Page 1

october.november 2018

celebrating

all things woman where to shop style home h e a lt h f a m i ly life

Brynn

rising up and racing down

duncan


why not

WORK WITH

the BEST

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Monteverdi Trestle Table

INTRODUCING THE

MONTEVERDI

Monteverdi Accent Chair & Monteverdi Sofa

COLLECTION

This new addition into Rachael Ray Home is based on Rachael’s love of and special connection to an area in Italy, known as Monteverdi. This rustic casual collection features Pine solids with Knotty Cypress Veneer in a Sun-Bleached Cypress finish. Beautiful details such as planked tops, Forged Nero finished metal hardware and accents create pieces with a timeworn and hand-made feel. The collection offers multiple options for bedroom, dining and occasional.

Monteverdi Upholstered Bed


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thanks WITH A GIVE

grateful

HEART

There’s no better time than now! Experience the incredible livability and sophistication of your brand new Heritage home this holiday season - built around entertaining, relaxation, flexible living and plenty of storage.

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o c to be r.novem ber 2 01 8

CONTENTS

CONTRIBUTORS

style MAGICAL MCCULLEY OPTIX GALLERY HOW TO DRESS FOR A CHARITY EVENT MORE THAN HAIR AREA STYLE

home PERFECTION FROM CONCEPTION TO COMPLETION WHERE TO SHOP HOME

12

18 20 22 24

30 36


health

40 42 44 46 48

REACHING FOR PAIN RELIEF FIXING FOCUS IN FIFTEEN MINUTES (OR LESS) CHI HEALTH AT HOME THE BEAUTY AND BREVITY OF LIFE THE KIDNEY AND HYPERTENSION CENTER

REINVENTING HERSELF KNOWLEDGE IS POWER NORTH DAKOTA HEART GALLERY THE MANNER OF GIVING

profiles

62 64 66 68

52 54 56 58

family

TWO MBA OPTIONS FOR ONLINE LEARNERS CONNECTING PEOPLE AND PURPOSE FINDING PASSION AND PURPOSE RISING UP AND RACING DOWN Brynn Duncan: because disabilities do not define

28TH ANNUAL PAWS WALK PERFECTING THE EXPERIENCE FLAVORS OF FALL: ROASTED APPLE RECIPES CALENDAR

78 80 82 84

life


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Member FDIC


“It’s a huge weight

lifted off my shoulders.”

Member advocates from Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota. Inspired by fighters like the Jones family. While Marcie Jones focuses on her son, Chase, and aggressive leukemia treatments that routinely take him across the state, her member advocate personally oversees the claims paperwork and any out-of-network referrals. Marcie stays focused on Chase, and keeping him in remission.

Read Chase’s story at BCBSND.com/Chase


october NOVEMBER

contributors

OUR WRITERS

are the voice of Area Woman Magazine. They bring to life the Fargo-Moorhead area and the incredible stories of the women we feature. These are the talented contributors showcased in this issue. Learn more about these and our other contributors at areawomanmagazine.com.

Our cover story was written by Rebecca and photographed by Stacy, page 68.

SUSAN A. STIBBE

REBECCA MEIDINGER Rebecca is a speaker, Bible teacher, writer, blogger and stay-at-home mom to four wild kids in south Fargo and wife to her awesome husband Paul. As a speaker and Bible teacher, it is Rebecca's joy to bring messages of hope, joy and freedom in Christ to groups of teens and adult women. As a blogger, Rebecca shares the reallife challenges of marriage and motherhood. Rebecca loves a hot cup of coffee, a cool morning run, and warm sunshine on her face. Learn more about Rebecca at rebeccameidinger.com.

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STACY KENNEDY photographer

Stacy is a photographer that specializes in high school senior and commercial portraits. Her years in the fashion industry and behind a camera lens has gained her the reputation of creating images that stand out. Check out her portfolio at stacykennedy.com.

| areawomanmagazine.com

Susan graduated from North Dakota State University with a major in English education and a minor in speech/ communication. She is a former teacher who served on the Northern Cass School Board, the North Dakota State Board of Education, and the North Dakota State Board for Career and Technical Education. Susan and her husband, Bill, live on their farm near Hunter, North Dakota. They have one grown daughter, Emily.

ROXANE B. SALONEN Roxane, a wife and mother of five from Fargo, is an award-winning children's author, freelance writer and newspaper columnist.

MEGAN BARTHOLOMAY A North Dakota native, Megan is a freelance writer and editor with an addiction to grammar, cats, wine and good food. She lives in downtown Fargo with her husband, Mike, and their bevy of fuzzy babies.


||||||||||||||||| Be the reason someone Smiles today |||||||||||||||||

LINDSEY WAGNER Lindsey is from Brainerd, Minnesota, and is a student at North Dakota State University. Her favorite past time is to sit down with a cup of coffee and read her favorite style blogs. Her happy place is anywhere on the water.

LINDSAY TRUAX Lindsay is the editor of the website Pink and Navy Stripes, a lifestyle and fashion blog. She loves to help others take the latest fashion trends and make them wearable. Lindsay and her husband have three little girls.

Fun, Unique, Thoughtful Gifts for All Occasions — or Just Because! 25 SHEYENNE ST, WEST FARGO 701-541-9077 gratefulcratefulls.com

Birthdays - Anniversaries - Weddings - Housewarming - New Baby - Get Well - Sympathy - So Much More!

SIRI FREEH Siri is a former Miss Minnesota, media personality, and current RN health coach at Sanford Health. She focuses on helping people living their best life possible and enjoys gourmet cooking, hot yoga, and the occasional (vegan) burger.

KRISTY OLSGAARD Kristy grew up in Buhl, Minnesota, and graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead. She spent 16 years in the banking industry. After moving to her husband Kevin’s family farm, she has had the privilege to be a stay-at-home mom, a title she is proud to wear. It has given her time to pursue a career in writing. With two sons, Nick and Tyler, the family keeps busy attending their activities. Their family spends time golfing, snow skiing and mowing a large yard.

STRUGGLING WITH INFERTILITY? WE CAN HELP. The team of experts at Sanford Reproductive Medicine has been focused on making the dream of parenthood come true for couples for more than 20 years. Our success rates consistently rank higher than the national average. And with outreach and telehealth services, we can help couples throughout the region.

Learn more at sanfordhealth.org, keyword: RMI. 035001-00124 4/18

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celebrating all things woman

publisher AREA WOMAN PUBLISHING, LLC

editor in chief JON-MICHAEL SHERMAN

art director MEGAN ELGIN

proofing editor JILL OCKHARDT BLAUFUSS

advertising MIKE SHERMAN 701-306-5119 DEBBIE TROMBLEY 701-729-1910 JON-MICHAEL SHERMAN 701-306-1288

graphic design intern HELENA NORRAW

marketing intern LINDSEY WAGNER

photography 5FOOT20 DESIGN LOUNGE ABBY ANDERSON EXPRESSIONS BY ASHTON PHOTOGRAPHY JILL OCKHARDT BLAUFUSS LINDSAY KAYE PHOTOGRAPHY MIKE SMITH SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY STACY KENNEDY TRUE EXPRESSIONS, KELSEY BUCHHOLZ

read it online issuu.com/areawoman

find us areawomanmagazine.com

Area Woman is a proud member of the Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Chamber of Commerce. It is published bimonthly by Area Woman Publishing, LLC and printed in the U.S.A. ©2018 Area Woman Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from AW. Area Woman is a trademark registered at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Area Woman Publishing assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs and does not necessarily agree with content or advertising presented.


Driving COMMUNITY GROWTH

I choose to serve on Starion’s Board because, as a community bank, they play a significant role in driving economic development, growth and success in our region.

Tammy Miller

Border States Electric, CEO

starionbank.com Member FDIC

Starion Bank Board Member Since 2011


style

area

photo: pink thread boutique

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STYLE

words by SUSAN A. STIBBE photography by JILL OCKHARDT BLAUFUSS

magical

M C C UL L EY O P T I X GAL L E RY

M

cCulley Optix Gallery is a fun, friendly boutique that offers a wide selection of frames to those looking for the perfect pair of prescription glasses or nonprescription sunglasses. It is a beautiful space with a warm and welcoming décor. It strives to feel like every customer’s best friend’s house, making frame shopping a special experience. “Anyone can come in and buy glasses,” says Dr. McCulley. “Not all optometrists have a wide frame selection, so we can provide glasses for customers with “outside” prescriptions

(those from other eye doctors). We also have nonprescription sunglasses to help customers find the style that works the best for their individual look and we can adjust them so they fit perfectly.” McCulley is the owner and sole practitioner of McCulley Optix. She sees patients from the age of 0 to over 100. As their slogan says, “Locally owned and loved for over 12 years.” She was born and raised in Fargo. After college, optometry school, and a few years of practice in Minneapolis, she returned to Fargo to open McCulley Optix. “I realized Fargo was missing a unique, niche optical gallery. I came from a corporate type atmosphere and wanted my practice and the gallery to be different. I wanted it to be a place where customers could find the “perfect” frames,” says McCulley. The gallery features rotating artwork by local artists of all types, some well-known, some up and coming. Several large pieces hang in the gallery at any given time. But the gallery’s main focus is on helping customers find fabulous glasses. They carry many fashion labels not found anywhere else in the Fargo area. And here in the spirit of full disclosure, I must admit I found the greatest frames ever. I immediately put them on the top of my Christmas list and informed my husband. I have never felt so enamored of a pair of bifocals. “My” glasses are Lafont, a family-owned company in France that designs gorgeous and unique frames.

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The gallery carries many designer label brands including: Zero G – A frame that is made of titanium, is super lightweight, and perfect for customers with an active lifestyle

Our wealth planning process is centered around you.

Oliver Peoples – The brand that is all the rage with celebrities in Hollywood Tiffany and Jimmy Choo – Always classic, iconic choices Tuesday, October 16 from noon to 6:00 p.m., the gallery will be holding a trunk show in partnership with Jimmy Choo and Dior. This will be a chance for customers to try on all the new styles and all the colors these designers make. McCulley Optix is rolling out a new feature on their website this fall. It is a personal shopping program which allows users to fill out a form about their coloring, face shape, and their preferences in style, color, and shape of frames. They can also upload a picture. The user can schedule a time to visit the gallery and the staff will have an array of preselected choices ready for them. “We will personally shop for eyeglasses and/or sunglasses,” says McCulley. “We hear all the time that people dread shopping for glasses like they do for swimsuits or jeans. By using our personal shopping experience, we can do the legwork on selecting frames that are a match for their style and visual needs. This makes the process in the gallery easy and fun.” Office manager Jenna Gilbertson has a remarkable eye for choosing the perfect frames. Again, full disclosure, she helped me find those great Lafont glasses. She has a wonderful sense of style along with her dynamic and helpful personality. No appointment is needed at the gallery. Walk-ins are welcome anytime to browse and try on the new styles.

Bri Clemenson, Diane Sandven, Lorelle Olson, Mona Tedford Rindy, Marit Haman

Contact us today to begin planning for the future with confidence. Fargo 492-2600 • Bremer.com Products and services offered through Bremer Trust, National Association are not insured by FDIC, are not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, the depository institution, and are subject to investment risks including possible loss of the principal amount invested. © 2018 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved.

Fargo FS-135 PlanningProcess 0918.indd 1

9/4/18 1:15 PM

Optix Gallery Est. 2006

Personalized Service for Every Patient Staff that knows you by name and takes the time to understand your individual vision needs. From the exam chair to the optical, we focus on you.

“This is what we are so good at and what we love to do it,” McCulley says. “We are here to offer choices and our focus is always customer service. We want all our customers to feel special.”

And special, indeed, is McCulley Optix Gallery!

MCCULLEY OPTIX GALLERY IS LOCATED IN FARGO AT 2553 Kirsten Lane. Contact them or schedule an appointment at 701-373-2020 or optixgallery.com.

Visit our website to schedule your very own personalized shopping experience! McCulley Optix Gallery

701-373-2020 • www.optixgallery.com [ aw ] a r e a wom a n

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STYLE

words by LINDSEY TRUAX photography by RYAN TRUAX

how to

DRESS for a C HA R IT Y E VE N T

It can be so hard to decide what to wear for a charity event; especially if it is unclear how formal the event will be. At this stage of life, I tend to overdress because I am so excited to be invited to something I can dress up for. I do like to follow the rule of, “It’s better to be overdressed than underdressed.” Follow Lindsay on INSTAGRAM: @pinkandnavystripes

phone a friend

look for something you already own

When in doubt, phone a friend! If you are unsure how formal you need to go, it’s always a good idea to consult a friend who has gone to the event in years past. If she went to the event the previous year, she will be able to give you tips on what to wear or how dressy everyone was. Sometimes, it’s a new event, or at least new to your circle, but at least you can phone a friend who is attending the event in the current year so that you can coordinate your level of formality. At least you’re both in it together! Do not be afraid to ask the

I love to buy something new for an event but if the event is more formal, and you buy a more formal dress, odds are that you are not going to get much use out it. Of course, if you know you have a bunch of events coming up that you could wear it to, that is a different story, otherwise, it’s not generally worth spending the money on. I always start by looking for a little black dress which you may already own. Maybe there is a bridesmaids’ dress in your closet that you could wear again. Adding a shawl to it can really change up the look.

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coordinator of the event for guidelines either. I was once invited to an event called the Red Dress Collection. It was a fashion show to raise money for the American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women” initiative. By the title of the event I was not sure if they wanted the guests to wear red or some other color. I emailed the event coordinator and it turns out that they only wanted the models in the show to wear red. I was so happy I checked because I would have felt a little silly showing up in a red dress.


accessories The concept of “doing basic well” can be so elegant because nothing takes away from your overall look. Wearing a black dress, a great pair of pumps, stud earrings, a bold lip color, and a necklace or bracelet can really be a show stopper. Accessories can really take a look to the next level and are a great way to achieve a trendy look without breaking the bank. Don’t forget to bring a scarf to wrap around your shoulders if you think you’ll get cold. If you are wearing heels and do not think you can make the whole night in them, bring some ballet flats or sandals. You can always check them with your coat if the event you’re attending has a coat check.

don’t be afraid to rock a skirt Sometimes it’s easy to think you always need to wear a dress to events but wearing a skirt can be cute and appropriate for the event too. I find that I can get more use out of a skirt because you can dress it up or down. I love a pleated skirt because you can wear it with a dresser top for an event or with a chambray shirt for a more casual look. [ aw ]

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STYLE

words by LINDSEY WAGNER photography by ELENA K PHOTOGRAPHY

When you do what you love, it's more than a job;

IT' S A CARE E R F U E LE D BY PA S S I O N

B

eauty and color have no age. Stylist and owner of Bucci Salon, Connie Bernabucci, has continued to prove that through her cosmetology work and expertise in this industry. “I want to make people feel good about themselves and boost their self-esteem,” says Bernabucci. “When you make someone feel great, there is nothing that they can’t achieve!” Bernabucci grew up in Ashley, North Dakota, and started her journey at a beauty school in Jamestown; she then continued her exploration into hair in Atlanta, Georgia, and La Crosse, Wisconsin, before settling in Fargo.

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She found her niche in life at the young age of 13 when she would design and make her own clothes from scratch. From the love of creating clothes came the love of creating hair designs. “My vision was already in pattern mode,” says Bernabucci. “So I took it from patterns in clothing and shapes and moved it to a head of hair.” Her inspiration comes from everything with color, art and nature. As well as her travels around the world that include five hair shows abroad in Greece, Italy, Paris, Portugal and the Mediterranean. After 25 years in the industry she told herself that she would go to the Paris Mondial Hair Show, which was pinnacle in her career and the largest hair show in the world. “It was breathtaking for me because I’m sitting in this huge auditorium with artists from all over the world and I felt so engulfed in creativity and that this small prairie North Dakota girl is sitting in all of this,” says Bernabucci. After that it drove her to keep learning as the industry is ever changing and always transforming.


A

long with the industry always changing, women are always changing. Every age comes with different looks and has different styles and colors that are popular among them. The 20 and 30 year olds want styles that are trendy and quick and easy to maintain. A fresh balayage, ombre and long layers are popular. The 40 and 50 year olds want a fresh cut to make them look and feel younger. “My usual go-to is a textured bob with long layers,” Bernabucci says. For 60s and beyond Bernabucci said that everyone can be gray and beautiful as long as you sport a sassy haircut. Bernabucci makes sure that every guest has an amazing experience when they step into her salon. Seasons always play a part on what magic Bernabucci will create. She likes to stick with three colors, which is the high light, low light, and a burst of color section. She wants the haircolor, skin tone and eyes to all come together as one. With that she makes a spring/summer look and a fall/winter look for her clients and changes up one of the three colors to fit the season and keep things fresh. Some questions that she seems to get a lot include: What’s trending right now? How do I combat the grow-out stage? How can I keep my platinum hair from turning brassy? Why doesn't my grey cover? How to help hair thinning? Right now, pastel/metallic and vivid colors in balayage are incredibly popular and can add fun to any style. To battle the dreaded grow-out stage there are sprays, powders, and Redken take-home kits that can be used to keep hair looking fresh. To keep platinum hair from turning brassy, Bernabucci foils in blue/black haircolor and recommends toning shampoo and conditioner to confront the brass. To cover grey hair it's a higher developer and more pigment. Hair thinning can be helped with minoxdil; as well as laser treatments, vitamins, and other topical treatments may be helpful to restore hair’s full-body potential. “I’ve been able to stay in this industry for as long as I have with this much enthusiasm as I’ve had because of the feeding of the art in my mind,” says Bernabucci. It is clear as day that Connie Bernabucci is here to stay in a career that betters lives all around her. “The sky is the limit when it comes to coloring, like art!” [ aw ]

creative & visual TAKING A

APPROACH TO COLOR

b u cc i s al on

2 1 0 8 SO U TH U NI VE R SI TY DR # 1 0 5 A FA RG O

232.8224

Connie Bernabucci

A ME RI CA N B OA RD OF CE RTI F I E D CO LO R IS TS

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area style Pumpkins and sweaters and boots, oh my! HIT THE STREETS TO S H OP THESE LO CA L FA L L LOOKS .

Dale of Norway Solfrid Sweater STABO SCANDINAVIAN IMPORTS

PINK THREAD BOUTIQUE

BURLAP BOUTIQUES KITTSONA BLUE DAISY BOUTIQUE LEELA & LAVENDER


BOOTS & HEELS

FUSION BOUTIQUE Inside Scheels Home & Hardware

LAURIE'S: YOUR JEAN headquarters

MAINSTREAM BOUTIQUE PRIMROSE BOUTIQUE

»

Turn the page for more styles & shop locations...


after

Hair Arts Hair Wrap human hair

CENTRE for HAIR and WELLNESS before

Little Bird Bridal available at GUNDERSON’S JEWELERS Today’s bride is unique, creative, and expressive. She wants her jewelry to speak to her, while telling her story. This unique bride deserves a unique ring.

Experiencing

HAIR LOSS? Call Violet Deilke 218.236.6000 Violet is passionate about helping people and you can feel that passion when you are around her. I will be forever grateful to Violet for what she has done for me; she is truly amazing! — GAIL, Metro Fargo-Moorhead

DOWNTOWN MOORHEAD centreforhairandwellness.com

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B LU E DAI SY B O U T I Q UE 1 6 50 4 5t h St S , S u i t e 1 0 5, Far go sh opbl u eda i sy.com B O OTS & H E E L S 4 1 0 B r oa dw a y N , F a r go boot sa n dh eel ssh op.com B U R L AP R U ST I C C H I C BOUTIQUE 34 0 1 U n i v er si t y Dr S , F ar go 7 0 1 - 56 6 - 8 1 7 6 C E N T R E F O R H AI R AN D W E L L N E S S Dow n t ow n M oor h ea d 2 1 8 - 2 36 - 6 0 0 0 FUSION BOUTIQUE I n si de S C HEELS Hom e & Har dw ar e 32 0 2 1 3t h Av e S , F a r go sch eel sh om ea n dh a r dw ar e.c om


lo c at i o n s

It’s not about our style...

it ’s about

introducing Brighton Shoes at LAURIE'S

visit our newly expanded showroom retail showroom hours: 8:00 AM — 5:00 PM M — F FOLLOW US ON HOUZZ

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

3211 Fiechtner Dr Ste. 1 Fargo | 701-365-4040 | DesignDirectionFargo.com GU N D E RSO N 'S JE W E L E RS 5 60 1 28th Av e S , F a rg o g u n d e rs o n s .c o m K IT TSO N A 61 0 Ma in Av e, F a rg o k itts o n a .c o m L AU RIE 'S S h o p p e s a t BLU 3 265 4 5 th St S , F a rg o la u r ie s f a rg o.c o m L E E L A & L AV E N D E R Sho p p e s a t BLU Wa te r C re e k 32 6 5 45 th St S , S u ite 1 1 6, F a rg o le e la a n d la v e n d e r.c o m MA IN ST RE A M B OU T IQ U E 2 6 03 K irs te n L n S , #1 0 3 , F a rg o ma in s tre a m b o u tiq u e.c o m PIN K T H RE A D B O U T IQU E 2 14 Ro b erts Alle y, D o wn to wn F a rg o PRIM RO SE B OU T IQ U E 61 6 Ma in Av e, F a rg o faceb o o k .com/ p rim r o s e b o u tiq u e f a s h io n STABO SCA N DIN AV IA N IM PORTS 4 0 6 Br o a d wa y N , F a rg o s ta b o -im p o rts .c o m

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help today for a

BETTER TOMORROW COME EXPERIENCE FASHION AT

S H O P P ES AT B LU 3265 45 th STREET S FARGO 7 0 1 - 282- 8180 l a u r ies f a rgo.c o m

www.lmhc.org

continuing to do do what continuingto best : : continuing whatwe wedo do best

TakingCare Care of Taking of Patients Patients

continuing continuing continuing to doto what doto what we dodo what we best do we : best do: best :

Taking Taking Care Taking Care of Care Patients of Patients of Patients

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nephrologist independent Dr.first Khaled Dr. Khaled Dr. Rabadi Khaled Rabadi Rabadi in fargo and grand forks

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Dr. Khaled Rabadi

first independent nephrologist in fargo and grand forks

FARGO LOCATION

FARGOFARGO LOCATION FARGO LOCATION LOCATION located at Internal Medicine Associates (IMA) locatedlocated at Internal located at Internal Medicine at Internal Medicine Associates Medicine Associates Associates (IMA) (IMA) 1707 Gold Drive South • (IMA) Fargo 1707 Gold 1707Drive Gold 1707South Drive Gold•South Drive Fargo•South Fargo• Fargo

GRAND FORKS LOCATION

GRAND FORKS LOCATION FARGO LOCATION GRAND GRAND FORKS GRAND FORKS LOCATION FORKS LOCATION LOCATION 1451 44th Avenue South, Suite 112D • Grand Forks 44th South, Suite 112D •Grand Grand ForksForks 14511451 44th 1451Avenue 44th 1451 Avenue South, 44th Avenue South, Suite 112D South, Suite •112D Suite Grand •112D Forks • Grand Forks located atAvenue Internal Medicine Associates (IMA) kidneynd.org kidneynd.org kidneynd.org 1707kidneynd.org Goldkidneynd.org Drive South • Fargo

ToToschedule schedule an appointment at either location To an at either either location To schedule schedule To anschedule appointment an appointment appointment an appointment at either at location at either location location

GRAND FORKS LOCATION CALL 701-775-5800 CALL 701-775-5800 701-775-5800 CALL 701-775-5800 1451CALL 44th Avenue South, Suite 112D • Grand Forks kidneynd.org

To schedule an appointment at either location

CALL 701-775-5800


home

area DIETRICH HOMES

octo be r. nove mbe r 2 0 1 8

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Perfection

FRO M C O N CEPTI ON t o C OMPL ETION words by SUSAN A. STIBBE photography by TARA SWANSON

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the Dietrich showcase home is a gorgeous custom-built home in the Shadow Creek Development of West Fargo. It is nearly 6,000 square feet with six bedrooms and four baths. It is apparent from the moment you walk into the house that every space has been beautifully finished with high quality materials and special attention to details. Let’s take a look at this executive home.


A

large back entry is accessed from the garage. The entry features a walkin closet and benches, shelves and hooks to accommodate family outerwear, boots and sports equipment. The porcelain tile floors throughout the house are heated with high-efficiency boiler floor heat. The connecting laundry room has a section for a craft area and gift wrap center. It has a double-sized laundry sink with a stainless steel pull-up faucet, and a built-in drying rack and ironing board. The countertops are quartz and the high-quality finished cabinets are an upgrade rarely found in most homes. Leading off the back entry is the spacious and gracious kitchen. The floors are quarter-sawn white oak with a gray wash. It is a professional Wolf and Sub Zero equipped kitchen with a custom design and custom cabinetry. There is a 48 inch Wolf rangetop with four burners, a char broiler, griddle and indoor grill. The Wolf professional double ovens are both convection. The upper oven is steam convection and the lower oven is regular convection. The 30 inch Sub Zero refrigerator and freezer blends perfectly with the cabinets. Careful attention has been paid to the drawers. Individual drawers are designed to hold silverware and dishware. A walk-in pantry with auto-

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matic lighting is carefully hidden in one corner. The pullout microwave is conveniently placed in the large center island with a walnut top. “We wanted a monochromatic look, but added different colors and textures in the kitchen for visual interest,” says Clay Dietrich, president and CEO of Dietrich Homes. The custom cabinets are an attractive shade of ivory which beautifully compliments the backsplash, a gray modern subway tile with a wave texture. The four-foot granite composite sink has a built-in drying rack and colander. The adjacent dining area has comfortable seating for 6–10 diners. Sliding privacy doors lead from the kitchen to the four-season sunroom with a fireplace for chilly evenings. Shiplap on the walls and ceiling give the sunroom a cozy feel. Both the sunroom and the kitchen, in addition to the adjoining great room, have wonderful views of the pond outside the large, gracious windows. “In this development, all of the lots surrounding the pond have access to the pond. There is no public access, so the owners really enjoy the great sunsets over the serene pond,” says Dietrich. “The city of West Fargo really does a fantastic job of keeping it beautiful with several aerators adding a bit of drama.”


The sunroom provides access to the main level Trex deck. It has a stunning view of the pond and surrounding homes. The stone details and beautiful landscaping make it a place where every visitor will want to linger and enjoy the surroundings. The main level deck provides outside access to the lower level patio/terrace. The patio is a dyed and stamped concrete surface with plank detail. Both decks have convenient piped in natural gas for grilling, and they also have outdoor speakers. Returning inside to the two-story vaulted great room, the show stopping linear fireplace is a central feature. It has a built-in surround with book shelves and a large flat screen television above. The wood floors continue throughout. The formal front entry and foyer is spacious and has a view of the pond through the open plan great room windows. The entry boasts a large walk-in closet — truly a must for those of us living and entertaining in our cold weather climate.

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The large exterior front porch welcomes guests and family alike with dyed and stamped concrete, linking it visually and texturally to the lower patio terrace. Directly off the entry is a den perfect for a home office or private homework space. Down the hall is a powder room/half bath for guests. Continuing down the short hallway is the very private main floor master suite. It looks out over the pond with a perfect aspen tree just outside the window, bringing the feel of outside in. It is a perfect setting for resting and rejuvenating. It has a very good sized custom closet for storage in addition to a dressing room. “We see very few dressers in master bedrooms these days. Having the custom closet and dressing room leaves more room in the bedroom for larger beds, side tables and sitting areas,” says Dietrich.

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T

he master bath has all the amenities today’s homeowners desire. These include his-and-her vanities, a 4-by-9 foot enclosed shower with multiple shower heads, and a freestanding soaking bathtub. It has pullout drawers designed with spaces for curling irons and blow dryers. These drawers have metal holders so appliances can remain plugged in when not in use. “Whenever we have the opportunity for storage, we use it,” Dietrich says while demonstrating hidden shelves built in behind a mirror. There are built-in custom speakers throughout the suite. The home has zone heating and cooling and the master suite is its own zone, so it can be adjusted separately to the perfect temperature for sleeping without affecting the other areas of the house. According to Dietrich, control of heating and cooling within spaces of the house is a great way to make a home more livable for everyone. Leaving the master suite and continuing past the foyer, is the stairway to the upper floor. Several windows in the stairway bring natural light to the area. At the top of the stairs is a loft area overlooking the great room. It is a perfect space for meditation, contemplation, reading or homework. There are three bedrooms on this floor, one features a window seat and built-in dressers. “We work hard to use the space wisely,” says Heather Sagvold, design consultant at Dietrich Homes. “All the closets have shelving units, pull out drawers, and multiple hanging spaces.” The two bedrooms which face the pond have great views while the third bedroom overlooks the quiet street. The upper floor features a split bath and multiple sinks with custom tile work. Function is a big consideration when designing a family home. Pocket doors are always used when regular doors would interfere with the space.

Going down the stairs to the home’s lower level where, according to Dietrich, there is a space designed with something for everyone. The family room features another stunning linear fireplace and a large flat-screen television. The double sliding patio doors walk out to the covered lower level terrace. Again, the dyed and stamped concrete with plank detail terrace add continuity to the main level deck and entry way. The covered terrace stays shady and dry no matter the weather. The landscaping is beautiful and the stone retaining wall is completely finished, a detail not found in all homes. Open to the family room but visually occupying its own space is the pub-style bar. This area has ledgestone and darker woods which gives it more of an intimate, pub feel. There is a large bar with a refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave and ice machine. The dual-zone wine refridgerator has one side designed for wine and the other for soft drinks and other beverages. There is room on either side of the bar for seating or game tables. The large patio doors and windows make sure there is plenty of natural light, in addition to the recessed lighting throughout. A family-style theater room is next to one of the game areas. It is a wonderful space designed to be a perfect spot for family and friends to enjoy movies

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on the big screen. A big comfortable sectional is elevated to ensure perfect viewing. It is designed to have the ambience of a true cinema. Down a short hallway are two lower-level bedrooms. Both have great views of the pond. “All the rooms in the house that should have a view, do,” says Dietrich. They both have walk-in closets since they are designed with teenagers or older children in mind. There is another split bath with a 5-foot shower with a rain head and double sinks. The linen closet next to the bath is deep enough to fit a comforter. The finished mechanical and storage room is also on this level. It has a separate stairway that leads to the garage. “It is really nice when workmen come and also expands the storage of the garage,” Sagvold says. This area also houses the home’s two heating systems and the audio-visual system. The home has seamless steel siding, maintenance-free shakes and natural stone which give it very attractive curb appeal. The yard is fully landscaped with a sprinkler system and a flower-drip system for perfect blooming all season long. This executive home is listed with Hatch Realty. Dietrich Homes is a full-service build firm. They handle the whole process from idea to completion without hiring any outside firms, which makes the experience more consistent and pleasant. They are a full-plan service with individual interior and exterior design experts. “We are here from idea to completed house,” says Dietrich. “You get a personalized service, not a cookie-cutter design. We want what works for you and your family.”

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Tradit ion

BUILDING ON

As their website says, “Straight talk. Honest prices. The best materials. Great relationships. Quality that comes with decades of building solid homes that are a pleasure to live in year after year.” Clay Dietrich is the president and CEO of the company, his son Tom is the vice president and COO. Heather Sagvold is design consultant and Melissa Meyer is plan design specialist. “We are not really a boss-employee company,” continues Dietrich. “It’s truly a team concept. Like a big family, we all work together to produce the very best homes we can. We have a great product and we love to talk about it.” And we in Fargo-Moorhead love having this company and especially this home in our community.

Quality that comes with decades of building luxury dream homes that are a pleasure to live in year after year.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Dietrich Homes: 4151 38th St. S., Suite B, Fargo 701-364-2781 | info@dietrichhomes.com [ aw ] Listing Agent: Hatch Realty

701-364-2781 | 4151 38th St S, Fargo

dietrichhomes.com DESIGN

|

BUILD

|

R E N O VAT E

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health

area

photo: nathalie dĂŠsirĂŠe mottet on unsplash.com

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39


HEALTH

words by CONNIE WIRTA photography by SCOTT THUEN of THUEN STUDIOS

reaching for Unique surgery turns

shoulder joint upside down

pain relief

DELILA REILE of Fargo (right) has had total joint replacement on both shoulders. DR. PRASAD SAWARDEKER, an Essentia Health orthopedic surgeon, did her latest surgery using reverse total shoulder replacement, which was developed for patients like Reile who have a damaged rotator cuff and a degenerative type of arthritis called cuff tear arthropathy.

D

elila Reile spent decades working on her family’s farm near McClusky, North Dakota, and painting houses. The work took a heavy toll on her shoulders so she’s chosen to have total shoulder replacement surgery twice.

Persistent pain and a weakening shoulder had first brought Reile to Dr. Daniel Ostlie and Physician Assistant Ryan Kessel in Essentia Health’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Department at the 32nd Avenue Clinic in Fargo. They were able to provide some relief with injections and physical therapy but when she couldn’t get lasting relief, Reile turned to Sawardeker, who specializes in shoulder, elbow and hand surgery.

Now 83 and living in Fargo, Delila turned to Dr. Prasad Sawardeker, an Essentia Health orthopedic surgeon, for her latest surgery.

The experienced orthopedic surgeon recommended reverse total shoulder replacement, which would take away Reile’s painful arthritis and improve her strength and range of motion. She had had some success with her right shoulder surgery in 2016, so she decided to go ahead with the left. “I said, ‘Let’s do it. If it works, it works,’” Delila recalls.

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During surgery, Sawardeker reversed two key parts of the shoulder joint. He attached an artificial socket to the top of her arm bone and fixed a metal ball into her shoulder blade. This technique was developed for patients like Reile who have a damaged rotator cuff and a degenerative type of arthritis called cuff tear arthropathy. In a healthy shoulder, rotator cuff muscles provide proper motion, function and stability. Conventional replacement surgery still relies on these muscles, which no longer function in a patient like Reile. Reverse replacement instead relies on the deltoid muscle on the top of the shoulder, Sawardeker explains.


Reile’s shoulder motion had become very limited. She could only reach to shoulder level in front and could not reach above her head at all. She had extreme weakness in her shoulder and muscles were atrophying. She couldn’t sleep and struggled with daily tasks, like getting dressed and cooking meals. “I couldn’t lift, and cooking — I just couldn’t do it,” Reile recalls.

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Reile, who retired at age 70, says hard work wore out her shoulders. “Heavy labor and wear and tear certainly contribute to the overall degenerative process that occurs in patients with arthritis,” Sawardeker says. “The pain was quite debilitating for Delila.” After a successful surgery and an overnight stay at Essentia Health Fargo, Reile recovered at home and even received her physical therapy there. At her one-year follow-up appointment, she had no pain and a full range of motion in her left shoulder and arm. “Many patients find their pain is markedly improved after surgery,” Sawardeker says. “Most can reach to shoulder level by six weeks and regain the ability to lift overhead by 12 weeks. Most patients are satisfied with their outcome in the first three months and final results are usually achieved within a year.” Reile appreciates not only the care she received from Sawardeker but also his willingness to answer her questions and spend time with her. “He’s a very good doctor,” she says. “Communicating with my patients is one of the most important parts of my job,” Sawardeker says. “I carefully go through the risks and benefits of a surgery and we make an informed decision together. I want to make them feel secure and comfortable with their decision to proceed with replacement surgery.”

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT Dr. Prasad Sawardeker is chair of the Orthopedics and Sports Medicine team at the Essentia Health – 32nd Avenue Clinic in Fargo. He specializes in shoulder, elbow and hand surgeries. Dr. Sawardeker is board certified by the American Board of Orthopedics and was recently inducted into the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, which is made up of leading national and international orthopedic surgeons. To make an appointment, call 701-364-8900.

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41


HEALTH

words by KRISTY OLSGAARD

cataract surgery turns back the clock for better vision.

fixing FOCUS

in FIFT EEN MIN UTE S

(or less)

I

s your vision cloudy or blurry? Are you having trouble reading small print? Have colors lost their vibrancy? Is your night vision diminished by glare or halos?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might want to see the doctors at Bagan Strinden Vision to determine if cataracts are affecting your vision. A cataract has formed when the natural lens inside an eye becomes cloudy. Making a decision to surgically remove the cataract need not be daunting. With over 50 years of combined cataract surgery experience, Dr. Steve Bagan and Dr. Tom Strinden of Fargo offer many options for better vision.

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How do you know when you should have cataracts removed? When blurriness affects daily activities, such as reading, driving or performing regular tasks. Often what triggers people to have surgery is driver’s license renewal. Dr. Bagan says, “With standard cataract surgery, we try to minimize a patient’s refractive error and leave them with good distance or near vision.” Dr. Strinden adds, “When patients have significant levels of astigmatism or desire freedom from glasses, we offer multifocal and toric implants that offer patients greater independence from spectacles.”

Does the surgery work for people that are near-sighted, far-sighted or who have astigmatism? Recently Dr. Strinden corrected 67-year-old Patricia’s eyes. “She battled extreme near-sightedness and astigmatism nearly all her life and was unable to function without glasses or contact lenses. During the ten-minute surgery, the cataract was removed and a toric implant of the calculated power was placed in her left eye. Two weeks later, the right eye was similarly corrected. Patricia says, “My vision has vastly improved after surgery. I truly enjoy the convenience of not needing glasses and have no more eye strain while driving. Plus when my husband and I travel, I better appreciate scenery and spotting wildlife.” An extremely far-sighted patient of Dr. Bagan’s is enjoying life without his thick type glasses. Mi-


chael says, “After nearly 60 years of dependence on glasses, the improvement is remarkable. When I wake up, I can see the clock without grabbing my glasses and my peripheral vision is also better. Come winter, it will be nice not to deal with the hassle of fogged up glasses.” Eyesight is one of the most precious senses, so concern for effective results is natural. Today new technology helps perform this minimally invasive procedure with a very high success rate. A pre-surgery consultation sets the tone for satisfying results. Patients learn about various aspects of surgery and doctors clarify the patient’s visual needs and expectations.

What happens during surgery? Surgery is a minimally invasive 10 to 15 minute procedure. After a patient is sedated, surgery begins with a tiny incision (less than a tenth of an inch), which provides access to break up the lens with an ultrasound tool, remove those pieces and insert a new lens. The incision heals quickly. Surgery is performed one eye at a time. Patients usually schedule the second eye surgery one to five weeks later.

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Vision is restored quite rapidly. Many patients can see 20/20 one day after surgery. While limitations are few, eye drops must be applied for four weeks. Also they may want to shield the eye at night for a while.

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HEALTH

words by ROXANE B. SALONEN photography by LINDSEY WAGNER

CHI Health at Home

WALKS WITH FAMILIES in LIFE’S QUIET RIPPLES agency offers home-health, palliative and hospice services

We may not be able to cure, but we can help the patient and family heal. — M IC H E L L E C OOL E Y

T

he connections we make at our life’s beginning grow and spread slowly and widely over time, like ripples when a pebble drops into the water. But as we near our end, Michelle Cooley, observes that those ripples become smaller, more focused and inward. “Most people, as they’re nearing the end of life, family and others they are closest to and love the most become very important,” says Cooley, FNP-C, ACHPN and hospice nurse practitioner for CHI Health at Home. “To be able to have family surrounding them and giving them love and their presence is very healing.” CHI Health at Home helps foster the kinds of memories that bring comfort and meaning in these times, turning them into gifts. “We may not be able to cure, but we can help the patient and family heal,” Cooley says, adding that CHI also provides bereavement services for the family after the loved one dies.

Cooley, a nurse practitioner who now works as a consultant for hospice nurses, has worked the gamut of areas in nursing, from premature babies to geriatrics. “I’ve taken care of babies just over a pound to elderly patients over 106 years old,” she says. In the early 1980s, when the ministry of hospice was just developing, she volunteered for a hospice agency, spending time reading to patients, helping them write letters, or just sitting with them in quiet moments. She’s now rediscovered the importance of this phase of care. “I just think it’s so important patients die with dignity and have a good quality of life until they die,” Cooley says. “We’re all going to die, so let’s make it a good death.” With improved palliative-care services and symptom management, it’s more possible than ever, she says. “I work with an entire team — everyone from chaplaincy to social work to working with nurses, physicians and nurse aides.” She works not only in the Fargo-Moorhead area, but with outlying regional CHI agencies, including those in Williston, Valley City, Dickinson, Bismarck in North Dakota; and Little Falls, Breckenridge and Albany in Minnesota. “What’s different with us than some of the other (hospice) agencies is that we offer home health, palliative care and hospice services, so there is continuity of care,” she says. “Often the patient has the same nurse the whole way through.”


And because CHI is faith-based, workers can meet the spiritual needs of the patients. “Our mission is based on Catholic values, so there’s a very big spiritual component,” Cooley says, adding that, though people of all or no faith can receive services, the whole person can be addressed. This might lead to following up on a request for prayer, for instance. Once, a blind, elderly patient with heart disease and significant hearing loss told Cooley she’d been asking God why she’s still alive, since she can’t see or hear. He told her, “Because you can still pray.” “So, she prays,” Cooley says, “for her family, her caregivers, everyone. It was very touching to be able to acknowledge that.” Cooley urges anyone 18 or older to fill out a healthcare directive. “It’s a gift you give your family.” She also encourages those who think they may need hospice to reach out sooner than later. “Nationally, a high number of patients die within seven to 10 days of being on [hospice] services,” she says. “If we can get them [connected] when they have six months to live, we can do our magic and help them live with quality until they die.” CHI Health at Home also can be a critical conduit between the patient and family when past issues or communication issues arise. “It’s hard for people to die if they have unresolved business,” Cooley says. “We can help the patient have closure, so they can have a peaceful death,” which also brings peace to the family. “What we do is very rewarding. It’s not just a job, it’s a mission,” she adds. “I think most people in healthcare have that feeling, but in home health, palliative care and hospice — especially in a spiritually-based organization — that’s even more valued. We have the privilege to care for people at a very intimate time in their lives.”

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45


HEALTH

words by ERIN MARIE HEINERT photography by JOSE MEDINA MEDRANO

Beauty BREVITY the

&

of l i fe

one woman’s journey as a cancer warrior

WHAT DOES

PINK

MEAN to you?

“For myself and a lot of my friends who have gone through breast cancer, it’s hard to be called brave. But we are some of the strongest people I know. I think the Bob Marley quote sums it up perfectly. ‘You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only choice.’”

Denise Kaeslin was diagnosed with breast cancer six years ago, and like many breast cancer patients, she remembers the day vividly. “I was waiting for the results of a biopsy,” remembers Kaeslin. “And as soon as I picked up the phone, I knew instantly it was breast cancer.” Kaeslin received her care at the Sanford Health Roger Maris Cancer Center in Fargo from a team dedicated to caring for every aspect of her.


“When I met my oncologist, Dr. Shelby Terstriep, I had every confidence in her expertise to care for my physical self,” explains Kaeslin. “But over the course of the last six years, Dr. Terstriep and my entire team at RMCC have taken care of so much more. They have all been a blessing in my life.” Kaeslin had a double mastectomy and due to her intense radiation treatments, a traditional breast reconstruction was not feasible. So a part of her healing process included a large chest tattoo to cover her scars and help her deal with her new body. “After my surgery, I went three years without looking in the mirror,” recalls Kaeslin. “So I had this piece done with cherry blossoms. It reminds me of the beauty and brevity of life.”

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Another large part of Kaeslin’s healing process is being involved in her local survivorship community. “When you are living with this constant anxiety, you are not really living,” says Kaeslin. “The Fargo Moorhead Breast Friends support group gives us a safe place to have open, honest conversations with women who share a similar story. That can be hard to share with people who haven’t been through what we have, especially our loved ones. We can talk openly about the more difficult, sensitive and scary things, and offer support to one another. It helps remind me that I’m not the only one out there going through this.” After her fight with cancer, Kaeslin also refocused her life. “You get so caught up in the mindless distractions and noise of day-to-day life,” says Kaeslin. “After my diagnosis, I reconnected with myself. I decided that my life was going to be guided by service, purpose and gratitude. I want to do what I can to make the world a better place and not let cancer or the anxiety that comes with it control me. Because this really is something that changes your life and affects you every day.” Kaeslin is now a foster mom for local rescue dogs, an advocate for her breast cancer support group, and is striving every day to make a difference.

“I may not be able to change the world, but I can change the world around me.”

[ aw ]

DeAnn M. Pladson

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www.pladsonlaw.com a r e a wom a n

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47


HEALTH

words by MEGAN BARTHOLOMAY photography provided by THE KIDNEY AND HYPERTENCSION CENTER

spotlight on: th e K I D N E Y a nd H Y PE RT E N S I ON C E NT E R

A

ccording to The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, more than 661,000 Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and 468,000 of those individuals are currently on dialysis. In addition, one in three Americans has high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, which often contributes to the cause and progression of CKD. But a Grand Forks–based doctor is trying to shift those statistics one patient at a time.

DR. KHALED RABADI

Meet Dr. Khaled Rabadi. Rabadi grew up in Jordan where he received his medical degree from the University of Jordan in 1992. From there, he completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Dakota, and after working as an internist at then MeritCare in Fargo, he realized he wanted to specialize. He completed his fellowship in nephrology, the study of kidneys, at the University of Minnesota and went on to work for Altru in Grand Forks, eventually opening the Kidney and Hypertension Center in Grand Forks in 2002. The Kidney and Hypertension Center provides service to patients with chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes, kidney disorders, kidney transplants, end stage renal disease and adult medicine. Rabadi is the only hypertension specialist in Grand Forks and works with patients at the Kidney and Hypertension Center; the Kidney Institute of North Dakota (KIND), which he founded in 2003; and Aurora Dialysis which he opened in 2008. In Fargo, he exclusively sees patients with kidney problems and hypertension at Internal Medicine Associates. He also has an impressive list of medical credentials including: board certified nephrologist, board certified hypertension specialist, first independent nephrologist in North Dakota, founder of the 48

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Kidney and Hypertension Center, founder and medical director of the Kidney Institute of North Dakota (KIND), founder and medical director of Aurora Dialysis, and founder and medical director of the Mazen–Leelee Diabetes Center. Many patients have expressed their overwhelming appreciation for Rabadi’s hands-on approach and dedication. One long-term patient said of Rabadi and Aurora Dialysis: “This is without question the finest dialysis unit I have dealt with; it’s like a hotel setting providing comfortable chairs, warm blankets and pillows. The staff are thoughtful, kind and evidently loyal as I have had a chance to reconnect with them during my visits in the last four years. Dr. Rabadi has made himself available 24/7. This is highly unusual and very impressive.”

SERV I NG THE FARGO/MOORHEAD AREA S IN CE 1 9 8 8

Max R Johnson, MD | Craig M Mason, MD Marina Gilca, MD Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology Fellowship Trained Retina Specialists Limited to Diseases & Surgery of the Retina & Vitreous

701.293.9829 or 877.503.0251 Marina Gilca, MD University Medical Center Max R. Johnson, MD

2829bySouth University Drive, Suite 204 Certified the American Board of Ophthalmology Fellowship Trained Retina Specialists Fargo, North Dakota 58103 Limited to Diseases & Surgery of the Retina & Vitreous

Serving the Fargo/Moorhead area since 1988 701.293.9829 or 877.503.0251 U NI V ERSI TY MEDI CAL CENTE R 2829 South University Drive, Suite 204 | Fargo, ND 58103

state of the art p hys i c a l re h a b i l i t a t i o n h o s p i t a l

OPENING THIS FALL firs t of its kin d in North Da kota

In addition to Rabadi’s responsive nature, he also boasts a team of more than 25 skilled professionals like Julie McGauvran, MS, RN, who functions not only as the office manager for the Kidney and Hypertension Center, but also the co-founder and manager of the Kidney Institute of North Dakota (KIND), co-founder and manager of Aurora Dialysis, clinical assistant professor at the University of North Dakota College of Nursing and Professional Discipline, and has more than 30 years of dialysis experience. She says that Rabadi’s stringent guidelines for his patients result in better follow-up and higher patient compliance and better outcomes.

FOR MORE INFORMATION on Rabadi, his team and the Kidney and Hypertension Center, visit kidneynd.org. [ aw ]

4671 3 8 t h St reet Sou t h , Fargo

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Ask About Our Rewards Program


family

area photo: expressionsbyashton.com

o c to be r. nove mbe r 2 0 18

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FAMILY

words by ANNE ROBINSON-PAUL photography by JUSTIN EILER

rei n ve n t i ng herself

hawley, minnesota, mom goes to ndsu for a new career

AMY KRONBECK of Hawley, Minnesota, is reinventing her career by studying landscape architecture at NDSU.

A

my Kronbeck’s 11-year-old son got the “What-do-youwa nt- to - b e -w h e n -yo u grow-up?” assignment at school. He was only a fifth grader at the time, but his career interest prompted her to start poking around the local universities’ websites, including North Dakota State University. That’s when she ran across a field she’d never heard of: landscape architecture.

Kronbeck and her family live in Hawley, Minnesota, a community about 20 miles east of Fargo-Moorhead, where there is a breadth of higher education options. Additional education and a new career had been on Kronbeck’s mind. She earned a psychology degree after high school, but had not worked in the field. It was later in her college career when she understood the steps and additional education required for jobs that interested her. By that time, she had missed opportunities to prepare for graduate school.

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It was easy to move on with life and drop the idea of grad school. She got married, secured an office job and had kids. She later worked as a substitute teacher, which allowed her to match her work schedule with her kids’ school schedule. But as Anna and Ian (now 15 and 13) got older and more independent, she started thinking about reinventing her career. Landscape architecture sounded like it could be the change she craved. She loved being in nature, using her creativity and making a difference in her environment and community. “The idea of designing outdoor space was really appealing.”

ON HER WAY Kronbeck is well on her way to a new career. She is now in her third year of NDSU’s landscape architecture program and is loving it. “Learning something new has been so refreshing,” she says.

NDSU landscape architecture students Amy Kronbeck and Rikka Senum with professor Dominic Fischer at Viking Ship Park in Moorhead. Kronbeck and Senum were part of a studio class that redesigned the park as a final project, giving them hands-on experience with their field’s tools and processes.

She likes the emphasis on hands-on learning. In her first studio class, for example, she and her classmates did site visits, sketched, learned to use design software and built models. Their final project was to use their field’s tools and processes to redesign Moorhead’s Viking Ship Park. At the end of the semester, they presented their designs to a public audience that included city officials. It is common for NDSU students to be actively researching, creating or working with real clients. “My favorite part of the Viking Ship Park project was coming up with a thoughtful design where visitors can experience a sense of community, nature and city all within the park,” she says. “From the first site visit to the final details of design, I was able to take my concept and apply it to a park that I drive by every day.” The class focused on parks and open spaces, so the students also had the opportunity to take field trips to Winnipeg to see the river development project and to Minneapolis to see the Grand Rounds Park System.


Kronbeck appreciates making connections with peers and faculty members. She has built close relationships with other students and the professors in her program. “It is obvious from day one that the landscape architecture professors are passionate about the field,” she says. “They push us hard, are generous with their time and knowledge, and express a sincere interest in our successes.”

You belong here.

She is a full-time student and approaches her education like a job, making sure to always attend class and to budget her time for projects. Sometimes it means missing her kids’ activities or going off by herself to work, but she wants to make the most of her education and to make her family proud.

Offering K-12 education. We have a place for you.

Call 701.373.7114 oakgrovelutheran.com

She originally planned to pursue additional education once her kids graduated from high school, but she is enjoying sharing the experience with them and modeling her motto: “Work hard, do your best.” They empathize when her school work is intense, and they are excited when she does well.

is becoming

Some of Kronbeck’s friends have commented that they can’t imagine going back to school. “I have 20 or more years of work,” she says. “Why wouldn’t I take this opportunity to pursue something interesting?”

NEW Master of Landscape Architecture degree

SAME GREAT CARE and SERVICE

Starting this fall, NDSU is offering a new Master of Landscape Architecture degree, which gives students the opportunity to earn a master’s degree in five years rather than the typical six years. The program includes a range of coursework that prepares students for the landscape architecture field and leads to professional licensure. Learn more at ndsu.edu/ala.

[ aw ]

Pregnancy Testing Limited Ultrasound Options Counseling Other Pregnancy Help FREE and CONFIDENTIAL

learn more at

teamfirstchoice.com | 701-237-6530


FAMILY

words and photography by ALEJANDRA SAAVEDRA, Matt's Automotive Service Center

knowledge is

POWER

WOMEN’S GUIDE

to k nowi ng wh at ’ s wh at wh en i t c omes to you r vehicl e

WHAT SHOULD YOU EXPECT to LEARN?

When you think about the automotive industry and who works within it, you think men. They’re supposed to be the ones who fix vehicles and know what do when yours is making that weird noise. Well we’re here to tell you that the automotive industry is not just for men, it’s for everyone and anyone who owns a vehicle. 54

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As a vehicle owner, you should always feel comfort in knowing what’s right and wrong with my vehicle and when it’s time to take action. At Matt’s Automotive Service Center, we believe that knowledge is power and want to give you the tools and knowledge you will need when your vehicle needs repairs or services. We know your time is valuable so below are the topics that will be covered during the Women’s Car Care Clinic.

ID ENTIFYING AUTOMOTIVE TERMS and WHAT THEY MEAN

Part of taking control of your vehicle repair is understanding the terminology and components used in the automotive industry, so you can follow what the service advisor’s report really means. We’re going to break down the terms that your service advisor may use so you are able to better understand their report and take away as much as possible from your conversation.

H OW TO FIND A SERVICE CENTER and

Q UESTIONS TO ASK WHEN

Think about where you’re currently getting your vehicle’s routine maintenance. Do you feel heard when you go in? Are they taking the time to explain the status of your vehicle and what it means? We want to remove fear and confusion from a trip to your service center by teaching you what to look for and make sure that the one you choose is right for you. It’s all about being comfortable and knowing you’re in control when you walk in.

Do you know what questions to ask your service advisor when they say something needs to be replaced? Questions can be anything from cost to urgency to the reason it needs to be replaced. We want to give you the knowledge and power to know what questions to ask and be certain that you’re getting the correct answer.

BUILD A RELATIONSHIP WITH THEM

IN A SERVICE CENTER


we want to give you the

knowledge and power

to know what questions to ask and be certain that you’re getting the correct answer.

AN IN-DEPTH EXPLANATION OF AUTOMOTIVE PARTS ON VEHICLES, WHAT THEY DO, WHERE THEY ARE LOCATED and SIGNS THEY ARE FAILING You know what your tire does, where it goes, etc., but that might not be the case for parts that are not easy to find or clearly visible. We’ll be going in depth to explain what your vehicle’s parts do, where they are located and signs of when they need repair or to be replaced.

NEW LOCATION: 406 BROADWAY N, FARGO 701-282-0421 Stabo-Imports.com

WARNING LIGHTS and WHAT THEY MEAN Instead of ignoring the lights in your vehicle and letting your dashboard light up like a Christmas tree, let us tell you what each light means and what action you should take when they light up.

HOW TO CHECK and ADD FLUIDS

Behind the scenes there are a lot of fluids that make the wheels go ‘round in your vehicle. Do you know how to add more windshield washer fluid? What about the coolant, engine oil or brake fluid? Knowing how to check these and other fluids, when to add more and when it’s time to bring your vehicle in is a powerful tool you have at your fingertips.

CHANGE WIPER BLADES,

CHECK LIGHTS and TIRES, ETC.

Because winter driving is inevitable where we live, it’s important to take those extra steps to make sure you’re driving safely. There are a million instances where you’ll need your tires, wiper blades or lights to be in optimal condition and because we don’t know when that’ll be the case, it’s important to know how to check them and when it’s time for a replacement.

FEELING INSPIRED TO LEARN HOW TO TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR VEHICLE? If so, invite your friends and we’ll see you SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, at our WOMEN’S CAR CARE CLINIC from 9:00 a.m. to noon at our Fargo location. Registration starts at 8:30 a.m. Don’t forget to mark your attendance on Facebook. We’ll see you there!

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER Master of Business Administration Offers evening classes Provides networking with business professionals paul.brown@ndsu.edu | ndsu.edu/business/mba

Master of Accountancy Become an accounting professional Develop skills and competencies in small classes jill.zuber@ndsu.edu | ndsu.edu/business/macc

NDSU is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business

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FAMILY

N O RT H DA KOTA H E A RT GA LLE RY

Hailey, 12

Lashanti, 14

every child Kaylor, 17

Wyatt, 12

D E S ERVES A C HANC E FOR A FAM ILY TO CA LL THEIR OW N and these are the faces of the beautiful children waiting for their forever family! The North Dakota Heart Gallery’s mission is to out to the public and encourage the adoption of children in the North Dakota foster care system.

Anthony, 14

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N OVE M BE R is NATIO N A L AD O PT I O N AWAR E N E SS M ON T H


Destiny, 15

CONNECT WITH US AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS. FREE DOCUMENT SHREDDING October 6, 2018 DRIVER SAFETY CLASS October 10, November 8 & November 14, 2018 LGBT CAREGIVING WORKSHOP with AMY GOYER November 14, 2018 CAREGIVING LUNCH & LEARN with AMY GOYER November 15, 2018

Learn more at aarp.org/fargo

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CLIENT: AARP PRODUCT: td594304 JOB#: ARP_STL_p80175 ART DIRECTOR: Nathan Hoang

TO LEARN MORE OR INQUIRE ABOUT A CHILD, please visit our website at NDHeartGallery.org or email us at info@ndheartgallery.org!

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AD APPROVAL DATE:

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Jerry, 9

Foster Love. Foster Hope. Foster Family. BE A FOSTER PARENT. 877-766-7284 • www.pathinc.org


FAMILY

words by WHITNEY IRISH photography by NYNNE SCHRØDER on Unsplash

“ THE MANNER OF GIVING

is worth more than the gift. ” P IE R R E C O R N EILLE , 1 7 TH CE NTURY FRE NCH DRAMATIST.

W

hile I highly doubt he was referring to IRS regulations and the laws surrounding financial assistance for the nursing home, Pierre’s words are fitting for this discussion. In this season of giving, ironically there are a few selfish things to consider before you make any significant gifts. Now, I’m not referring to the oh-so-coveted American Girl doll for your granddaughter; think more along the lines of that quarter of farmland to your child, or new car for your grandchild. What is considered a gift? A gift is the transfer of anything for less than fair market value. I often hear of people wanting to sell something, such as a house worth $200,000, to their kids for a dollar to avoid it being considered a gift. Well, that is a still a gift of $199,999 because it is a sale for less than fair market value. Here are a few examples of well-intentioned actions that are considered gifts that often surprise people: forgiveness of a loan, paying a bill or debt for another, putting a non-spouse on the title to your house or vehicle. Gift Taxes: The annual gift tax exclusion for 2018 is $15,000. This means you can gift $15,000 per recipient in 2018. For example, you can give $15,000 to each grandchild (Merry Christmas, indeed), but if you give over that amount in one year you have to file a gift tax return (IRS Form 709). However, you will not have to pay any gift tax unless you have already given away millions and millions of dollars during your life. Capital Gains Taxes: When considering larger gifts, such as the transfer of real estate, it is important to consider capital gains tax. Gifts made during life generally do not receive a step-up in basis for tax purposes. For example, Dad gives Son a tract of farmland; if Son later sells the farmland, he will pay capital gains tax on the difference between Dad’s cost basis (usually low, especially if we are talking family farmland) and what Son sells it for. This can result in a significant tax consequence for Son. Alternatively, if Son inherited the farmland at Dad’s death, Son would receive a step-up in basis for tax purposes. Then, if Son sells the farmland, he will only pay capital gains tax on the difference, if any, between the value on Dad’s date of death and the sale price. Medical Assistance: If you are currently receiving Medicaid (medical assistance, generally to help cover nursing home costs), or may need to apply in the near future, be very cautious with your gifting. When you apply for Medicaid, you must report any gifts you, or your spouse, has made within the past

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five years. The transfer of certain assets within five years before applying for Medicaid will make you ineligible for Medicaid for a period of time, depending on the value of your disqualifying transfer. Even small, seemingly insignificant transfers can affect eligibility. As discussed above, while you may gift $15,000 per year, per recipient, without paying gift tax, Medicaid still treats that as a gift affecting your eligibility. Likewise, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. Charitable Giving: Charitable gifting is encouraged and therefore receives more favorable tax consequences. There is no $15,000 limit on charitable giving before the donor has to file a gift tax return. However, a charitable gift may still affect your Medicaid eligibility. There are also some ways to give charitably that will result in better tax consequences. For example, if you are leaving $50,000 to charity at your death, try doing so through pension benefits rather than cash or real estate. A charity would neither pay income taxes nor estate taxes on such benefits, whereas any individual recipient of those benefits would. This is a great way to transfer more wealth at your death.

THE PRACTICE OF

PLANNING FOR YOUR FUTURE

Vogel Law Firm’s estate planning and probate attorneys provide clients with advice and solutions to their estate planning concerns. We provide a wide range of services including: Estate Planning / Elder Law / Asset Protection Planning Trusts, Special Needs Trust, and Trust Administration Estate, Probate and Trust Litigation / Probate Guardianships and Conservatorships

The laws surrounding how gifting might affect your Medicaid eligibility and impact your taxes are complex. Before applying for Medicaid or doing any significant gifting, please consult with your elder law or tax attorney, and accountant. [ aw ]

ATTORNEY WHITNEY IRISH practices in the area of estate planning and probate at Vogel Law Firm. She handles all aspects of the planning and preservation of clients’ estates, including wills, power of attorney documents, trust creation and administration, business planning, farm succession planning, complex estate planning, planning for protection of minors, Medicaid planning, guardianships and conservatorships. For more information visit vogellaw.com.

Whitney Irish

James Cailao

Valeska Hermanson

Steve Astrup

vogellaw.com 877.629.0705

With offices in Fargo, Bismarck and Grand Forks, ND, and Moorhead and Minneapolis, MN

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M A I NST R EA M BO U T I Q U E 2603 Kirsten Lane S #103 | Fargo, ND 701-356-6684 | mainstreamboutique.com

Everyday

is is aa day day to to do do the the right right thing thing financially. financially.

Tom Strinden, MD | Sarah Swanholm, OD | Steve Bagan, MD

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY C ATA R AC T S U RG E RY Area's Leaders in multifocal IOL implantation & iDesign LASIK

Specialists in Eye Disease and Surgery No referrals needed. Most insurances accepted.

4344 20th Ave. S. Fargo | (701) 293-8242 www.baganstrindenvision.com

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profiles

area photo: stacykennedy.com

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PROFILES

words by KRISTI MONSON, MSU Moorhead photography by DAVE ARNSTON, MSU Moorhead

MSU Moorhead offers

TWO MBA OPTIONS FOR ONLINE LEARNERS

MBA, MBA Healthcare Management

A

Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from Minnesota State University Moorhead (MSUM) will help you to jumpstart your career, change your career path, strengthen your skill set for advancement and transform your work life. MSUM offers two MBA options: the general MBA and the MBA with Healthcare Management. The programs are AACSB accredited, delivered entirely online and competitively priced compared to other regional MBA programs.

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The MBA offers degree holders the opportunity to earn more, qualify for high-level leadership positions and network with business professionals. According to a 2018 report by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, there’s more than a 38 percent difference between the projected entry-level salary for someone with a bachelor’s degree in business ($56,720) and the starting salary for an MBA graduate ($78,332). (naceweb.org) MSUM’s MBA offerings focus on developing skills to elevate critical and innovative thinking, building a strategic leadership mindset, and promoting an understanding of business functions within an organization. The MBA with Healthcare Management degree is designed specifically for mid-level managers seeking to advance to high-level leadership roles within healthcare organizations.

“The MBA program has helped me to further leverage data to make more informed and better decisions for my organization,” says Tai Clark, a 2016 MBA graduate and now a resources analyst at NASA. “I can look at an organization in a holistic perspective and understand how one decision impacts other areas of the organization.” Graduate MBA programs are not just about data. MSUM alumna Drew Sannes worked as a graduate assistant while completing her MBA from MSUM earlier this year. She credits the guidance of Assistant Professor Wooyang Kim for helping her grow and expand her horizons. “We worked very closely on a research project, and going through that whole process with him as my mentor definitely pushed me outside of my comfort zone,” Sannes says. “I feel empowered and confident to go out into the business world.”


“Our MBA and MBA with Healthcare Management degrees help students develop as leaders through group projects that relate to the real issues they will confront in their careers, regardless of their specific positions. I can’t think of many more important skills than knowing how to contribute to and lead a group,” says Denise Gorsline, MSUM’s interim dean of the College of Business and Innovation. “The MBA’s value is well beyond the familiar three letters; it helps graduates build on successful careers.” Alumna Tammy Miller is CEO and Board Chair of Border States Electric Supply. “With an undergraduate degree in accounting and the first eight years of my career in public accounting, I knew accounting, finance and business law well when I joined Border States,” Miller says. “But I lacked knowledge and experience in marketing, human resources, organizational structure and strategic planning. The training, projects, networking, teambuilding and time management that were all part of the MSUM MBA program prepared me very well for my leadership roles at Border States.” While the propensity for leadership helps some people rise to the top, more often, aspiring leaders benefit from the additional training, knowledge and networking an MBA provides. “An MBA prepares you to manage the people, processes and strategies that do the job — like a marketing director,” says Greg Serdar, assistant professor in MSUM's Paseka School of Business and MBA program coordinator. The online delivery of the MBA and MBA with Healthcare Management gives students the flexibility and peace of mind to balance work, family and school. Professors are more than accommodating and encourage students to proceed at a pace that fits their life. Whether you’re a mid-career professional or an on-the-rise employee, an MBA degree may provide the best path to achieving your career goals. MSUM’s online MBA and MBA with Healthcare Management degrees prepare professionals to be effective and authentic leaders who will elevate their organization’s performance and success.

“…a vibrant and stunning performance full of sparkling energy…” Sunday Times – Passau, Germany

2018-19 CHERYL NELSON LOSSETT PERFORMING ARTS SERIES

NOBUNTU

Nobuntu, the female a cappella quintet from Zimbabwe, has drawn international acclaim for inventive performances that range from traditional Zimbabwean songs to Afro Jazz to Gospel. The ensemble represents a new generation of young African women singers who believe that music is an important vehicle for change, one that transcends racial, tribal, religious, gender and economic boundaries.

SATURDAY TICKETS Purchase tickets online at mnstate.edu/tickets or call (218) 477-2271 M-F from noon to 4 p.m.

GAEDE STAGE

7:30PM

20 O C TO B ER

ROL AND DILLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS

CHECK OUT ALL OF MSUM’S DEGREE OFFERINGS AT mnstate.edu/graduate/programs. [ aw ]

Minnesota State University Moorhead is an equal opportunity educator and employer. This information will be made available in alternate format, or if a disability-related accommodation is required, please contact Accessibility Resources at 218.477.4318 (voice) or 1.800.627.3529 (MRS/TYY).


PROFILES

words by LAUREILEE LOFTSGAARD photography by DENNIS KRULL, 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE

Connecting

?

PEOPLE & PUR POSE

Have you ever wanted a one-stop shop to learn about current needs of our community, what our nonprofits are doing, and how YOU can help meet those needs?

A

Make a DIFFERENCE not just a donation.

t the FM Area Foundation, they don’t call it “making a donation;” it’s “making an impact.” They’ve been doing that in Cass and Clay counties for over 58 years for nonprofits and charitable causes. The FM Area Foundation, your community foundation, has been bringing together members of our community and helping them make a greater impact with their charitable dollars. They currently manage over 360 charitable funds and since 1960 they have granted over 40 million dollars in our community. It’s the foundation’s tagline:

Connecting people and purpose.

“Historically we’ve done this in a very personalized and one-on-one way,”

says Lexi Oestreich, program officer at the FM Area Foundation.

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Lexi Oestreich

Now, they’re launching a tool to do this on a much larger scale. The idea behind this new giving platform, called the grant catalog, is to inspire people to give this holiday season by highlighting the needs of local nonprofits. The website will showcase a variety of charities and share information about projects and programs that need support in the areas of basic human needs, education, community building and the arts. This interactive platform will allow online donations and track, in real time, gifts and progress being made towards each fundraising goal.


Launching in early November, the grant catalog will be available online through their website, areafoundation.org. “This kind of crowdfunding site for nonprofits will help expand their reach by not only letting people donate a gift, but also letting them know the specific needs of our nonprofit sector,” Oestreich says. The initial grant catalog fundraiser will run through the end of the year, focusing on holiday giving. Subsequent fundraisers will be offered in 2019. The platform gives donors the chance to learn about a wide variety of needs in our area and the opportunity to broaden their scope of giving. “It will help donors feel more of a connection to what they’re giving to,” says Greg Diehl, development officer. “Donors want to make a difference, not just a donation.” The grant catalog will allow like-minded donors, through their giving, to collectively address current needs in the community and make a difference today.

GIVE A GIFT THAT...

Caring and Competent

impacts your community keeps giving makes a difference

Greg Diehl

“We invite the community to take advantage of this platform,” Oestreich adds. “This is just one more tool in our toolbox.” The foundation also helps

donors set up charitable funds, provides resources to professional advisors, administers a number of scholarship funds, assists nonprofits through capacity-building trainings, and supports community initiatives. The foundation also provides assistance to donors regarding the ND Charitable Income Tax Credit and the IRA Charitable Rollover programs.

View the new FM Area Foundation’s Grant Catalog Platform and support a charity or project in the areas of Basic Human Needs, Education, Community Building and The Arts.

409 South 8th Street Moorhead, MN 218-233-1533 888-799-1533 korsmofuneralservice.com

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED in working with the FM Area Foundation or have any questions, please contact Lexi Oestreich or Greg Diehl at 701-234-0756. [ aw ]

Bryce Beckstrand

areafoundation.org


PROFILES

words by SIRI FREEH photography by MIKE SMITH

finding

passion& purpose

TH E WO M E N O F T HE P L A I N S A RT M USE UM

It is a classroom,

a think tank, a motivator, an eye opener. It builds bridges, dreams, relationships and community. It is the Plains Art Museum. And it has faithfully served the FargoMoorhead area and beyond for nearly half a century. For the thousands that enter the museum every year it provides a collective and yet personal experience; giving each visitor unique inspirations and insights. KATHERINE RIECK

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With each piece, artists fill the Plains Art Museum with a visual orchestra. But who are the conductors that bring this symphony to life? While many contribute, meet three of the women who help cultivate visitors’ experiences: Katherine Rieck, Tonya Scott and Laura Youngbird.

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You would assume that a passion for art is what led these women to work for a museum. While true, each path was entirely unique. For Katherine Rieck, a former high school teacher abroad, she admits, “I love to teach, but I was like, ‘Where can I teach and encourage creative thinking and not have to give tests? Museums!’” She is now the assistant director of education, creating programs for all ages and needs, training staff and artists, and designing interactive spaces within the museum. Tonya Scott can relate to Rieck’s unorthodox path, having been a divisional merchandise manager at Vanity for 14 years. “I honestly didn’t see myself working in a museum,” says Scott. “I don’t have an art background, I’m not an artist. But I love being surrounded by artists.” She has now been with the museum for over 10 years as the earned income manager. "I love the museum,” Scott says. “The sense of community in that space, the diverse amount of people that come in — you

really take pride in that place.” She now enjoys working with people and contributing to their growth and success, as well as overseeing the store, visitor services, events and more. The museum’s sense of community and diversity were important to Laura Youngbird as well. “As an art teacher I brought my students to the Plains every year,” Youngbird remembers. She was soon asked to contribute her expertise in anthropology and Native American art to TONYA SCOTT


various outreach programs the museum offered. Eventually, she was presented with the opportunity to serve as director of Native American programs. “The job description did not literally have my name on it, but it could have!” Youngbird says. She is able to draw from her life experiences and use them in program planning, curating, working with Native artists, and teaching classes. The museum has given each of the women an opportunity to use their talents within their roles, while also bringing their gifts together. It is one of the things Rieck loves most about working at the museum. “The freedom to collaborate with my colleagues,” says Rieck. “We are all passionate about our jobs and that really comes out.” Scott also points out this collaboration floods outside the building’s walls. “Our biggest thing is for the community itself,” says Scott. “We are free for everyone, regardless of class, race, religion, background, orientation.” Being able to offer free admission excites the women. Youngbird remembers, “I used to like to go to the exhibits more than once, LAURA YOUNGBIRD and when you want to go 20 times — well you can’t really do that!” she laughs. “I believe ‘your museum,’” she says, quoting Andy Maus, “is a place for everyone in the community to celebrate each other, share ideas and cultivate understanding.” Their passion stems from how art has impacted their own lives. “I’ve seen a lot of shows in the gallery over the last 10 years,” says Scott. “Some are beautiful, some are abstract, some have a social discussion behind them. I’ve learned that art doesn’t have to be beautiful, it just has to make you feel.” “Art has always been a huge part of my life,” shares Youngbird. And, it has taught her much, “I am learning to see.” The arts has also empowered them as women. “I want to make societal change,” says Rieck. “And I feel I can do that through the arts.” While all of the women would agree that working in nonprofits has its ups and downs, the passion and purpose it provides far outweighs every challenge it brings. “You’re not just making money to make money,” explains Scott. “You’re making money to do more and more and more.” “You will meet a high concentration of passionate people,” adds Rieck. “They bring different perspectives and together we can make something really amazing.” [ aw ]

701.893.9178 | fargo@ExpressionsByAshton.com | ExpressionsByAshton.com


brynn duncan

because disabilities do not define words by REBECCA MEIDINGER

photography by STACY KENNEDY PHOTOGRAPHY

hair and makeup by MERESA SCHROEDER : 218-841-2646 : @millionhairbymeresa

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COV E R STORY a r e a wom a n

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W

hen was the last time you had a conversation with somebody who caused you to want to be the very best version of yourself possible? Someone who, just by being him/herself, caused you to want to try harder, reach higher, run faster, dream bigger, live larger, love better? A conversation with Brynn Duncan would do exactly that. If you caught a glimpse of this 17-year-old beauty racing down the slopes, you’d never guess that just ten years ago her parents were fiercely praying that their daughter, who now is training for a spot on the 2022 Paralympics Ski Team, would simply survive. Over the last decade, surrounded by her family of cheerleaders, Duncan has chosen every single day to rise up, face obstacles head on, and live in the confidence that while disability may be a fact of life, it will never define her.

On August 18, 2008, Dixie and Cody Duncan received the phone call that every parent fears. Their 7-year-old daughter Brynn had been in a horrific car crash that resulted in a snapped spinal cord as well as severe internal bleeding and organ damage. Thinking back to that day, Dixie Duncan recalls how, prior to getting in the car, her daughter wouldn’t stop kissing her goodbye. Despite her young age, Brynn Duncan remembers her own apprehension too: “Even though I was so young, I distinctly remember having that gut-feeling before I got in the car, like I knew something was going to happen.” After being ambulanced to Fargo and then flown to Minneapolis, Duncan spent the following days and weeks overcoming one obstacle after another as surgeons worked to repair her internal damage. “At that point,” explains Duncan’s mom, “we weren’t focused on Brynn walking … we were just focused on Brynn living. That was our prayer.” Brynn Duncan’s family continually covered her hospital bed with prayer and covered her room in frogs — frog pictures, frog balloons, frog stuffed animals — as a constant reminder to be “fully reliant on God” (F.R.O.G). After one particularly miraculous discovery of a blood clot that nearly took her life, one of Duncan’s surgeons remarked, “This girl is only alive because someone up there is

MOST PEOPLE SEE MY DAUGHTER IN A WHEELCHAIR AND FEEL SORRY FOR HER. WE SEE BRYNN IN A WHEELCHAIR AND SEE A MIRACLE.

SHE IS MIRACLES UPON MIRACLES. — DIXIE DUNCAN

watching out for her.” Setback after setback and miracle after miracle, the Duncans’ constant mantra was, “My God is bigger.” “As physicians discussed various risks or complications with us, that phrase just went through my brain every day,” says Dixie Duncan. “It kept me going. Most people see my daughter in a wheelchair and feel sorry for her — ‘Oh poor girl, she’s in a wheelchair.’ We see Brynn in a wheelchair and see a miracle. She is miracles upon miracles.” Then came the day when this sweet 7-year-old girl, after a week of lying in her hospital bed, realized that she couldn’t feel her legs. At her mom’s insistence, no medical personnel or family members had yet discussed Duncan’s paralysis with her or around her, but Duncan knew something was wrong. “I had tubes and wires running everywhere, but I couldn’t feel anything on my legs. I remember pinching my thigh as hard as I could with my fingernails and knowing then that my legs didn’t work.” As her little girl turned to her and whispered, “Am I disabled?” Duncan’s very wise mother simply replied, “Honey, we don’t know yet.” How true those words would become! They didn’t know and couldn’t have imagined then the tremendous capabilities within her, despite the inability to use her legs. During the following months of rehabilitation, Dixie Duncan refused to let her daughter say the word “can’t.” “You can tell me you’re tired. You can tell me you’re sick. You can tell me it hurts. But you can’t tell me you can’t. You can,

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Brynn. You have to do things differently, but you can do it.” And while there were very hard days of being overwhelmed and depressed as Duncan adjusted to the loss of her legs and activities she loved like dancing and gymnastics, she has certainly risen up to every challenge. With her parents and sisters constantly cheering her on and her faith that God is always near her and for her, Duncan has exceeded every expectation, never letting her disabilities overtake her abilities. “I mean, I am ‘disabled’ in that I can’t use my legs, but I’m certainly not going to let that disable my life.” Three months after the accident Duncan returned to school as a second grader. A month later she was invited by the local organization Hope Inc. to play sled hockey. Duncan remembers the joy of being able to be on the ice with other kids who had disabilities. “They got me. They knew what I was going through. And we got to skate!” Hope Inc. became an integral part of Duncan’s life, and she has continued to play hockey

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with the Hope Hurricanes for the last ten years. The following winter, at age 9, Duncan defied her disability yet again by going downhill skiing. Having enjoyed downhill skiing in the past, the whole family rallied around Duncan as she experimented for the first time with a mono ski at Powder Ridge near St. Cloud, Minnesota. Later that winter, Duncan participated in the Great Lakes Mono-Ski Madness and Race Camp, hosted by the Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Center in Duluth. There, Duncan fell in love with alpine racing. From that point on, Duncan returned annually to Mono Ski Madness Camp and took nearly every opportunity she could to hit the slopes, which is easier said than done when you live here in the flatlands — the terrain of the Red River Valley doesn’t quite cut it for an Alpine racer. Eventually, due to her spunk, determination and cheerful attitude, invitations started coming, doors started opening, and Duncan’s dreams began unfolding before her eyes. Partnering with a coach from


I MEAN,

I AM ‘DISABLED’ IN THAT I CAN’T USE MY LEGS, BUT I’M CERTAINLY

NOT GOING TO LET THAT DISABLE MY LIFE. — BRYNN DUNCAN

Minneapolis and various ski clubs around the country, at age 13 Duncan started traveling, training and racing. By age 14, with a mix of nerves and excitement, unhindered by any so-called “disabilities,” Duncan was cruising through airports solo. Often unable to travel along due to their careers, Duncan’s parents found a great ally in technology. “Thank goodness for cell phones!” exclaims the brave (albeit nervous) mom. “She is in constant contact with me until she’s on the plane and then once again at her next gate. I love flightaware.com, which allows me to track where she is in the air.” In 2015 at a Ski Spectacular event in Breckinridge, Colorado, Duncan met her current coach, Erik, from the National Sports Center for the Disabled, the organization with whom she now skis. As if traveling for one competitive sport wasn’t enough, Duncan’s love of sled hockey had also grown over the years. When she was 14, Duncan traveled to Maine to try-out for the US Women’s Sled Hockey Team — and made it! She traveled and competed for two years with that team, while also playing with our local Hope Hurricanes, who won national championships at both the 2017 and 2018 USA

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Disabled Hockey Festival. Because traveling for two sports took such a toll on the traditional school schedule, Duncan made the decision to leave Moorhead High School and complete high school online. Participation in two competitive winter sports takes quite a toll on her body too. “Falling hurts on a mono ski … a lot. When we crash, we have a 60 pound contraption strapped to us that crashes with us. When I fall, everything in me hurts.” Laughing, Duncan recalls last winter when she dislocated her right shoulder in a massive ski crash in Mammoth, California, and was told by her doctors that she “absolutely could not” compete in the national hockey tournament two weeks later. “But of course I went and played anyway,” she laughs.

ne of the greatest joys of Duncan’s life came last winter when she was chosen by the National Ability Center out of Utah to travel to Pyeongchang, South Korea, not only as a spectator for the 2018 Paralympics, but also as ski mentor for kids with disabilities. For three days, young adult skiers from the US taught Korean children with disabilities to ski, while also training Korean coaches to coach kids with disabilities. Beaming with joy, Duncan remembers the smile of an 8-year-old boy as he raced down the mountain. “For a child with disabilities in Korea, they don’t think they’ll ever have opportunities to do normal things again. So, being able to teach a child that he can do it, encouraging him to just try it even though he was so scared, and then seeing his huge smile and hearing him shout, ‘Again! Again!’ as he crossed the finish line … that was just the best thing ever.” Now, as we near the ski season once again, Duncan has her eyes on the 2022 games in Beijing, hoping to go as a competitor this time. Training with the National Sports Center for the Disabled out of Winter Park, Colorado, Duncan intends to spend more time in the mountains this winter, hitting the slopes and perfecting her art. To help make her Paralympic goals a reality, Duncan is seeking local business sponsorships and partners. Despite all of her accomplishments and medals, Duncan is also very real and open about her struggles. Her ability to be vulnerable and connect with others is one of the things that make this superstar so very real and loveable. “The truth is, even though I get to do all this amazing stuff, I’m still grieving the loss of my legs. I’ll always grieve the loss of my legs. It’s kind of a different kind of grief, because I carry my legs around with me everywhere I go. Everyday. Every flight of stairs. Every dance. Every doorway. It’s a constant reminder of what I lost.” Yet, in the midst of the trials and adversity of the last decade, Duncan says that the promise of Romans 8:28 has carried her through the times of suffering: “For we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” Certainly, even in the midst of the suffering and pain that she’s endured, a great plan is unfolding before her eye — a plan that will include, but will never be defined by, disability.

Day after day, Brynn Duncan is rising up and racing down. [ aw ] 74

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Weekly Specials:

Outdoor patio

[sneak peek of a new menu item from The Tavern]

overlooking pond with fountain

Taste of the Tavern Tuesday

with Fire Pits

Open

Wine Wednesday [happy hour on wine all day]

Flatbread Friday

[4 featured flatbreads only $7.50 each]

Monday-Saturday from 11am-9pm

Full Bar

serving wine, beer & cocktails

Menu items and drinks

can also be delivered to guests receiving services in the salon and spa

A T H A I R S U C C E S S : 3 2 33 4 5 T H S T R E E T S O U T H , F A R G O : 7 0 1 - 2 3 2 - 9 3 83

Thank you

TO THE 28th ANNUAL

P WS WALK Patrick Luger, MD

sponsors

FREDDY’S LEFSE Bremer Bank Casey’s General Stores, Inc. Conmy Feste Ltd. Consolidated Communications Fargo Moorhead Kennel Club First International Bank & Trust FRS Works, Inc.

Glacier Snow Management Co. Haugen, Moeckel, & Bossart Invisible Fence of Fargo Jim and Cathy Ohnstad Jordahl & Associates, Inc. Kipp Harris Realtors Labby’s Grill & Bar

Luther Family Buick GMC Paradigm Enterprises, Inc. Prairie Winds Veterinary Center ReMax Legacy Realty Rover’s Playhouse Rusco Window Co., Inc. Scenic Landscaping

Schumacher Goodyear Shack on Broadway Shaggy’s Dog Wash & Grooming Sharon Windels Solberg Stewart Miller Law Firm Southgate Veterinary Hospital Susan Fuglie Consulting

Blarney Stone Breadsmith Brokerage Printing Copy Kat Printing Inc. Dan Bahe

Face Painting by Monkey Allowance Family Fare Fargo Park District Fernweh & Liebe Photography Games to Go

Hornbacher’s Insomnia Cookies Kittsona MSUM Catering New Breed Brew Chewz

Pepsi-Cola RetroDisc PetSmart Sam Bacon Photography Potbelly Sandwich Shop Spitfire Bar & Grill Prairie Dog LLC Patrick Kirby of Do Good Better Consulting

in - kind sponsors

media sponsors

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Two Rivers Veterinary Hospital Valerie J. Axt Valley Outdoors Wags Stay N Play West Fargo Animal Hospital Yuppy Puppy Dog Hotel


life

area

photo: trueexpressionskb.com

o c to be r. nove mbe r 2 0 1 8

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LIFE

words provided by HOMEWARD ANIMAL SHELTER photography by FERNWEH + LIEBE PHOTOGRAPHY

28th ANNUAL

PAW S WA L K


Love

“I My Bank !” - Darla Julin, Fargo

O

n July 24, Homeward Animal Shelter held its 28th Annual Paws Walk event at Rheault Farm in Fargo. It was a beautiful summer evening for this half-mile fun walk and pet party in support of the homeless dogs and cats of Homeward Animal Shelter. Over 350 people and over 210 dogs (and a few cats) attended to support all the furry faces of Homeward Animal Shelter. Donations for the Paws Walk are collected by participants prior to the walk. Prizes were awarded to the top teams and individuals who raised the most for the shelter animals.

bellbanks.com/Darla Member FDIC

In addition to the Paws Walk, the event included: music, inflatable games, face painting, doggy wading pools, a photo booth, vendor booths and free food by Potbelly Sandwich Shop and Insomnia Cookies. Over $42,000 was raised for the shelter pets of Homeward during this year’s event. All proceeds directly benefit the shelter animals by providing them with food, shelter and veterinary care while they await their forever homes.

Our Vision

If you were unable to attend July’s Paws Walk event, make sure to check out Homeward Animal Shelter’s fall fundraising event – Wags, Whiskers & Wine, a silent/live auction and wine tasting event taking place October 19 at the Holiday Inn Fargo.

Fargo

TO L E AR N MOR E ABOUT

We envision a world in which aging is viewed and understood in radically different ways.

(701) 239-4524 1401 West Gateway Circle

Assisted Living, Basic Care and Memory Care For more information or to schedule a personal tour, call or visit one of our websites!

Homeward Animal Shelter and how you can adopt, donate, volunteer or foster, visit homewardonline.org.

19090

evergreensoffargo.org

Moorhead (218) 233-1535 512 3rd Avenue South evergreensofmoorhead.org

[ aw ] a r e a wom a n

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WHERE to dine

words by SIRI FREEH photography by KELSEY BUCHHOLZ, True Expressions

D ININ G WI T H MEZ Z A LU N A

perfecting the experience “

There is something sacred about dinner, some of the best moments happen around the dinner table.

we want to provide that.

Mezzaluna co-owners Taylor Snelling (left) and Joe Brunner

t

he lively city streets and sounds of downtown Fargo surround you as you stand outside Mezzaluna’s back door. Yet with that first step in, a sudden rush of calm washes over. A warm welcome, as if stepping inside a close friend’s home. The bustle of life hushes. A familiar ease commences. With each smile and nod from passing staff, it is as if you had known each other a long time. Such courtesy and approachability is what the Midwest is known for; yet, Mezzaluna has perfected it.

For Taylor Snelling, it is an atmosphere well known to regulars and still upheld today. “We bring the big city restaurant feel, with the familiarity of a small town joint.” Taylor Snelling and Joe Brunner purchased the upscale eatery in April 2018 and have sought to continue to provide the soul of Mezzaluna. “We both grew up in the Midwest,” explains Snelling. “Our hope is that the food brings back a memory from someone’s childhood.” The food has always been known for quality. But now, the new ownership strives to excite guests with something

new. “We want to challenge people’s palates and bring a new experience to what’s familiar,” says Snelling. This is where co-owner and executive chef Joe Brunner’s creativity shines. “Whether introducing a new sauce, spice or ingredient guests wouldn’t expect,” says Brunner, “we want to continue to be out of the box.” With the cooler weather comes a new menu — and a great deal of intention. “Behind each word on the menu, there’s a million sub thoughts that go into it,” says Snelling. Brunner adds that each flavorful masterpiece is not left to him alone. “We take inspiration from everyone,” he says. Brunner’s team of two sous chefs and five cooks works together to bring dishes that compliment the crisp fall air: heartier dishes may include meat, smoked tomatoes and pickling techniques. Should you not see something that appeals to your palate or dietary needs, the staff welcome the opportunity. “There is so much we can do that isn’t on the menu,” Brunner shares excitedly. With a simple call ahead of time, the kitchen is happy to meet nearly every need. From vegetarian to vegan, the kitchen strives to not only make all guests feel welcome, but exercise their skills in making something delicious for everyone. For Snelling the reason is deeper. “There is something sacred about dinner,” she says. “Some of the best moments happen around the dinner table. We want to provide that.”


Asked if they have a favorite dish, Brunner reveals, “It is so hard to choose, but I am amazed at how adding smoked tomatoes completely transforms a New York Strip steak.” Snelling takes the opposite approach. “Anything I used to hate or not eat, I am now constantly trying so that I can talk about it and be mindful of our guests and what they are looking for,” she says. “People first” is the running mantra throughout the restaurant, starting with the guest, to the dishwasher in the back. Brunner agrees, “It’s their happiness that means success to us.”

If only he’d listened to me SOONER!

Service to guests includes a commitment to community. Mezzaluna works with local and regional growers to bring fresh produce to each dish, including Nurtured Plains Farm in Oakport, Minnesota, and Meadowlark Garden in Park River, North Dakota. “Every night on any given dish, you’ll get something local,” Brunner highlights.

The local produce is inspiration for Mezzaluna’s drink menu as well. “Our mixologists come in and look at what produce we’re using. We want to make a great standalone cocktail, but also one that pairs well with a dish.”

UPSCALE EATERY WITH THE DECOR AND MENU OF A big-city restaurant, the warmth and familiarity of a small-town joint and the mystique of a 1920’s speakeasy.

From the mixologists, to the cooks, to each service member on the team, it is the people that fuel Mezzaluna’s atmosphere. “The biggest thing we focus on is culture,” Snelling shares. Both owners agree, they hope to provide a space to spark creativity, allow people to grow, and provide the best service around. “We hope that everyone who works here or dines here, leaves here better off than when they walked in.” [ aw ]

Located downtown Fargo behind the historic Fargo Theatre 309 Roberts St, Fargo • dinemezzaluna.com a r e a wom a n

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RECIPES

words by CASEY STEELE and CHEF RANDALL TOENGES, Square One Rental Kitchen & Events photography by CASEY STEELE

roasted apples Simply roasting apples maximizes their flavor and gives them a texture that holds up better when cooked or baked. i n g re d i e n ts Apples (any size, any flavor)

d i re cti on s Preheat oven to 375 F and line a baking sheet with a silicone mat. Peel and core your apples, chop into quarter inch to half inch cubes. Bake for 25–30 minutes until lightly golden brown. Let cool.

spiced apple chutney The spices in this chutney make for a warm, satisfying and versatile topping for numerous dishes. It’s so good you can eat by the spoonful! ingredients

directions

1 shallot, minced

In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, add oil, shallot, ginger, garlic and garam masala. Sauté until fragrant, 1–2 minutes.

2 inches fresh ginger root, peeled, smashed and minced

R OA ST E D APP L E S SWE E T & SAVO RY 82

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Stir in red pepper flakes, salt and pepper.

1 medium clove garlic, peeled, smashed and minced

Add remaining ingredients except roasted apples, letting the dried fruits plump up.

1 teaspoon garam masala

Bring to a boil.

Pinch red pepper flakes

Reduce to a simmer, simmer 3–5 minutes.

1/4 teaspoon salt Black pepper

Add roasted apples. Remove from heat and let sit. If you’d like more liquid in your chutney, add more apple cider.

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Can be served warm or cold.

¼ cup dried apricots, diced (approx. 6-7 pieces)

Pictured served over a bed of sautéd kale and roasted pork tenderloin.

¼ cup golden raisins ½ cup apple cider ¼ cup pure maple syrup ¼ cup apple cider vinegar 1 ½ cups roasted apples


homemade roasted apple pop tarts

Homemade pop tarts are amazing! Made with real ingredients, a flaky crust and totally customizable. You can even make them with your little ones for a great in-the-kitchen activity. Get creative — try different shapes, icings, etc. to spice things up! Makes 8 standard sized tarts ingredients

directions

2 – 9-inch pie crusts (homemade or your favorite prepared refrigerated pie crust)

R OAST ED A P P LE FILLING

PRE PARING PIE CRUST

Combine apple juice, maple syrup, brown sugar, roasted apples and a pinch of salt in a medium saucepan.

1 cup apple juice

Bring to a boil.

If using homemade pie crust, split dough in half. Roll each half into a 14 by 10 inch rectangle, one-eighth inch thickness.

2 tablespoons maple syrup

Reduce to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes.

2 tablespoons brown sugar 3 medium apples, chopped and roasted (recipe left)

Meanwhile, combine apple brandy (if

1 tablespoon apple brandy (optional)

with 2 teaspoons cornstarch until smooth and lump free.

2 tablespoons cornstarch Pinch of salt

While stirring the apple mixture, add in the cornstarch mixture. Stir well.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened

Once mixture comes to a boil, remove from heat and let cool completely before assembling the pop tarts.

1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon brown sugar ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon cinnamon

omitting brandy, use 1 tablespoon apple cider, room cold or room temperature)

C R E A M C H E E S E FILLING Cream together cream cheese, maple syrup, brown sugar, vanilla and cinnamon until smooth and creamy.

If using prepared pie crust, square off the edges and roll remaining dough into a 14 by 10 inch rectangle. You could cut out cute shapes in the scraps and use as little decorations for your pop tarts. NOTE: yields may be less with prepared pie crust or the pop tarts may be smaller depending on the brand of pie crust. Cut each rectangle into 4 equally sized rectangles, each measuring approximately 5 by 7 inches. Gently fold each rectangle in half to create a crease. Unfold and cut down the center, making 8 similarly sized rectangles. Spread 1 and a half tablespoons cream cheese filling on 4 of the rectangles, leaving a half inch of pie crust along each edge. Top cream cheese with 2 tablespoons apple filling and spread into an even

layer, leaving a half inch border of pie crust along all 4 edges. Lightly brush the edges with water. Cover with another rectangle of pie crust and gently press the edges together. Using a fork, crimp the edges together. For a rustic, more handmade look, leave the edges as is. Or, you can cut off uneven edges for a cleaner look.

BAK ING Preheat oven to 400 F. Place filled and sealed pop tarts on a parchment lined baking sheet, spaced 2 inches apart. Brush top of each pop tart lightly with cream (or whisked egg) and sprinkle with raw sugar. If using a powdered sugar icing/glaze, do not add raw sugar. Bake 15–18 minutes til golden brown. Cool slightly before enjoying. Can be stored in airtight container for up to 2 days or frozen to enjoy later.

SQUARE ONE is a food focused business located near downtown Fargo featuring all things food — from hands on cooking classes and team building events to a shared kitchen facility for up and coming food startups. Casey Steele owns and manages Square One while operating her own food business of eight years, Love in the Oven Bakery. Chef Randall is a classically trained certified executive chef bringing more than 20 years of experience and passion to his classes, recipes and events. We really love food and want to share our love of all things delicious with the community! a r e a wom a n

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october Note: All events are subject to change. Confirm dates and times before attending.

NOVEMBER OCTOBER 25

community

One Book, One Community AUTHOR VISIT WITH P.S. DUFFY

events + services OCTOBER 6 FREE DOCUMENT SHREDDING Take this simple step to help protect yourself from identity theft by having sensitive personal documents shredded for free. Sponsored by AARP North Dakota 8:00 AM – NOON West Acres Shopping Center southwest parking lot 3902 13th Ave S, Fargo aarp.org/fargo

OCTOBER 13 & OCTOBER 15–17 COATS FOR KIDS DISTRIBUTION This free event is open to children and families in need of warm coats and gear for winter. Documents required for this event will be a photo ID for the head of the household and Social Security cards for all household members receiving winter gear. 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM Moorhead Salvation Army Service Center 1503 1st Ave N Moorhead 701-232-5565

OCTOBER 16 DIOR + JIMMY CHOO TRUNK SHOW Treat yourself, and your eyes, to a bit of glamour this fall. The Dior and Jimmy Choo trunk show at McCulley Optix Gallery is the perfect opportunity to tap into both your feminine and fabulous side. The entire most recent glasses and sunglasses collections from the two brands will be available for purchase this day only. Stop by to try on the exclusive styles and enjoy a day of fashion and fun. NOON – 6:00 PM McCulley Optix Gallery 2553 Kirsten Lane, Fargo optixgallery.com

All ages are welcome to attend an author presentation. Seating is limited and is first come, first served. All ages, free and open to the public. A book signing will follow Duffy's presentation. 7:00 PM Knutson Center Centrum Concordia College 901 8th St. South, Moorhead 1book1community.org

NOVEMBER 9 FRASER, LTD. FESTIVAL OF TREES Join Fraser, Ltd. for their 18th Annual Festival of Trees. View over 150 beautifully decorated trees on display from November 9-30, during regular business hours. Free and open to the public. 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Fargodome 1800 N University Dr, Fargo


NOVEMBER 17 ST. ANDREW'S (SCOTTISH) SOCIETY DINNER AND PROGRAM Celebration of Scottish food, bagpipes, dance, songs, tartans, culture and history. Purchase tickets by November 12 by calling 218-287-1646. Contact cynthia.sillers@gmail.com or 701-261-5683 for more info. 5:15 PM DoubleTree by Hilton 825 E Beaton Dr, West Fargo

NOVEMBER 23 COOKIES WITH THE CLAUS FAMILY The Claus family will arrive by horse-drawn sleigh at 1:00 PM. Games Galore, entertainment, sleigh rides, cookie decorating, art and more. This event is free and open to the public. 1:00 – 4:00 PM Fargodome 1800 N University Dr, Fargo

theater events OCTOBER 12–14 & 18–20 THE LARAMIE PROJECT presented by Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre Comprised of interviews conducted following the October 1998 kidnapping and fatal assault of gay University of Wyoming student, Matthew Shepard, The Laramie Project is a chronicle of life in the town of Laramie the year after the brutal crime. This fascinating collection of community reactions explores the depths to which humanity can sink and the heights of compassion of which we are capable. Adults, $23; seniors (65+), $18; students, $13 OCTOBER 12, 13, 18–20 | 7:30 PM OCTOBER 14 | 2:00 PM Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre 333 4th St S, Fargo 701-235-6778 | fmct.org

OCTOBER 25-28 WAR OF THE WORLDS: The Panic Broadcast presented by Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre An alien invasion throws humanity into chaos in the classic sci-fi novel The War of the Worlds — but all it took to cause real-life panic in the streets was Orson Welles’s 1938 radio adaptation, which listeners took for news. This play recreates the colorful events surrounding the infamous evening, including the full original broadcast. Adults, $23; seniors (65+), $18; students, $13 OCTOBER 25-27, 7:30 PM OCTOBER 28, 2:00 PM Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre 333 4th St S, Fargo 701-235-6778 | fmct.org


find your cause OCTOBER 6

OCTOBER 21

TAKE STEPS WALK FOR CROHN'S AND COLITIS

Holy Cross Catholic Church HOMEMADE TURKEY DINNER

Take Steps is a family-friendly fundraising event where patients, loved ones, friends and supporters empower and inspire each other to continue the fight against these devastating diseases. Patients and their families are able to connect with the greater IBD community, helping them understand that they are never alone in this fight. 11:45 AM Rheault Farm 2902 25th St S, Fargo online.ccfa.org/site/TR/TakeSteps/Chapter-MinnesotaDakotas?fr_id=7844&pg=entry

OCTOBER 16 HUNGER AND HEALTH SUMMIT Join organizations and individuals dedicated to ending hunger and improving health through nutrition. Learn about the current state of hunger, hear innovative ideas, and create a shared vision for the Cass Clay Hunger Coalition. Free registration. Lunch provided. Sign-up at tiny. cc/cchungersummit. Contact Stacie at 701-2379337 with questions. 8:30 AM – 1:00 PM Dakota Medical Foundation 4141 28th Ave S, Fargo

OCTOBER 19 WAGS, WHISKERS & WINE Join us for wine tasting, delicious appetizers, music, and fabulous silent and live auction items at the 9th annual Wags, Whiskers & Wine event. All proceeds benefit the homeless dogs and cats of Homeward Animal Shelter. 6:00 – 9:00 PM Holiday Inn Fargo 3803 13th Ave S, Fargo 701-364-9013 homewardonline.org

Homemade Turkey Dinner with real mashed potatoes, stuffing, gravy, coleslaw, cranberries, mac & cheese, buns, apple cake and pumpkin bars. Children's games, bingo, raffle, silent auction, chance baskets, punch out game, 50/50 raffle, country store and more. 10:00 AM – 2:30 PM Holy Cross Catholic Church 2711 7th St E, West Fargo Just south of Costco 701-282-7217

NOVEMBER 8 ONE HOPE, MANY HEARTS Gala Free for the whole family with a short program, food, cash bar, and kid’s carnival! The 2018–2019 children’s photos will be unveiled and more information about adoption from foster care will be provided. 5:30 – 7:30 PM Fargodome 1800 N University Dr, Fargo

9th Annual

WAGS WHISKERS &WINE Friday, October 19, 2018

6-9PM | Holiday Inn Fargo SILENT AUCTION + LIVE AUCTION WINE + APPETIZERS + MUSIC + FUN

All proceeds benefit the homeless pets of Homeward Animal Shelter. For tickets + more information visit: www.homewardonline.org Ticket Cost: $40 through October 7th, $50 starting October 8th. Tickets are 100% tax deductible.

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empowerment OCTOBER 14–15

OCTOBER 26

WOMEN’S BUSINESS SUMMIT

12th Annual Rest & Rejuv: “LET’S GET UP AND LIVE!” WITH EMILY COLSON

Join women leaders from across the state for advanced training sessions, networking, business growth opportunities, personal development, professional focus and of course, fun! Bismarck Event Center 315 S 5th St, Bismarck ndwomensbusinesssummit.com

OCTOBER 23 NAVIGATING THE LEADERSHIP JOURNEY Sometimes taking a huge risk leads to the opportunity of a lifetime. Hear how Susan Jarvis took on anything bigger than she’d ever done in her career to ultimately execute the project of her lifetime – the new $500 million Sanford Medical Center. 3:30 – 5:00 PM DoubleTree by Hilton & West Fargo Conference Center 825 E Beaton Dr, West Fargo Register at fmwfchamber.com, or 218-233-1100

Men and women are invited to join us for this community-wide event with Emily Colson, popular speaker and author of the award-winning book, “Dancing with Max,” and daughter of Chuck Colson, as she shares the struggle and beauty of life with Max, her 27-year-old son with autism. Brought to you by the Inclusion Ministry Network. Free will offering. 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Hope Lutheran Church 2900 N Broadway, Fargo fargohope.org

OCTOBER 27 12th Annual Rest & Rejuv: DANCING LESSONS, WITH EMILY COLSON Mothers of children with special needs will join Emily Colson as she shares hopefilled stories of life with her son, Max, who has autism. Laugh together, cry together, and find the gifts and beauty on this journey. Register by Oct 20 at cindyleebuchanan@gmail.com or 701-429-1724. $5 suggested donation 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Hope Lutheran Church 2900 N Broadway, Fargo fargohope.org

NOVEMBER 8 ENDLESS HOPE: THE ANCHOR YOUR SOUL NEEDS, featuring Liz Curtis Higgs Higgs’ messages are biblical, encouraging, down to earth and profoundly funny, helping both sisters and seekers embrace the truth of God’s amazing, unchanging grace. Join us for an evening of laughter and encouragement with Higgs and worship music with Austin & Lindsey Adamec, as we celebrate the endless hope God offers us. Sponsored by Prison Fellowship International. Tickets at lizcurtishiggs. com or Hope Lutheran Church. 7:00 – 10:00 PM Hope Lutheran Church 3636 25th St S, Fargo

one book one community FARGO

MOORHEAD

WEST FARGO

The Cartographer of No Man’s Land

AUTHOR P.S. DUFFY

ABOUT THE BOOK Set during World War I and centered on the themes of family, friendship and sacrifice, Duffy’s book examines how peoples’ lives are forever changed in wartime, whether on the battlefield or at home. MEET THE AUTHOR Thursday, October 25 at 7:00 PM Concordia College Centrum • Knutson Campus Center More Info: 1book1community.org

1 Book, 1 Community is made possible by the sponsorship of the Friends of the Fargo Public Library, the Friends of the Moorhead Public Library, and the Friends of the West Fargo Public Library.

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NOVEMBER 15

NOVEMBER 17

CAREGIVING LUNCH AND LEARN with Amy Goyer

BEAUTIFUL WHOLENESS

Come and hear Amy Goyer, AARP’s Family and Caregiving expert and author of “Juggling Life, Work, and Caregiving,” speak about the joys and challenges of caregiving and how to maintain your own health and find life balance while taking on this important role. Free, but preregistration is required. Sponsored by AARP North Dakota. 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM Fargodome 1800 N University Dr, Fargo aarp.cvent.com/CaregivingFargo11-15

NOVEMBER 12 BIG DADDY WEAVE AND BRANDON HEATH CONCERT Big Daddy Weave and Brandon Heath are coming to First Assembly Church in Fargo on November 12 for the Jesus I Believe Tour. 7 PM First Assembly Church 3401 25th St S, Fargo life979.com

NOVEMBER 17 SUCCESSFUL CAREGIVERS Celebrate national caregivers month in November! Join us to learn more about ways to care for a loved one and take good care of yourself. Come and be inspired to learn about in-home care, respite care, caregiver tools, community resources and much more. 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM Bethany Retirement Homes 4255 30th Ave S, Fargo 410-419-8621

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A full day life coaching event for women. Discover real-world, easy-to-apply tools that powerfully change relationships, careers, and lives. 8:30 AM – 9:00 PM Courtyard by Marriott 1080 28th Ave S, Moorhead bigbluecouchcoaching.com/beautifulwholeness

NOVEMBER 27 GRATITUDE ATTITUDE: How to Make an Ordinary Life Extraordinary Many of us lead what we believe are ordinary lives, but in the daily grind, lose sight of the extraordinary that surrounds us. At this session, Trina Michels will share her personal gratitude journey that consists of four different stages: cautious, comparative, gripping and nirvana, and how you can identify and move on with your own. Register at fmwfchamber.com or 218-233-1100. 3:30 – 5:00 PM DoubleTree by Hilton & West Fargo Conference Center 825 E Beaton Dr, West Fargo


RePurposing lives

dessert

TICKETS

can be purchased at jailchaplains.com

$ OCTOBER 26 & 27 LOVE THINKS How to Avoid Falling for a Jerk (or Jerkette) "What does a healthy relationship look like? Single, divorced or even a parent of a teen or young adult, join us to find out what makes a relationship healthy and how to recognize when it's not. Seminar is Friday event and Saturday morning and includes relationship tool, workbook, continental breakfast and snacks. Registration is required. $47 per person. Hosted by John & Debbie Trombley 701-793-6864 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27 8:30 AM – NOON Bethany Retirement Living 4255 30th Ave S, Fargo Register: ignitechurchfm.com/lovethinks

15

SOCIAL & FUNDRAISER

per person

$

250

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18

sponsored table

5:30PM 6:45PM

SILENT AUCTION PROGRAM / LIVE AUCTION

HOLIDAY INN - FARGO 3803 13th Ave S | Fargo, ND

QUESTIONS? 701.364.0067

MEETING SPECIAL

Book your next meeting

Already have a meeting booked with us? Great!

AND CH OOSE FROM : • Complimentary AV with a room rental and food and beverage service

CHOOSE FROM: • Complimentary soda and bottled water service with purchase of two meal services

QUOTABLE: "For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Then you will seek me and find me: when you seek me with all your heart, I will be found by you, declares the Lord."

• Complimentary AV equipment with purchase of two meal services

• 10% off final bill (excluding tax and service charges) • Double Hilton Honors/Marriott Rewards

• Two complimentary guest room vouchers

* M eet i n g m u st b e h eld i n 20 18 . On e o p t i o n p er me et in g / ev e nt .

— JEREMIAH 29: 11-14

( 701) 499-6000

( 218) 2 8 4 - 1 0 0 0 a r e a wom a n

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farewell ADIEU

areawomanmagazine.com


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Area Woman Magazine | Fargo, ND  

October.November 2018 | Celebrating all things woman! Area Woman is the first known free-released women's interest magazine in the country

Area Woman Magazine | Fargo, ND  

October.November 2018 | Celebrating all things woman! Area Woman is the first known free-released women's interest magazine in the country

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