.

For the truly creative, Riddle’s Jewelry has two full-time certified goldsmiths on site

All repairs are done in the store and pick-up and drop-off couldn’t be easier.


Customers can relax by the fireplace and enjoy complimentary refreshments in the cozy customer lounge. Those who are in a hurry – or have a car full of kids – can simply drop off their jewelry at the drive through window. “We have people drop off their pieces and run over to go grocery shopping,” said Sylskar. “It’s just so convenient.” The shopping environment, unique products and convenient and efficient services are all intended to make life easier for Riddle’s Jewelry customers, who the staff see as family. “Jewelry is a sentimental thing and there’s always a story behind it,” said Johnson. “I’ve sold rings to moms and dads and now I’ve sold them to their sons. You go back to your jeweler because there’s trust there and you’ve built that relationship.“ [AWM] Riddle’s Jewelry 4055 13th Avenue South Fargo, ND 58103 701-277-1494 riddlesjewelry.com

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ALL IN THE

FAMILY WITH WHITE BANNER UNIFORMS ARTICLE AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF WHITE BANNER UNIFORMS

T

ogether, they filled the embroidery/ ironing/alterations room with the family working together.

They were preparing for the White Coat ceremony at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences. On Monday of the first week of school, students are measured. When students recite their Hippocratic oath on Friday of that week, they don their new coats. The journey for those coats means a busy week at White Banner Uniforms on Broadway in downtown Fargo. The university’s medical school information and the student’s name have to be perfect for this first step in professional development. Mary English, her husband Allan Luistro, MD, and their children, Kristin, a sophomore at Concordia College; Katherine, a junior at Fargo Davies High School, and Alex, a freshman at Davies, work together to make it happen. White Banner is in its second generation in English’s family. Her mother, Eleanor English, who just celebrated her 80th birthday, purchased the shop in 1961. Four women have owned the shop since it began.

enforcement center they offer everything from body armor to shoelaces. At Halloween, they double and triple check customers. You need an ID to purchase handcuffs and other things.

White Banner uniforms fill area universities, schools, businesses and homes – not always as uniforms. Many wear the clothing for comfort.

While you shop for scrubs, you can shop for medical equipment. You can purchase comfortable shoes and lanyards.

The business began with starched white nurse uniforms, caps and hosiery. Now the staff that includes oldest daughter Kristin, helps customers find clothes that will make their care-giving jobs comfortable.

If you are looking for a chef’s hat in the hospitality department, you’ll find it. Many area restaurants connect with White Banner to clothe employees.

“We offer fashion, comfort, brains and beauty. We educate people about their options and the benefits of different fabrics and styles. We help people dress for their profession,” English said.

Many industries require identification clothing. White Banner provides the merchandise.

The store has more than clothing and shoes. Downstairs in the law

56 AREA WOMAN

Kristen, a nurse at Sanford Orthopedics, said White Banner is not only a one-stop shop, it is nice to be able to find equipment.


“Their clothes are really comfortable. The clothes are cute and there is a good selection of top names. They have so much selection, it’s just fun to shop there.” In 1981, they opened a boutique in Grand Forks. “It was the first concept store in the Midwest,” English said. Cherokee, strategic partner in the store, came to English because of the Fargo store’s reputation. English calls her staff “hard-working professionals serving hard-working professionals. We are passionate about what we do. We see ourselves as caring for the caregiver.” Becky Anderson is the on-site manager in the Fargo store. “She helps us keep growing.”

58 AREA WOMAN


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Additional services include BOTOX Dermal Fillers ● PCA Skincare ● Custom Facials

White Banner also offers a website with fast delivery. Check whitebanner. com for special sizes and continually updated products. “The website gives us more options and our customers more flexibility,” English added. “We have fun together. It is hard work, it is good work.” [AWM]

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FIVE FINANCIAL

STRATEGIES THRIVENT FINANCIAL’S HANNAH SORENSEN

I

t could happen anytime. Your spouse dies. You lose your job. You fall seriously ill.

These life changing events are often huge surprises. Your financial security shouldn’t be. “You need to know what bills you have and where your money is stored,” cautioned Hannah Sorensen, Financial Associate with Thrivent Financial in Fargo. “I see so many women trying to recover from a tragic situation and I think it’s scary when you don’t have the necessary knowledge.” Understanding your money matters now and preparing for later doesn’t have to be daunting. Sorensen offers these five tips for smart financial planning:

Start Now (whenever now is) Regardless if you’re 72 or 22, you should know your financial picture. We’re not talking a state-of-theart digitally-enhanced image, more like a Polaroid. “You need a snapshot of your current financial picture,” explained Sorensen. “You need to know what money you have coming in and what your required expenses are.” The simplest way to start this process is by creating a budget. You can make your own with a spreadsheet or hire a professional like Sorensen to map it out for you.

Plan For a Life Changing Event

I work with people to look at the full picture ... Where are your gaps? I help you fill them in.

It’s not a matter of ‘if’ your world will be rocked, but ‘when.’ “Life is unexpected,” said Sorensen. “If something drastic happened, how would you respond to it?” She recommends comprehensive financial planning, including, but not limited to, a diverse investment


BY PATRICIA CARLSON HANEY’S PHOTOGRAPHY

portfolio, stable retirement goals and adequate insurance coverage. “I work with people to look at the full picture,” she said. “Where are your gaps? I help you fill them in.”

Create a Catered Plan “You are unique and you need a unique plan,” Sorensen said. It’s like finding the perfect hair color. The boxed drugstore varieties look great on the shelves, but one-color-fits-all usually doesn’t work. Your best bet is to hit the salon for an individual, professional consultation to find the perfect combination of highlights and lowlights. The same theory holds true for your money. “It’s really easy to give overall advice, but that advice may not be specific enough for you,” added Sorensen.

Establish Trust Nothing rubs Sorensen the wrong way more than an ‘expert’ who talks the whole time. “You want them to listen to you,” she advised. “The more questions they ask you, the more you know they have your best interests at heart. The more they talk about themselves and a certain product, the less I would trust them.”


It’s going from being a saver to a spender in a way ... I’m here to help you look at those dollars you’ve saved for all those years and find out how to allocate them correctly for you.

Sorensen encourages her clients to write down their life goals and interviews them about their risk tolerance. Additionally, she reaches out to clients’ beneficiaries to make sure everyone is on board with her tailored plan.

Create a Retirement Paycheck The magical day where you finally walk away from your full-time gig also means you’re giving up guaranteed income. That’s why it’s crucial to create your own paycheck in retirement. “It’s going from being a saver to a spender in a way,” said Sorensen. “I’m here to help you look at those dollars you’ve saved for all those years and find out how to allocate them correctly for you.” Sorensen said people often think their expenses will go down in retirement, but in truth, they don’t. Even though you may not have a mortgage anymore, you don’t want to drop the items you’ve become accustomed to having like a cell phone, Internet and dinners out. Let’s not forget that you might also have grandchildren to spoil.


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Finally, don’t forget to keep family in the loop about your financial security. Sorensen advises everyone to have a will, health directive and power of attorney. If you’ve worked hard to prevent surprises in your own life, you should give your loved ones the same courtesy. For more information contact Hannah Sorensen, Financial Associate with Thrivent Financial at 701.388.4649 or hannah.sorensen@thrivent.com. [AWM]

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AREA WOMAN

HEALTH


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SURVIVAL MAKING A LIFE AFTER CANCER

ARTICLE AND PHOTO COURESTY OF SANFORD HEALTH

N

ancy Callender has learned to appreciate the things that make her sing – inside and outside.

When she sits and quietly watches the birds, or gets her sewing machine humming along with a smile and song, she’s content and happy. The 57-year-old breast cancer survivor doesn’t like to define her life by her past disease, but instead by what makes her happy today. “I’ve learned to do the things that give me great peace, to pay attention to the little things, which really are big things,” says Callender. “I have a happy life.”

The beginning Callender’s journey began when she found a lump in her left breast in March 2011. It wasn’t the first time she had found something that needed to be checked out, but this time a biopsy confirmed cancer. Surgery to remove the lump and check her lymph nodes showed her cancer had spread to 11 nodes. She followed surgery with radiation and chemotherapy. Callender was able to work throughout her treatment, going in almost daily to her job as a business office manager at a nursing home. It was important for her to keep her regular schedule. “I wanted to go to work because I could take my mind off of the cancer,” says Callender. “I worked with such caring, compassionate people who were wonderful to me.”

after and cared for and then you’re done and the panic sets in,” says Nancy. “It was like I was free-falling.”

By November 2011, scans showed Callender was cancer free. It was time to celebrate and heal, but for the first time in her journey with cancer, she felt horrible.

Callender’s treatment team suggested she make an appointment at the embrace Survivorship Clinic at Sanford Roger Maris Cancer Center. The help she got there changed her life.

Life in “free-fall” She was worried the cancer could come back. She had pain and numbness in her hands and aches in her knees. And she just wasn’t sure if it would ever go away.

She spent half a day at the clinic. Her appointment included a tailored questionnaire to assess her emotional and physical needs, a physical exam, education, a customized prescription for nutrition and exercise, and recommendations for further follow-up.

“I was so used to seeing the doctors and the nurses, feeling so very looked

A physical therapist dealt with her residual physical pain and a

I don’t worry about what anybody else thinks or believes, each day is a good day to be alive ... I try to limit my fears and see the beauty of every day.


psychologist helped her helped her work through her anxiety and process the experience she had been through. “I never felt rushed one second,” says Callender. “Any person who has gone through cancer can use this. It was the best four hours I’ve ever spent.” 

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A different way Sanford embrace Medical Director Dr. Shelby Terstriep says many cancer survivors, like Callender, struggle most in the days following their treatment. After having great support for their every need, they suddenly are expected to get back to normal after great changes physically, emotionally and financially.

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“Cancer treatment doesn’t end when your treatment is done,” says Dr. Terstriep. “Transitioning to normal care is a completely different experience.” Dr. Terstriep says getting support and individualized follow-up care after the treatment is done is an essential step toward putting life back on track. Experts in “survivorship” can make the transition to life much easier. The oncologist recommends cancer survivors talk to their health-care providers about supportive services both during and after their treatment. Programs like embrace Cancer Survivorship Program can help people through the long-lasting emotional, physical and financial effects of cancer. “When you’re educated and empowered, you’re ready to move forward to lead the best possible life,” says Dr. Terstriep. “You need someone who can answer your questions and realizes your life and the care you need has changed.” Today Callender lives her life not focusing on the cancer she’s survived, but the life she loves to lead. She changed her lifestyle and work schedule to be able to focus on family and friends. She feels good – both physically and emotionally. “I don’t worry about what anybody else thinks or believes, each day is a good day to be alive,” says Callender. “I try to limit my fears and see the beauty of every day.” [AWM] VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/68 AREAWOMAN.COM 69


FROM THE GET-GO I SAID GOD WILL SEE ME THROUGH THIS.

MESSAGES OF HOPE A JOURNEY THROUGH BREAST CANCER

BY MEGAN BARTHOLOMAY >> 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

Cindy Eggl isn’t sorry she got breast cancer, but she doesn’t understand how either. It doesn’t run in her family and she’s been diligent in preventative mammograms since she was 35, had annual physicals and completed monthly self-breast exams, so the now 55-year-old was stunned when she learned she had Stage II breast cancer in April 2011. Despite having a double lumpectomy, removal of nine lymph nodes, 16 chemo sessions and 33 radiation treatments, Eggl decided she needed to take action to help others seeking comfort with their own cancer battles. “I’ve always been a giver, and I think God has entrusted me with the message of hope.” Eggl’s new book “Boundless Blessings and God’s Grace: My Journey Through Breast Cancer” chronicles her journey through breast cancer, which started as a series of CaringBridge journal entries. “I never had aspirations of writing a book,” she said, “but so many people told me what an inspiration I had been to them.” She said she started the journal as an outlet for her emotions and to provide updates, but it was the encouragement of a number of people who called, emailed or visited her in person that finally set her on the path to publication. Eggl said her reasons were twofold: to spread the message to trust in God during dark times, and out of a sense of responsibility to other cancer patients and those who need awareness and education about preventative care. Since publishing her book and finishing treatment, Eggl, who worked full-time during her battle, has been forced to resign from her job and sit on the sidelines while her body fully recovers, a role with which she is not comfortable. She said the hardest part about cancer


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is the lack of normalcy. “I worked 50 to 60 hour weeks prior to my breast cancer, and 40 hour weeks during my chemo and radiation. I’m just not used to doing nothing.” But the avid golfer and new author isn’t doing nothing. Eggl, a Cando, ND native, cofounded the Impact-Cando Connection Fund with her sister Jill and former Candoite Rusty Papachek in 2008. They organize a charity golf tournament and other fundraising opportunities yearly. The purpose of the nonprofit fund is to benefit their small community of Cando by “giving back time, talent and treasure” to improve parks, schools, the local theater and, you guessed it, the golf course, among other things. In the meantime, Eggl has let God take her through this journey. “From the getgo I said that God will see me through this, and I totally gave it up to him.” Today, Eggl is most thankful for her health. Her beautiful smile, spirit and post-cancer spikey grey hair show that this journey has not weathered her. “You take whatever it is God gives you and make the most of it every day.” Eggl’s book “Boundless Blessings and God’s Grace: My Journey Through Breast Cancer” is available as an ebook, in paperback and hardcover through Amazon, her website www. boundlessblessingsandgodsgrace.com and various local retail outlets. [AWM] She has upcoming book signing events: October 11 - Concordia College Offutt Concourse: 12 pm - 3 pm November 2 - Melberg’s Christian Bookstore: 11 am - 1 pm VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/70

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DR. JONI BUECHLER, RADIATION ONCOLOGIST

ONE FOOT IN FRONT

of the other BY ANDY GREDER >> PHOTO COURESTY OF ESSENTIA HEALTH

Dr. Joni Buechler learned an important lesson from her own life just as she was wrapping up years of training to become a cancer specialist. The radiation oncologist says she gained a deeper understanding of what her patients experience when her own routine mammogram came back abnormal. “I was worried. I cried. I couldn’t sleep,” she recalls. A later test determined there was no cancer. “My patients amaze me,” says Dr. Buechler, who joined the Essentia Health Cancer Center in Fargo last spring. “They have a cancer diagnosis and every day they get up and put one foot in front of the other. Some of them continue to work, take care of their families and take care of themselves. I’m just in awe of them.” Dr. Buechler, 47, grew up on a farm northwest of Bismarck, near Golden Valley. She and her three sisters worked alongside her brother and parents in the grain fields and cattle barns. “They taught me how to work, how to be honest, how to be kind,” she says of her

parents. “My dad always said a girl can drive a tractor just as good as a boy can. He instilled in me that I can do anything that a boy can do.” Dr. Buechler enrolled at Minot State University and stumbled upon radiation technology as she searched the course catalog. “I had no idea what that was about,” she recalls. “I probably had one X-ray taken in my life. I just thought that it looked kind of interesting.” Dr. Buechler worked first as an X-ray technician, then as a radiation therapist and later a nurse. Most of her education and work has been in North Dakota. “I loved being a nurse, but felt that God wanted me to apply to medical school,” says Dr. Buechler. “I did not want to do it. I knew that it would take a lot of time and a lot of money and I didn’t know if I was smart enough to do it.” Dr. Buechler graduated from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Grand Forks and served her residency in radiation oncology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa.


The physician believes her background helps her make patients feel more comfortable. For example, she often asks herself whether a patient will be able to get on to an exam table or hold a position during treatment. “I still consider the other aspects of the patient and not just what I’m treating,” says the board-certified radiation oncologist. “I see them in a different way.” Dr. Buechler works with each patient and his or her care team to develop an individualized treatment plan. She determines how to use regulated doses of radiation to kill cancer cells. Dr. Buechler says she and the other healthcare professionals at Essentia Health don’t see patients as just the type of cancer listed in their charts. “We think of them by their first name or their laugh,” she says.

My patients amaze me... They have a cancer diagnosis and every day they get up and put one foot in front of the other. When Dr. Buechler meets patients, she wants to get to know them – where they live, what they do for a living, if they have pets. Then she gets into the diagnosis. “Sometimes they come to me and they might not know the cancer is aggressive, so somebody needs to tell them,” Dr. Buechler says. “I don’t go all doom and gloom, but I also don’t sugar-coat things. I pretty much put the cards on the table and I think they appreciate that.” Dr. Buechler says her strong faith helps sustain her in her work. “I will pray with some of my patients,” she says, “but I pray for all of my patients.” [AWM] VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/72

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LOCAL TO GLOBAL MEETING WORKFORCE NEEDS IS MSUM’S PROMISE BY COURTNEY WEATHERHEAD >> MSUM PHOTOGRAPHY

“Through education, we achieve the power to transform not only ourselves, but also our world.” These are the words of Minnesota State University Moorhead’s Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs, Anne Blackhurst. Transforming the world is an ambitious aspiration, but Blackhurst said, “That promise is unleashed every time a student sees she really can test a hypothesis, or analyze a balance sheet, or critique a film, or thrive in another culture, or write a short story worthy of her professor’s praise.” For 125 years, MSUM has been dedicated to fulfilling its promise to students and employers—meet the needs of the state and region.

MSUM administrators regularly meet with business and community leaders and employers of our alumni to learn how the university can better prepare graduates for the workforce. The goal is to provide the most relevant, up-todate education possible. New programs and initiatives are already underway as a result. “In the College of Business and Innovation alone, during the past year, partnerships with industry and business leaders resulted in new programs in entrepreneurship, business analytics, and project management, as well as an executive MBA and a master’s degree in accounting and finance,” Blackhurst said. Another example is a trio of new graduate programs that serves healthcare administrators and executives. Collaboration between the School of Business and the School of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership offer the necessary specialization to serve three distinct audiences: senior healthcare executives, nursing administrators, and mid-level healthcare administrators. MSUM now offers a Doing Business in China minor and certificate. Students and business professionals alike will gain understanding of China’s unique international business practices and implications of one of the world’s most populated countries. The People’s Republic of China is the world’s second largest economy and the world’s fastest growing major economy. This means the demand for professionals with a working knowledge of how to do business in China is growing.

The true promise of higher education is realized only when our students use their education to better our world.


“We are pleased to offer this certificate program to students and professionals in the local and regional communities,” said Marsha Weber, dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “We are fortunate to have faculty who have traveled and researched extensively in China who can provide participants in this program with a first-hand view of the cultural, political, and economic environments in China and the opportunities that exist to do business in China.” Two of MSUM’s professors, Dr. Peter Geib and Dr. Ruth Lumb, are experts on doing business in China. “Ruth uses technology to create virtual teams, in which MSUM students and students in China work together on research, case studies, and feasibility projects,” Blackhurst said. “In the process, they develop cross cultural understanding and the skills to operate in a global business environment.” MSUM is also fulfilling its promise to serving the Red River Valley. For example, this summer, geosciences students received geo-archeology experience in Moorhead by using remote sensing methods and GIS mapping at the Comstock House historic site. The project results will be shared with both the City of Moorhead and the Minnesota Historical Society.

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“The true promise of higher education is realized only when our students use their education to better our world. Creative minds, well-honed intellects, even well-developed value systems, stop short of realizing their promise if they are not employed in service to our local and global communities,” Blackhurst said. The community is invited to learn more about doing business in China at MSUM’s Global Innovation: Doing Business in China Nov. 12. There will be a panel discussion with regional experts to help business professionals understand opportunities that exist between China and the U.S. [AWM]

VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/76

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... you are overcome by the feeling that you can accomplish ANYTHING and make a difference ...

A Labor of Love

Engaging the Past with the Present... For the Future

Having roots in interior design, architecture and natural resource management, Amy Nash has an unbridled wealth of knowledge and enthusiasm that’s infectious. She’s established herself as a local leader in sustainable planning and an ambassador for downtown Fargo. Her drive to improve North Dakota’s built environment through mindful urban design and sustainability leaves people feeling inspired and proud to call the Midwest home!

Nash, a proud Bison, graduated with interior design, environmental design and architecture degrees from NDSU, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in natural resources management. Her business, ALNSustainable Design and Consulting, LLC., offers services ranging from residential design to urban planning, although Nash said her practice gravitates towards renovation and sustainability consulting. Throughout her work she found her true passion of sustainability connected to historic preservation. “I love anything where I can take the majesty of

what’s already there, enhance it and give it another life. What’s more sustainable than that?” Each project is always a collaborative effort with the end result having a much lighter ecological footprint. In terms of the built environment, the common mentality in the Midwest is newer is always better. Through a continuous re-education process from stewards like Nash, mindsets are slowly turning around. A perfect example is the excitement surrounding the enhancements planned in


BY JESSI LARSON SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

the historic downtown Fargo district. Historic preservation has become a form of storytelling with designers and architects playing the teller. Renewing an original ghost sign, or uncovering a brick wall read as chapters of a book. It takes a keen eye to revive these “stories” of the past, but when it’s done just right, the result is vibrant. “When people start seeing those stories of a building’s lifetime, they start gravitating towards it and wanting more,” Nash gushes.


There is nothing like shaking the hand of the former president ... Follow that up with some of the most incredible leaders in the world, many of them women, and you feel very small. But, then you’re overcome by the feeling that you can accomplish ANYTHING ...

She went on to say she’s always loved this vibrancy downtown encompasses and wanted to become even more involved. So during the summer of 2011, she took a courageous leap back into the intern world. Cue the Downtown Community Partnership (DCP). “I called up Mike Hahn from the DCP and asked if they needed any extra help, and the rest is history.��� While volunteering many hours of her time researching other downtown districts and business improvement districts she became hooked. “I got bit by the downtown bug,” she admits. Through all her hard work, Nash has become the DCP’s Sustainability Coordinator. Amy’s first project at the DCP was research. “I began researching large urban areas as well as peer cities to see what we can implement here in Fargo.” The DCP, under Amy’s lead, engaged community members and

business owners to get feedback on what improvements they wanted in their district as part of a Business Improvement District (BID). This data aided the DCP in focusing on multiple efforts with environmental, social and economic sustainability in mind. Two notable projects planned are an ecological tree walk utilizing our green spaces and the City of Fargo’s first on-street recycling effort. Other programs include building databases, energy efficiency programs and other sustainable built-environment improvements. In April of 2012, Amy, along with other DCP staff, Mike Hahn and Jed Pahan, attended the


National Main Streets Conference in Baltimore, Maryland. The conference focuses on innovative techniques to spark economic development and help communities survive downturns through diversity and thinking sustainably. “We went up to New York City where I noticed many parallels between their dense urban environment and downtown Fargo, just on a much different scale. You look at New York City and they have art museums, theaters, college campuses, and historic churches and we have all of that here. It was like our little downtown smashed into the heart of New York City. It made me appreciate the Fargo vitality even more,” Nash said. She’s not only working in Fargo, but also on collaborative efforts in Ohio, Minnesota, and South Dakota. Of all the great opportunities Nash has received thus far in her career, one of the milestones was being the first North Dakotan selected to attend the Clinton Global Initiative in Washington D.C. in 2012 and again in 2013. Twelve hundred community leaders from around the world gathered to brainstorm and share their solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges. Dignitaries included the likes of Madeleine Albright, environmental activist, Vandana Shiva, and of course, Bill Clinton. “There is nothing like shaking the hand of the former president and talking with him. Follow that up with some of the most incredible leaders in the world, many of them women, and you feel very small. But, then you’re overcome by the feeling that you can accomplish ANYTHING and make a difference on the planet through hard work and dedication.” Nash’s work is truly a labor of love. But what is this all for, what drives her? She goes on to say, “Everything I’ve learned is to help give back to my city and state.” The one things that sticks out about Nash is her desire to share; share her knowledge, her time and her resources. This steadfast desire to give back is what truly makes her a champion in the design community and in life. [AWM]

VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/78

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JESSICA WACHTER’S EXPRESSIVE ART

BY JILL N. KANDEL >> SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

A North Dakota native, Wachter grew up in Bismarck where her parents, Mike and Kelly Wachter, introduced her and her younger sister to art museums and historic centers, as well as football and soccer games. “I was able to see a lot of different worlds growing up,” Wachter said.

EVERYONE IS AN ARTIST. MOST PEOPLE FORGET ... I WANT TO REMIND THEM.

Jessica Wachter believes in hard work. She sometimes pulls all nighters. Sometimes she spends six months or more contemplating a canvas, adding a stroke of color here or there, before she feels it is complete. Her oil on canvas paintings and monoprints, which sell into the thousands, are works of art that might appear to people as random, but years of study and long hours of diligent work precede their creation.


AREAWOMAN.COM 83


I work right on the screen. It takes hours. I might print twenty and throw them away before I get one I really like. There are no editions; they are one of a kind.

Wachter moved to Fargo to pursue a B.S. degree in Art with a minor in Interior Design from NDSU. “I loved NDSU and wanted to be really involved on campus,” Wachter said, “I was part of the Blue Key Honor Society, the Bison Ambassadors, InterVarsity and Cru and Chi Alpha.” Wachter also worked with the God’s Child Project, helping with fundraising and building homes in Guatemala. “During my studies at NDSU, my art work was strongly influenced by the oils and colorful textures of a renowned artist named Joan Mitchell,” Wachter said. By the time her four years of study were coming to an end, Wachter was well prepared for her senior thesis show. Many art students opt for a group senior showing, but Wachter had completed enough work, including both paintings and prints, to do a solo show. Her solo show turned out to be life changing in several ways. As a little girl Wachter dreamed that someday she’d become a professional artist. “I thought it would be so impossible, so far off,” Wachter

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said, “It was so exciting at my senior show to see that people connected with and enjoyed what I had created.” When the director and owner of ecce, and art gallery on Broadway in downtown Fargo, walked into her art show looking for works from young artists it was a perfect match. “I was the first artist in their expanded showroom,” Wachter said. “It was such an honor to be able to exhibit there.”

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Wachter’s mixed-media work includes oil on canvas and monoprints on paper. “My monoprints are unusual,” Wachter said, “I work right on the screen. It takes hours. I might print twenty and throw them away before I get one I really like. There are no editions; they are one of a kind.” Wachter’s art is self-reflective and works on various levels, both emotionally and intellectually. “I am always transforming life into new art,” she said. “My work translates into a visual experience, rooted in or delivered through abstract expressionist language. It’s strongly gestural and often contains my own personal celebrations, struggles, joys, loves and losses. I express my own experiences through the use of color, texture and composition. There is always a deeper content than what you see on the surface, or what is shown, and this is constantly changing.”

AREAWOMAN.COM 85


>> PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSICA WACHTER

“People might come to me wanting a certain size or specific colors and I create a piece with those ideas, using my own inspiration,” Wachter said. She has had people buy a work of art and then use that piece as the focal point of an area. “I want to imbue my work with a tangible essence and a mystery,” Wachter explained, “while at the same time keeping it open enough for the viewer’s own response.” “Working with oil is a messy job,” Wachter said. “The first thing I do when I arrive at my studio is to change into my painting clothes. Being an artist means showing up for work every day and painting.” Wachter stretches and primes her own canvases. She often works on ten to twenty paintings at a time. This is partly pragmatic oils take a long time to dry and partly contemplative, giving her time to decide and mull over her unfinished work. Once she has added a layer or a color to one canvas, she can let it rest and dry, while she goes on to another. Wachter’s paintings sit on coffee cans or bricks, just inches off the studio floor. She does not work standing in front of an easel, but often sits on the floor in front of her medium sized paintings. Her six and eight foot canvases require her to stand on a ladder. “Sometimes, while I am thinking about a particular painting, I study it and look at it from various angles. Once I’ve added paint, I won’t move it. I don’t want to disturb the paint or cause it to drip while it is drying, unless that is the effect I want to achieve. I needed a studio with a lot of wall space and was super happy when Starion Financial heard I was looking, and offered me this space.”

>> PHOTO BY OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

Wachter has had several solo shows at ecce Art Gallery and recently had a solo six-month exhibit, Beyond Convention, at the Plains Art Museum. “The exhibit at the Plains was a huge honor for me as a local artist,” Wachter said. “It was an interactive space of suspended screen prints, which acted as an entry point and contrast to the conventional displays of my oil paintings.” Wachter’s dedication to her art shows itself in the work she continuously creates. “It’s a big deal to produce enough work for these shows and galleries. I have off days. But I have to do the work. It’s a balance. Producing, yes, but also I want to be vulnerable and bring my joys and hurts to the canvas. I want to bring authenticity to my work. If I’m frustrated or happy or sad, I put that on the canvas.” Wachter often brings simple horizon lines into her paintings. “My paintings are subtle minimalist,” she said, explaining their complex simplicity. “My dad used to be in ranching and we have some land by the river. I love going there and getting away. I love going to the Minnesota lakes. Blue tends to end up in my paintings. I am drawn to the blue hues, but I might also paint the water orange, seeing the world in a different way.”


Creating >> PHOTO BY OCKHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY

I EXPRESS MY OWN EXPERIENCES THROUGH THE USE OF COLOR, TEXTURE, AND COMPOSITION.

When asked why a person would buy an expensive work of original art, Wachter replied, “A piece of art can make or transform a whole room. It is something that is only yours. There is not another one out there. There is also the depth and feelings behind it; it is hand crafted. And I think there is something that moved you with that particular piece. You see something that you don’t want to live without. Sometimes it can’t be explained, why you connect to a piece.” Wachter has two pieces of her own art which she has never sold. “I kept the biggest piece from my senior show,” she said. “And also a smaller piece that I hated. I worked on it for a long, long time and in the end I fell in love with how it

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BEING AN ARTIST IS NOT LIKE HOLDING DOWN A REGULAR JOB. IT'S A ROLLER COASTER UP AND DOWN BUT THERE IS ALSO A FREEDOM TO MY WORK.

turned out. I couldn’t let it go. I still have those two pieces; they are hanging in my home.” Wachter, who has been asked to do a TED talk in Des Moines, Iowa, will be painting on stage and talking about her passion to help people realize the artist inside. “We are all born with gifts,” Wachter said with enthusiasm. “Everyone is an artist. Most people forget they are artists. I want to remind them. We are all capable to make a difference in the world. I am making art, but I also want other people to find underneath what their artist is and to give that to the world. We were designed to do this. It’s like a calling in life. The key is discovering your gifts. Not letting fear get in the way. Fear of what people tell you you should do or you can’t do.” Wachter is involved in the FM area. She consults for ecce Gallery and serves on the NDSU Bison Arts Alumni Board as well as the Visual Arts Support Team at NDSU. She co-chaired the Bison Arts Gala for the last two years. She is a part of the young, urban, downtown scene planning and helping execute various events such as the Midnight Brunch, and Fargo’s Great Gatsby Party, and has done volunteer work with TEDxFargo and with the Misfit Conference. One of Wachter’s favorite quotes is from Picasso who said, “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.” Wachter is finding her way to do this. “Being an artist isn’t an easy or a paved path,” Wachter said. “I worked really, really hard. I am my own business. I couldn’t have predicted how my life and art work would turn out, but I did see at a young age that people liked my work. That I could transform what other people see.


I don’t believe in luck, it’s hard work, but still I’ve been very blessed.” For the past two years, Wachter has worked with the CHARISM Neighborhood Support Center’s Faces Project. “I taught self-portrait art to middle school students. They were girls who were new immigrants and still had language barriers. The girls drew pictures of themselves. How they saw themselves and how they wanted other people to see them. They developed creativity, self-esteem, and confidence. It was very exciting to be a part of their lives and to see them transition into living in the U.S. and the new cultural patterns that surround them. Their energy overflows into the art work I am producing.” “The Fargo community has been exceptionally supporting of me as a young artist,” Wachter said. “I’ve had amazing mentors who have truly helped me grow throughout the past few years.” Her largest commissioned art piece so far came when West Acres Mall asked her to be a part of their permanent Regional Showcase collection. She painted seven oil paintings, sized eight feet by four feet, which were then converted into a permanent tile installation. Wachter’s art can be seen around the Fargo community in various places such as Starion Financial, Gate City Bank, Dawson Insurance, and the Kilbourne Group. Wachter said she’d love to obtain her master’s in Fine Arts, or complete an internship with an artist, perhaps a residency. “I’d love to travel more,” Wachter said. “But no matter where my future leads me, I’ll always be grounded here in North Dakota.” “I’m so fortunate to follow this path,” Wachter said. “Being an artist is not like holding down a regular job. It’s a roller coaster up and down but there is also a freedom to my work. No one is holding me back. No one says you can’t do this or you have to do that. I have a lot more growing to do. It’s an exciting time in my career. Even though I don’t always know the details of my path, when I’m honest, I like it that way.” [AWM] To see more of Wachter’s art, visit her website jessicawachter.com. VIEW OR SHARE THIS STORY ONLINE AT issuu.com/areawoman/docs/on13/82 AREAWOMAN.COM 89


IN AUTUMN EVERY LEAF

IS A FLOWER


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Area Woman Magazine Fargo, ND