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Contents 28 August-September

46 In Every Issue

Area Life

Area Style

Contributors . . . . . . . . . . 10 Area Calendar. . . . . . . . . 16 Weddings. . . . . . . . 40 & 44 Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Hair Trends . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Fashion Trends . . . . . . . . 52 Where to Shop . . . . . . . . 54

Making a Difference for Women. . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Riding on Angels’ Wings Fundraiser. . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Fall Home Show . . . . . . . 30 Fargo’s Red River Zoo. . . 32 Let’s Find Them a Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Enticing Invitations . . . . 42 Professional, Pretty and Polished. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Bold & Beautiful . . . . . . . 52 Legally Speaking. . . . . . . 56

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90

72

52

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Area Health

Area Profiles

Her Survivor Story . . . . . 60 Time is Brain. . . . . . . . . . 62 Her Personal Best. . . . . . 64 When Sharon Fell. . . . . . 66 A Servant’s Heart at Riverview Place. . . . . . . . 68

Homeschooling: An Education Option. . . 82 African Soul, American Heart . . . . . . . 84 Forget eBay; Check Out Esty . . . . . . . . 86

On the Cover Pebbles Thompson . . . . . 90 Bringing Light to Darkness

Area Home Artists’ Haven. . . . . . . . . 72 AW |

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PUBLISHER

Area Woman Publishing, LLC

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Mike Sherman | 701-306-5119

EDITING & PROOFING

Mike Sherman | Editorial Director Amy Peterson | Copy Editor

ADVERTISING Mike Sherman | 701-306-5119 | Account Executive Anna Hettenbaugh | 701-729-1910 | Account Executive Patty Nystrom | 701-412-4109 | Account Executive Becky Sherman | Accounting Manager

DESIGN & LAYOUT

Dawn Siewert | Graphic Designer

PHOTOGRAPHY

5Foot20 Design Lounge | Classic Photography Haney's Photography | Sickels Photography Skyloft Photography | Milestones Photography

FIND US

Phone: 701-306-5119 www.areawoman.com www.facebook.com/areawomanmagazine

READ A DIGITAL COPY

www.issuu.com/areawoman Area Woman is a proud 28 year member of the Fargo/Moorhead Chamber of Commerce. Area Woman Magazine is published six times a year by Area Woman Publishing, LLC. Print quantity 23,000 per issue. Printed in the U.S.A. ©2012 Area Woman Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Area Woman is a trademark registered at U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Area Woman Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Area Woman Magazine does not necessarily endorse or agree with content of articles or advertising presented.

Correction: In the June/July issue of Area Woman the story titled “South Fargo’s Answer to Sophisticated Living” Jan Melvold was noted as an architect and he is the lead designer.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Roger Minch

Kristy Olsgaard

Jill N. Kandel

Janelle Brandon

Roger Minch was born and raised in Fargo, North Dakota and graduated from North Dakota State University in 1974 and the University of North Dakota School of Law in 1978. Mr. Minch joined Serkland Law Firm in 1978. His areas of concentration include bankruptcy, loan documentation, collections, foreclosures and workouts. He served as a board member of the Fargo/Moorhead Symphony for seven years and for one year as its president, and currently serves on the board of the FM Opera and the Bison Arts Board. He is one of two North Dakota Attorneys certified as a Creditor’s Rights Specialist by the American Board of Certification sponsored by the American Bankruptcy Institute and the Commercial Law League of America. Kristy Olsgaard grew up in Buhl, Minnesota and graduated from Moorhead State University. She spent 16 years in the banking industry. After moving to her husband Kevin’s family farm, she has had the privilege to be a stay-at-home mom, a title she is proud to wear. It has given her time to pursue a career in writing. With two sons, Nick and Tyler, the family keeps busy attending their activities. Their family spends time golfing, snow skiing and mowing a large yard! Jill N. Kandel has lived in Zambia, Indonesia, England, and in her husband’s native Netherlands. Her writing has been published in literary journals including The Gettysburg Review, Brevity, River Teeth, and Image. One of her essays was published by Penguin in the anthology “The Best Spiritual Writing 2012.” Another essay is forthcoming in “Becoming: What Makes a Woman,” to be published by the U. of Nebraska Press. Janelle Brandon is a food and outdoor enthusiast! When possible, she commutes via bicycle and loves her community supported agriculture share which provides her a bountiful amount of vegetables for creating delectable dishes now and in the winter months ahead. She’s married to Lukas and mom to Dylan and Julia. Brandon enjoys capturing human interest stories and digging deeper to find the truly meaningful, inspirational values in those doing amazing things everyday in the Red River Valley. She also reveres the childbearing year and takes pride in her work as a birth doula. Learn more at www.janellebrandon.com.


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Women’s Resources


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hough it may seem like summer is winding down, there are still plenty of things to see and do before the snow flies. Check out the calendar in this edition of Area Life to make your plans. And be sure to catch up on the events you may have missed through the Featuring Fargo articles about the Moorhead Soroptimists and the Riding on Angels’ Wings fundraiser, get a preview of the Fall Home Show, and get an up-close look at the Red River Zoo.

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AW • EVENT CALENDAR August 1 Family Fun Concerts - Thunder Ridge Local bands will entertain families with lively music. Get your face painted, jump in the bouncy castle and take home a craft project. This is a free event and there will be limited concessions for sale. Brunsdale Park 1702 27th Avenue South, Fargo 701-499-6060 or fargoparks.com August 2 Fred Cogelow - Artist Reception Join us for the opening exhibition of sculpture by Minnesota artist Fred Cogelow. His life-sized figures begin as green logs that Cogelow sculpts into whimsical portraits of rural folk and celebrities. 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Free for Museum members; $10 nonmembers. Plains Art Museum 704 1st Avenue North, Fargo 701-232-3821 museum@plainsart.org

AUGUST

needs of our Sodbuster by Luis Jimenez. Kreysler will have spent a day examining Sodbuster and will report back. 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Free Plains Art Museum 704 1st Avenue North, Fargo 701-232-3821 museum@plainsart.org August 2-4 WE FEST A Country music festival with top national performers at the Soo Pass Ranch in Detroit Lakes. 218-847-1340 or wefest.com

August 2 Cruisin Broadway Explore Historic Downtown FargoMoorhead along Broadway with all the classics. 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm 701-364-9867 or fmdowntown.com

August 2 Sodbuster Conserved Come and hear a presentation by noted conservationist Bill Kreysler and participate in a public discussion about the restoration

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August 4 Birds, Butterflies, Beetles & Bugs Children will enjoy an outdoor scavenger hunt as everyone learns more about these essential creatures and what attracts them to our gardens. Adults welcome. Kids ages 5 and up should have an adult chaperone. Free to all ages. 9:00 am - 11:30 am NPBGS Greenhouse 1200 28th Avenue North, Fargo 701 293-9696 or info@npbotanicgarden.com

August 8 Family Fun Concerts - Silverado Local bands will entertain families with lively music. Get your face painted, jump in the bouncy castle and take home a craft project. This is a free event and there will be limited concessions for sale. 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Island Park 302 7th Street South, Fargo 701-499-6060 or fargoparks.com

August 8 3rd Annual Joes for G.I.’s All proceeds donated to local military support groups. Lunch $5.00 Sloppy Joes, Chips, Cookie and Soda 11:00 am - 1:00 pm U.S. Bank Plaza 2nd Avenue and Broadway, Fargo or U.S. Bank Service Center 4325 17th Avenue Southwest, Fargo August 13 Movie Night Come to Island Park at dusk for some fun in the park at the annual Summer Movie Nights! The fun starts when the sun goes down with a movie with free Pepsi and popcorn while supplies last. Island Park 302 7th Street South, Fargo 701-499-6060 or fargoparks.com August 15 Red River Valley Speedway Races The All Star Circuit of Champions Sprints make a second swing back through the valley for a grudge match. This mid-week show will give some drivers who didn’t make the 1st round a chance to battle for the win. Red River Valley Speedway 1805 West Main Avenue, West Fargo 701-356-5377 or redrivervalleyspeedway.com


ST EVENTS August 16 Philosphy for All: What is a Garden? This is a perfect time to start a discussion of philosophy and gardens. Topics will include the concept of “defiant gardens,” Japanese gardens, and gardens as locations of doing philosophy in ancient Greece. 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Free Plains Art Museum 704 1st Avenue North, Fargo 701-232-3821 museum@plainsart.org August 18 ND Appaloosa Horse Show Horse Arena - Red River Valley Fairgrounds 1805 West Main Avenue, West Fargo 701-282-2200 or redrivervalleyfair.com August 18-19 Pioneer Days at Bonanzaville Pioneer Days is an annual event at Bonanzaville and show what life was like 100 years ago in the valley. There are embroidery, woodcarving, and threshing demonstrations. Bonanzaville 1351 Main Avenue West, West Fargo 701-282-2822 or bonanzaville.com

August 19 FM RedHawks vs. Rockland Boulders Hawkeye’s birthday party, Annual pre-game Sunday brunch, and inflatables in the playground thanks to Games Galore. Kids run the bases after the game thanks to Muffins to Marathons and SunMart Ticket Giveaway. Game Time at 1:00 Newman Outdoor Field 701-235-6161 or fmredhawks.com August 20 Dog Swim Four-legged friends are invited to dive in and splash around with fellow dogs. Admission is $2.50 per dog and proceeds benefit the Moorhead Dog Park. All dogs should have a collar, carry ID tags, be properly licensed, vaccinated, and in good health to participate. 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm South Park and Northeast Park Wading Pools 2102 14th Street South & 1817 8th Avenue North, Moorhead

August 21 Symphony Rocks @ Bluestem The Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra will again join forces with the 12-piece Post-Traumatic Funk Syndrome for a fundraising concert event at Bluestem Center for the Arts.

6:30 pm VIP Pre-CONCERT BASH in Bluestem Marcil Commons, Scheels Living Room VIP concert tents 8:00 pm Concert on Bluestem Amphitheatre Stage Tickets: $18 - $75 Bluestem Center for the Arts 801 50th Avenue Southwest, Moorhead 701-478-3676 or fmsymphony.org August 22 Concordia Cobber Feed Join us for one of the 20 Cobber Corn Feeds across the nation. We’ll provide the hot and fresh corn-you just bring whatever else you want to eat and drink. Concordia College 901 8th Street South, Moorhead 218-299-3734 or cord.edu August 25-26 Island Park Show Spend a day at Island Park shopping in the shade! Come to the beautiful park for a two-day festival of original fine arts and unique crafts. 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Free Island Park 302 7th Street South, Fargo 701-499-7788 or fargoparks.com

August 19 BMX Jam Bikers, show off your tricks at the BMX Jam. All skill levels can participate in the exhibition. Helmets are required. Prizes given away each day. 4:30 pm Dike West Skate Park 310 4th Street South, Fargo 701-499-7788 or fargoparks.com

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AW • EVENT CALENDAR September 5 Members Appreciation Night All current members are invited for a special evening that includes animal presentations, encounters and a picnic dinner. Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo 701-277-9240 or redriverzoo.org

September 6 Cruisin Broadway Explore Historic Downtown FargoMoorhead along Broadway with all the classics from 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm 701-364-9867 or fmdowntown.com September 6 Pre-Planning Seminar Pre-planning topics of wills, veteran’s benefits, nursing home concerns, and final needs will be discussed. Everyone will receive a free pre-planning guide. 2:00 pm - 6:30 pm Hjemkomst Center 202 1st Avenue North, Moorhead 218-233-1533 or korsmofuneralservice.com

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SEPTEM B September 6-8 Lobster & Lefsa Festival A fun atmosphere of food and entertainment with the added appeal of the uniquely creative combination of fresh Maine lobster and Norwegian style lefse. 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Downtown Fargo Broadway and 1st Avenue South, Fargo 701-306-0165 or lobsterandlefse.com September 8 CCRI Walk & Roll-A-Thon Enjoy music, picnic, silent auction, and games while supporting people with disabilities. All proceeds from the walk will be used to purchase service enhancements; adaptive equipment, educational and recreational opportunities. Those who raise $25 will receive a t-shirt. 10:30 am - 1:00 pm Oak Grove Park 170 Maple Street North, Fargo 218-331-2024 or jhudson@ creativecare.org September 8 Saturday Movie - Hunger Games Enjoy popcorn and a movie in our event room! 2:00 pm Moorhead Library 118 5th Street South, Moorhead 218-233-3757 or larl.org September 8-9 Fall Parade of Homes The Fall Parade will include a wide range of prices in developments throughout the F-M area. The homes are built with pride by HBA of F-M Builder members, each with his or her distinct style. Bright yellow and blue directional signs and pennants will mark homes participating in the Parade. Parade

of Homes magazines will be available Sept. 4 at Hornbacher’s. Noon - 5:00 pm each day. Scattered-site tour of homes in the FM area. 701-232-5846 or hbafm.com September 9 Grandparents’ Day Bring your grandma and grandpa to the Zoo and they will get in free! You can also meet the Zoo’s resident grandparents:  Yukiko and Shan Tou, Chinese Red Pandas. Zoo hours:  10:00 am - 5:00 pm Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo 701-277-9240 or redriverzoo.org 

September 9 Walk of Hope A walk for suicide awareness and remembrance. We will walk to the Angel of Hope statue in Island Park and have moment of silence for


M BER those who have died by suicide. We will then walk back to the courtyard for a short program. Registration starts at 1:30 pm. The walk begins at 2:00 pm. Courtyard between the Fargo Civic Center and Fargo Public Library 701-293-6462 or myfirstlink.org September 11-13 Big Iron See the newest and best in agriculture equipment at the Midwests largest Ag expo. Red River Valley Fairgrounds, West Fargo 701-282-2200 or bigironfarmshow.com September 13 150 Years of Fashion A historic fashion show of men’s, women’s and children’s clothing from the Red River Valley. 7:00 pm Tickets are $10. All proceeds benefit HCSCC. Historical & Cultural Society of Clay County 202 1st Avenue North, Moorhead 218-299-5511 or hcscconline.org September 14 Free Friday Movies at the Carlson Library Free Friday movies are shown at 1:00 pm on the 2nd Friday of each month (September through May.) Free popcorn is served. Dr. James Carlson Library 2801 32nd Avenue South, Fargo 701-476-4040

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AW • EVENT CALENDAR September 15-16 Fall Parade of Homes The Fall Parade will include a wide range of prices in developments throughout the F-M area. The homes are built with pride by HBA of F-M Builder members, each with his or her distinct style. Bright yellow and blue directional signs and pennants will mark homes participating in the Parade. Parade of Homes magazines will be available Sept. 4th at Hornbacher’s. Noon - 5:00 pm each day. Scattered-site tour of homes in the FM area. 701-232-5846 or hbafm.com September 15-16 Remodeled Home Tour The Home Builders Association of F-M will host its first Remodeled Home Tour in conjunction with the final weekend of its Fall Parade of Homes. The event will be detailed in the Fall Parade of Homes event magazine available Sept. 4th at Hornbacher’s. The Tour will feature remodeling projects in existing homes throughout the metro area, including a variety of rooms, and possibly landscaping and yard improvements. Noon to 5:00 pm each day. Scattered-site tour of homes in the FM area. 701-232-5846 or hbafm.com September 18 Northport Classic Book Club Book club featuring classic titles meets third Wednesday of the month (September through April.) Free. A list of titles is available at fargolibrary.org. 6:30 pm Northport Library 2714 North Broadway, Fargo 701-476-5977 or 701-476-4026

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SEPTEM B September 20 ZOOlebration! Enjoy a sampling from local restaurants at the Zoo’s annual fundraiser. Bid on unique items and enjoy the unique atmosphere of the Zoo. 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo 701-277-9240 or redriverzoo.org

awareness, education and suicide prevention, please contact Jill Brandt at 701-205-4710 or Mary J. Weiler at 701-219-4110. Registration: 1:00 pm Walk 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Lindenwood Park, Fargo Register online at: outofthedarkness.org

September 22 Pie-o-neer Day Enjoy a slice or a whole pie at the Berquist Cabin as we demonstrate cooking techniques of the 1800s. All pie sales benefit HCSCC. Historical & Cultural Society of Clay County 202 1st Avenue North, Moorhead 218-299-5511 or hcscconline.org Weekends, September 20 – October 13 Good People by David Lindsay-Abaire Good People addresses the mistrust between childhood friends whose divergent paths have led them to different socioeconomic positions, thereby challenging their assumptions about wealth, class, education and the social stereotypes in which they find themselves. 7:30 pm Thursday - Saturday 2:00 pm matinee October 7 only Theatre B 716 Main Avenue, Fargo 701-729-8880 or theatreb.org September 23 Out of the DARKNESS Fargo-Moorhead’s Community Walk to prevent suicide and support survivors. If you would like to walk in honor of a loved one or friend, or can be a sponsor or volunteer for this event supporting mental health

September 26-28 61for61 Radiothon Join The FOX 107.9 as they broadcast live from Sunmart and share the stories of the patients and their families whose lives have been touched by the Roger Maris Cancer Center. Enjoy a silent auction, cook outs, family fun night, candle lighting ceremony and more! Proceeds benefit the Roger Maris Cancer Center. 6:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunmart 3175 25th Street South, Fargo laura.scott@sanfordhealth.org 701-234-6620 or 61for61.sanfordhealth.org


M BER September 29 61for61 Home Run/Walk Join the fun during the 61for61 Home Run Walk at the Scheel’s Arena. Register for the 10K, 5K Run/Walk or new this year, a 1k Youth Run and support the Roger Maris Cancer Center. Scheels Arena 5225 31st Avenue South, Fargo laura.scott@sanfordhealth.org 701-234-6620 or 61for61.sanfordhealth.org September 28-29 Fall Home Show hosted by Home Builders Association It will showcase home improvement companies and a featured speaker on home or yard improvement. Friday, noon - 8:00 pm Saturday, 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Admission is $3. Fargo Civic Center 701-232-5846 or hbafm.com

September 29 Carrie Underwood Concert Doors open at 6:00 pm Show at 7:30 pm Fargodome 1800 University Drive North, Fargo Tickets available at the FARGODOME box office, online at inforumtix.com


AW • EVENT CALENDAR October 5 NDSU Homecoming Party All NDSU alumni and Bison fans welcome. Cash bar and dinner buffet. Photo opportunity with football championship trophy. Minneapolis based band, Brat Pack Radio takes the stage at 8:00 pm. Event sponsored by The NDSU Alumni Association. 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm Fargo Holiday Inn 3803 13th Avenue South, Fargo 701-231-6807 or ndsuhomecoming.com October 6 NDSU Homecoming Open House Family friendly open house, with refreshments, face painting, tattoos, and more. Parade starts at 10:00 am 9:00 am to Noon 1241 North University Drive, Fargo  701-231-6800 October 6-7 FM Studio Crawl During the two-day event, the public is invited into the studios of the many working artists in the Fargo Moorhead area. 701-298-3936 or fmva.us Downtown Fargo

OCTOBE October 10 15th Annual Chefs’ Gala & Auction Bringing together FM Area’s top chefs to celebrate food and raise money to support Daily Bread. Gourmet food, drinks, live music and silent auction. Tickets available August 1st. Space is limited. 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo 701-232-2624 or fmchefsgala.org October 14 25th Annual Apple Dumpling Day 12:30 pm - 3:30 pm Riverview Place 5300 12th Street South, Fargo riverviewplace.org October 14 - October 20 Wolf Awareness Week Wolf activities will be held all week. Check the website for details. Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo 701-277-9240 or redriverzoo.org

October 7 FM Breast Cancer Walk Walkers will unite to raise awareness and funds for those affected by breast cancer, whether as a survivor or supporter. This three-mile walk will begin and end at West Acres Shopping Center. West Acres Mall 3902 13th Avenue South, Fargo 701-356-1468 or fmbreastcancerwalk.org October 7 Jazz into Fall Concert Featuring Andraya Abrego and the Concordia Jazz Trio. 2:00 pm Free Main Library 102 3rd Street North, Fargo 701-241-8198 or 701-241-1492

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October 14 Toby Mac Doors open at 6:00 pm Show at 7:30 pm Fargodome 1800 University Drive North, Fargo Tickets available at the FARGODOME box office, online at inforumtix.com

October 20 Women’s Showcase Exhibits, show and seminars focusing on women’s career, health and home at the FARGODOME. Fargodome 1800 University Drive North, Fargo 701-241-5419 or fmwomensshowcase.com October 20-21 Antique & Collectible Show Mon - Fri: 10:00 am - 9:00pm Sat: 10:00 am - 5:30 pm Sun: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm Moorhead Center Mall 510 Center Avenue, Moorhead 218-233-6117


BE R October 20 Fargo Mini Marathon Whether its the Mini Milers 1K & 2K, the 5K Run/Walk, the 10K Run/ Walk or the Half Mini Marathon, there is going to be something for everyone! Starting times: 5K Run/Walk: 8:05 am 10K Run/Walk: 8:10 am Mini Marathon: 8:30 am Mini Milers 1K & 2K: 12:00 Noon Scheels Arena 5225 31st Ave South, Fargo 1-888-RUN-FARGO October 28 & 30 FM Opera’s Cinderella You all know the story. Now see it as you’ve never seen it before. Rossini takes a time-honored story of a young woman overcoming a difficult home life and sets it to some of the most beautiful music you’ve ever heard. Cinderella is the perfect opera for the first time audience member because not only do you know the story, but the songs are sung in English as well. Tickets are selling fast, so buy your tickets online or contact the Opera office to reserve your seats. October 28 at 8:00 pm October 30 at 2:00 pm Reineke Festival Concert Hall, NDSU 1301 12th Avenue North, Fargo 701-239-4558 or fmopera.org

Quotable

“For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Then you will seek me and find me: when you seek me with all your heart, I will be found by you, declares the Lord.” — JEREMIAH 29: 11-14

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Women’s Resources

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AW • FEATURING FARGO

WRITER: SARAH MORRAU | PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN NASH

MAKING A DIFFERENCE FOR WOMEN Soroptimist Style Show Helps Enrich Women’s Lives

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hat do 43 bottles of wine, 53 designer-themed purses and a style show have in common? They all helped raise more than $8,200 during the 6th annual Soroptimists International of Moorhead Spring Time Styles silent auction and style show. The event was Saturday April 14 at Christ the King Lutheran Church in Moorhead. Susie Nickell, PR Director for the Moorhead Soroptimists, said the tickets sold out quickly, and the event raised about $2,000 more than last year. Soroptimists International is the largest classified women’s service organization in the world. “Soroptimist” means “best for women”― and that’s what this organization strives to achieve. The Moorhead Soroptimists meet once a month to discuss fund raising efforts for The Rape and Abuse Crisis Center, Churches United

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for the Homeless and Frasier, to name a few. They give awards to women to help them better their lives. The members also ensure that Gooseberry Park in Moorhead is cleaned annually and it stays handicapped-accessible. This annual event is a chance to enjoy coffee and cake with friends, get great deals on wine and watch women of all ages bidding above and beyond for the themed purses that support a very worthy organization. [AWM] Visit www.soroptimistncr.org for more information.


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WALLY & SANDY FUCHS

JEREMY & AMANDA HELGOE

KIRK & BETTE SHIPPLEY WRITER: MARIE LASKA | PHOTOGRAPHY: CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHY

2nd Annual

RIDING ON ANGELS’ WINGS FUNDRAISER Supporting Equine Therapy in the F/M Area

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ecently the Red River Valley Fairground was a host to a Mixed Stag fundraiser benefiting the nonprofit charity Riding on Angels’ Wings (ROAW). Founded in 2002 by Bette Shipley, the mother of a son born with Cerebral Palsy, ROAW’s goals include not only strengthening and empowering youth, but also providing education on the benefits of equine therapy and activities. Held on March 30th this 2nd annual event saw over 350 individuals enjoying a pork roast dinner, raffles, cash prizes and live auctions. The event received overwhelming community support, including corporate sponsorship from Jordahl Custom Homes. Support from individuals such as Harvey Orthodontics and Wally and Sandy Fuchs were also instrumental in making the evening a success. Describing the event as a fund-raising opportunity for youth to receive therapeutic riding scholarships, Shipley stated, “We want to be able to serve the children, and if

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we can offer scholarships to help them, that is the ultimate goal.” Likening the growth in ROAW’s programming to the vast numbers of new faces at the event, Shipley continuously strives to educate the public on equine therapy and its immeasurable benefits―not only for youth with disabilities but also for ‘at-risk’ youth―and also to provide quality programming while working closely with parents in a family-centered atmosphere. Upcoming events such as the Fargo Marathon, which includes ROAW as one of its GoFar Charity teams, are helping to ensure that ROAW will continue to provide an outstanding therapeutic option in the Fargo-Moorhead area. [AWM]

“We want to be able to serve the children ... that is the ultimate goal.”


BRENDA SCHMIDT & TAMMY DESAUTEL BOARD PRESIDENT DALLAS LEITCHENBERG MATT CULLEN HOCKEY STICK

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AW • LIFE

FALL HOME SHOW

Visit With Home Improvement Pros; Learn How to Spruce Up Your Yard

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IMAGES USED ARE PAST PROJECTS OF KARSTEN’S WHERE HE’S SHOWN THAT OUTDOOR DINING AND ENTERTAINING CAN BE CREATED IN ANY SPACE. PHOTOS TAKEN BY THE OUTDOOR GREATROOM COMPANY.

he Fall Home Show, hosted by the Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead’s Remodelers Council, provides an opportunity to learn straight from the pros about kitchen and bath remodeling, yard improvement and gardening. In addition, attendees can visit with a wide array of home improvement specialists, all under one roof, for one low price. Both days of the show, Sept. 28-29, you can take part in seminars on gardening, yard improvement and kitchen and bath trends: Friday: Cass County Extension Horticulture Agent Todd Weinmann will address winterizing gardens and tips to make your garden healthier. He will also cover planting of and care for garlic, tulips and other hardy bulbs. Weinmann has worked for North Dakota State University for eight years with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in horticulture. Saturday: Horticulturist, Landscape Designer and Author Joel Karsten of Roseville, Minn., will cover landscape lighting and its ability to add night beauty to your home as well as improve nighttime safety and security; composting through all four seasons; and creating outdoor focal points including water features, specialty lighting, art and sculpture applications and designing/building an outdoor fireplace for a northern climate. He has a bachelor’s degree in horticulture science and is a Certified Nursery Professional through the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association. Adding to his academics, Karsten’s childhood was spent on a tree nursery and crop farm in southwestern Minnesota. “Gardening is in my blood,” he says. “The knowledge through lifelong lessons gained from spending time with my grandma, Josephine, and my father, ‘Big’ Glen, far surpass what I learned in school.” Both days: Platinum Sponsor Accent Kitchen & Bath will offer seminars on kitchen and bath remodeling trends.

Show at a glance… • The Fall Home Show, hosted by Home Builders Association of F-M’s Remodelers Council, will be Sept. 28 – 29 at the Fargo Civic Center. • Hours: noon – 8 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday. • $1-off admission coupon in the show guide inserted Sept. 23 in The Forum. Starting Sept. 24, the coupon will be available at www.hbafm.com and show guides will be available at Hornbacher’s. • New two-for-one admission hours will run 2 – 5 p.m. Friday ($1-off admission coupon not valid during this time). • Admission is $3. Children younger than age 14 will be admitted free when accompanied by an adult. Parking is free and convenient. • Call (701) 232-5846 or visit www.hbafm.com for more information on exhibiting in the show.

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Check www.hbafm.com as the show nears for a seminar schedule, or pick up the show guide in The Forum Sept. 23 or available at Hornbacher’s Sept. 24. HBA Executive Vice President Bryce Johnson says, “We are excited to introduce Joel Karsten to the area. His infectious spirit, outgoing personality and passion for gardening are sure to keep audiences entertained. Todd Weinmann will also offer great information about our yards and gardens as we head into fall. And of course, Accent rounds out the offerings with ideas for a spectacular home renovation.” Now in its 23rd year, the Fall Home Show will offer exhibits on everything from general contracting services, to flooring, siding, spas, windows, water purification, decks, heating/ air conditioning, interior decorating and design, kitchen and bath design, cabinetry, garages and more. Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity will offer kids’ projects throughout show hours allowing children to construct projects provided by Lowe’s Home Improvement. Changing its format slightly from years past, the show now runs Friday/ Saturday. Another new feature is a twofor-one admission special running 2-5 p.m. Sept. 28. Johnson says, “This is a great, affordable opportunity for people who are just gathering ideas for a project, or those who are ready to get started. It’s a great time to buy or renovate a home with a large selection of housing stock and local housing and remodeling incentives. A home continues to be a great investment in the F-M metro area.”

JOEL KARSTEN

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RED RIVER ZOO

A Local Treasure with an International Impact WRITER: MARIE LASKA PHOTOS BY: REBEKAH SICKELS PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE RED RIVER ZOO

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n urban Fargo, North Dakota there are limited opportunities to connect with nature inside the city limits. However, Lisa Tate, the Executive Director of the Red River Zoo, has made it her mission to ensure that Fargo residents are aware of the treasure that lies at their doorsteps. Located at 4255 23rd Avenue South, Fargo’s Red River Zoo is only twelve years old but has a national reputation that belies its young age. As one of the few non-profit members of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Red River Zoo boasts a renowned conservation program for some of the world’s rarest cold climate species. Ms. Tate proudly describes how the zoo plays a pivotal role in international and national conservation processes, listing the Chinese Red Panda as a flagship example in that one quarter of the captive population in the United States was bred at the Red River Zoo. As these efforts are undertaken with no public funding support whatsoever, the Red River Zoo relies heavily on community partnerships and donations. However, the zoo is also extremely affordable, offering among other deals a year-long family pass for only $65.00, which allows unlimited visits to the

to a Species Survival Plan to ensure the highest level of genetic diversity in a captive population. This plan directly affects which animals can be brought to the zoo and which species need to receive consistent support through conservation processes. Though the Red River Zoo has a stellar reputation for its conservation efforts—notably with the Chinese Red Panda and Pallas Cat species—it can be an extremely difficult process, notes Tate, as “boys and girls don’t always like each other, and there is a lot of expense to see if the chemistry will be there.” One of the most dynamic surprises for visitors to the zoo is its 1928 Allen Herschel carousel, which has become a huge hit for many on-site birthday parties. The carousel was donated to the zoo by Fargo’s Dietrich family, and is one of the few consistently-used carousels still in existence.

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zoo and all of its attractions for up to four individuals. Additionally, as part of the AZA, a membership pass at the Red River Zoo will also provide discounted or free admission to over 150 zoos and aquariums nationwide. Open from 10am—7pm during the spring and summer, the zoo showcases several world-class exhibits over 22 developed acres, and focuses on three main biomes: North America, Northern Asia and the Scandinavia/Arctic. Throughout the biomes threads a well-thought-out walking path (which is lit up at night, welcoming couples seeking a romantic stroll), natural prairie grasses and the not-so-distant howling of wolves. Specific exhibits such as the stunning Trapper’s Cabin—an exhibit designed in a log-cabin style to showcase a striking pack of grey wolves—allow visitors an up-close-and-personal viewing experience; all from the safety and comfort of a room that has hosted many business lunches, grooms’ dinners and children’s sleepovers. The zoo is excited to announce that not only will a new crane exhibit be introduced this summer, but due to the generosity of a local community member next year will beget a stunning river otter exhibit designed to make visitors feel as if they’re underwater in an otter den. As explained by Tate, the Red River Zoo adheres


Along with birthday parties, formal dinners and wedding celebrations, zoo staff are kept busy with animal presentations and facilitating summer and day programs such as Junior Zookeeper and Zooniversity. This dual focus of conservation and education underlies one of the zoo’s founding principles found in the words of Baba Dioum: “In the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, we will understand only what we are taught.” [AWM] More information on zoo programming and exhibits can be found at www.redriverzoo.org

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Let's Find Them a Home JORDAN HOFKER PHOTOGRAPHY

The Humane Society Fargo-Moorhead is primarily a pound rescue organization dedicated to rescuing dogs and cats at risk of being euthanized at local impounds. Each year, we adopt out hundreds of wonderful pets that just need a second chance at finding a “forever” home. We have a variety of pets available for adoption, from puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between, and almost any breed, including purebreds. Next time you’re considering adopting a pet, please check out our shelter and consider giving a pet in need a home. Check us out at www.humanesocietyfargomoorhead.org or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/fmhumanesociety, or give us a call at 701-239-0077.

Pretzel Bugs

Jeeves

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Graupel

Tori

Cora


Midnight

Napolean

Riley

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Women’s Resources

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n addition to trendsetting fashion and hair style advice, Area Style is the place to check out area photographers that may be right for capturing your growing children or special event. You can also take a look at hot trends in invitations from Valley Printing, get a bit of legal advice, and meet Dr. Rachel Fleissner.

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AW • WEDDINGS LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY DARRELL DEUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY MILESTONES PHOTOGRAPHY

forever friend I DO. DEVOTED ETERNAL LOVE love unconditionally i take you to be my 41

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LOVE, HONOR & RESPECT


SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY DARRELL DEUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

as long as we both shall live...

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AW • STYLE

WRITER: JOYCE EISENBRAUN

Enticing Invitations Vintage with lace, contemporary with metallic, formal damask with elegant script, or a sunny beach theme: the possibilities are endless, and limited only by the imagination of the customer. It’s a favorite trend in invitations, available locally.

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bout seven years ago, Valley Printing of Fargo saw a wonderful opportunity to help many of their wedding customers by creating a new type of all-inclusive wedding invitation. The multi-panel card stock folds up into a self-mailer, but when unfolded, includes all the invitation information, along with directions and handy tear-off reply card. “Our customers love the convenience, plus they can customize it to make it exactly right for them,” said Valley Printing graphic designer Megan Elgin. “They’ve really taken off in the last few years, in part because people like having everything on one piece, but also because each invitation can be totally customized from the words to the colors to the paper.” In addition to using the invitations for weddings, Elgin noted that the invites have been used for corporate special events, sales and recognition dinners, plus bar mitzvahs, graduations, class reunions and other specialty occasions. “Customers often bring swatches in that they want to match,” said Elgin. “We have over 1000 different ink colors to pick from, so we can match any color you select.” Last year’s hot color? Purple. This year? “We’re seeing a lot of guava, yellow and green,” she said. In addition to the ink choices, Valley Printing also offers a wide variety of paper stocks from which to choose, including metallic, various textures and recycled papers. “Each invitation is custom,” Elgin said. “Everyone’s event is different, and usually the invitation is the first impression for that event, so you want to give people an idea of what to expect. All the text is totally customized for your event. If we don’t have a design in-house already that you like, we’ll create a custom design―at no additional charge.”

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Elgin can also incorporate any photographs, logos or other graphic elements the customer wants into the design. If the customer wants a certain look or feel to the invite, Elgin can help make that happen as well. “We had one person who wanted a zebra-stripe effect with pink and black, so we created their invitation using that motif,” said Elgin. “Another wanted an Old West theme, so we created something that looked like a ‘Wanted’ poster. Others have chosen a formal look with elegant script on a damask-texture background or lace. One wanted two little pig caricatures, one dressed in a tux and the other with a wedding veil, so we created those. Of course, flowers of all types and trees are always popular.” Brides and corporate planners from the area come to Valley Printing, but so do customers from across the country, as well as Canada, Ireland and Scotland. “We even did the map with driving directions for the wedding in Ireland,” recalls Elgin. Valley Printing’s graphic designers work closely with each customer to create the right invitation. Usually once an order is placed, it takes two to three business days to get the invitation designed and ready for the customer to proof. Another advantage is that there is no minimum or maximum order, so the customer can choose exactly how many invitations they need. Eclectic, fun, formal or simple, the invitations created at Valley Printing are as varied as the events, but the customers’ reaction is always the same: “They are beautiful!” “Thank you for all the time you spent so that it turned out just right!” “They are amazing!” “We can’t wait for our family and friends to receive them!” For more information on the invitations, please stop by or visit their website: Valley Printing 3045 Main Avenue Fargo, ND 58103 701-237-6408 www.sealandsend.net or valleyprinting@ideaone.net

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MILESTONES PHOTOGRAPHY

AW • WEDDINGS

SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

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SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

DARRELL DEUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY

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SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY


LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

DARRELL DEUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY

MILESTONES PHOTOGRAPHY

LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

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CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHY

LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHY MILESTONES PHOTOGRAPHY

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MILESTONES PHOTOGRAPHY

SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

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LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

AW • KIDS

LEGACY PHOTOGRAPHY

SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY


SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHY SKYLOFT PHOTOGRAPHY

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Women’s Resources


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WRITER: PATRICIA CARLSON | HANEY’S PHOTOGRAPHY

Sometimes more is more;

especially in the workplace. When you want more than wash-and-go, turn to your stylist for a professional look that is pretty and polished. Please keep in mind that an office appropriate style doesn’t have to mean boring. Experiment with color! If you’re a fair-haired gal, try caramel lowlights underneath a bright, all-over baby-blond wash. Brunette beauties should think red - cinnamon, cayenne and crimson all look smashing when weaved into brown tresses. And play with length! Shoulder length styles look great with side-swept bangs and faceframing layers. Close cropped ‘dos appear full and fabulous with added texture and height at your crown.

Don’t expect to head to a meeting with wet hair or a ponytail with these styles, though. Hair cuts like these require a little extra lovin’ so get reacquainted with your hair dryer, curling iron, mousse and shine spray. Feel free to ask your stylist for a tutorial before heading out the door - they want you to look and feel your best long after you leave the salon chair! [AWM]

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weet and feminine, meet sultry and masculine― opposites marry for a bodacious fall fashion 2012 season. Ladylike silhouettes lighten looks borrowed from the boys, while winter white shines bright in separates and dresses. As seen on the Fall/Winter 2012 Fashion Week runways in New York, this season’s top fashions are a delicate balance of bold and beautiful. Military, classic or tweed, jackets and coats rocked the runways from Elizabeth and James to Tory Burch. At the former, black military-inspired jackets topped layered ensembles of skinny pants and winter white tunic-length tops. 3.1 Phillip Lim featured a structured shearling coat, softened by its forest green color. At Tory Burch, menswear-inspired tweed suits appeared in purple, and structured yet graceful black fur cropped coats polished off prim ensembles.

APRICOT LANE

WRITER: ANNA G.

LARSON

LAURIE’S

LAURIE’S

Prim and ethereal are the yin and yang of fall’s dramatic ensembles. Marchesa’s decadent formfitting cap-sleeved gowns danced down the runway in silvery-white and peachy gold hues. The fashion house also showed laser-cut black leather dresses with flouncy skirts and clingy, edgy tops. At Derek Lam, chunky sleeveless sweaters balanced flowing silk skirts, all in shades of winter white. Winter white was also the color of choice for voluminous menswearinspired pants and button downs on the Proenza Schouler runway. Structured and powerful yet soft andladylike, fall fashion 2012 embraces balance and proves opposites really do attract. [AWM]

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APRICOT LANE

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LAURIE’S


FUSION BOUTIQUE

SCHEELS HOME & HARDWARE

APRICOT LANE

FUSION BOUTIQUE SCHEELS HOME & HARDWARE

FUSION BOUTIQUE SCHEELS HOME & HARDWARE

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where to shop

Eyewear

Scarves

Combining classic style with a contemporary twist, William Rast Eyewear is the ultimate eyewear accessory for anyone looking to complement their individual style.

The season’s best accessory complete your look with a scarf from our collection featuring Tolani, Treska and more!

Fusion Boutique

Located inside Scheels Home & Hardware 3202 13th Avenue South, Fargo 701-232-8903 scheelshomeandhardware.com

Hillmer Eye Clinic

101 10th Street North Suite 120, Downtown Fargo 701-239-9771 hillmereyeclinic.com

Contacts Want a no-maintenance contact lens? Acuvue 1-Day Moist and 1-Day Moist for Astigmatism are ideal for kids and adults alike. Wear once and throw away! Call to schedule an appointment today!

McCulley Optix Gallery

2553 Kirsten Lane, Fargo (Corner of 25th St. and 32nd Ave. S.) 701-373-2020 | optixgallery.com

Stonewall Kitchen Stonewall Kitchen is all natural and all delicious! Our full line is made up of jams and preserves, mustards, syrups, olive and flavored oils, sauces, chutneys and relishes, salad dressings, gluten free options and more! See store for weekly samplings and give the gift of gourmet today!

Local | Fresh | Natural Fun scarves and accessories, vintage jewelry, locally made pillows and cards, funky gifts, and fresh cut flowers.

3 Chicks Boutique

2733 South University Drive, Fargo 701-237-6255 | bakernursery.com

1201 Center Avenue, Moorhead 218-233-6131 hollandslandscapingandgarden.com

Shower Caps Dry Divas designer shower caps. Choose from several fabulous patterns made from high-quality, soft laminated fabric. Available in Bouffant, Classic and Little Diva sizes. | $29.99

So You Boutique

West Acres Kiosk | in the JCPenney’s Wing

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Holland’s Landscaping & Garden Center


Fine Art Giclée on Canvas The Art of Cassandra Barney

Boerth’s Art Gallery Framing & Mirrors 212 Broadway, Fargo 701-235-8923 boerthsgallery.com

Liz W. Designs Copper Bracelets Handmade by Liz Walberg of c.lizzy’s, these hand-forged copper cuff bracelets make a bold statement yet they are lighweight and comfortable to wear. Individually designed earrings and necklaces are also part of Liz’s collection and new pieces are being made all the time!

c.lizzy’s

410 Broadway, Downtown Fargo 701-235-4902

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AW • LEGALLY SPEAKING

What to Do

if Someone Owes Me or My Business Money, and They File a Bankruptcy Case?

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nce the person or entity that owes you money files a bankruptcy case, you can take no further action to collect the money or foreclose mortgages or security interests securing payment of the debt, unless the debtor initiates the surrender of collateral, otherwise agrees, or the Bankruptcy Court modifies or terminates the automatic stay, an instant indefinite moratorium, that temporary protects the entity who has filed the bankruptcy case. If you are a listed creditor, you will get a notice, information about the meeting of creditors and how to file a claim. Then, distinguish between a Chapter 7 liquidation case as opposed to repayment cases usually filed under Chapter 12 for family farmers or Chapter 13 for individuals with a regular income. Next, determine whether you are a secured creditor or an unsecured creditor. Secured creditors include creditors holding mortgages in real property or security interests in personal property given to secure payment of the underlying indebtedness. Typically, if you are an unsecured creditor, the best you will be able to do is file a proof of claim to receive a distribution from the Chapter 7 trustee, or payments from the Chapter 13 trustee, as they are received from the debtor. If you believe there has been fraud, a materially false financial statement, or other unusual circumstances, you should consult an attorney. You can always go to the meeting of creditors and ask questions. In a Chapter 7 case, where there is a consumer (as opposed to business) loan, the debtor is required to indicate what it intends to do with collateral (usually a car). The choices are to surrender the collateral, reaffirm the debt or pay for the collateral. A reaffirmation agreement serves to keep the personal obligation to pay from being discharged. In a Chapter 7 case, the discharge comes when the Chapter 7 trustee has liquidated all non-exempt assets, and made distributions. In a Chapter 13 repayment case, the discharge typically comes when all repayments required by the Chapter 13 plan have been paid. Either way, all the discharge does is forever make the personal obligation to pay unenforceable. So if you are a secured creditor, your liens (mortgages, security interests, etc.) continue, and once the case is closed, and the automatic stay is no longer in place, you can enforce the liens (foreclose mortgages, seek possession of personal property collateral, etc.). Only under very unusual circumstances are liens, as opposed to the personal obligation to pay, invalidated by a bankruptcy case or discharge. But in repayment cases, if you have notice of the case, you will be bound by the terms of any repayment plan, whether you could have objected to it or not. Typically, if you are a secured creditor, or have a substantial claim, you should consult an attorney. This article was written and prepared by Roger J. Minch, an attorney with the Serkland Law Firm in Fargo, North Dakota. For more information call 232.8957, email at rminch@ serklandlaw.com or visit www.serklandlaw.com. WRITER: ROGER J. MINCH

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AW • ADVERTORIAL

BRINGING HAPPY BACK

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achel Fleissner, MD Board Certified Psychiatrist has worked in Fargo since 1998. She has owned her own practice since 2006 after being awarded the Prestigious Bush Foundation Medical Fellowship to study Neuromodulation. In 2009 she was the first and only Psychiatrist to bring Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to North Dakota. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) In her career as a Psychiatrist, Dr. Rachel Fleissner has come upon many patients who just did not get better from their illnesses of Depression, Anxiety, PTSD with medications and therapy despite doing everything asked of them by their doctors. Too many patients could not tolerate the side effects of the medications and some just did not get better whatever medications they were prescribed. Due to her desire to “Bring Happy Back” to her patients, Dr. Rachel researched which new technologies were available. Transcranial Magnetic Therapy (TMS) FDA approved for patients with treatment resistant depression, TMS uses pulsating electromagnetic energy directed at every specific area of the brain activating brain circuits. The magnetic coil is placed on the scalp non-invasively and magnetic fields produce pulses of energy directly into the region of the brain responsible for depression. These healing pulses of energy are heard and felt as a tapping on the skull for the patient participating in the treatment. The sensation is very well tolerated with no systemic side effects. Patients come for each session returning to their daily activities immediately after each session. There is no sedation or anesthesia, and no change in cognition for the patients.

“Once I had read the amazing reports and success stories from this treatment modality I knew I had to bring this to Fargo and my practice.”

Happiness comes one patient at a time, watching people who have suffered with Depression, Anxiety, PTSD for many years get better is wonderful. Having the ability to treat patients in Fargo with the technology used at the major medical centers across the USA is something I am very proud of. Treating the Brain as a Electrochemical Target There are different brain regions that are known to be involved in mood regulation. The main brain areas include the pre-frontal cortex, the anterior cingulate gyrus and the amygdala. Brain activity can be altered either chemically by using drugs but since drugs act throughout the body (systemically) many people suffer from side effects that often limit them being able to tolerate the drugs. In addition over one-third of patients prescribed drugs for depression do not respond successfully to them. Brain activity can be altered electrically by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). Using a pulsating electromagnetic field to treat a very specific area of the brain it can successfully treat patients who have not had success with medications. TMS is focused, noninvasive and non-systemic. Rachel Fleissner, MD 2902 South University Drive Fargo, ND 58103 701-364-9723 www.DrMyRachel.com


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ealth is something we so often take for granted, until it is taken from us. This edition of Area Health takes a look at Judy Green, Anne Conway, and Sharon Joelson, three women that no longer take their own health for granted. Be sure to read about strokes in women, and get to know Sister Agatha Lucey, one of the women behind the scenes at Riverview Place.

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AW • HEALTH

HER SURVIVOR STORY

Sanford Marketing Executive Shares Her Journey with Breast Cancer

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routine mammogram took Judy Green from being an advocate for women’s health to someone working toward her own survival story. Sanford’s Vice President for Corporate Communication was diagnosed this spring with breast cancer. Since the day she started this journey, she’s been humbled and inspired by the way colleagues, friends and breast cancer survivors have reached out to support her. “One of the emails I received after people started hearing about it said, ‘you’ve become part of a sisterhood and there are many sisters who are survivors,” says Green. “I never thought I’d be part of this sisterhood, but I’m so thankful for it.”

Screening for life Green wants to encourage other women to take the time for screening tests. She feels fortunate that she was able to have her cancer diagnosed at an early stage, which has improved both her prognosis and treatment. “My wish for women everywhere is that they carve out the time in their busy lives to make it a priority to get screened,” Green says. “Taking care of your health is far more important than another meeting or anything else we have on your schedule.”

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Green was getting ready for a family trip to celebrate her 25th anniversary with her husband, Scott, when she went in for a routine mammogram and ended up having three biopsies. While she was still on vacation, she got the phone call that cancer had been found in her right breast. “The diagnosis of cancer, the word itself creates fear, but then you decide that you’re going to survive this,” Green said. “There is no question about whether I’m going to make it. I’ve simply got to get through the journey.”

Getting better Green had a lumpectomy to remove the cancerous cells, followed by her first session of chemotherapy in April.


She told friends and colleagues and began to make plans as to how she would balance career, family and the medical care she needed. Her 23-year-old son Ben had weeks earlier told his mother that he planned to shave his own hair off alongside his mother as a sign of support. So when her hair began to fall out two weeks after she started chemotherapy, the entire family went later that day to Green’s hairstylist. Green had her hair shaved off first and then her son stepped into the stylists’ chair. While she wasn’t highly emotional that day, she remembers shedding one tear and wiping it away as her husband and daughter Allison stood by, everyone participating in the solemn event. “It was a pretty powerful and big moment for us as a family,” Green said. “I’ve been so blessed to have their support every step of the way.” Green has one more round of chemotherapy to complete this summer. She’ll begin radiation treatments in August. Her care at Roger Maris Cancer Center has been nothing short of amazing, every step of the way, she says. “From mammography to surgery, I’ve had the best care possible,” she says.

Showing support Throughout the whole process, she’s been floored by the way her family knows just the right way to help out – phone calls, notes and visits to raise her spirit. As she worked hard to keep life as normal as possible, her co-workers did things both little and big to show Green that they cared. “We all walk around during our lives and say, ‘hey, how are you?’ everyday,” Green says. “I’m now at a place where people ask that and it’s real, a genuine extension of care and support.” Green says she feels fortunate that she’s been able to keep up with the routine and people who love her, focusing on what is important. Her religious faith has been an inspiration and helped her make it through her treatment. And the survivor stories she hears everyday strengthen her resolve to beat this disease. She knows that soon she’ll be sharing her tale of survival, too. “Every story gives you hope,” says Green. “It gives you a sense that you’re not alone, that you can do this and make it. I know I will.”

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AW • HEALTH

TIME IS BRAIN

Stroke in Women: What You Need to Know

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DR. ZIAD DARKHABANI, INTERVENTIONAL NEUROLOGIST, CONSULTS WITH STROKE PROGRAM COORDINATOR, AHREN DOSCH, AT ESSENTIA HEALTH IN FARGO

f you think being a woman reduces your risk of stroke, it’s time to think again. While men used to be at a higher risk, the American Stroke Association reports women now suffer 60 percent of the strokes in America. Each year, 425,000 women have a stroke and 80,600 die. “We’ve changed how we look at stroke in women,” says Dr. Ziad Darkhabani, a new interventional neurologist at Essentia Health-Fargo who specializes in treating stroke patients. He uses high-tech imaging and tiny catheters to reach and treat blood clots in the brain. Why women are suffering more strokes isn’t clear. Dr. Darkhabani points out that age is one of the biggest risk factors and women simply live longer than men. Estrogen, once considered a protecting factor for women, now appears to increase risk based on the higher rate of stroke in women on birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy, he says. Key to saving lives and reducing the debilitating impact of stroke is prompt diagnosis and expert treatment, says Dr. Darkhabani. Time is critical, he explains, because research shows the first three to four hours

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STROKE WARNING SIGNS • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg – especially on one side of the body • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination • Sudden severe headache with no known cause


offer the best opportunity make a difference in a patient’s outcome. Dr. Darkhabani stresses that you should not wait if you think someone has symptoms of a stroke (see box below). If possible, choose an emergency room at a hospital such as Essentia Health-Fargo that has a dedicated stroke team and specialists trained in rapid diagnosis and intervention. A stroke is caused by a blood clot or hemorrhage in a vessel in the brain. Deprived of oxygen and nutrients, brain cells begin to die. At the same time, nearby vessels try to take over and saving them through prompt treatment can make the difference, Dr. Darkhabani explains. “Our goal is to open a vessel as soon as possible to restore those nutrients and oxygen and save brain tissue,” says Dr. Darkhabani. “Opening the vessel gives the patient the best chance possible to improve.” As an interventional neurologist, Dr. Darkhabani uses high-tech imaging and a tiny catheter to reach a clot in the brain. There he can directly deliver an effective clot-busting drug called tPA (tissue plasminogen activator), or use special tools attached to the catheter to remove the clot. Patients who suffer an ischemic stroke (caused by a blood clot) are routinely treated with tPA through an intravenous line if they can be treated within four hours of the onset of symptoms. However, that’s only about 3 percent of patients. Dr. Darkhabani explains the window for his interventions can extend up to eight hours and there is a better chance to open large vessels. “The burden that stroke places on both the patient and family is significant and can be devastating,” says Dr. Darkhabani. “I often see people on their worst day of their lives. I know how important it is for family members to understand what has happened and how important it is to give them emotional support.” Dr. Darkhabani recently joined Essentia Health and is currently the only interventional neurologist in North Dakota. Stroke patients seeking this specialized care no longer need to be transported to the Twin Cities or Billings, Montana for treatment.

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AW • HEALTH

HER PERSONAL BEST

Total Hip Replacement Requires Total Team

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weat glistening on her forehead, Anne Conway reaches over and increases the resistance on the triceps machine. She completes 20 reps, then moves to the next station. Her goal? “Do this without perspiring,” she said laughing. A year ago this longtime Fargo educator never imagined a total hip replacement could lead to a new lease on life. “Exercise was never even in my vocabulary,” said Conway. “This whole experience pushed me into a totally different way of thinking…”

Overcoming fear Conway’s need for a total hip replacement followed years of rheumatoid arthritis -- an autoimmune disease. Even when wellmanaged, RA can eventually wreak havoc with joints. “Last spring I recognized I was walking funny -- like a duck, but I didn’t know why,” said Conway. She was referred to Dr. Andrew Hvidston, orthopedic surgeon at Sanford Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in Fargo.

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“This whole experience pushed me into a totally different way of thinking…”


When Dr. Hvidston showed her an X-ray of a healthy hip joint compared to her own, she saw the problem. “I knew surgery was the right answer, but that didn’t stop my mind from going wild,” she said. “I was 59 at the time and wondered -- is this the beginning of the end? Will all my joints need to be replaced? Is it time to write my obituary? I have a huge imagination.” Dr. Hvidston’s experience and his explanation of the surgery reassured her life was not over. She also learned that surgical expertise sets the stage for the next important steps. Optimal results real generally are excellent, with some complications. Conway’s successful surgery took place last June at Sanford South University. “They get you moving right away,” she said. “It’s a little like graduating from high school and receiving luggage from your parents. It’s their way of saying, ‘Go on now, have a good life.’”

Beating the blues For Conway, the “good life” needed a boost. “Initially I was a little depressed and didn’t feel like exercising,” she said. “That’s where my physical therapist Jennifer Iverson really made a difference. Always professional and always kind, she wouldn’t allow me the luxury of feeling sorry for myself. She kicked my butt and motivated me!” Twice-a-week outpatient PT led to increased strength and mobility. But Conway gained something more: inspiration to lead a more active, healthy life. She’s already lost 71 pounds.

Reaching higher Today Conway exercises at Sanford Family Wellness Center. Iverson designed a program, then sent it to the Wellness Center trainers. “I ask them questions, but they ask me questions, too,” said Conway. “They show me how to push harder, but safely.” Feeling more energetic than she’s felt in years and moving better, Conway looks to the future with a new mantra: “Keep trying, keep moving, keep pushing. If it’s important to you, do it!” Sanford Orthopedics & Sports Medicine -- for the everyday competitor in all of us. [AWM]

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AW • HEALTH

WRITER: JANELLE BRANDON | REBEKAH SICKELS PHOTOGRAPHY

WHEN SHARON FELL Living with a Traumatic Brain Injury

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haron Joelson, 65, of Moorhead, never thought a fall on the ice in January 2011 would change her life forever. Joelson is an RN with over 40 years of experience and was working as a medical reviewer at the time of her fall. Joelson loved being a nurse and felt productive and valuable at her job. When she fell, she hit the back of her head. Joelson immediately had a horrible headache, but didn’t think much of it and began her workday. A concerned co-worker noticed that Joelson was confused, irritable and just didn’t seem like herself. She was taken to the emergency room. “They did a CT scan in the ER and it didn’t reveal a bleed or fracture,” said Joelson. “But everything was different from that day forward.” Joelson developed debilitating migraines and felt like she was walking around in a fog. When she returned to work in February 2011, she was unable to fulfill the requirements of her position. The fluorescent lighting immediately triggered migraines and a loss of balance, she could not remember the steps for projects, and had difficulty with finding the right words when trying to articulate. Familiar work tasks were now very complicated and she knew she was unable to perform them. Though she didn’t tell her friends or family, she secretly feared that she was experiencing the onset of dementia.  “I went to the neuropsychologist to get evaluated,” said Joelson. Instead, she was experiencing the symptoms of a traumatic brain injury.  “That’s when I was referred to Janet.”

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SHARON JOELSON


Janet Grove is a Licensed SpeechLanguage Pathologist at Progressive Therapy Associates in West Fargo, which she co-owns with Jodi Hedstrom. “I began working with Sharon last August,” said Grove. “She’s made tremendous functional gains in the time I have been seeing her.” According to Grove, for many like Joelson, even the simplest tasks can become very challenging. Cleaning, paying bills, gardening, cooking and watching a movie require additional planning and energy. Through treatment, Joelson is now aware of her impairments and can better plan her days so she can be more productive. More than a year after her injury, she is learning to do things that were once effortless for her. She can now manage her health and care for her home. The brain exercises Grove has Joelson practice and perform aren’t easy for Joelson and she is often exhausted after her therapy sessions. “I have great hope for Sharon,” said Grove. “She has a great attitude and I have to remind her this isn’t a sprint, it’s a marathon.” “Even though it’s hard and I have to work on it every day, I am starting to be able to function again and do the things I used to do like garden and manage my own affairs,” said Joelson. “Janet’s a Godsend.” [AWM] To learn more about Progressive Therapy Associates, call 701-356-7766 for a free consultation or visit www. progressivetherapyassociates.com.

JANET GROVE

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WRITER: KIM WAGNER | PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN BORGE

A SERVANT’S HEART AT RIVERVIEW PLACE Twenty-Five Years of Service

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ister Agatha Lucey fondly recalls her mother’s observation, “If the Lord calls you, you obey.” Agatha Lucey was born to Patrick and Margaret Lucey on February 5, 1930. She was raised in Killarney, Co. Kerry, Ireland, the youngest of eight children. She received her early education with the Presentation Sisters in Crosshaven, Co. Cork, Ireland. In November of 1947, together with her twin sister, Deborah, and several other Sisters from the “Old Country,” she made the voyage to America. Sister Agatha shared, “The Presentation Sisters Foundress, Nano Nagle encouraged us to educate and change the lives of others outside in the community, not behind walls.” Making her profession of vows in 1950, Sister Agatha feels empowered to emulate Nano Nagle’s commitment to serve in Christ’s name. “Serving the Lord is my life’s focus and gives me great joy!” Riverview Place was developed by the Presentation Sisters to meet an area need for residential accommodations for active seniors. March 1, 1987 was Dedication Day for this new venture, providing pleasant and secure housing for people 55 and older. In 2012, Riverview celebrates 25 years. In 1996 the Presentation Sisters and eleven other congregations of religious women consolidated their assets to create a new organization called Catholic Health Initiatives. This is the

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organization sponsoring Riverview Place yet today. Sisters: Agatha, Mary Beauclair and Josephine Brennan have continued to be a vital part of Riverview Place through their individual service and presence within the community. These three lively women have devoted their lives to serving Riverview Place. “We are a team,” Sister Agatha reports. “We live together in an apartment on the campus.” Sister Mary has a green thumb. The courtyards and flowerbeds are maintained under her vigilant eye and the winter greenhouse thrives with vibrant colors. Sister Josephine works in food service, ensuring residents and guests always feel well nourished and loved. All three Sisters agree, Riverview Place is not merely or essentially a building and it certainly isn’t a museum to what has been. It is a living organism and as a living thing, continues to grow and change. In May, a new enhanced living section named Crosshaven opened in Riverview Place. Already fully occupied, Crosshaven provides an accommodating environment for those needing physical and cognitive supportive care 24-hours a day. Residents share meals in a family setting around big tables. Organized activities provide socializing opportunities and a cup of coffee is always available. People concur that their lives are enriched by the Riverview Place experience. A resident shared, “The Sisters who live here


are rare individuals who genuinely share compassion with everyone. I am grateful for their kind consideration.” In 1988, resident Betty Sullivan wrote a letter directly to Pope Paul II, commending Sister Agatha’s tireless work. A response from the Secretariat of State noted, “His Holiness wishes me to assure you that he will pray for Sister Agatha Lucey and he gladly sends her his Apostolic Blessing.” Today at 82, Sister Agatha can be found at Riverview Place using her nursing skills in the health office, rearranging tables for an upcoming meeting, mopping up an overrun toilet, pouring coffee for visitors or holding the hand of a resident as he or she journeys from this life to the next. Just as her mother encouraged her as a little girl, wherever the need is the greatest, Sister Agatha heeds the call and listens wholeheartedly. “A servant angel in the flesh,” notes Jeff Pederson, President and CEO of Riverview Place. “Sister Agatha is the epitome of the heart and soul of our community.” Riverview Place begins their next 25 years with exciting plans for the future, confident in the goodness of God. “He has supported and sustained us thus far and we place our trust that the mission will continue to thrive,” Sister Agatha notes. The community is invited to join Riverview Place as they celebrate their 25th Apple Dumpling Day celebration on October 14, 2012 from 12:30 – 3:30 pm. [AWM]

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lan Hochhalter from Building Concepts works with homeowners Jeff and Anne Zarling to create a unique blend of art and function in their home on Villa Parkway in West Fargo. See just how they did it in this edition of Area Home.

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WRITER: JOYCE EISENBRAUN | PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL K. SMITH

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AW • HOME ascinating, sophisticated and contemporary begin the description of an extraordinary new three-level home on Villa Parkway in West Fargo. Owners Jeff and Anne Zarling have a passion for contemporary art, and have designed a home that not only is ideal for entertaining and relaxing, but is also a brilliant showcase for their treasured artworks. Gray vinyl and deep gray ledgestone accents combine with fresh white casings and doors on the exterior of the home. The front entry translucent glass door and two sidelights have a geometric Frank Lloyd Wright appeal. Hanging from the 20-foot ceiling is a Swedish designed chandelier: The outside “moooi” circular shade offers a beautiful reflection during the day, while allowing the interior chandelier to shine through at night. A finely wrought glass and wood entry table complements a contemporary painting of a harlequin figure on the right. The foyer rug has a native motif in rust, blue, tan and black. All the walls throughout the home are a soft gray, with white casements and four-panel reed glass doors. The subtle tones create the perfect setting for the vivid colors, shapes and styles in the various art pieces throughout the home. “We wanted an uncluttered look,” said Anne. “I did a lot of online searching and idea gathering to see what was now available. One of the best pieces of advice we received was simply to stay true to your style stay focused on what you wanted, and that’s what we’ve tried to do.” Fortunately, Jeff and Anne have similar tastes in their home designs. “We’ve done two houses together,” Jeff recalled. “For this, Anne did a tremendous amount of work, but the result is a very comfortable space where we can relax or entertain friends. It works very well for us.”

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Living Spaces

The open floor plan helps the living, dining and kitchen areas flow together. Earth-toned ebony stain on maple flooring extends throughout the main floor. On the left side of the living room is a baby grand piano, with two striking Andy Stark paintings above. A 15-foot high fireplace surround,

in a ribbed dry rock texture painted a dark gray, holds a gas fireplace with sparkling crushed fire glass, adding both warmth and a splash of color in the center. In the corner, a large flat panel television is hooked to the Bose theater system used throughout the house. Facing the fireplace is a large caramel-colored leather sectional sofa, centered on a blue, red and cream area rug. On the side, two round chairs in gray microfiber are accented with a chrome floor lamp. The back wall of the living area boasts three large windows that overlook the neighborhood pond, offering an ever-changing seasonal view. The dining area next to the living room has an additional bank of windows overlooking the pond. Guests are invited to dine at a rectangular natural maple tabletop atop black metallic legs, with matching black leather chairs. The chandelier above is suspended on fine stainless cables, with black pleated fabric that can be expanded or contracted to suit the mood. To the side, sliding glass doors lead to a brick patio, with Adirondack-style chairs done in black metals.

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Just off the dining area is a den/ office area. Gray zebra-stripe tone-ontone carpet adds a plush feel for the toes. The desk has a frosted glass top with brushed chrome legs. A large black and gray Andy Warhol-inspired art piece actually uses topographical lake maps as the background. Natural maple cabinets topped with pebble granite in taupe, gray and black create the framework for the kitchen. Stainless appliances, including the double ovens, French door refrigerator and rectangular single basin sink are complemented by the oversized brushed nickel hardware. A six-burner gas stovetop, soft close drawers, under cabinet “toe� lights and large pull-out pantry shelves next to the refrigerator add efficiency to this beautiful work area. The island has a two-tier granite countertop for serving and prep work, accented by three petite crystal and silver pendant lights. Tucked under the end is a wine refrigerator. Four Cherner, Italian-made maple chairs with a Stella orange stain provide seating at the counter.

Guests Welcome

To the left of the foyer is a powder room and guest suite. Even the powder room details reflect the contemporary focus of the home, with a rectangular sink set into the granite counter top, a flat faucet and brushed nickel hardware. Lighting is provided by rectangular frosted glass sconces. A self-closing lid on the contemporary-styled toilet is another handy feature. The guest suite runs the length of the home, with the bedroom area overlooking the front yard. Window treatments are sheers with horizontal inset panels that are electronically controlled. Natural maple bedside tables have an unusual design that includes a chrome reading light. Above the bed, three art pieces in silver mats complement another large black and white painting. Next door is the guest bath with gray and taupe Italian porcelain flooring that extends into the walk-in shower. Full wall mirrors are above each of the sinks, lit by frosted glass and chrome wall sconces set into the mirrors. Glass block windows offer light and privacy in the bath and dressing area in the adjoining walk-in closet.

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The Loft

From the foyer, maple tread stairs on dark gray ironwork steps lead to the upstairs master bedroom loft. An E.K. Hougen painting is featured on the landing. Two ebony-stained sliding barn doors ensure privacy to the loft. Enemy Brain #3, a painting by Wilson from MSUM dominates the short hallway to the master suite. Gray carpet, a gray frame king bed with black and gray linens, and mahogany end tables and chest, create a backdrop for the favorite art pieces chosen for this area. A balcony door on the far end overlooking the pond has a Juliet railing. Matching plum leather chairs offer a cozy place to read or relax next to an inset gas fireplace. The master bath has a glass block wall above the bathing tub, which features a separate faucet arcing into the tub. Twin rectangular undermount sinks are set into taupe and gray granite countertops with wall mirrors lighted by chrome and crystal light sconces. The walk-in shower is lined with Italian porcelain. In addition to racks of storage, the large walk-in closet has a maple dressing table.

Lower Level Comforts

At the bottom of the stairs is another favorite painting that Jeff discovered at the Rourke Gallery. To the left is a glassenclosed sauna, which uses abachi wood from the Ivory Coast, next to a steam room with a shower. Topping the maple slat cabinet is a granite counter with a white vessel rectangular sink. A tall architectural clock with maple and cherry woods was another art find by Jeff. The family room also has taupe carpet, with black leather chair, sofa and loveseat and red leather accent pillows.

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A maple and walnut Star Trek-esque creation by Steve Revlin, appropriately titled The Enterprise, doubles as the coffee table. On the wall, a large flat panel television connects to the Bose theater system, while another gas fireplace provides light and warmth on cool nights. The bar area features ebonystained maple cabinets, accented with cream and black zebra-stripe chairs. Three pendant lights in brushed nickel complement the cabinet hardware. In the corner, a round game table hosts conversation or games. Along the east wall is a temperature-controlled room, soon to become the wine room. Although Jeff and Anne had to leave their beloved Orchard Glen home because of flooding, they have created another masterpiece with the help of their architect and builder, Alan Hochhalter from Building Concepts. Beautiful contemporary spaces showcase the owners’ exceptional art collection while creating a marvelous home for living and entertaining. For more information about these custom homes, contact Alan Hochhalter, Architect/Builder Phone: 701-280-2091 Email: alan@buildingconcepts.us

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et to know some of the extraordinary women in our community in this edition of Area Profiles. An interview with Rachel Larson and Julie Walter will help answer some questions about homeschooling. Take a look at some women that have taken their hobbies to the Internet through Etsy. And get to know Pebbles Thompson and the amazing work she is doing with Project Night-Light.

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WRITER: JILL N. KANDEL | PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL K. SMITH

HOMESCHOOLING: An Education Option The number of homeschools is growing at an annual rate between seven and 15 percent. On average, homeschool students in grades 1-4 perform one grade level higher than their public and private school counterparts. Area Woman takes a look behind the scenes in this interview with two home educating mothers. Rachel Larson was homeschooled and now is a mother of four. She has been homeschooling her own children for five years. Rachel’s husband Jeremy is an engineer at Phoenix International. Julie Walter, a twenty-year home education veteran, has graduated four of her nine children from high school. Her oldest daughter, Kristi, graduated from NDSU’s College of Business in accounting. She is currently living in England with her husband and working in accounting. Kelly is a senior at UWStout majoring in graphic design. Heidi attends NDSCS, and Mandy is pursuing photography. Julie’s husband, Jim, is the president/CEO of 702 Communications.

AW: Why did you choose to home educate? Rachel: I had a positive experience being homeschooled myself. I started

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homeschool when I was in sixth grade and mostly wanting to be popular. Homeschooling allowed me to focus on things that were more important. I wanted to give my children the same opportunities that I had. Julie: Back in 1987, we met some homeschooling students, and we were really impressed with them. They were polite, well-mannered, intelligent, hard working, and they had a real love for Christ. We were sold on the home education choice.

Rachel: It is a tutored education. We can go faster or slower as our children need. Julie: Homeschoolers can pick and choose how they set up their year. We school all twelve months, Monday through Thursday. There isn’t any stand-in-line time; it’s more efficient.

AW: How are your children doing socially?

Rachel: I’ve loved how you can tailor the days to a particular child and his interests. We’ve had the time for more community involvement like being part of the Friendship Family Program at MSUM and having international students come into our home. Julie: You can get a lot accomplished in the morning, and the children have the afternoons for things of their own interest. Our girls train and take care of horses. It’s all educational — not just the bookwork.

Rachel: They’re average kids: some more extroverted, some quieter. Regular life with play dates and  church, community, and sports involvements is enjoyable.  We’ve had  field trips to the Post Office, Water Treatment Plant, Happy Joes, and the Food Bank with a local homeschool group. Julie: They do well interacting with people of all ages. Besides community activities, they are part of a local home school support group called REACH, which offers a spelling bee, public speaking, a project fair, a bake off/brain bee night, ice skating, T-Ball, baseball and soccer. There are also scienceoriented activities such as the First Lego League and BEST Robotics.

AW: How does home education differ from public school?

AW: What do you enjoy about home educating?

AW: What do you see as the advantages?


Rachel: I’m with my children for all the milestones, and I see the light bulb moments. I love read-aloud time. It’s fun to share those stories, and cuddle, and laugh and cry together. Julie: Seeing their successes all the way from preschool to adulthood has been a joy. The biggest were Kristi’s Cum Laude honor when she graduated from NDSU, Kelly’s Most Outstanding Student honor when she graduated with a 4.0 from Alexandria Technical College, and Heidi’s acceptance in the dental assistant program at NDSCS.

AW: What has been the largest influence that home education has had on your family? Rachel: It has enabled our family to think as a unit. Our hours are shared. At first it was intimidating. But homeschooling is just an extension of parenting. What you’ve done with your children as toddlers, you continue in and grow. Julie: My children had the time to bond with each other. And we’ve had time to study the Bible and to learn what it means in our everyday life, how to live out the gospel of Christ and understand the grace He offers.

AW: What support is available for home school families? Rachel: The MACHE convention is the highlight of my year. You meet other homeschoolers, talk to vendors, choose curriculum, and listen to well-informed educators. Julie: There are three large organizations. NDHSA, The North Dakota Home School Association: www.NDHSA.org. MACHE is a Minnesota state organization: www. MACHE.org. And Home School Legal Defense Association is national: HSLDA.org. [AWM] For more information about local homeschooling visit www. reachhomeschool.org.

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ARDING SCHOOL SKILLS AT THE BO LE AB LU VA N GIRLS LEAR T THEIR FAMILIES Y HELP SUPPOR DA E ON AY M EY SO TH

GIRLS IN FRONT OF THE AFRICAN SOUL, AMERICAN HEART BOARDING SCHOOL FOR ORPHAN GIRLS.

African Soul, American Heart Deb Dawson’s Extraordinary Quest to Shelter Orphans in Sudan WRITER: KRISTY (MAKI) OLSGAARD PHOTOGRAPHY: DEB DAWSON AND ASAH

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eb Dawson’s life was full with a husband, three biological sons between them and three adopted daughters. After retiring from the helm of a local insurance company and earning her MFA in creative writing from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 1999, she was trying to publish a memoir. Until she met Joseph Akol Makeer, a Lost Boy of Sudan. “Joseph said after 22 years of civil war, South Sudan had depopulated much of the country,” Dawson said. “But a peace agreement had been signed and people were returning. An orphan himself, he wanted to make a movie about orphans returning from the refugee camps to encourage people to help.” While pursuing her MFA, Deb made four short films. Initially, she thought she’d pass the project off to other filmmakers, but it turned out she had the passion to see it through. “In December 2007, our small team flew to Kenya and filmed at Kakuma refugee camp where Joseph had lived for 11 years. Then, we chartered a mission plane to land in Joseph’s village of Duk Payuel, Jonglei State. There we interviewed children, elders, chiefs and pastors. Our 25-minute documentary, African Soul, American Heart, won awards at film festivals,” Dawson said. “More important, we learned that orphan girls are the most vulnerable children in a village. These children really needed help.” Dawson and a team of dedicated volunteers began to develop plans and raise money for these “throw away children— girls that no one is going to help. They are malnourished, uneducated, often sold as a wife at puberty in exchange for a dowry, and frequently die during childbirth,” Dawson said. They formed African Soul, American Heart (ASAH), a nonprofit dedicated to sheltering and educating orphan girls in the Republic of South Sudan.

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DEB DAWSON WITH THE GIRLS WHO HAVE CHANGED HER LIFE, AND WHOSE LIVES SHE HAS HELPED CHANGE FOREVER. Dawson and several ASAH board members have traveled to Duk regularly since 2007, sharing their expertise with villagers and working tirelessly to acquire land and raise money to build the ASAH Boarding School for Orphan Girls. The school opened in February 2012, and currently houses and educates 12 girls, ages 10 to 17. “Four girls from the neighboring village, Patuenoi, will join the school when we complete more housing after the rainy season,” Dawson said. “Our goal is to house and educate 50 orphan girls.” Today, the school nurtures, feeds, clothes and educates girls through primary school (8th grade). “As our students graduate, we will provide secondary school education as well,” Dawson said. “Our intention is to educate 50 young women through trade school or college, so that they will have valuable skills to help their country develop.” Chiefs there want ASAH to serve all the villages in Duk County, so each village will reap the benefits of what these educated young women will bring back to their communities.


ASAH EDUCATES GIRLS THROUGH PRIMARY SCHOOL (8TH GRADE). “Imagine the impact 50 educated women will have in their villages, their state and their country,” Dawson said. “They will change the lives of those they touch, and together, they will change their world.” Around the world, it has been shown that when you educate women, you educate a community. Dawson recently returned from her seventh visit to Duk, bringing supplies, hope and love to the girls. “This is a remote village and there have been many challenges, but every time we hit an obstacle, we manage to get through it. It’s been an extraordinary experience,” Dawson said. “Besides educating and tutoring them, we teach additional skills like sewing, crocheting, gardening and cooking something beyond sorghum, so when they graduate, they’ll have marketable skills that can help support their families.” Dawson is passionate about helping these girls, “because no one else will,” she said. “My personal goal was to publish a book, and perhaps one day I will do that. But these people need help right now. By doing what we’re doing, they will have an opportunity for the future.” Ordinary people do extraordinary things. Sounds like good material for another story. Deb Dawson will be recognized for her humanitarian efforts and accomplishments at Minnesota State University Moorhead’s Distinguished Alumni Celebration to be held Sept. 28 during the university’s 2012 homecoming celebration. As a gifted photographer and writer, Dawson beautifully showcases the people of Sudan through video, pictures and writing. Read more about African Soul, American Heart: www. AfricanSoulAmericanHeart.org and www.africansoulamericanheart. blogspot.com. You can also watch videos on YouTube.

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FORGET EBAY; CHECK OUT ETSY Shopping the Local Modern Way

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alk around town and you’ll hear people using a new word: Etsy. But what exactly is it? To start with, you can forget E-Bay with its long waits and auction style bidding. Etsy is a modern equivalent made easy. Think of it as a vibrant handmade marketplace, an online community of artists who sell handcrafted and vintage items, including art, glass, jewelry, needlecraft, toys, and woodworking. Etsy is an e-commerce website that is reconnecting makers and buyers. Each item on Etsy is individually listed and photographed, shipping prices are included, and shops set up different payment systems, PayPal being the most popular. Etsy charges 3.5 percent on all sales, and the rest of the profits go directly to the sellers. Anyone, anywhere, can join. Anyone, anywhere, can buy. Etsy shops are changing the way artists, craftsmen, and entrepreneurs do business. When you go to www.etsy.com, you can shop by category, color, or by recently listed items. You can also shop

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local: just type in your city zip code and browse all the shops from your hometown. AW interviewed three local women who run Etsy shops. SugarAndSpice run by Christine Zorn of Moorhead

WRITER: JILL N. KANDEL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL K. SMITH

Why did you choose to start selling on Etsy? I started making and selling dolls when my children were small. My youngest daughter, Sam, had a normal birth. But at the age of 22 months she began to regress. She is autistic and is nonverbal. Making dolls is a source of


income that lets me stay at home. I’m thankful to have this. What do you sell? Dolls are my bestsellers, but I also make buntings. Each doll is unique. I love doing special requests, like putting a child’s name on the doll. I make light and dark skinned dolls, fairies, and Christmas tree topper dolls. Where have you sold? I have made sales in the USA, Russia, Australia, Canada, Romania, Turkey, Spain, France, and the UK. Do you have any advice for people wanting to start an Etsy shop? Before you start, do your homework. Get to know the site, how it functions. It’s not just making items. You have to photograph, list, sell, and ship. What do you like about Etsy? Etsy is amazing. I’m sitting in my own living room in Minnesota, and I’m selling dolls all over the world! LaceyBugCreations run by Lacey Igo of Moorhead Why did you choose to start selling on Etsy? I have been a crafter my whole life, and when I discovered Etsy I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to share my love for crafts. What do you sell? My shop is mostly about my Coffee and Tea Cozies, but I also sell Fingerless Gloves. Last year around Christmas I added Mitten Ornaments and His & Hers Holiday Cozies in Christmas Colors. What do you like about Etsy? I like the freedom and ease to keep up a shop. I’m also an Etsy shopper. It’s a great place to find handmade

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made reversible flannel booties with elastic in the back. Friends told me I should sell them. What do you sell? Mostly children’s clothing. I love making personalized clothing, like birthday outfits with dates on them, or special orders with names, colors, or cloth patterns. I use cotton, fleece, and corduroy. What do you like about Etsy? It’s user friendly and easy to use, even for me, and I’m not real tech savvy. Do you have any advice for people wanting to start an Etsy shop? Calculating your prices is important, thinking about costs and the time involved in making and selling.

items from people who have a passion for their art. I love the fact that Etsy is a home where artists can get together and easily sell their work. It’s a huge craft fair 365 days a year.

Wyoming. I tell them to find their niche and create what they love.

Do you have any advice for people who want to start an Etsy shop? I’ve helped several people set up their shops including my sister-in-law with her Tyke Tees shop and a friend in

Why did you choose to start selling on Etsy? I have three daughters, and I wanted to make them cute little booties because their socks were always falling off. I

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BootieBoutique run by Shannon Moser of Fargo

Is there anything else you’d like to say about your shop or Etsy? It’s a great hobby/business for me as a stay-at-home mom. It’s funny, now when I’m sewing something, my four year old comes up to me and says, “You should put that on the web, mom!” [AWM] For more information go to www.etsy. com where you can use the Shop Local button to support FM area artists, or feel free to browse the world!


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Bringing Light to Darkness PHOTOGRAPHY: CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHY

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ope brings light to dark places. Pastor Pebbles Thompson, founder of Project Night-Light, is determined to shed light on the dark places that are left when children are the victims of abuse. And she’s doing it one Bag of Hope at a time. Driven by a belief that children are a blessing from the Lord, Pebbles, along with her husband Darin and children Kennedy (12), Matayia (6), Malachi (5), and Tobias (2), have taken their torch of hope across North Dakota and into Minnesota in an effort to open eyes to the reality of abuse and raise support to care for those that suffer. Their goal is to see Project Night-Light grow to serve children nationwide.

Looking back, the timing couldn’t have been better. He traded the build-your-career version of the American dream for a new dream that involved putting the family’s time, money and talents to work in following God’s call. As is Pebbles’ style, she jumped immediately at what God had laid on her heart, and in April 2008, Project Night-Light started to take shape. A connection with Heartland Community Church, where Pebbles had served as volunteer youth pastor, gave the fledgling ministry a place to grow. While most of the funding for the ministry came from the Thompson’s own pockets, it wasn’t long before Pebbles took her infectious personality and passion for the cause in front of churches and groups in hopes of raising support for Project Night-Light. The “burning bush moment” was becoming a reality.

The Burning Bush

The First Date

Just a few short years ago, in 2008, Pebbles found herself in the midst of what she called her “burning bush moment.” She clearly heard God tell her to start a ministry to help children that have been victims of abuse. At nearly the same time, Darin, who was the family’s breadwinner, found himself unemployed after leaving a 13-year career as a sound and audio technician for a home sound system company. The Thompsons, like many families in the late 2000s, didn’t worry too much about money. But as recession hit at the end of 2008 and deepened in 2009, people were less concerned about installing fancy sound systems in their homes and lake cabins. Soon Darin’s hours were cut and then he was laid off, the last of the company’s six employees to be let go.

Eighteen years after their first date, Pebbles finds it fun to look back and see how far they’ve come―from questioning teenagers to faithful ministry partners. “We’ve been married for 15 years this December,” she said. “He makes me laugh, he’s my best friend, my protector, my other half and an amazing father. Now he’s also my full-time ministry partner. We work together and dream together on how to reach more hurting kids every day.” Darin had a fair idea of what he might be getting into when he asked Pebbles Eagle on a date in 1994. She was 15 and he was 18 when they met in church on a Sunday evening. She went to high school in Jamestown, N.D. and he was a farm boy from Rogers,

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N.D. After a few group dates, Darin worked up the courage to ask her out. Though she said “yes,” there were a few things she needed him to know if their relationship was going to move beyond that first date. 1. I’m going to be a pastor. I need a man willing to be in church three times a week in the front row while I’m up front leading. More importantly, I need someone who loves God more than anything. 2. Never hit me. One time and I will leave. All through my family line, women have made poor choices about men. The women in my family picked men who were unhealthy and they (the men and women) felt being hit was normal. But it isn’t OK with me. 3. Be capable of loving a child who isn’t biologically your own. I plan to adopt a child some day. “I had three rules for dating because even though I knew it was unlikely that I would marry some guy I met in high school, I knew it could happen,” said Pebbles. “I also wanted to lay a foundation of healthy choices early on so I didn’t form bad habits

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in the type of people I surrounded myself with. We all seem to have a type of person we are drawn to. People who come out of abuse tend to gravitate to abusive relationships themselves. I had a choice to shape what my future could look like, and it started with my relationships.” Darin agreed to all three conditions, but he swears it’s not because she’s stop-and-stare beautiful. He can honestly say that her looks had nothing to do with him saying “yes” to her conditions for a date. Even before their first official date, Darin said, “I couldn’t imagine a day without her. I just knew.”


God is in the Details In addition to her family, Pebbles has gathered around her a smart, diverse board of directors to help guide Project Night-Light. Early on she worked with members of Heartland Community Church to establish a board for her growing ministry. Last year, as the ministry expanded to help children in the St. Paul area in Minnesota, and began growing financially, an attorney was consulted to establish Project NightLight as a tax-exempt organization, known as a 501C-3 organization. Pebbles and Darin are members of the board but don’t have voting privileges on salaries. This past June, Project Night-Light added Pebbles’ mother Fran Geisler to its staff. As the former office manager of Salvation Army in Jamestown, she brings non-profit expertise to the table. She also “helps our kids maintain some sort of normal,” Pebbles said. At this point, Project Night-Light is able to pay Pebbles a salary that allows her to provide for their family. “We plan our spending because it allows us to give more,” Pebbles said. “We can’t give to help missions if we are not responsible with our budget. We make sure our children don’t go without. (Our) furniture is old and worn but my kids would just color on the new stuff anyways. We are able to pay our bills each month, give to some of our favorite causes and save for vacations and emergencies.” Though things are stable now, there was a time when the family was reminded of their need for God’s provision. “The lowest point was at the end of my secular job,” Darin said. “God had told me to quit my job while she was doing (youth pastor work) but I was thinking ‘I’m the man. I should be the breadwinner.’ Once my job was gone – when I did not know [how] my paycheck was coming – then I found I could just go on faith. There’s no reason other than faith that we still have our house today.” Time and again, the couple stared at the numbers and wondered how they’d pay the mortgage on their modest five-bedroom home. Over and over they were blown away by the gifts or helping hand they received when it was time to write the mortgage check. It was an new experience for a man accustomed to living more by a spreadsheet than blind faith.

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AW • PROFILES Two years ago Darin started his own small business, but his heart belongs to his family and the ministry, so they receive his full-time attention. Though he is not paid by Project Night-Light, he volunteers more than 40 hours per week. Darin said “I feel more fulfilled now helping kids than I did putting wires in houses.”

Bags of Hope With a pre-teen daughter and three little ones who arrived after a bout with infertility, Pebbles tends to children day and night. “To us, we’re not done yet … we know we want to adopt,” she said. Pebbles calls the children helped by Project NightLight “my spiritual children.” While these children are just statistics to most people,

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they are very real to Pebbles and she prays sincerely for them daily. When she followed God’s direction to help abused children Pebbles’ research uncovered a fact that bothered the mother’s heart in her. Sometimes when children are taken to a doctor to be examined for physical or sexual abuse, their clothing is kept as evidence. This means the young victims leave the clinic or hospital and walk out in public wearing an ill-fitting hospital gown or clothing that has been gathered by kindly medical staff. To these children, losing their clothing only adds to their shame and feelings of worthlessness. “These are children of the King,” Pebbles says. “They should be treated like little princes and princesses … like I treat my children or you treat yours.” She believes children examined for abuse deserve to wear real clothing that fits after their exams and to have some things that bring comfort and hope. This desire to restore dignity is what fuels their family’s weekend trips to speaking engagements at churches throughout Minnesota, North Dakota and sometimes South Dakota. The family also travels together to transport Bags of Hope to one of the Children’s Advocacy Centers they work with in Grand Forks, Bismarck, Minot, Fargo and St. Paul, Minn. The contents of each Bag of Hope cost about $50. Pebbles designed the Bag of Hope to meet physical and spiritual needs. She makes sure each item is a brand name―nothing fancy; Suave kids’ shampoo/conditioner and Carter’s pajamas―and each bag is packed like a loving mother would carefully pack an overnight bag for her child. Each bag contains:

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A fleece tie blanket Pajamas/socks/underwear 2-in-1 shampoo/conditioner Toothbrush/toothpaste  Fruit snacks/water bottle  Flashlight  The book “You Are Special” by Max Lucado  Zipper tote bag to hold all their new special items  Teen girl bags include deodorant and a personal journal Infants and toddlers get diapers/Pull-Ups and wipes AW |

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AW • PROFILES Pebbles explained that many abused children feel used and that’s why only new items are placed in the bags. She carefully selected items for the Bags of Hope that would provide some bit of security and comfort. Since 2008, Project Night-Light has put 2,980 Bags of Hope in the hands of abused children. Pebbles feels a pull to help more children and believes God wants Project Night-Light to grow so it can help children throughout the U.S. and maybe even farther.

Let Go … and Let God “This is a completely different life than I envisioned growing up on a farm near Rogers,” Darin said. “This thing is bigger than me. I finally had to just let go and believe in Project Night-Light.” Earlier this spring Pebbles was invited to speak at a church in western North Dakota. In her talk, she mentioned her hope that Project Night-Light might eventually help children in other states. In connection, she mentioned an idea of a motor home that would make travel less constrictive for the Thompson children and be outfitted as a mobile ministry center/Bag of Hope packing center. A woman approached Pebbles after the church service, chatted with her at length and then handed her a check. Pebbles thanked her, folded it in half and put it in her purse to deposit later. When she had time to pause and look at the check she was stunned to see the large donation, with a notation that the gift should be used

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for two motor homes:―one that can be used to transport the Thompson family and any volunteers as they travel, and one that can be modified for use as a mobile packing station for Bags of Hope. Overall, the gift is intended to spread the ministry to other states. “Darin took a picture of the check,” Pebbles said, “as a reminder that when things seem impossible God always provides.” They thought the idea of a nationwide ministry and mobile packing center was far in the future because of the time it would take to gather the money. The Thompsons are researching motor homes and plan to be on the road next summer thanks to the generosity of one family who quietly gave a generous gift. “Pebbles is a big dreamer,” Darin said. “I’m taking baby steps to be a dreamer. When you see things fall into place again and again, you start to believe more and more. Our God is a big god.” For more information about the people and heart behind Project Night-Light, please visit http://www.ndnightlight.org. [AWM]


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Area Woman August/September 2012  

Sophisticated. Intelligent. Informed.

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