Area Woman Magazine | Fargo, ND

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the family issue + HOME

+ H E A LT H

+ LIFE

Aleyna Leibfried

A N O T H E R P L A C E AT T H E TA B L E


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H AWA ▶ N U R S I N G A S S I S TA N T

CALLED TO

C A R E FO R YO U Our mission is reflected in the work we do every day. And it’s the people of this place who inspire us. Here, we share our lives, our work, our stories. It’s people like Hawa, who always knew she wanted to help care for others, that make this place unlike any other. We are called to make a healthy difference in people’s lives.

LIKE NOWHERE ELSE Join our team: EssentiaCareers.org

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august.september 2021

contents P H OTO : ALI C IA MARIE P H OTOGRAPHY

family

12

IT 'S HE R BUSINESS: ST YL ISH BABY + KIDS

14

T HE BIRTH ING C ENTER AT E SSE NT IA H EALTH

16

FAMILY E VE RY WH ERE

18

ANNE CA RLSEN: A L EGACY OF IND E PENDENCE

20

T HE TH ING ABOU T R OUTINES

22

T HE SPICE OF FAMILY LIFE



contents

home 24 26

BEYOND THE KITCHEN

28 30

THE BUFF LIFE: RECIPES 101

WHAT IS THIS WORTH?!

health 32 34 36 38

EMOTIONALLY CHARGED CONVERSATIONS WHAT IS GSM? A SPORTS PHYSICAL CAN HELP PARENTS SPOT HEALTH ISSUES A DIFFERENT APPROACH TO HEALTH PLAY: A WINDOW INTO THE LIFE OF A CHILD

profiles

50

40 42

THE FAMILY BUSINESS BEHIND CRAVE

44

ONLINE DEGREE OFFERS FLEXIBILIT Y AND OPPORTUNIT Y FOR WORKING MOTHER

46 48

NO ONE DOES MORE FOR VETERANS

SCHEELS HOME AND HARDWARE FOCUSES ON FEMALE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CHAPTER AESTHETIC STUDIO

on the cover Aleyna Leibfried: A N OTH E R P L AC E AT THE TA B L E

22

life 56 58 60

JUNKIN' MARKET DAYS

62

CALENDAR

FROM PASSION TO PURPOSE

Q&A ON A GUARDIANSHIP OR CONSERVATORSHIP


Look forward to seeing you.

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assessments. Call us today at 701-476-7200. 510 4th Street South \\ Fargo, ND 58103 prairie-stjohns.com Model representations of real patients are shown. Actual patients cannot be divulged due to HIPAA regulations. Physicians are on the medical staff of Prairie St. John’s, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Prairie St. John’s. The facility shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. 210153-1598 05/21


our writers celebrating 36 years

are the voice of Area Woman Magazine. They bring to life the Fargo-Moorhead area and the incredible stories of the women we feature.

publisher JON-MICHAEL SHERMAN

art director MEGAN ELGIN

proofing editor JILL OCKHARDT BLAUFUSS

advertising MIKE SHERMAN 701-306-5119 JON-MICHAEL SHERMAN 701-306-1288 TAMIE ZACCHEA 701-306-7932

photography 5 FOOT 20 DESIGN LOUNGE ALICIA MARIE PHOTOGRAPHY JUSTIN EILER MIKE SMITH M. SCHLEIF PHOTOGRAPHY PEXELS.COM RUBINIC PHOTOGRAPHY SCHERLING PHOTOGRAPHY TAYLOR JANE PHOTOGRAPHY UNSPLASH.COM

REBECCA MEIDINGER

TAYLOR JANE PHOTOGRAPHY

Rebecca is a speaker, Bible teacher, writer, blogger and stay-at-home mom to four wild kids in south Fargo and wife to her awesome husband Paul. As a speaker and Bible teacher, it is Rebecca's joy to bring messages of hope, joy and freedom in Christ to groups of teens and adult women. As a blogger, Rebecca shares the real-life challenges of marriage and motherhood. Rebecca loves a hot cup of coffee, a cool morning run, and warm sunshine on her face. Learn more about Rebecca at rebeccameidinger.com.

Hi! I'm the Taylor in Taylor Jane Photography. I specialize in newborns, maternity and families. Photography is my passion and I pride myself on safety and education when handling the tiniest humans!

read it online issuu.com/areawoman

find us areawomanmagazine.com

Area Woman is a proud member of the Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Chamber of Commerce. It is published bimonthly by Area Woman Publishing, LLC and printed in the U.S.A. ©2021 Area Woman Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from AW. Area Woman is a trademark registered at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Area Woman Publishing assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs and does not necessarily agree with content or advertising presented.

The cover story was photographed by Taylor Jane and written by Rebecca Meidinger, page 50.

ALEXIS SCOTT Alexis is a relationship builder by day and a freelance writer by night. As a multi-passionate woman, she won’t settle for a life that is anything less than busy and exciting. When she isn’t writing or focusing on her day-to-day career she is skipping through life with her husband and 4 young boys.


Introducing Our

These are the talented contributors showcased in this issue. Learn more about these and our other contributors at areawomanmagazine.com.

Newest Clinician

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SIRI THADEN

ASHLEY SORNSIN

Siri is a certified yoga instructor, mama, and manager of Sanford Women’s Programming, Pregnancy Navigators and Specialty Care Clinic in Fargo. Her passion is health, intentional living and seeing women realize their potential.

Ashley is a local health, fitness and life coach with a passion for inspiring and motivating others to live their best life. She started her own business, BUFF Inc., teaches group fitness classes at the YMCA in Fargo, is a health and fitness writer, has appeared on local TV as a fitness expert, and shares her life and expertise candidly on Facebook and Instagram. To work with Ashley for nutrition, fitness and life coaching, contact her online at eatlivebebuff.com.

        

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MEGAN ELGIN Megan grew up on the family farm in small town North Dakota and graduated from MSUM. She loves all things creative including her job as the art director here at Area Woman Magazine. She is passionate about reading as many books as possible and loves discussing them with others. Megan lives in Horace with her husband and son, loves camping with her family in the summer, and snuggling on the couch with them in the winter.

WASIFA AHMAD HASAN Wasifa is a dentistry graduate, full-time blogger and makeup artist. She blogs and makes videos about beauty, makeup, fashion and lifestyle on her blog sifascorner.com.

         


area

FAMILY WORDS : E VAN KJOS

P H OTOG R A P HY : PR OV I D E D BY MC KE N Z I E KJ O S

ST Y LISH BABY + K ID S at Tootsie's and Kenzie + Co. Boutiques

When Tootsie’s Children’s Boutique opened in September of 2017, owner and founder McKenzie Kjos saw something of herself in all of her customers. “I love seeing the excitement on people’s faces when they come to the store for the first time,” she says. “I grew up loving everything to do with clothes.” As a kid, Kjos admits she would change her outfits multiple times a day, despite upsetting her mother, her number one shopping companion. “Shopping trips with my mom are some of my favorite childhood memories. I could never sleep the night before, I was so excited.”

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it's her business

Kjos started by working in various local retail and boutique shops, building a foundation on which the idea of opening her own boutique grew. After years of watching her little nephews and nieces grow up, Kjos knew she wanted to work with kids clothing. Tootsie, a loving nickname from her grandparents, helped solidify the opening of the business. From clothing sizes preemie to 7, shoes, and basic infant necessities, Kjos hopes Tootsie’s will be a one-stop-shop for all of your children’s needs. “I love helping people find the perfect picture outfits, everyday wear, or gifts for special occasions, like baby showers or birthdays,” says Kjos. She continues the tradition of taking shopping trips with her mother by going to market, where Kjos says she hand picks everything that comes into the store. "I listen to my customers closely. If there's a certain style or brand that people are looking for, I try to pick them up when I go to market." With a new location in Fargo’s BLU 32 development, Tootsie’s inventory has expanded to include even more styles for your little ones. The move has also allowed Kjos to develop a new boutique for a slightly older demographic.

“When Tootsie’s opened, I always had customers asking when I would open up a new store for older kids,” says Kjos. “With all the wonderful support from the Fargo community, I was able to open up a second location that offers those next-in-line sizes.” Kenzie + Co. offers clothing in the sizes 6-16 range, along with fun accessories like backpacks, sunglasses and beauty products. Looking to the future, Kjos has a few more business ventures in the works that she cannot wait to share with her customers. In the meantime, she is excited to continue growing her businesses to fit the needs of local mothers and families.


Rosie is packing he r bag s... ↓

McKenzie Kjos and her mother at market shopping for new items to bring to the boutiques.

“I wouldn’t be here without the support and love from my family and friends,” says Kjos. “Especially my mom and dad. From building product displays, setting up until 6 a.m. before a grand opening or helping me move merchandise for a pop-up shop. I am very grateful.”

I S O N THE M OV E

Tootsie's Children's Boutique SIZ E S P RE E MIE TO 7 4600 32nd Ave S, Suite 100, Fargo tootsiesfargo.com.

Opening September 1st in OUR NEW LOC ATION:

Kenzie + Co. SIZ E S 6 TO 1 6 5670 38th Ave S, Suite E, Fargo kenzieandcofargo.com. [ aw ]

4582 32 nd Avenue S Fargo, ND 58104

wimmersdiamonds.com


area

FAMILY WORDS : TAR A E K R E N

P H OTOG R A P H Y : Provi d e d by DA N I E L L E GO R AC Z KOWS KI a n d E A PC A R C H I T EC TS ENG INEER S

the Birthing Center

AT E S S E N T I A H E A LT H Labor and delivery experience The rooms are designed to serve the needs of Essentia’s labor, delivery, recovery, postpartum (LDRP) model of care. Each room features all the needed supplies, equipment and amenities a laboring woman needs as well as items for recovery and postpartum care. One-on-one nursing care is provided for each patient, and the nurse doesn’t need to run back and forth for supplies or additional items. The rooms feature in-line medical gases such as oxygen and nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas. While the large canister is hidden, a line comes right out of the wall for timely and easy use.

S

pacious rooms with floor-toceiling windows, a fireplace, calm and soothing décor, a whirlpool tub, a mini fridge and one-onone attention as well as aromatherapy, music and dimmable lighting may sound like the perfect spa getaway or a five-star hotel. However, these are just a few things that make your labor and delivery experience at Essentia Health like nowhere else. Big changes have been delivered to the birthing center at Essentia in Fargo. Remodeling is nearly complete in the 15 labor and delivery rooms on the top floor of the hospital and the windows provide a breathtaking view. Each room features nearly 420 square feet of space and is designed for the comfort, health and safety of mom and baby first and foremost. Birth partners now have a couch that converts to a sofa-sleeper for a more comfortable stay as well.

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Danielle and Hunter shortly after birth

Moorhead mom Danielle Goraczkowski delivered her baby boy, Hunter, at 3:17 a.m. on July 6 after arriving for her induction at 7 a.m. the day before. She was able to experience the amenities firsthand and made full use them. “The whirlpool tub was my favorite,” says Goraczkowski. “The rooms were so spacious; we didn’t feel boxed in, and everything was so nice.”

During active labor, women no longer need to be tied to monitoring equipment making labor more comfortable. The unit uses telemetry — constant electronic monitoring — for laboring women, meaning a patient can be up and moving while the baby’s heart rate and mom’s contraction patterns are monitored. The medical aspect of your stay is behind beautiful cabinetry and is made to blend into the calm and comfortable surroundings. A variety of relaxation techniques can be used at any time during labor, including a whirlpool tub, birthing ball, birthing bar, walking, distraction, position changes, dimmable lighting and breathing techniques. Rooms also feature a variety of pillows, music, hot or cold packs and aromatherapy. In addition, laughing gas, epidural and IV medications are available should you and your care team decide they are necessary. Rooms are designed to be used in high-risk deliveries as well. Each room features dedicated space if a baby needs additional care from our neonatal intensive care team after birth. Board certified neonatologists are available 24/7 to be at your delivery if necessary. Essentia features a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for babies born as early as 23 weeks or having any kind of complication or additional care needs. Essentia’s NICU features large private family-centered rooms with space and amenities for parents to stay in the room at all times. Plus, a Ronald McDonald Room is just down the hall for parents to step away while still being close, grab a snack or take a shower.


In the case of a cesarean section delivery, the operating room suite is on the same floor and your labor nurse accompanies you to the procedure. Patients will notice there is no change in their care team if a C-section is needed. Essentia Health features patient focused care. “We are known for honoring birth plans and our one-on-one nursing care,” shares Kecia Lund, nursing director for Women’s and Children’s Services. “The new rooms have a better, more intentional design along with a relaxing atmosphere and state-of-the-art safety.” The Birthing Center is a locked unit and features a security system for the safety of each baby. “The nurses were so attentive to my every need,” shares Goraczkowski. “I felt very well cared for.”

Baby-Friendly designation Essentia is the only Baby-Friendly designated hospital in Fargo and one of only two in the entire state. Baby-Friendly hospitals are the gold standard in breastfeeding and bonding practices between mother and child. Designation involves a rigorous process including application, on-site review and patient audits. Essentia is committed to ensuring your birth experience is the best it can be, and your baby starts their life on the right track. Lund says, “Baby-Friendly means we are committed to providing evidence-based care and education to give parents the information they need to make informed decisions about how they want to feed and care for their baby, free from commercial interests and focused on what is best for baby.” Baby-Friendly standards are adhered to for breastfeeding as well as formula feeding. Your choice is respected and supported, and caregivers provide the same level of information, education and support to each and every mother.

Summer Events Healthy Foods for Cats & Dogs Fun & Unique Toys, Treats & Chews Adoptable Pets from Cats Cradle Shelter

ASK ABOUT O U R R E WA R D S P RO G R A M

LEARN MORE ABOUT Essentia Health’s high-quality, patient centered care in the Birthing Center at Essentia Health by visiting essentiahealth.org.

   

[ aw ]

3037 13th Ave S, Fargo, ND • 701.239.0110 • naturalpetcenter-nd.com


area

FAMILY

family everywhere W I T H A PA S S I O N FO R C A R E , F A M I LY I S N E V E R I N S H O R T S U P P LY WORDS : CLAIR E M OHR

P H OTOG R A P H Y : PR OV I D E D BY CC R I

“Before I was Liz’s mom, I was Liz’s nurse” Clare Garberg spent most of her medical career as a pediatric nurse at Clare Garberg MeritCare, which is now Sanford. It was here where Garberg first met (left) with her Liz, an infant who had been hospitalized for a prolonged amount of daughter, Liz. time due to congenital hip disorder and breath holding spells. Liz’s breath holding spells were different than those of other infants and more dangerous as they would “And in a moment of not thinking clearly,” says cause her heart rate to drop severely and require Garberg, “I said, ‘Well I could take her home.’” resuscitation. With Liz’s parents unable to properly care for her due to their individual disabilities Garberg and her husband Bryan became licensed and the dangers of her breath holding spells, the foster parents and brought Liz into their family. hospital began searching for foster care for Liz. “She was just adorable. They had already diag-

Liz

nosed her with a huge cognitive delay and I just thought that if we got her out of the hospital environment and into a home she would really progress.” With four children of their own, Liz’s new siblings excitedly welcomed her into their family. Her new family became very important to Liz and allowed her to feel that love from a very huge group of people.

Liz (middle) with her sisters before attending prom.

However, caring for Liz outside of the hospital and its many resources proved to be a challenge. When Liz was 10 years old, a social worker informed the family of agencies that could provide assistance. Because of this, the Garbergs found CCRI. “That was life changing,” Garberg says. While still living at home with her family, CCRI caregivers would take Liz to activities such as bowling, cooking, and later, the annual CCRI prom. These events allowed Liz more opportunities to engage with the community and create new bonds. “As Liz got older, she watched her siblings all leave the nest and it was important she had that too. She hit an age where it was time for her to have her own place,” says Garberg. Liz moved into a home where she

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THE POWER OF PREDICTABILITY

9.28.21

FREE Parent Night Event 7–8 PM Refreshments served at 6:30

9.29.21

Enhancing Family Well-Being Through Routine and Play

Professional Workshop 10AM–3PM $50 (before 9.10.21) Lunch included

HOLIDAY INN FARGO Registration required

Liz (left) with caregiver Madie.

speaker: Katy Smith is now supported by caregivers 24 hours a day. This granted her more independence and an opportunity to form new relationships. CCRI not only brought Liz a new place to live, but new people into her life. Now 30 years old, Liz is a familiar face to everyone at CCRI, from office staff to the executive director. “She sees us all as part of her family,” Alita Hanson, SLS Assistant Director, shares. “Liz is somebody who just very genuinely loves the people in her life.” While working as an RN at CCRI, Garberg saw how family reaches every corner of the company. “To see the passion everybody has was unbelievable.” The love and support of a family is a universal experience and for Liz, finding CCRI meant expanding her family even more. As Hanson says, “She knows she has two homes.”

CLAIRE MOHR is currently the development and communications intern for CCRI as a part of the Swendseid Program at Concordia College. A double major in communications and environmental studies, Mohr spends a lot of time on campus whether that’s catching up on studies or trying to make friends with the local turkeys. [ aw ]

Katy Smith is a keynote speaker, an educator, a trainer, and a valued resource for parents and educators. She has spent a career engaging communities in transformative converstions.

sponsored by:

Parent and Family Resource Center Cass County Extension

1010 2nd Ave S Fargo, ND 701-241-5700 ndsu.cass.extension@ndsu.edu www.ag.ndsu.edu/pen/region-5


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ANNE CARLSEN:

a legacy of independence WOR DS : TA MI E Z ACC H E A PH OTOG R A P H Y : P R OVIDE D BY A N N E CA R L S E N

A

nne Carlsen was born over 100 years ago with significant physical limitations. A century ago, individuals with these challenges would not be able to participate in most activities in the community and were not able to achieve independence. But Anne’s parents were her greatest advocates, encouraging and empowering her. Anne went on to spend her entire life working to help children and adults achieve independence, as her parents had done for her.

Today, Anne’s legacy lives on at Anne Carlsen. Anne Carlsen has grown from the original location in Jamestown founded 80 years ago, to nine locations throughout North Dakota serving thousands of families. Their mission is simple: provide support and care from birth through adulthood to those who need it to achieve independence and quality of life. Delivering on that mission to hundreds of families here in Fargo is an extensive team of skilled professionals, recently consolidated into one convenient location in south-central Fargo.

Available services begin at birth with early intervention (EI). Services for early intervention are done with the family during their daily activities. EI is designed to meet the developmental needs of each child and the needs of the family related to enhancing their child’s development. Some children qualify for services based on a diagnosis the child received at birth while other children can experience developmental delays with no known cause. Regardless of the reason for the delay, EI aims to maximize the potential of each child. Early interventionists work as a team and include a robust variety of professionals such as early childhood special educators, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists and social workers. By the time a child turns three, the early intervention team has helped the family connect with any additional resources and services the child may need. In addition to comprehensive early intervention services, Anne Carlsen offers a vast array of services for families in need. They include, but are not limited to, speech therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy. In addition to these traditional pediatric outpatient services, Anne Carlsen’s Fargo therapy clinic offers specialized approaches

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like orofacial myology, which focuses on improving the strength and coordination of the mouth to improve feeding and speech skills. Anne Carlsen also offers applied behavior analysis (ABA), a specialized therapy for children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Busy parents and patients will appreciate the consolidation of services under one roof. Care and services are coordinated between specialties, eliminating the need to travel to different locations on different days. Parents, patients and professionals are a team at Anne Carlsen. The goal is to address all the child’s needs, empower and partner with parents to be able to support their child’s needs themselves, and for the child to achieve independence and quality of life through treatment and support.

September 28, 2021

MIKE WILLIAMS Christian Comedian

Mike Williams is a well-known speaker, author, missionary and genuinely funny guy. His personal testimony is powerful and his humor will have you rolling in the aisles!

6:30 pm Doors Open • 7:00 pm Dessert Social and Program Delta Hotel 1635 42nd St SW, Fargo To purchase tickets or sponsor a table visit: fargonlc.org

“Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth, burst into jubilant song with music” PSALM 98:4 Services at Anne Carlsen are available to children and adults experiencing temporary setbacks as well. In situations where a person was extremely ill or injured, for instance, temporary help regaining full speech or motor function may be needed. Anne Carlsen is dedicated to nurturing abilities and changing lives for the better, whether the need is long term or short term. Anne Carlsen operates as a non-profit organization and will happily work with you to explore funding options available to you. Developmental screenings are typically free. They welcome your inquiry by phone and would be happy to provide more information for your unique situation.

Anne Carlsen

Uplifting! life979.com

4152 30th Ave S, Fargo 701-364-2663 | annecarlsen.org [ aw ]

life979.com


area

FAMILY

the THING ABOUT ROUTINES WORDS : KAT Y S M IT H

I

P H OTOG R A P H Y : K in d e l Med i a o n p exel s .co m

n the very beginning of the pandemic, I had been in my home for ten days with my daughter and her two small — really, really small — kids. Frank was nearly three and Fletcher was just six months old. We were on a mission to do our best to sort out the new realities of the world while keeping the boys, and ourselves, as safe as we possibly could. I have had a lot of time to reflect on what is really important in the lives of families. I am reminded about what a gift routines are to the lives of children, no matter how old they are, especially when their lives are disrupted.

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Routines give children a sense that there is order in the world, even when your whole world is in your home. Routines offer security in a stressful time. Routines give a cadence to the day. Routines help children regulate their behavior and their feelings. When children know what to expect, they do better. With months of social distancing behind us and an uncertain journey still ahead of us, it seems to be a good time to consider a routine. No need to run for the chart paper and markers, routines with young children do not need to be rigid. Give yourself some grace, make it fit for you and your children. Design your daily routine to be a comfort, not a stress. For those of you living with little children, I will offer you the following elements of a routine in honor of the little folks you live with.

Smooth Transitions: Comings and goings are so important to children. Outdoor Time: Children play to the space. They play bigger, wilder, louder and most creatively in nature. Put the sun on their faces and the wind in their hair. Put outdoor time on repeat in your routine playlist. Resting time: Cuddle up. Nap. There is no better resilience-builder than sleep for your children, and for you. You might be surprised to see just how much sleep you really need.

Creative time: Make some time in the day to be creative. It is often in this space that children can express how they feel. Art, even for small children is a window into their minds and hearts. Mail those treasures to people you love.


Family Table Time: Sit. Eat. Enjoy one another’s company at the table. All together. No phones. No screens. Talk. Work on your manners.

Reading time: So. Many. Books. Your

children are treasures from the Lord

children may request the same book over and over again. That’s okay, it is one way that children build predictability into their world.

Chore time: Yep, I know. You do a much better job. It takes twice as long when they help. But hear this, every single one of us, big and small, needs to believe that we are a part of a community that cares about one another. Chores are a way to give meaning to our days. Time away: I took a drive yesterday. I needed to cry. Your children will look to you for guidance and hope. Parenting is often shouldering the tough stuff for children. Protect them by taking good care of yourself.

Joy time: Play. Laugh. Be silly. Imagine. Dance. Play some more. You live with little children, lucky you!

KAT Y SMITH will be presenting “The Power of Predictability: Enhancing Family Well-Being Through Routine and Play” at a parent night event on September 28, and a professional workshop on September 29 at the Holiday Inn Fargo. Sponsored by NDSU Extension Cass County. For more information and to register, contact Diane Herding at diane.herding@ndsu.edu. Katy Smith is a keynote speaker, an educator, a trainer, and a valued resource for parents and educators. She has spent a career engaging communities in transformative conversations. Katy is the 2011 Minnesota Teacher of the Year, the first early childhood teacher in Minnesota, and the first parent educator nationally, to be honored with the award. [ aw ]

Preschool & Child Care Center, Inc. A Christian center sharing the love of God while educating the whole child — emotionally, socially, physically, creatively, and cognitively. FOR 22 YEARS,, we have been blessed by God and the community.

Thank you for voting us

BEST CHILD CARE FACILITY for three consecutive years

If you want to be an inspiration and impact a child's life to the fullest, COME JOIN OUR TEAM.

To apply, email resume to swonderskids@yahoo.com

701-235-7149 ext 22


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t ow n g r i WORDS : JES SICA L AR G HE PH OTOGRA PHY : P R OVIDE D BY STON E TOWN G R IL L FO OD PHOTOGRA P H Y : M . SCHL E IF P HOTOG R AP H Y

STONE TOWN GRILL

The Spice of Family Life I

think we can all agree that starting a business is hard work. And depending on your skill sets, many of us would admit that starting a business with your spouse is an even bigger feat. How about opening a restaurant with your spouse during a pandemic? Who would be crazy enough to do that? Ladies and gentlemen, introducing Stone Town Grill — created, owned and operated by myself (Jess) and my husband Marty Larghe. Yes, we opened a restaurant during the height of COVID-19. Yes, it is stressful. Yes, it effects our marriage (how would it not). But it is not all doom and gloom. Let me explain. To provide a little context, Stone Town Grill is a build-your-own salad, grain or noodle bowl with made-from-scratch sauces from cuisines all over the world. It is fresh and fully customizable, and it came to fruition from our love of travel and the way we cook and eat at home. With travel, we got introduced to different spice blends and flavors that I worked to recreate at home. With home cooking, we value using fresh, whole ingredients

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and cooking from scratch as much as possible. Between Marty and I, we have nearly five decades of restaurant experience (most of it Marty), so of course we daydreamed about having our own restaurant. In 2018, I started developing all the recipes and ideas for the concept. After much tinkering, testing and planning, we decided to take the steps to start making our daydream a reality. In 2019, we found a property, a lender, a contractor and all the many dozens of services necessary to open a restaurant. Things were looking up, and we were planning a summer of 2020 opening! Everything was going our way. Then 2020 happened. We all know about 2020. The short story of how it specifically affected us was that our summer opening became a post-Thanksgiving opening due to COVID19-related construction delays. Couple up opening during an undesirable time of the year with massive restrictions on dining out due to COVID-19, and the result was a quiet start to business. Since opening, Marty and I have worked in the restaurant nearly every day — which is exhausting — but also necessary right now. We have literally put blood, sweat and tears (so many tears!) into this work, and there is no guarantee it will all work out. But here are some reasons why it is all worth it to me no matter what happens.

Jessica and Marty Larghe


First, even though this work is a tremendous source of stress and can bring out the worst in us, it also pushes Marty and me to depend on and support each other even more. We both know this restaurant would not exist if it was just one of us without the other. Though I may not always show it, I truly admire Marty’s knowledge and love of running a restaurant, and whenever a situation arises where I do not know what to do, I know he has an answer. And Marty is always bragging to customers, telling them, “My wife developed all the recipes!” When we have a good day, we celebrate together. When we have a down day, we support each other. When one of us is overwhelmed, the other tries to calm them. When one of us is having a bad day, the other tries to give them grace. And when we are both having a bad day, we learn not to take it personally. It is messy and stressful and tiring and chaotic, but it has pushed us to grow in our marriage and deepen our relationship with each other. We are truly partners in this crazy endeavor.

→ FROM LEFT

before

CO MP LE TED IN 15 DAYS • U P TO 75% LESS THAN CUSTOM C ABINE T S Give your kitchen a fresh face by refinishing the existing cabinet boxes while updating them with all new cabinet doors, drawer fronts and hardware to completely transform the look. TRY OUR FREE ONLINE ESTIMATOR 701-850-6824 • kitchenrefresh.net 623 Main Ave. E, Suite 101, West Fargo

TO RIGHT: Kiana, Carter, Marty and Jaycie.

Besides working daily with each other, all three of Marty’s kids work at Stone Town Grill. Kiana, Carter and Jaycie all work part time as servers, and it is the first serving job for each of them (and the first job ever for Jaycie). It is so encouraging to see how proud they are of their dad and how much they appreciate all his hard work. They all truly support and promote the restaurant, and it really means a lot to me and Marty to have them working alongside us. With everyone in the family working at Stone Town Grill, this is definitely a locally owned and operated business. So, while I long for the day when we have a “normal” work schedule, the support of family does encourage me to keep doing the work. And I cannot imagine doing this work with anyone except my husband!

Stone Town Grill is located at 705 32nd Ave E, West Fargo. For more information, visit us online at stonetowngrill.com.

beautiful, fast, affordable kitchen makeovers

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Don’t let the name fool you, although Kitchen Refresh is GRAYSCALE known for breathing new life into dated kitchens, they also tackle all those other troublesome organizational50 K 25 K areas in a home as well. 100 K “If it’s a cabinet, it doesn’t matter where it is, we can absolutely Refresh it! I can’t help but shake my head a little and smile when clients ask if our work can be done on a bathroom BLACK & WHITE vanity or a laundry room. These rooms come in second and 100 K third for the work projects our team takes on. So many homes currently combine the laundry and entrance area off the garage. Not only do these rooms get hit the hardest with the in and out traffic, but throw in all the seasonal wear and tear, then sprinkle in the laundry needs of an active family – I do believe this can create the perfect storm for chaos. If any one area in a home could wave a flag for a functionality refresh, the laundry room/garage entrance would be the winner!”

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The Kitchen Refresh team shares two recent laundry room/ garage entrance projects they are particularly proud of:

before

before

after

In the first example, the Kitchen Refresh team worked with the client to refresh their current cabinetry, and move layout elements into a more well planned out design. The cabinetry was adjusted and moved down to accommodate both the washer and dryer to open up the space. The client selected a deep rich navy color for their lowers and a bright and airy off-white for the top cabinetry. The biggest impact in the space was the removal of a large closet with equally large doors, which interfered with the foot traffic this space has passing through it on a daily basis. By removing the closet, a large drop zone area was created to house shoes and, once again, coats and seasonal wear. The awkward corner that was created by the former closet by the back entrance was revamped into additional storage including a counter surface to drop carried-in items. New paint, flooring and counter tops were also added and coordinated by the design team for Kitchen Refresh to tie up the design.

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— KI TC HEN R EF R E S H D E S I G NE R , A N D R E A CO L E MAN


I BECAME A COUNSELOR BECAUSE

your life is worth my time. after

WENDY REGNER, LPC

before

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th2fargo.com * 4654 Amber Valley Parkway, Fargo * th2fargo@gmail.com * 701-541-4092

In the second example, storage was a must in this busy household. The high ceilings in the room provided the opportunity for the addition of tall cabinets to store all the seasonal gear and items our client didn’t know what to do with. The height of the cabinetry gave space to create a large drop zone to hang coats and place shoes, yet offer a place to sit while getting ready to head out or when returning to the home. Cabinetry was also added on the back wall with new counters to allow a much-needed surface for folding clothes and storing laundry-related items. New flooring and paint finished off the design.

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Stone Town Grill is a build your own salad or grain bowl with a large fresh food bar and made-from-scratch sauces from cuisines all over the world. From Tex-Mex to Thai Peanut, there is a flavor for everyone!

FREE

So, refresh it already! Give them a call, check them out on Facebook at Kitchen Refresh of Fargo, or visit kitchenrefresh.net. [ aw ]

beverage, bowl & dessert

@stonetowngrill 705 32 nd AVE E, WEST FARGO • 701-532-1797 • stonetowngrill.com


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What is this worth?!

This is probably

the most frequently asked question when dealing with collectible, vintage or antique items. It can be a hard question to answer, but it boils down to this: What is someone else willing to pay? What was valuable and sought after 10 years ago can wind up being of little interest or value to people today, and things people never saw as collectible are now commanding high prices and in great demand. 26

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A great example of this is toys. Vintage action figures from the 80s and 90s are hot collectibles. If they are still in their original packaging, they can sell for hundreds of dollars. Even out of the package they’re in demand, more so if they are free of damage and have at least some of their little parts and pieces. Conversely, we handled an estate in which the owners had amassed a large, beautiful collection of vintage and antique Tiffin glass. The prices they paid for these items 20-30 years ago were still marked on some of the pieces and were at least double the price those same items would sell for today. No one has a crystal ball to predict what will be hot in 2031 to start hoarding now. But there are some ways to find at least an estimated current retail value for your treasures. If you're selling to a dealer, expect the offer price to be about half the retail. A go-to for a lot of people is eBay, and for good reason, but it can be misleading. People frequently make the mistake of researching items and judging value based on the listed price. Sellers on eBay can list their item at whatever price they want. That doesn’t mean anyone will pay it. To get a more accurate idea, check the “sold items” listings.


You need to have a free account with eBay to view sold items. The values you see on eBay are not necessarily reflective of the value of an item if you were to sell it here in Fargo. There are 66 million eBay accounts just in the United States and over 180 million globally. Etsy has become a great source for vintage items, and you can view global selling price ranges for items. As with eBay, Etsy sellers can set the price wherever they want, and the item may never sell. It is difficult to find final sale prices, with or without an account. Worthpoint is an aggregator site that collects sale prices from on-line sales all over the country, including eBay and Etsy. A Worthpoint subscription is necessary to see the sale prices of items. They offer a free 7-day trial. Their subscription prices are flexible but can be expensive. Facebook Marketplace can be helpful for researching selling prices locally and regionally. The downside is that once an item sells, it disappears from the Marketplace. There is no sold items search. The staff behind the counter at the Fargo Antiques & Repurposed Market frequently assist customers by offering these options, and often purchase items from them. While they are not professional appraisers and do not claim to be, they are keenly aware of what sells in Fargo and at what price. If you have a large quantity or an entire household you’re dealing with, trying to determine the value of each individual item is a daunting task. This frequently happens when there is a loss in the family, downsizing or relocating. For those folks needing to liquidate entire contents, that can also be arranged through The FARM. You can find additional information on how to sell to our dealers or inquire about an estate buy out in the “contact us” section of the website, farmantiques.net.

Warm summer regards,

Kristi

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at the F. A . R . M .

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701 · 356 · 9199 www.farman tiques.net

Z Open 7 days a week [ aw ]

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Mon-Sat 10-6, Sun 12-6

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1 0 1 s e Recip

the B U FF life

WO R DS & P HOTO G R A P H Y : AS H L E Y S O R NS I N

Back 2 School Edition It’s back to school season, the schedule is filling up fast, and there’s little time to prepare a healthy breakfast or snack. Often, once those feet hit the ground, you’re full speed ahead running out the door and lucky to be wearing two matching shoes. Sound familiar? Fortunately, eating healthy can fit into that schedule with just a little prep work that you can do now. These recipes can be enjoyed all week, so you can grab and go, knowing everyone will be nourished for a busy and productive day. Getting healthy, easy and delicious breakfasts (and snacks) that the whole family will love may sound like an impossible task, but these two completely customizable recipes will earn you an A+.

Chewy Protein Granola Bars Join Ashley on FACEBOOK: at ‘The BUFF Life Community’ Group INSTAGRAM: @ashleysornsin WEBSITE: eatlivebebuff.com

Chewy Protein Granola Bars are absolutely delicious and pack a nutritious punch with the added protein powder. They make a great snack at or after school, they’re a true winner when found in a lunch box, and your kids just might request them for breakfast as well! Using sunflower seed butter makes them school friendly and if chocolate chips aren’t your favorite, try craisins or coconut. Go ahead and get creative, everyone can make their own batch!

makes 12 bars

INGREDIENTS: 2 cups oatmeal ½ cup vanilla plant-based protein powder 2 tablespoons ground flax ¼ cup SunButter (or other nut/seed butter) ¼ cup honey ½ cup coconut milk, vanilla unsweetened ⅓ cup chocolate chips (or other toppings)

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350 F. Line an 8x8 pan with parchment paper. Mix dry ingredients together in large bowl; mix wet ingredients together, then stir into dry ingredients. Fold in chocolate chips. Press mixture into pan and bake for 18 minutes. Allow to cool, then cut into 12 bars. Keep stored in an airtight container in the fridge.

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Sheet Pan Protein Pancakes makes 8 servings

Sheet Pan Protein Pancakes are probably the best way to make pancakes, with no flipping and easy cleanup. The flavor options with toppings are endless, so everyone can customize their own, while breakfast is made in just one pan for the entire family. They are even delicious cold, making them perfect to pack as a grab and go breakfast or snack. Naturally sweetened, no syrup is required, so you can feel good about feeding your family pancakes every day of the week.

INGREDIENTS: 2 cups oat flour ¼ cup vanilla plant-based protein powder ¼ cup ground flax 2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoons sea salt 2 ½ cups coconut milk, vanilla unsweetened ¼ cup honey 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Toppings: ½ cup blueberries, ½ cup blackberries, ½ cup walnuts, ½ cup pecans

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DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 425 F. Line 9x13 pan with parchment paper. Combine dry ingredients, set aside; combine wet ingredients, set aside. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix well. Pour pancake batter into pan, spread evenly, then add toppings. Bake for 15-17 minutes. Cut into 16 pieces with a pizza cutter, each serving is 2 pieces.

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Now you’re armed and ready to tackle the back to school grind with healthy, easy and delicious recipes the entire family will love. Being properly fueled with nourishing food that also tastes great will keep those bodies performing their best, in and out of the classroom and boardroom. [ aw ]

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E M O T I O N A L LY C H A R G E D C O N V E R S AT I O N S : React + Interact Differently WOR DS : DE SIR E E ZIE L K E , P HD, L P

P H OTO G R A P H Y : D E N N I S KR UL L , 5 FO OT 20 D E S I GN LO UNG E

W

e know communicating with family members and friends can be difficult at times, but living through a global pandemic has made it even more challenging. People who love each other have had to face emotionally charged differences of opinion on things like mask wearing, social distancing and presidential elections. Now we are faced with global pandemic fallouts such as unemployment and uncertainty about returning to our “normal” lives. Here are a few tips to use in preparing for difficult conversations with loved ones to help increase the likelihood of a successful discussion.

Desiree Zielke, PHD, LP

Stay curious. Speak for yourself! Use “I” and “we” statements such as “I feel concerned and worried about our finances because you don’t have a job. What do we need to do differently?” Using “I” and “we” puts you on the same team (rather than you versus me) and prevents you from making assumptions about the other person’s feelings, intentions and motives.

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When you have a difference of opinion with someone, it can be hard to have an open, honest conversation if you believe your opinion is “right.” Ask questions and stay genuinely curious to learn about why the other person believes what they believe (“That’s interesting. Help me understand your thoughts on that.” Or, “Can you tell me more about that?”). You do not have to agree with them, but you can then at least understand where they are coming from.


Watch your nonverbals. Nonverbal behaviors (tone of voice, posture) are crucial in all conversations, but particularly important when having a challenging conversation. Make sure you keep your tone of voice even, volume normal, and tone conversational rather than confrontational. Be mindful of your posture so your arms are not crossed in front of you, and you are not using an intimidating stance (e.g., hands on hips, being too close). Ideally, you would have your arms open and be sitting or standing in a non-threatening manner with appropriate distance between you and the other person.

Reduce technology to a minimum. All difficult, emotional conversations should be done face-to-face when possible. As mentioned above, nonverbal behaviors are important aspects of conveying your message so being in-person is best for difficult conversations. If in-person is not possible, try to use a video call platform for the conversation. Texting and emailing are NOT useful ways to conduct important conversations because you completely lose tone of voice, and misinterpretation is easier. While these tips can increase your likelihood of success, they are not guaranteed. If the conversation becomes unproductive, you can always end the conversation and agree to disagree. We can only control our behavior; we cannot control the behavior of others, and all are entitled to their opinions and feelings. Please reach out to local mental health professionals for more training on assertive communication for more complicated situations.

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Services now provided in one location! We are pleased to announce that Anne Carlsen has integrated its Behavioral Health & Autism Services, Therapy Services, and Early Intervention Services in one Fargo location! Anne Carlsen is dedicated to continually

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Anne Carlsen Services: FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact us at Becoming Balanced. Desiree Zielke, Ph.D, LP (left), Trishia Powell, MSW, LCSW (middle) and Rachel Blumhardt, MEd, LPCC, LPC, NCC (right) becomingbalancednd.com | 701-551-1840 [ aw ]

— MA R LENE

• Behavioral Health & Autism Services • Early Intervention Services • Speech Therapy • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Visit www.annecarlsen.org or call 1-800-568-5175.

4152 30th Avenue, Fargo, ND 58104


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Genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) also known as vaginal atrophy, or atrophic vaginitis is a painful condition that many women suffer through silently. Commonly, as women start menopause (usually around the age of 50, but sometimes sooner), their hormone levels decrease which can cause the vaginal lining to become drier and thinner.

SY M P TO M S According to a review article from the Journal of Menopausal Medicine: 50-60% of post-menopausal women experience symptoms of GSM during their lifetime. These symptoms can include:  dryness

More than half of post-menopausal women are affected by this treatable condition WO RDS : HE AT HE R NOVA K , R P h , P h a r m D

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 genital itching  vaginal discharge  burning with urination  urgency with urination  recurrent urinary tract infections  dyspareunia (pain during sex)  decreased vaginal lubrication during sexual activity  spotting after intercourse Low-estrogen state in the postmenopausal period causes many health problems. In contrast to vasomotor symptoms (ex. hot flashes and night sweats) that are often improved over time, GSM symptoms are chronic, rarely resolve spontaneously and often progress if left untreated. Although these symptoms are not life-threatening, they are progressive and may have a profound impact on the quality of life of postmenopausal women by negatively affecting self-esteem and intimacy with their partners.1

Unfortunately, many women hesitate to seek treatment for this very common and treatable condition. This reluctance may be due to a feeling of embarrassment discussing GSM symptoms with a healthcare provider or because they falsely believe these symptoms are just part of getting older and there is nothing that can be done about it.

T R E AT M E N T There are two primary ways most healthcare providers approach treatment for the symptoms of GSM — by addressing the loss of estrogen and by treating the symptoms. Loss of estrogen can be addressed by starting hormone replacement therapy. Either systemic treatment with oral hormone capsules, or localized treatment with vaginal creams or gels may be suggested by your healthcare provider. For women using vaginal estrogen creams or gels for GSM, there are a variety of products available that each incorporate a different kind of estrogen. Most of these estrogen creams and gels are available at any retail pharmacy. A certain bio-identical estrogen called estriol, which is often used vaginally to address GSM symptoms, is only available in custom compounded products prepared by pharmacies specializing in compounding.

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J Menopausal Med. 2015 Aug


STEP 1: Laugh with friends

about hormones and menopause. In addition to hormone replacement, or as a stand-alone option, local symptoms can be targeted through the use of overthe-counter lubricants or moisturizers to help relax the vaginal lining and improve the feelings of dryness. For patients who are unable or would rather not use hormone treatment, there are also novel prescription options that can be custom-made at specialized compounding pharmacies. These products target GSM symptoms, but are hormone-free. Patients may have different reasons for not seeking help for GSM symptoms, but it is important to note that good treatment options are available that offer hope and can really help many of these women.

HEATHER NOVAK,

RPh, PharmD

STEP 2:

Book Heather for a Women’s Hormone and Wellness Consult. Text “Hormone” to 701-365-6050 to learn more or go to inhealthcompounding.com/balance

2345 25th Street South, Fargo | 701-365-6050 | inhealthcompounding.com

I F YO U A R E I N T E R E ST E D in learning how InHealth Specialty Pharmacy works with local healthcare providers to help patients suffering from GSM symptoms, please contact them at 701-365-6050.

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InHealth Specialty Pharmacist Heather Novak RPh, PharmD is a 2004 graduate of NDSU College of Pharmacy. With specialized training through Professional Compounding Centers of America, Heather has over 15 years of experience in compounding and hormone therapy. She has a passion for helping patients with their hormone and nutritional health.

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HEALTH WOR DS A ND P H OTO G R A P H Y : SA N FO R D H E A LT H

A SPORTS PHYSICAL CAN HELP PARENTS SPOT HEALTH ISSUES It’s also a good time to check mental well-being in light of pandemic

ost young people require a sports physical before they can take part in school athletics or activities – at least when the season is predictable. Before school starts again, it’s a good idea to schedule a physical for fall sports and activities, says Dr. Jason Sharp, a physician with Sanford Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in Fargo. “We conduct the regular physical exam, and we also ask specifically about any history of cardiac conditions or heart tests,” he says. “After this past year, we ask more questions focusing on the cardiac and pulmonary perspective. Such as, were you ever diagnosed with When a sports or activities COVID and have you physical is needed experienced any issues The requirement for when and how often a physical is needed is when you returned to mandated by each state. It is recommended that these checkups the sport?” be completed six weeks prior to the start of either the school or Autumn Nelson, a family nurse practitioner with Sanford Health in Fargo, offers the following helpful tips for parents.

activity season that your child is participating in. This six-week period allows time for any additional check-ins needed that may stem from this physical appointment. That may include therapy to an injury that is yet to be fully healed and could possibly limit the child from performing at full health and put them at a greater risk to re-injure themselves.

What a sports and activity physical will check for During the check-in, a nurse or provider will check for several items with an overall goal of understanding the well-being of the child to perform any physical activity. Past medical history is assessed first to be aware of any past illness or surgeries, along with any past injuries or concussions. This check-in will also go through basic height, weight and arm circumference to check for any concerns or abnormalities. Additionally, the appointment includes a mental health check.

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Young athlete Stella Swenson and her mother Megan chat with Sanford Health’s Dr. Jason Sharp during the sports physical. They discuss what sports Stella is playing in this year and if she has any injuries that may hinder her performance.


“Particularly this year, athletes were isolated, they get depressed and sometimes they don’t realize what they are experiencing,” Dr. Sharp says. “I have a conversation with them and talk whether they would like more counseling or to discuss it more with their primary care provider.” Sharp adds that now is a good time to check if your child has the appropriate athletic equipment, such as shoes that they walk and train in every single day. It can make a world of difference so they don’t get an injury in the first place.

Differences in physicals based on age Everything that is covered at a young age remains important as a child grows. As the child ages, more in-depth questions about social history such as drug use are addressed. This is a good age to start this discussion and allow parents to be aware and children to understand the risks of their choices. At every sports and activity physical, preventive steps of a healthy lifestyle, such as eating habits and remaining active, are addressed.

What parents can take away from these appointments If a child or parent has any question about how to stretch a certain muscle or do a stretching routine daily at home, primary care providers are qualified to recommend this type of basic therapy. This is also a time to check if a past injury has been fully healed. If the child is still feeling a substantial amount of pain, that is when providers refer them to a physical therapist who can go in depth into rehabbing this injury. These young athletes are also told several times that if they take any sort of strong hit to the head they should tell their parents and coaches right away so they can be evaluated for a concussion. Providers and nurses also can recommend sports gear that they think is safer than other products. They also recommend that students take advantage of athletic trainers who are on site at their school. These athletic trainers can go further into preventive gear and care, and things such as taping ankles or wrists. This is also a great time to ask any question that a parent or child may have, even if it is not related to their sport or activity. [ aw ]

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a different approach to health S WA N S O N H E A LT H P R O D U C T S WORDS : SIR I T HADE N

P H OTOG R A P H Y : M I KE S MI T H

Turmeric. CBD. Reishi. Lion’s Mane. Even… chlorophyll? Yes, you may recognize them as the latest trends in integrative health, which has only in the last 10 years exploded in popularity within mainstream culture. For Swanson Health, however, it has been their passion and purpose for over 50 years. “I live and breathe all of this, even outside of work,” says Crystal Nicklay, retail manager at Swanson Health. The company has carried many currently trending products since they opened their store 39 years ago. And the knowledge they possess about these products proves it. “We do a lot of training on supplements and the products we carry,” Nicklay explains. It is also what sets Swanson Health apart the moment you walk in the door. “We do not have a lot of turnover, so our team knows a lot.” You may wonder, though, with all of the latest trending products, how does the team keep up with it all? “There is always new research, information and supplements coming out,” Nicklay acknowledges, “but a lot of this we have had forever.” The company has found that continual training and education for their team, with a foundation of veteran staff, equips them to be an encyclopedia of sorts in the products they carry. Amid over 8,000 products the Swanson Health store off 45th Street carries, the current stars in the integrative health scene include CBD, zinc, probiotics and chlorophyll. Nicklay laughs on the last one, “It was TikTok that spurred the chlorophyll craze.” Not far behind though are elderberry, magnesium, letter vitamins and various varieties of mushrooms. Regardless of how you first learned about it, the team helps you navigate through it all by offering personal recommendations in-store, or by following them on social media to see their educational videos on both Instagram and Facebook. You may walk in out of curiosity and come out with both knowledge and products that truly meet your needs. For example, many people come in initially looking for supplements to help support immune health or assist with weight management. But Nicklay’s team won’t just focus on a supplement, they’ll look at the big picture. “People will come in wanting to lose weight, but as you start talking to them, we find out about their

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CRYSTAL NICKLAY, Swanson Health retail manager

CREATING COMFORT for over five decades

caffeine consumption and difficulties sleeping.” Nicklay does clarify that while they do not offer medical advice, they do help you connect the dots to what may be the underlying issues you really want to address. Looking at the whole picture of health is important to the team at Swanson Health. It is not just about what is put into the body, but what surrounds the body on a daily basis. That is why they offer more than just supplements. “We have something for your mind, body and home,” says Nicklay. They offer cleaning products, health foods and local products. Not only are staff available for questions, they welcome them. Nicklay attests that they love when people “go a little deeper into what’s going on.” They also offer health coaching services that “can help get to the root of the problem and serve as a guide in supporting people and what aspects of health they would like to address.” Swanson Health has made it their mission to be there for each person, the whole person — from the supplement-curious to those who are seeking a different way to approach health. Nicklay states, “We love helping people that want to be helped.”

Swanson Health Retail Store

4501 15th Ave S, Fargo. For more information, visit us online at facebook.com/swansonhealthretail.

We Put the World at Your Feet carpetworldfargo.com

701-235-7525 4601 17 th AVE S, FARGO

LO C A L LY OW N E D

for over five decades

CARPET • VINYL • CERAMIC TILE H A R D W O O D • L A M I N AT E

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F R E E I N - H O M E E S T I M AT E • F U L L I N S TA L L AT I O N S E R V I C E


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HEALTH

play

A WINDOW INTO the LIFE OF A CHILD how play therapy can heal WORDS : E R IN R OCHE L E AU a nd AN G E L A CAV E T T

P H OTO G R A P H Y : Provi d e d by C H RYSA L I S B E H AV I O R AL HEALTH S ERVIC ES

Erin Rocheleau I have the honor and privilege of watching children learn, grow and heal. What goes on in a child’s brain and how they process the world around them is a beautiful thing. My window into their world is play. Kay Redfield Jamison, a clinical psychologist, wrote, “Children need the freedom and time to play. Play is not a luxury. Play is a necessity.” This statement rings especially true as we, as a community, heal from the Coronavirus pandemic which impacted all areas of our lives. We all processed the virus in different ways as adults. We took on new hobbies, perfected recipes, connected to nature and connected to others in digital ways. Living rooms and guest rooms were transformed into offices and classrooms, as schools and work places switched to distance schooling and working from home became the norm. In my own children, I saw them process all of these changes through play. My son who was 2.5 years old at the start of the pandemic grappled with these changes through his love for superheroes. He lined up Spiderman, Batman and Captain America to defeat the evil villain, the Coronavirus, who is invisible, and lives in the air all around us. His sister who was 5 at the start of the pandemic struggled with missing friends from preschool. Her play centered around parties and vacations to Disney World with her preschool friends. Both of these play scenarios were integral in allowing my children to sort through and process a complex and strange time when their worlds were turned upside down.

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Angela Cavett During my doctoral internship year, I had moved to New York just a month before 9-11 when the World Trade Center buildings were hit by planes during a terrorist attack. During that year, working in residential treatment and watching my own 3 and a half year old daughter, it was evident that play was the way children processed trauma. They reenacted and processed their understanding of this life-changing event.

ANGELA CAVETT, PhD PH OTO S : SCH ER L I N G P H OTO GR A P H Y

E

rin’s and my examples are of dramatic experiences, COVID-19 and 9-11, which have impacted the whole world. Play is not only healing in those situations. There are also daily examples of how children process experiences through their play. In therapy with children, we witness children expressing their experiences through play every day as well as using play to learn and process their feelings and beliefs. Play allows us a view into the child's experiences. This is why play is the instrument through which children may communicate in therapy. Garry Landreth said, “Play is the child’s symbolic language of self-expression.” Play therapy is a developmentally-appropriate way for children to heal. How play is used in therapy is determined by the concerns of each child, adolescent or adult. Based on the concerns,

different models of play therapy will guide treatment. Play can be used for narratives or to teach a skill. A child may use puppets of an otter momma and baby to learn otter breathing to increase relaxation. A child may play out a recent experience of fighting with a sibling or anxiety about an upcoming medical procedure and together with the therapist create, through play, ways to react. Drumming in a social or emotional play therapy group can promote positive thinking and improve coping. There is evidence that the movements and rhythms when art, play and music are included in therapy improve learning over standard talking (and sitting) therapies. Play can even be used with babies. FirstPlay includes playful storytelling and massage of the baby by the parent which can improve mood for the parent and attachment for the baby. Another play therapy, Theraplay, replicates what happens with securely

is the clinical director and psychologist at Chrysalis Behavioral Health Services and Training Center where she provides individual, play, group and family therapies for children and families as they heal from trauma, anxiety and mood disorders. Learn more at chrysalispc.com.

attached children through interactive play between the parent and child. There is joy in this parent-child play and joy is indeed necessary for attachment. Even treatments such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing have integrated play into their models because play helps facilitate positive changes and decreases symptoms. Play is not only healing for children. How grief, trauma or depression feel can often be shown more through symbolic means such as sandtray or art therapy. For adults as well as children, this allows for deeper processing. Play offers a window into the world of others and a means to help make change. [ aw ]


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PROFILES

the

family business B E H I N D C R AV E

B

rothers Kam and Keyvan Talebi traveled to the United States from Iran in June 1979. But unlike previous summer vacations in America, the boys, ages 9 and 6, never returned home.

The Talebis’ trip happened because their mother, Shahnaz, had advanced-stage breast cancer and needed treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Their father, Karim, the chief financial officer of a large power-generation company in Iran, moved the boys here to be near their mother. Meanwhile, back home, Islamic revolutionaries overthrew the government. “When we came here, we certainly did not think that we were coming here to stay,” Kam Talebi reflects. “We thought that Mom would be seen at the hospital, and we would go back at the end of the summer, but here we are, some 30 years later.” Showing resolve, the Talebis adapted to their new home, learned English, earned college degrees and, in 2007, established Kaskaid Hospitality, an expanding restaurant business that began with Crave in Edina. Now, the Talebis have 18 restaurants and 2 event centers located in the Midwest, including the local Crave restaurant inside West Acres Mall.

family focus The Talebis credit family for their success, down to the name of the business, Kaskaid, which is a reconfigured collection of first initials of family members. For example, the S is for their mother, Shahnaz. She “is one of the miracle cases,” says Kam Talebi, 44. “She has gone through several relapses, but she has fought through them all. She is an absolute inspiration. She has beaten all the odds.”

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WO R DS : R O B E RT BU R NS P H OTO G R A P H Y : PR OVIDED BY KA M & KE Y VA N TALEBI


K stands for their father, Karim. They admire their father for his integrity, says Keyvan Talebi, 40. “I always valued the fact that it was tough for him to come here. He gave up a great job and a beautiful home to do everything to save my mother. I will never forget that, and the love and passion that he had for his family.” As the Talebi brothers continue to pile up successes at Kaskaid, their roots put things in perspective. “Every day that goes by, you realize what’s important, in terms of family values and being a strong person,” Kam Talebi says. “Your health and your family are the number one thing you have in this world, and you have to work to appreciate and cherish it every day." Kaskaid has grown from 100 employees to more than 1,000. And they are more than just numbers, the Talebis say. “We run the business as a small family. We are close. We are open-door, handson and we care about every single employee we have. I think that resonates,” says Kam. Kam advocates a life well-seasoned with happiness. He says, “We live in a world full of stresses. Be happy. Be happy to be able to make a difference and be the best you can be. Smile and enjoy life with your family and friends. For those who have proven they are leaders and proven their successes, enjoy life and what it gives you, be there for people, and provide opportunities for the people who surround you. Let that be your business legacy.” Crave offers a vast menu featuring a scratch American kitchen serving the freshest, highestquality food using only the best ingredients.

crave fargo is located inside West Acres Mall at 3902 13th Ave S, Suite 3643. Call 701-809-9020 for reservations. For more information, visit craveamerica.com. [ aw ]

t

I ndi vi dual The r apy t

Fam i l y The r apy t

Pl ay The r apy t

Attachment Therapy t

Tr aum a The r apy 1 620 1 6t h Ave S , Far g o 701 .809.53 70 info@ chr ys a lis pc .com chrysal i sp c .co m


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PROFILES

S C H E E L S H O M E A N D H A R D WA R E

Focuses on Female Leadership Development WOR DS : ASHL E Y WAIT

P H OTO G R A P H Y : PR OV I D E D BY SC H E E L S H O ME A N D H A R DWA R E

History Rooted in Hardware Scheels hardware has strong roots in the Midwest, starting more than a century ago in 1902 when the first store opened in Sabin, Minnesota. Frederick A. Scheel, a German immigrant, used the $300 he earned from his first harvest of potatoes as a down payment for the small hardware and general merchandise store. From the very beginning, Fred Scheel and his family learned leadership development was key to a strong business and company culture. This foundation set the tone for the rest of the Scheel family as the company grew.

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By the early 1930’s Scheels hardware stores expanded to the Fargo-Moorhead area and a number of farming communities up and down the Red River Valley. As customer interest increased, sporting good lines were added to the product mix. Today, Scheels Home and Hardware has varied product offerings including women’s fashion, home decor, grilling and a cafe, but remains the company’s only hardware focused location. The hardware industry is traditionally male dominated, but that has not stopped the female leaders at Scheels Home and Hardware.

Team of Strong Females Because associate development is top priority, all associates, male and female, are empowered to set their own career path. For associates Sherry Senske, Kelly Hoover and Ashley Wait, that path led to serving the loyal customer base at Scheels Home and Hardware. Sherry Senske set the tone when she became the first female store leader at Scheels in 1997. Steve Hulbert saw her potential and let her run with it. Senske brought fresh ideas, a clear vision and a strong drive. She’s now an assistant store leader at Scheels Home and Hardware, where she’s added unique product lines other hardware stores don’t typically sell.


Make your DREAM PROJECT a REALITY

We understand the unique bond you share with other veterans of overseas conflicts because we, too, have been there. No matter which conflict called you to service, we invite you to join us as we continue to fight for all that’s good FOR VETERANS.

317 ROBERTS STREET, FARGO, ND

Kelly Hoover never saw herself working in a hardware store, but her passion for helping people landed her in the perfect position. Starting in the women’s Fusion Boutique and moving up to assistant store leader, she has empowered women to feel good in the clothing they buy and helps them accessorize for any occasion.

701-232-2493

Newly remodeled

LIVE MUSIC on weekends EVENT SPACE with catering Charitable gaming Bingo, Trivia + MORE

NOW JOIN US IN THE FIGHT Upfront Bar (opening soon)

Ashley Wait joined Scheels Home and Hardware in 2018 as a true expert in the lawn and garden department. She’s now an assistant store leader with a passion for home projects and all-things DIY, and finds joy serving customers each day.

Proceeds benefit Fargo VFW programs and services.

YOU FOUGHT FOR OUR COUNTRY. Redefining the Landscape

With more than 60 years combined retail experience, this team of strong female leaders brings innovative ideas to the hardware, home decor and fashion departments at Scheels Home and Hardware. Together, they’ve helped pave new paths for future leaders across the company and are redefining the landscape of the hardware industry. [ aw ]

No One Does More FOR VETERANS

Fargo VFW Post 762 202 Broadway N Fargo, ND 58102 701-235-8243


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PROFILES

ONLINE DEGREE

offers flexibility and opportunity for working mother WO R DS : B RY N N R AW L I N GS P H OTO G R A P H Y : J UST I N E I L E R

Tina Hoff’s professional journey

began in business. But it wasn’t the fulfilling career she wanted. Now, several years — and two kids — later, North Dakota State University is helping Hoff develop and perfect the skills necessary to succeed in nursing. And she’s doing it completely online. “NDSU has a great program,” Hoff says. “Being able to earn my degree online was a driving factor for me going back to school. Working full time, having kids and enjoying other activities in life required that flexibility.”

The professors ... apply real life scenarios to their teaching, which is extremely important for retention and actually being able to translate concepts learned to what we do every day.” — TIN A HOF F

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Hoff knew she needed to go back to school to advance her career. Several colleagues told her that NDSU was the perfect place to earn a degree as a working professional. She’s studying to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing, while working full time as a clinical care leader of integrative medicine at Sanford Health. Hoff says being intentional with her schedule and receiving support from family helps her tackle the rigors of being a student and full-time employee.


H IG H S C H OOL S EN IOR S : No w is a great time to wo rk o n your a pplication essa y!

College application planning Hoff has already used her classroom knowledge in her job. When a group visit was scheduled for several patients, Hoff utilized an article discussed in class to provide insight and emotional processing. Many of the patients reached back out to thank her for providing the resource. “I try to incorporate the education I am getting so I can continuously keep it imbedded in my mind,” she says. “The professors are great. They apply real-life scenarios to their teaching, which is extremely important for retention and actually being able to translate concepts learned to what we do every day.” It is a dream of Hoff ’s to one day be a registered nurse educator or program developer, where she could offer integrative approaches to healing. She wants to make the holistic health and wellness option more accessible to both providers and patients. Her nursing degree will provide a strong base to help fulfill that dream. Hoff encourages others to continue their education in pursuit of their goals, too.

Sched ule y o ur free co nsult at i o n w i t h us t o d ay !

MBA

Our evening classes and valuable networking opportunities combine with affordability for a high-quality and convenient MBA experience. MBA IN AGRIBUSINESS

“My kids and I have a lot of meaningful conversations about the importance of continuing your education and making that a priority, but also that it is a privilege that shouldn’t be taken for granted,” she says. Hoff plans to graduate in spring 2022. She’s also considering pursuing a master’s degree.

NDSU OFFERS 87 master’s and 52 doctoral degree programs, as well as 21 certificate programs. Explore the opportunities available at NDSU by visiting ndsu.edu. [ aw ]

Yamaya Sosa, PhD

ajko gno s.co m | 218-227-9925 | maya@ajkognosconsulting.info | @ajkogn os

Pursue the full MBA degree or opt for one of our nine-month graduate certificate programs, offered in the following areas: • Business Analytics • Leadership and Managerial Skills • Digital Marketing and Innovation • Investments and Applied Portfolio Management

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS: ndsu.edu/mba


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PROFILES

NO ONE DOES MORE FOR VETERANS WOR DS : TA MI E Z ACC H E A

P H OTO G R A P H Y : A R E A WO MA N STA F F PHOTO G R APHER

T

he Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) of the United States is a nonprofit veterans’ service organization comprised of eligible combat veterans and military service members. Eligibility is based on military service on foreign soil, in any branch, reserve, or guard, in any theater. The VFW was formed in 1899 by veterans of recent foreign wars. Many arrived home wounded or sick. There was no medical care or veterans' pension at the time, and they were left to fend for themselves. They formed local support organizations that would eventually band together and became known as the VFW. Today, over 120 years later, there are more than 1.5 million members of the VFW and its Auxiliary. The VFW continues its strong advocacy on behalf of veterans legislatively and was instrumental in the creation and expansion of the Veteran’s Administration (VA) system. The VFW Post 762 in downtown Fargo is named in honor of Private Roy Chandler. Private Chandler served in the 18th Infantry, 1st Division of the American Expeditionary Forces. He was the first soldier from Fargo killed in action in World War I. Post 762 has been serving veterans and their families since 1938. They provide financial and housing assistance, scholarships, education and opportunity to veterans and their families in the Fargo area. Assistance and programs are frequently delivered through the Auxiliary, which is open to the spouses or immediate family members of a VFW member. The Post provides youth outreach with programs like the Voice of Democracy and Scout of the Year. They hold ongoing fundraising activities like the annual Pinewood Derby, the proceeds of which are donated to the VA Hospital in Fargo. They also maintain an honor guard, who recently appeared at a FargoMoorhead Red Hawks game for Military Recognition Night. The honor guard is available to serve at any veteran’s funeral.

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In Your Community If you’ve been downtown lately, you’ve probably noticed some goings-on on the corner of Broadway and Second Avenue. This is the current location of VFW Post 762. They have been upgrading and remodeling for several months, to better serve veterans, their families and the community. Proceeds from the operation of the Post’s various activities fund programs to improve the lives of our local veterans and their families. So, what’s new? The original VFW Club has been refurbished and a larger space made available for live music every weekend. They have expanded into the space on the northwest corner of Second Avenue and Broadway and established The Upfront Bar and Grill which will be opening soon. The Post maintains charitable gaming licensed by the state of North Dakota, the proceeds of which benefit the local mission. Finally, the lower level has also been refurbished and is available to rent for private functions like birthdays, anniversaries, showers, and graduations. The kitchen is open and available for on-site catering. The Post has been a busy job creator for downtown Fargo, hiring new and experienced staff. They are available to help book and coordinate special events or provide an enjoyable night out. September 17 is National POW/MIA Day. Post 762 will be holding a Missing Man Ceremony in recognition of the service and sacrifice of those who never returned home. Additional details can be found on the Post’s website. Membership in the VFW or its Auxiliary is not necessary to enjoy any of the facilities at the Post and help support the important work the VFW does in our area.

Connect with Us at These Upcoming Events Every day brings an opportunity to connect. Here’s your chance to connect to your community and learn and grow. Join AARP North Dakota at one of these upcoming virtual events. Healthy Choices When Dining Out: A Passport to Healthy Living Event Wednesday, August 18 | 3 – 3:30 p.m. Brain Health Lunch and Learn Thursday, September 23 | 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. To find all of our upcoming events and to register, visit aarp.org/ndevents.

Over 150 Selections of Craft Beers, Wine & Spirits vote for your favorite.

JoinUs

Sat • Sept 18th

Our 8th Annual adult only festival will host a variety of things to see and do all afternoon, with great entertainment in the MDJ Saloon. Stay in our campgrounds or at one of our many hotels and resorts close by. Pre-Tastings on Friday 17th are hosted at restaurants in and around the Walker/Leech Lake Area.

HARVESTMOONFESTIVAL.net $ 35 pre-buy (until Sept 12th) • $50 at the gate • $10 non-Tasting

CAMPING: 10 AM • FESTIVAL OPENS: 2 PM • TASTING BEGINS: 4:30 PM• MDJ SALOON BANDS: 6:30 PM MOONDANCE FAIRGROUNDS: 7050 39th AVE. NW., WALKER, MN. 56484 6 MILES EAST OF WALKER NEAR BEAUITIFUL LEECH LAKE • CALL 218-836-1055

Summer of 2022 Newest

Moondance

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Seasonal Camping HOT SPOT! Woods

Seasonal

fargovfw762.org Facebook.com/fargovfwclub Phone 701-235-8243

Live On! Moondance Memories

[ aw ]

/aarpnd @aarp_nd

We will be bringing in smaller but more events throughout the summer along with seasonal camping!

Bar & Grill

Reserve Your Spot Now!

RV

Tent

CAMPING MUSIC FUN!


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PROFILES

Chapter Aesthetic Studio:

A NEW CHAPTER

for REJUV MEDICAL AESTHETIC CLINIC WOR DS : WASIFA AHM A D H ASA N PHOTOGR A P H Y : JAY R U B IN IC, R u b inic P h oto g ra p hy

Rejuv Medical Aesthetic Clinic in Fargo, the largest medical aesthetic center in the upper Midwest, has partnered with Aspen Dental Management Inc. (ADMI) to launch a new national brand of aesthetic medical studios across the U.S. Melissa Rogne, founder and CEO of Rejuv Medical Aesthetic Clinic, is going to take her successful business and launch this new national brand of state-of-the-art medical aesthetic clinics, call Chapter Aesthetic Studio, this fall. Founded on Rogne's belief that everyone has a beautiful story to tell, Rejuv was established in 2005. Her passion for providing innovative aesthetic services and products made Rejuv the pioneer in the region’s aesthetic industry and the largest clinic in the Midwest. Rejuv became ranked as an Allergan Top 100 clinic by continually innovating in both technology and client care. We sat down with Rogne to talk about this new venture, Chapter Aesthetic Studio.

Melissa Rogne with Bob Fontana, founder and CEO of Aspen Dental Management (ADMI)

AW: How did you come up with the idea of Chapter Aesthetic Studio?

Rogne:

Being in business in Rejuv for 16 years, people often asked me, “When are you opening additional locations?” I always said the same thing, “I will never open another location until I know I can make it the same as Rejuv.” I could not figure out how I could multiply myself in that way to maintain the same level of purpose, value and culture. You can set up laser and Botox anywhere, but replicating the uniqueness of a business is difficult. Then I was approached by ADMI, and our core values were culturally a great fit. More importantly, I knew that they have the experts like real estate teams, human resources and legal teams. They would allow me to do what I want to do and make every single clinic be just like Rejuv. All I needed to do was what I already do well, and it’s running an aesthetics business.

AW: What’s the significance of the name?

Rogne:

I thought, What would be the name that can really capture everything I knew about aesthetics? Because everyone has their unique narrative, everyone has a story, and we want to

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meet people where they are at in their stories. When you think about your life, you think about stories, and you think about different chapters. And it came to me like a bolt of lightning. It’s really about chapters! And that’s how Chapter Aesthetics Studio was born.

Cotton C a sh mere Topp ers in a n A rray of Colors $78 Tuesday - Saturday 11-5 l o c at e d d i r e c t ly s o u t h o f c o s t c o at i - 94 & v e t e r a n s b o u l e va r d

AW: How is Chapter Aesthetics Studio similar to Rejuv?

Rogne:

Our main goal is to take the purpose and values that we started with Rejuv and bring them to the national landscape by making aesthetics conceivable to as many people as possible. We are going to be a little smaller than we are in Fargo. Chapter Aesthetics Studio will be one-third of the size of Rejuv, so about 3,500 square feet.

A Community Celebration of Arts and Entertainment

In terms of the services we are offering, we will have about 80% of the services that we already have today, and we will focus on what we are known for, which is aesthetics, body and wellness. Other than that, the core of who we are, our purpose, values, the way we collaborate and work together as a team will be the foundation for Chapter. So, Chapter is, without a doubt, Rejuv at its soul.

Theatre B’s New Sizzling Summer Fundraiser

August 26 | 6-8pm Here are the services that will be offered at Chapter Aesthetic Studio: injectables such as Botox Cosmetic and Juvederm, laser skin treatments, body treatments including CoolSculpting and CoolTone, bio-identical hormone program, LED light therapy, facial aesthetics services like diamond glow treatment, peels and digital SkinScan.

Join us for Food, Fun and Fire

19 S EASON

Rogne knows and understands that beauty and aesthetics are as unique as the individuals she has worked with. It’s not one size fits all. She believes her new project can turn the page and reclaim beauty’s one truth: it radiates from within. [ aw ]

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Kick off Season 19 with

THE CAKE by Bekah Brunstetter / October 8-24

Tickets and Info at TheatreB.org


cover story

another place at the table Aleyna Leibfried on being a foster parent

WO R DS : R E B ECCA M EID ING ER P HOTO G R A P HY : TAY LO R JA N E P H OTO G R A P H Y HA I R A N D M A K EU P : O L I V I A R O G E R S N o r a S a l o n 5 6 7 0 3 8 t h Av e S , S t e C , F a r g o 701-490-2195 facebook.com/hairandmakeupbyolivia



ver the last decade, Aleyna Leibfried has set another place at the table for a child they’d only just met dozens of times. With each of those introductory dinners, amidst sharing names and stories, the Leibfried family has wondered how many more meals they’d get to share with that child. With some, it’s been just a few meals over the course of a weekend. With others, it was hundreds or even thousands over the course of a few years. But no matter the quantity, the aim has always been the same: Show love to a child in need of some love. “I mean, what’s one more plate at the table?” says Aleyna. “If I’m setting it for four, I may as well set it for five.”

Having grown up in a home that welcomed foster children, and gaining two siblings through adoption, it was only natural for Aleyna to open her own home to fostering as well. Shortly after she and her husband Travis had their second son, the Leibfrieds felt the heart-tug to foster care. One of the things that drew Aleyna and Travis to working in the foster community was their desire to serve and volunteer in a pattern that already fit into their daily rhythms. “I’ve always loved to volunteer, but with little children at home I didn’t have time to leave my house for volunteering,” says Aleyna. “Fostering was a way that I could make a difference without leaving my house for it. I mean, we were already doing all the kid stuff and already parenting. What’s one more kid? Crazy is crazy.”

While their youngest baby boy was just learning to sit up, before he’d even taken his first crawl, the Leibfrieds were already signed up for the family support program through PATH (now called Nexus-PATH Family Healing). The family support program is for anyone whose heart is being tugged at to help children in the foster system, but isn’t quite ready, equipped for, or called to full-time care. Those trained in the family support program provide respite for an at-risk child 4-6 days and nights per month, in addition to offering mentorship and guidance to the parent or parents. This prevention program plays an integral role in helping struggling families stay together, as trained families partner with and walk alongside them.


After being in the family support program for about a year, a teenage girl, who the Leibfried’s already knew, was in need of a full-time foster family. They knew instinctively that this was their moment to dive in all the way. Although beginning their journey with a 14-year-old girl wasn’t exactly their plan, they knew it was the right plan. Having two toddler boys at home, teenage girls were way off their radar. But they jumped in anyway and haven’t looked back. She was with them for about a year, and since then, their table has been set for many more kiddos, one or two at a time, who’ve needed an “in-between” family. As Leibfried says, “We’re the middle for these kids. They are coming to us with a past, and the future is still unknown. But we can be their middle.”

While this may all have been normal life for Aleyna, for Travis this was an all-new way of life. However, it has now become a natural rhythm for him too. And his extended family has also embraced the new additions with love and joy; a few of his relatives have even followed suit and gotten licensed to foster. In speaking of family holidays, Aleyna explains that everyone expects there to be extra kiddos. “One year, we got a new child in our home right before Christmas. So I got on the phone with the whole family and asked everyone to go out a buy another Christmas gift. No one batted an eye. It’s just normal to us.” While the lifestyle of fostering is a comfortable rhythm to some, it can be an intimidating thought to many. When we hear that Nexus-PATH currently has 120 kids in North Dakota on a waiting list for foster families,

we may ache and wish we could help. When we hear that Nexus-PATH helped over 400 kids in 2020, we may inwardly want to be a part of such a tremendous endeavor, but don’t know how. While our hearts may break at these statistics, which have worsened through COVID-19, the thought of opening up our homes to full-time care is a leap that most of us can’t quite wrap our minds around: “Don’t I have to have my own life figured out before I help others?” “Shouldn’t I have my own kids under control before I reach out to more?” “My finances are already strapped — how could I afford to feed another child?” “I work full time and so does my spouse; aren’t we supposed to be able to stay home with the child?” “I’m not married — do I have to be?” These are all questions that tend to become roadblocks to the idea of fostering, but the Leibfrieds answer is a resounding “no” to all of the above.


We’re the middle for these kids. They are coming to us with a past, and the future is still unknown.

Whether a family fosters through the county system or through Nexus-PATH, they are provided with support that addresses each of the questions above. Nexus-PATH partners each of their foster families with a social worker who is there for them as a professional support, a collaborator and a sounding board for whenever behavioral, medical or emotional struggles arise. If the family work schedule requires childcare or afterschool care to be utilized for the foster child, the financial cost of that may be covered. Additionally, the foster family receives per diem stipends to offset the living expenses of the child in care. Nexus-PATH also has a respite program in which families can choose to be “helpers” to foster families. Families in the respite program take kids for a weekend or several days so that the primary foster family can have a chance to rest, refuel and reconnect with their nuclear family unit.

But we can be their middle.”

Another roadblock for many people is the fear that if they become foster parents, they will have to say yes to every ask. Leibfried assures us that it’s okay to say no. And it’s okay to take breaks. “Sometimes after a child has left our home, we’ve needed to take a break,” says Aleyna. “So you just tell your social worker not to call for a while. Look, the best thing for the child is not to come into a home that is not ready or equipped for him or her.” The average age of kids in the Nexus-PATH system right now is age 9, and there is a specific need for families that are open to teenagers. However, Leibfried also mentions that the need for care is so great that families are able to make requests for specific age ranges of children. Although the agency may not always be able to cater to every request, they are eager to match the right child and family together for a successful experience for everyone.

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P H OTO : ALEY N A LEIBF RI E D

Perhaps the biggest hesitancy for most of us is the fear of not being able to let go when the time comes for a child to leave the foster home — whether he or she is heading back home or has been placed in an adoptive family. In addressing that concern, Leibfried was adamant, “You just have to let go. You have to. You have no more control after that child has left your home, so you just have to be able to let go. Trust that you’ve done what you can. Have faith in your social worker. Have faith in the family. Have faith in God.” While that is obviously much more easily said than done, it is a learned skill and the team of professionals helps foster families through the transition. It’s not a journey you go alone. And it’s not always a permanent good-bye. In some cases, relationships formed while a child is in care end up being permanent friendships with the families staying connected

and involved in each other’s lives for years to come. In other cases, where distance may be an obstacle, technology helps foster families stay in contact with kids who’ve come and gone from their home. Occasionally Leibfried walks into her family room and finds her boys playing Roblox virtually with past foster siblings, connecting through online video games. What joy to keep these relationships alive, if even just virtually. A decade ago when the Leibfrieds stepped into fostering, they did so with the intention of being “the middle,” serving kids that needed a safe place to land while they waited for permanency. Over the years, as fifteen children have come and gone from their home, their desire to permanently add a daughter to their family slowly grew. In August of 2020, they started the process of obtaining their home study with the goal of adding a

girl to their family. Now, it is with tremendous joy that they recently announced that dream is coming true. This spring, when an 8-yearold girl for whom the Leibfrieds had previously provided respite care became eligible for adoption, they jumped at the opportunity. “Oh! She belongs with us!” they told their social worker. And indeed she does. Her adoption will be finalized in September, making the Leibfrieds a permanent family of five (plus two dogs and two cats). So, does that mean they’re done fostering? “Well,” says Aleyna. “We’ve said that we are done before, and obviously that hasn’t stuck. So who knows?” But for now, the Leibfried’s are adding another place at the table … for good. [ aw ]


area LIFE

from passion to purpose WORDS : ALE X IS SCOT T

BUILDING A L E G ACY O F L A S T I N G I M PA C T

P ORTR A I T P H OTO G R A P H Y : MI KE S MI T H

is greeted by the girls upon arrival ↑ Deb Dawson in South Sudan. Photo provided by ASAH.

hroughout her life, Deb Dawson has felt called to places half a world away. As a young child, she grew up with an internationally adopted neighbor and later pursued adoption herself in both Korea and Siberia. Stating “this is my life’s work,” Dawson has had a personal mission to support disadvantaged youth across the globe. 56

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In 2007, Dawson was introduced to Joseph, a local NDSU college student from South Sudan. A Sudanese orphan himself, Joseph was wanting to start a program to support vulnerable children back in his home country. Dawson didn’t hesitate to say yes, and African Soul, American Heart (ASAH) was born. Dawson and Joseph worked on a documentary film to spread awareness of the orphaned child epidemic in South Sudan and tell the story of Joseph’s life. The documentary was an instant hit when it premiered at the Fargo Theatre in November 2008 with more than 300 people attending. Interest and awareness began spreading. Quite quickly, Dawson and Joseph realized that ASAH would be more than just a film. In 2010, with growing public support, Dawson and Joseph set their focus on educating and empowering South Sudanese orphans. They collaborated with other human rights

leaders to determine where ASAH could make the most impact. As young orphaned girls were least likely to get an education and most likely to become child brides, it was only logical that ASAH would embrace a mission to educate, empower and protect South Sudanese orphans. Preparing these youth for the transition to an independent life and instilling the skills and knowledge needed to help their communities and their country restore and sustain peace became ASAH’s vision. In 2012, shortly after South Sudan became an independent nation, ASAH opened a school to the first 23 girls in Duk Payuel, South Sudan. Unfortunately, ASAH experienced a tremendous setback when civil war erupted in 2013-2014 and the school was destroyed, displacing the girls from South Sudan to Uganda, now as refugees. Miraculously, all of the girls survived and ASAH persevered to continue the mission of protection, education and empowerment.


Deborah Yar finished her nursing degree with the help of ASAH and has returned to South Sudan to pursue clinical work in her home village. Photo provided by ASAH.

COVID-19 has been another disrupter. Yet despite this challenge, ASAH celebrated six student graduates; including one who received her nursing degree and has returned to South Sudan to pursue clinical work in her home village. Since 2012, ASAH has provided 50+ students with an education, vocational skills, protection against forced marriage and empowerment for their futures. For the last 14 years, Dawson and her team, both locally and in Uganda, have navigated civil war, political unrest, relocation to Uganda and COVID-19 to continue making a difference in the futures of these young people and their nations. Dawson has been so grateful to have the means and support from our great FM community and beyond to fulfill ASAH’s mission and Dawson’s dream. ASAH has created a legacy of impact and continues to provide transformational support half the world away. 2021 is a truly rare and special year for ASAH as they are closing in on achieving their mission. Their journey is now nearly complete and their vision and mission nearly fulfilled. It is a rare space for a nonprofit to be in a position to say that. ASAH celebrates their loyal and amazing donors, the successful work of their students, and the start of a strategic winding down of the organization as each remaining ASAH student works to complete their individual education and empowerment pathway. ASAH has an amazing celebration event planned for October 5 at the Sanctuary Events Center, downtown Fargo. Join their email list, view asahinsudan.org and follow them on Facebook to learn more about the event in the coming weeks. [ aw ]


area LIFE

FA L L E V E N T S P OT L I G HT

Junkin’ Market Days WO R DS : MEGA N E LGI N

P H OTO G R A P H Y : PR OV I D E D BY J U N KIN' MAR K ET DAYS

T

he crisp air and changing leaves will herald the coming of a new event to the Red River Valley Fairgrounds this fall. First held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota this past spring, Junkin’ Market Days creator Kerry Bamsey is bringing the market event to the Fargo area on October 29 and 30.

Kerry Bamsey

So what does this event offer even the most seasoned shopper? Junkin’ Market Days is an indoor market featuring over 100 vendors from a six-state area in one location. The market focuses on repurposed, rustic, shabby chic and farmhouse style products with a handful of vintage or antique items as well. Attendees can expect to find everything from repurposed furniture, home decor, jewelry and boutique clothing, to specialty gourmet food items. “This is not like a flea market or craft show. These vendors have taken a lot of time over the past year to create new products and find unique items,” Bamsey says, emphasizing the many hours of time, effort, care and love they have put into their products. “I won’t accept direct sales. Everything at the market is either made by the vendor or lovingly purchased with the intent to resell for the boutique experience.” She also stresses that the displays will not be set up like a typical booth-style event, “Vendors put a lot of work into making these displays a shopping event setup to show each item with care.”

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An inspired market Bamsey first attended similar events held in larger metropolitan areas like Minneapolis and Omaha. This sparked an idea to bring a similar experience to her home state with a goal of helping the vendors featured, as well as the community. Many vendors were struggling to connect with buyers and sell their products strictly through online platforms during 2020. This event allows them to reach new customers who can now see their products in person. The first Junkin’ Market Days was held in April 2021 in Sioux Falls with resounding success.

Thousands of customers and over 115 vendors filled the venue for the two-day market. “It shows that people really like this kind of event and will come out to support it,” says Bamsey. With the success of the first market, Bamsey made the decision to expand by bringing Junkin’ Market Days to Fargo. Her goal was once again to help these vendors reach more customers in more areas. Local makers in the Fargo and Sioux Falls areas have an opportunity to sell their products in both cities giving them wider exposure in a new location. It also benefits local customers who like to see new products they haven’t seen before and connect with new makers they wouldn’t otherwise find. Expand that exposure by all six states that the vendors are coming from and you’re sure to find something new and exciting.


Children are waiting for a family like yours!

Foster hope. Be a foster parent!

Bamsey certainly doesn’t plan to stop there. She intends to hold Junkin’ Market Days twice a year in both Fargo and Sioux Falls. In addition, she is using her expertise to teach other women how to bring a market to their city. Currently, three other women are learning that skill from Bamsey with the hopes to hold an event in their own communities soon.

NexusPATH.org

Make it an experience While Bamsey would love to see everyone at the event, she especially recommends it for a special day out with your friends. “This is something people can enjoy. With music playing, shopping and gourmet foods to sample and purchase, I really think it would be a fun girls’ day.”

What would happen to society's view of adoption if accurate adoption information were presented in every school?

Filled with uncommon and exclusive items, there will be something for every taste. Junkin’ Market Days will feature vendors on their Facebook and Instagram pages with photos and links leading up to the event, giving interested shoppers a chance to check out the vendors beforehand. Savvy shoppers will want to get there early to make sure they find those unique pieces before they sell out. When asked what her favorite products from the event are, Bamsey replies, “I love to find the one-of-a-kind pieces that are unique, especially outdoor items — something you won’t see at your neighbor’s house.”

Junkin’ Market Days

Friday, October 29 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, October 30 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Red River Valley Fairgrounds 1805 Main Ave W, West Fargo For more information, visit junkinmarketdays.com. [ aw ]

Partner with us

The need in our world for life-affirming education is immense, and it starts right here in our community. Through our Chosen Education Program we want to fill the educational void that exists on the topic of adoption. We teach in high school and college classrooms, pregnancy centers, churches, and community groups.             please reach out to us at 701-237-4473 or emily@casfamily.org.          ch r istian ado ptio n serv ices.org


area LIFE

QA

O N A GUA RDIA N S HIP O R CO N S ERVATO RS HIP WOR DS : B E R LY D . N E L S O N , S E R KL A N D L AW F I R M

The terms “guardianship” and “conservatorship” have been in the news recently with stories about a famous popstar being unhappy with her conservatorship. But guardianships and conservatorships can be important tools to help care for family members who are unable to properly care for themselves or make decisions. So what exactly are guardianships and conservatorships?

Q:

What is a guardianship or conservatorship?

A: A guardianship or a conservatorship is something set up for a person under authority of the court for someone who has been deemed incapacitated or in need of protection. An incapacitated person is an adult who is so impaired by illness or disability that the individual cannot communicate responsible decisions about important aspects of his or her life. A person subject to a guardianship is often called a ward or protected person. A guardian or conservator is the person or entity appointed by the court to act on the protected person’s behalf while that person is still alive. Guardians and conservators are empowered by the court to make decisions on behalf of the protected person. It is different than a power of attorney, which is something that a person sets up on his or her own without court authority by way of a document that confers rights to another as that person’s attorney-in-fact.

Q:

What is the difference between a guardianship or conservatorship?

A: Generically, a guardianship typically gives a guardian authority to decide where the protected person is going to live and what sort of medical treatment she will receive. A conservatorship typically gives authority to the conservator to decide how to handle the protected person’s finances and legal affairs.

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Q:

Q:

A:

A:

The guardian’s authority can include residential, medical, legal, educational and vocational powers, among others. A conservator’s authority is typically limited to financial and legal powers. A guardianship or conservatorship is sometimes utilized when a power of attorney is not available or insufficient. The process is often utilized when an adult child needs to manage a cognitively impaired parent’s affairs and there is a family dispute as to who should be making decisions. While guardians and conservators are often family members of the protected person, social services agencies may also serve as guardians, and banks or financial groups can be appointed as conservators. Courts will consider if a protected person previously nominated someone to serve as guardian or conservator, or if there is a power of attorney or health care directive in place, when determining whom to appoint as guardian or conservator.

Yes, there may be more than one guardian or conservator for a person, but if they cannot agree on a course of action, it may require further court involvement. Sometimes in families where conflict could make appointing siblings as co-guardians/conservators difficult, third-party guardians or conservators (like a bank) are utilized successfully.

What sort of authority does a guardian or conservator have?

Can more than one person or entity be appointed as guardian or conservator?

BERLY D. NELSON is a shareholder attorney with the Serkland Law Firm in Fargo, North Dakota. He practices in the areas of commercial and general civil litigation, including a focus on trusts and estate litigation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, call 701-232-8957, email bnelson@serklandlaw.com or visit serklandlaw.com. This article should not be considered legal or tax advice and should not be relied upon by any person with respect to his/her specific situation.

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QUAL I T Y L EGA L S ERV IC E SINCE 1888

provided by our EXPERIENCED AT TORNEYS

JACK G. MARCIL

BERLY D. NELSON

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7 0 1 - 2 3 2 - 8 9 5 7 • s e r k l a n dl aw. co m


AugustSEPTEMBER NOTE :

All events are subject to change. Confirm dates and times before attending.

August 5

August 17

August 18

LADYBOSS SUMMIT 2021

RACE EXHIBIT OPEN HOUSE

What is a ladyboss? A ladyboss is empowered, confident in her abilities and instinct, boldly leading with heart and integrity. A ladyboss works hard to create a more equitable world where everyone has an equal opportunity for a seat at the table through community building, education and empowerment. Are you a ladyboss or looking to become one? Join us to connect with and learn from the growing ladyboss network. With your virtual summit ticket you’ll gain access to a lineup of incredible speakers, panel discussions, new breakout sessions and exclusive digital resources. 8:30 AM Virtual Event ladybossmidwest.com/2021-summit/

YWCA invites you to stop in for the grand reopening of the RACE: Are We So Different? mini-exhibition. The exhibit is hosted at YWCA Administrative Offices in partnership with the Science Museum of Minnesota and Presenting Sponsors Microsoft and Sanford Health. With a focus on the history of race and it's very real consequences, the exhibit is a valuable resource for our community and opportunity to join together in the mission to eliminate racism. There is no cost to attend and registration is not required! 4:00 – 7:00 PM YWCA Cass Clay Administrative Offices 4650 38th Ave S, Suite 110, Fargo ywcacassclay.org/racial-justice

HEALTHY CHOICES WHEN DINING OUT — A Passport to Healthy Living Event

August 12 S’MORE BREWS PLEASE The Girl Scouts — Dakota Horizons council is hosting an 21 and older modern spin on a traditional Girl Scout campfire favorite — s’mores! The evening fundraiser will include hors d’oeuvres, a limited-edition specialty S’mores Stout brew, a silent auction and patio campfire with a s’mores station. 5:00 PM Drekker Brewing Company 1666 1st Ave N, Fargo gsdakotahorizons.org/smoreplease

August 17 & 18 SCHOOL SUPPLY BINGO! AT THE CARLSON LIBRARY Get some free back-to-school supplies at one of these events at the Dr. James Carlson Library. Pre-registration is required. For kids in grades 1 through 6. Call 701-241-1495 for details. 11:00 AM Dr. James Carlson Library 2801 32nd Ave S, Fargo fargolibrary.org

We’re all eager to dine out more again, and there’s no reason it can’t be healthy eating. Get tips from a registered dietitian on what to look for and what to order when you can’t find nutritional information. Take control and prepare yourself with the right tactics to enjoy your favorite restaurants. Register to receive a confirmation email that will include a Zoom link to connect to the program. 3:00 – 3:30 PM Virtual aarp.org/ndevents

August 19 SUMMER BOOK PARTY It’s like a book club, but you can read whatever you want! Stop by the Sodbuster Plaza outside the downtown Main Library to chat about the books you've been reading recently. Or check out what our librarians bring to recommend. No registration is required. 7:00 PM Main Library (outside) 102 North 3rd St, Fargo fargolibrary.org

QUOTABLE: "For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Then you will seek me and find me: when you seek me with all your heart, I will be found by you, declares the Lord." — JEREMIAH 29: 11-14


August 26 B ON FIRE: Theatre B’s New Sizzling Summer Fundraiser Theatre B is fired up for its 19th season and we’re celebrating! Inspired by the bonfires of our youth, we’re hosting a fun summer gathering in our outdoor green space with food, fire circles and more. Enjoy music from the Meat Rabbits, food from Detroit Deli, Maria’s Homestyle Mexican and Adibon African Fusion, and don’t forget dessert from Windsor Waffles. Bring your friends and gather round the fire-rings in Theatre B’s backyard. 6:00 – 8:00 PM Theatre B 215 10th St N, Moorhead theatreb.org

September 2 YWCA’S CHOCOLATE FANTASY Join us for YWCA’s 38th annual Chocolate Fantasy event and support the mission of YWCA Cass Clay. This year’s event will feature lots of chocolate, a silent auction and celebrity servers. Tickets are on sale now with options to attend in person or pre-order a dessert box to go. Silent auction opens Friday, August 27th at Noon. 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM Delta by Marriott Fargo 1635 42nd St SW ywcacassclay.org/chocolate

September 12 FM AREA OUT OF THE DARKNESS COMMUNITY WALK Join us for the Fargo-Moorhead Area Out of the Darkness Community Walk. Our doors open at noon and the opening ceremony begins at 2:00 pm. Proceeds bring local and national suicide prevention and awareness programs of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to our community. There will be opportunities to participate in person and virtually, so visit the website at afsp.org/fargo to learn more and register today. 2:00 – 5:00 PM, Registration begins at Noon Scheel’s Arena 5225 31st Ave S, Fargo afsp.org/fargo

September 12 4TH ANNUAL DESIGN CHALLENGE Scheels Design Challenge partnered with Midwest Nest and sponsored by Magnolia Paint. Visit us in store to see the designs and vote for your favorite! Students from the NDSU Interior Design program will have four hours to design a space inside Scheels Home & Hardware. They are challenged with creating a space inspired by the following themes: Coastal/Lakeside, Farmhouse, Rustic, Industrial, Scandinavian, Bohemian/Boho. Visit @scheelshardware on Facebook and Instagram for more event information. September 12 at 12:00 PM, Voting ends September 17 at 12:00 PM Scheels Home and Hardware 3203 13th Ave S, Fargo

WHEN

mourning DAWNS

SEPTEMBER 21 – OCTOBER 26

6:00 – 7:15 PM each Tuesday "When Mourning Dawns" is our six-week series that looks at the seasons of the year to guide our conversations about the seasons of your grief. Preregistration is required and space is limited. Please call or email us if you have questions or interest in this series. for more info: boulgerfuneralhome.com These meetings are led by our Grief Support Coordinators Sonja Kjar and Ann Jacobson.

701-237-6441 griefsupport@boulgerfuneralhome.com

events | book discussions | exhibits | movie screenings | & more

one book one community FARGO

MOORHEAD

WEST FARGO

Get answers to more than one hundred stereotype-debunking questions — thoughtful, awkward, and searching — and join your community by reading

Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask

YOUNG READERS EDITION 

by ANTON TREUER

PRESENTATION BY AUTHOR ANTON TREUER October 26 at 7 PM • FREE Admission The Centrum – Concordia College

1 b o o k1 c o mmu n ity.o r g


September 13, 20, 27 & October 4 ACTIVE PARENTING: FIRST FIVE YEARS The first five years are critical to a child’s development. In this free 4-week series, participants will learn attachment and nurturing, preventing behavior problems, and skills to encourage positive behavior. Registration required. Childcare available. 5:45 – 7:15 PM Schlossman YMCA 4243 19th Ave S, Fargo ag.ndsu.edu/pen/region-5

September 15 HOMEFIT — A Passport to Healthy Living Event Learn simple modifications that can make a home safe and comfortable for older adults for years to come. 3:00 – 4:00 PM Virtual aarp.org/ndevents

September 18

September 25

FARGO MOORHEAD WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S

10TH ANNUAL ND BBQ CHAMPIONSHIP

Join us for the annual Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest fundraiser for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. This inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to join the fight against the disease. While there is no fee to register for walk, all participants are encouraged to raise critical funds that allow the Alzheimer’s Association to provide 24/7 care and support and advance research toward methods of prevention, treatment and ultimately, a cure. The Alzheimer’s Association leads the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia, by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. We’re walking to support a world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia and we invite you to join us. 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Red River Valley Fair — Hartl Ag Building act.alz.org/fargo

Register your team for our 10th Annual Scheels North Dakota BBQ Championship Event. The event includes vendors giving grill demos, food samples and even special in store promos. Visit scheels.com/ndbbq for more information.

September 23 HEALTHY MIND & BODY LUNCH & LEARN Explore ways to stay sharp and live your best life as you age. Experts from the Global Council on Brain Health and AARP will share tips and tools to achieve a brain-healthy lifestyle. Learn what you can do to maintain and improve your brain health, such as staying socially engaged, managing stress, exercising, getting restorative sleep and eating right. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Virtual aarp.org/ndevents

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September 28 Parent Night Event — THE POWER OF PREDICTABILITY Join us for a free parent night event featuring speaker Katy Smith presenting The Power of Predictability — enhancing family well-being through routine and play. Katy Smith is a keynote speaker, educator, trainer and a valued resource for parents and educators. She has spent a career engaging communities in transformative conversations. Registration required by September 20. Refreshments served at 6:30 PM; Event 7:00 – 8:00 PM Holiday Inn Fargo 3803 13th Ave S, Fargo ag.ndsu.edu/pen/region-5

September 29 Professional Workshop — THE POWER OF PREDICTABILITY Katy Smith presents a professional workshop on The Power of Predictability — enhancing family well-being through routine and play. Tickets: $50 includes lunch. Registration required by September 10. Holiday Inn Fargo 3803 13th Ave S, Fargo ag.ndsu.edu/pen/region-5


Fargo Public Library

Book Clubs

Join fellow readers to talk books each month with a like-minded group! With a variety of topics, Fargo Public Library has a book club for everyone. Library events are free and open to the public. A complete schedule of upcoming library events is available at all Fargo Public Library locations and at fargolibrary.org. Main Library | 102 North 3rd St, Fargo | 701-241-1472 Dr. James Carlson Library | 2801 32nd Ave S, Fargo | 701-476-4040 Children’s Services | 701-241-1495

Experience the Difference

August 12 & September 9 VIRTUAL DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES BOOK CLUB Nonfiction, novels, memoirs and more. We seek multiple perspectives, with multiple points of entry, and we work to center the voices of marginalized communities and people through our exploration about inequality and injustice in the United States. Pre-registration is required and can be done online. Everyone who registers will receive an email the day before book club regarding virtual meeting details. A list of titles is available at fargolibrary.org. Contact Megan R. at 701-241-1492 or the downtown Main Library. 7:00 PM Virtual Event

September 2

SUMMER GARDEN BOOK CLUB

A SENSE OF PLACE BOOK CLUB

Join the in-person Summer Garden Book Club for an informal discussion featuring books related to nature, ecology and gardens. All interested readers are welcome. Pre-registration is required. Contact Lori West at 701-476-5977 or visit fargolibrary.org. 6:00 PM Dr. James Carlson Library (outside)

For all interested readers; this club meets at the downtown Main Library. A list of tiles is available at fargolibrary.org. Contact Beth at 701-241-1492 or the Main Library. 11:00 AM Main Library

VIRTUAL SENIOR BOOK CLUB Join the virtual Senior Book Club for an informal discussion every other month. The Senior Book Club will discuss “Those Who Save Us” by Jenna Blum. This book club is for readers 55 and older, but all readers are welcome. Pre-registration is required. Everyone who registers will receive an email the day before book club regarding virtual meeting details. Contact Kirstie Carlson at 701-298-6954 or visit fargolibrary.org. 3:00 PM Virtual Event

3 yr old Little Deacons - 12th Grade

For information or a tour call 701-893-3271 jp2schools.org

HOLY SPIRIT ELEMENTARY

August 17

August 24

Register Now for the 2021-2022 Academic Year

NATIVITY ELEMENTARY

SACRED HEART MIDDLE SCHOOL

September 13 TEA TIME BOOK CLUB For all interested readers. A list of tiles is available at fargolibrary.org. 6:30 PM Dr. James Carlson Library

September 28 CURRENT HISTORY BOOK CLUB Book club featuring history titles meets last Tuesday of the month through May at the Main Library. A list of titles is available at fargolibrary.org. Contact Steve Hubbard at 701-241-1492 or the Main Library. 7:00 PM Main Library

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TRINITY ELEMENTARY

SHANLEY HIGH SCHOOL



F RO M T H E C R E ATO R S O F RO S E C R E E K and M A RT E N ’ S WAY D E V E LO P M E N T S :

Fargo’s newest and most beautiful addition The first phase of Selkirk Place includes 44 residential lots and two large ponds. Spend quality time outside by walking to our 8-acre Park or take your bicycle for a ride on our newly developed bike paths!

YOUR HIDDEN OASIS

25 th St.

Easily accessible from 25th St., 64th Ave. S and I-29 Walking distance to Davies High School

First Addition Future Addition

Price includes internal utilities

218-979-6099 www. rs c are y la nd.com


GET READY FOR THE SPORTS SEASON Sports physicals

A student athlete’s first step toward victory is a sports physical. Our physicians can ensure your child is fit and ready to play throughout the season and all year long.

039024-00484 7/20

Call your clinic to schedule your appointment.