Issuu on Google+

au

visual arts foundations


table of contents

brief bauhaus history the bauhaus

1

lazlo moholy-nagy

3

herbert bayer

5

jan tschichold

7

piet zwart

9

theo van doesburg

11

joseph albers

13

bauhaus vs. anderson bauhaus preliminary vs. au foundations

15

bauhaus wheel vs. anderson wheel

17

anderson university degrees and facilities

19


student work foundations 105 fall design problem 1: compositional studies

21

design problem 2: self identity diptych

25

design problem 3: contour drawing

29

design problem 4: art historical sculpture

33

design problem 5: introduction to color

37

foundations 106 spring design problem 1: drawing: value and perspective

41

design problem 2: fortune telling (value diptych)

45

design problem 3: color mixing

49

design problem 4: public sculpture monument

53

design problem 5: who are you really?

57

contact information

61


about this magazine

So you are interested in Anderson University’s visual arts program? Here at AU our students experience a program that is unlike any other program in the country. But before you dive into what Anderson’s art department is all about, you should first learn about the history and the masters of the greatest school of art and design that ever existed: the Bauhaus. After reading about the Bauhaus, you will then be able to understand just how special AU’s art program is, especially in relation to our Foundations course. You will see the similarities between AU’s Foundations and the Bauhaus’s preliminary course. But there is one key difference, which you will learn about later in this magazine. (Sorry, no spoiler alerts here.) This magazine features student work from our Foundations course and gives you a rare opportunity to see a glimpse of projects you will be doing if you decide Anderson is right for you. For each project, there is a brief description of what the project is, and how it is similar and different from projects assigned in the basic course at the Bauhaus. So sit back, grab a coffee, and dig into a rich history and unique program that you will not be able to find anywhere else in the country.


brief bauhaus history

the bauhaus

The Bauhaus was a school whose approach to design and the combination of fine art and arts and crafts proved to be a major influence on the development of graphic design as well as much of 20th century modern art. Founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar, Germany in 1919, the school moved to Dessau in 1924 and then was forced to close its doors, under pressure from the Nazi political party, in 1933. The school favored simplified forms, rationality, functionality and the idea that mass production could live in harmony with the artistic spirit of individuality. Along with Gropius, and many other artists and teachers, both Laszlo MoholyNagy and Herbert Bayer made significant contributions to the development of graphic design. Among its many contributions to the development of design, the Bauhaus taught typography as part of its curriculum and was instrumental in the development of sans-serif typography, which they favored for its simplified geometric forms and as an alternative to the heavily ornate German standard of blackletter typography.

On the right is a picture of the Curtain Wall at the Bauhaus.

1


brief bauhaus history

laszlo moholy-nagy

Known for his versatility and the fundamentals of design which he taught his students, Laszlo replaced Johannes Itten as director of the Bauhaus in 1923. He experimented in many different fields including photography, typography, sculpture, painting, industrial design and printmaking. His experimentation across multiple mediums led to graphic design work characterized by bold typography in combination with striking photography. After he resigned from his position at the Bauhaus in 1928 he spent time working in Berlin as a film and stage designer. In 1937 he moved to Chicago and formed the New Bauhaus, which is now the Illinois Institute of Technology. The school shared the same philosophy as the original Bauhaus and caught on quickly. He chronicled his efforts to establish the curriculum of the school in his book Vision in Motion.

Lazlo Moholy Nagy, around 1927. The pieces on the opposite page is “Am 7 ” (left), “The Olly and Dolly Sisters“ (top right), and “A-19” (bottom right).

3


brief bauhaus history

herbert bayer

Bayer was both a student and a teacher at the Bauhaus and worked in a wide range of fields including painting, sculpture, typography, advertising and architecture. In his early years as a student he studied painting with Kandinsky, but in just a short while he was teaching one of the Bauhaus’ first classes on typography. The amount of work that he created before he was 28 was more notable than most designers entire careers of work. He spent time teaching at the Bauhaus, working as an Art Director for the Container Corporation and as an architect in both Germany and America In between his time at the Bauhaus and his career in America he spent time as the Art Director of Vogue magazine’s Berlin office. His contributions to the fields of graphic design, typography and advertising were many. One that should be noted was his design for a typeface that consisted of entirely lowercase letters. The German blackletter types were overly ornate for his taste and their use of capital letter for every proper noun was annoying. Logically, Bayer developed a sans-serif alphabet of lowercase letters titled “Universal”. In 1946 Bayer moved to Aspen, Colorado where he spent much of his time designing local architecture and posters for the local community. In 1959 Above is a picture of Herbert Bayer. The piece on the opposite page on the right has one of Bayer’s many self-portraits. The piece on the left is an example of Bayer’s design work done for the Container Corporation of America.

5

he designed another sans-serif typeface. Again it was all in lower case, but he called it “fonetik alfabet” and it contained special characters for the endings -ed, -ion, -ory and -ing. He is one of the most recognized designers to come from the Bauhaus institution and his theories of design are still taught in many schools today.


brief bauhaus history

jan tschichold

Tschichold claimed that he was one of the most powerful influences on 20th century typography. There are few who would attempt to deny that statement. The son of a sign painter and trained in calligraphy, Tschichold began working with typography at a very early age. Raised in Germany, he worked closely with Paul Renner (who designed Futura) and fled to Switzerland during the rise of the Nazi party. His emphasis on new typography and sans-serif typefaces was deemed a threat to the cultural heritage of Germany, which traditionally used Blackletter Typography and the Nazis seized much of his work before he was able to flee the country. When Tschichold wrote Die Neue Typographie he set forth rules for standardization of practices relating to modern type usage. He condemned all typefaces except for sans-serif types, advocated standardized sizes of paper and set forth guidelines for establishing a typographic hierarchy when using type in design. While the text still has many relative uses today, Tschichold eventually returned to a classicist theory in which centered designs and roman typefaces were favored for blocks of copy. He spent part of his career with Penguin Books and while he was there he developed a Above is a picture of Jan Tschichold.

standardized practice for creating the covers for all of the books produced by Penguin. He personally oversaw the development of more than 500 books between the years 1947-49. Every period of his career has left a lasting impression on how designers think about and use typography, and it will continue to affect them into the future.

7


brief bauhaus history

piet zwart

A pioneer of modern typography, designer Piet Zwart was influenced by Constructivism and De Stijl. His influence shows in his work and in this quote: ...to make beautiful creations for the sake of their aesthetic value will have no social significance tomorrow.... Zwart worked as a designer, typographer, photographer and industrial designer in the Netherlands in the 1920s and 30s. Primarily working for the NKF Company, he created many works of graphic design before retiring from the company to spend the rest of his days as an interior and furniture designer. Also influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, Zwart began his education at the School of Applied Arts in 1902. He spent most of his career moonlighting as an architect and photographer, as well as a designer and for several years he was very successful. His design career came to a halt when he was arrested by German soldiers in 1942. He was eventually released after the war, but the experience affected him drastically. He spent the rest of his life primarily working in interior design. His excellent use of color, typography, composition and photography are reminiscent of the Bauhaus and his influence on the future generations of graphic designers lives on through the Piet Zwart Institute at the William de Kooning Academy. Piet Zwart is pictured above. On the right is “Series of Monographs on Film Arts, No. 7, American Film Arts� by Piet Zwart.

9


brief bauhaus history

theo van doesburg

Highly influenced by Wassily Kandinsky, van Doesburg shifted his style of painting from one that emphasized less of a direct reflection of everyday life and one that placed more importance on a conceptual style that favored a simplistic geometric style. A Dutch artist, van Doesburg led the artistic style movement “De Stijl” into popularity and influenced graphic designers for many years to come with his theories, which conveyed the idea that there was a collective experience of reality that could be tapped as a medium of communication. Van Doesburg moved to Weimar, Germany in hopes of impressing the directer of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius. Gropius did not directly oppose his ideas, but did not accept him onto the faculty of the Bauhaus. In reaction to this, Van Doesburg positioned his studio directly next to the Bahaus and attracted many students with the ideas he promoted, most of which were developed out of the ideas of Constructivism, Dadaism and De Stijl. It was during these times that Van Doesburg formed a tight bond with the artist Piet Mondrian. And, in 1923, Van Doesburg moved to Paris so that he could communicate directly with Mondrian. However, the two were very much polar opposites in character and it resulted in the dissolution of their friendship. It has The piece on the opposite page (left) is “Counter-composition V” and the piece (right) is “ContraConstruction Project.”

11

been speculated that the breakdown came as a result of a disagreement about the directions of lines in their paintings. Van Doesburg moved to Switzerland in 1931, due to his declining health, and it was there that he died, on March 7th.


brief bauhaus history

josef albers

Albers was a student of the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany and was a practicing artist in the fields of design, typography, photographer, painter, printmaker and poet. His most influential work was created in the field of abstract painting and it showed an influence of both the Bauhaus and the Constructivists with its simplified geometric shapes. However, he also proved to be very influential to many other graphic designers and artists as a teacher at the Black Mountain College in North Carolina from 1933-49 and at Yale University in Connecticut from 1950-58. His series Homage to the Square is an example of his disciplined approach to composition and color theory. Towards the end of his career he and his wife established the Joseph and Anni Albers foundation in an effort to continue sharing and promoting the theory that he had established during his career. His style and work represent a bridge between the European art of the Bauhaus and Constructivists and the new American Art that emerged in the 1950s and 60s. He was a teacher and an artist his entire career, until his death in 1976 at the age of 88.

Josef Albers pictured above. On the opposite page is Albers’ “Homage to the Square: Gained” done in 1959.

13


bauhaus vs. anderson

the bauhaus: preliminary course The Bauhaus masters developed an innovative teaching program with the creation of a six-month-long preliminary course or “Vorkurs� by Johannes Itten. Other professors such as Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Josef Albers, Paul Klee, and Wassily Kandinsky are associated with the Bauhaus’s preliminary course. The course was an introduction to composition, color, materials, and three-dimensional form that familiarized students with techniques, principles, and formal relationships considered fundamental to all forms of visual expression. The basic course developed an abstract visual language that would provide a theoretical and practical foundation for any artistic endeavor. Because it was seen as a basis for all further development, the course aimed to strip away particularities in favor of discovering fundamental truths operating in the visual world. Every student had to complete this preliminary course before he or she could enter the workshop of his or her choice (sculpture, metal work, painting, lettering, etc.). Teachers and students alike worked together as a team. The Bauhaus put a huge emphasis on experimentation and problem solving, which became widely influential for the approaches to art education.

Image of the sun casting a shadow of the Bauhaus sign.

15


anderson university: foundations 105 and 106 The professors at Anderson University created a Foundations program that rivals that of the Bauhaus, and is unlike any other foundations program in the country. It is a two-semester, team taught course—ART 105 and ART 106—in which students are prepared for work at the upper levels in art and design. Like the Bauhaus, ever y student must take Foundations before they take courses related to their concentration. Jo Carol Mitchell-Rogers, Nathan Cox, Susan Wooten, and Peter Kaniaris created the Foundations program Anderson has today after they recognized they were dissatisfied with how the course was being taught. They gathered in Rainey Room 149 with white boards, markers, and paper and rethought the way art fundamentals had traditionally been instructed. They decided to focus on the students’ needs and created five learning outcomes or goals of Foundations. Later, the art department adopted the five goals into every course regardless of concentration. Even senior level courses are structured by these goals. The five goals are: (1) communication; (2) formal exploration; (3) creative visual problem solving; (4) exploration of tools, materials, and techniques; (5) investigation of history, theory, and methodologies. Anderson University’s sign.

Like the Bauhaus and other foundations programs, students learn design terminology and the practice 2-D and 3-D design, color theory, and drawing/rendering problems. The difference between Anderson’s Foundations program and that of the Bauhaus is the incorporation of a conceptual element into projects. Students do not just create something that looks pretty; there has to be a deeper meaning and purpose behind it. We have creativity with teeth.


bauhaus vs. anderson

the bauhaus

This diagram designed by Walter Gropius in 1922 illustrated the structure of the school curriculum. The outer “Vorlehre” represents the preliminary course. The two middle rings represent the three-year period of workshop training together with form theory. The workshops are identified in terms of their materials; “Holz” (wood) stands for the wood- car v ing wor kshops. Buil ding (“B au”) w as the f inal , highest stage of education.

17


anderson university

This diagram illustrates the structure of AU’s art program. The outer ring represents the Foundations course. In foundations, students are introduced to the art department’s five learning goals that will follow them throughout the course of their career at Anderson. Within Foundations, students are taught things like color theory and 3-D design. Students are also introduced to concept development, which distinguishes AU from the Bauhaus. After Foundations, students move into their concentrations and then graduate.


anderson university

degrees and facilities

Bachelor of Arts in Art

Rainey Fine Arts Center

Art Education (K-12)

Drawing/Printmaking Studio

Ceramics

Painting Studio

Graphic Design

Senior Painting Studio

Painting/Drawing

Graphic Design Mac Labs (2) Photography Darkroom

Art Minors

Sculpture Studio

Art

Ceramics Studio

Art History

Art Galleries Vandiver Art Gallery in Thrift Library Galant Art Gallery in Rainey Fine Arts

19


student work: foundations 105

design problem 1: compositional studies This is the first “problem” or project you will do as a freshman in our Foundations Program. It is known as “the line project.” You will learn to arrange lines within various formats (circles, rectangles, squares) in relation to various principles of design and Gestalt theory. These compositions are to be non-objective or non-representational. You will use black construction paper and X-acto knives to cut out the lines and arrange them on the various formats. Craftsmanship and time management are of the utmost importance in this project. This project is very similar to a project given in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus. In Kandinsky’s class, he had his students do “Point and Line to Plane” exercises. Kandinsky’s assignment focused on creating visually interesting and balanced compositions, which is what AU’s first design problem is all about.

ON

AL 4 GO

3−D

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

OR THEORY COL

GOAL 3

21

L5 OA DEV.

1

Gestalt Principles stem from a theory of visual perception that emphasizes the importance of holistic composition. According to this theory, grouping, containment, repetition, proximity, continuity, and closure are essential aspects of visual unity. Non-objective representation is work that portrays no recognizable imagery or subject matter.

G

Compositional line studies that Kandinksy had his students do at the Bauhaus. The project on the right was done by Brinson McGowan.


student work: foundations 105

The above piece was done by an unknown student, the pieces to the right and on the left of the opposite page were done by Sarah Leugemors, and both pieces on the left of the opposite page were done by Mckenzie Stokes. (Photographed by Kelly Johnson and Sarah Leugemors)


student work: foundations 105

design problem 2: self identity diptych For this problem, you will create a diptych composed to two separate but conceptually related images. One panel will represent your physical, external self, and the second will focus on your internal self, which could be spiritual, emotional, or some other aspect. The first will be a Xerox transfer of a photograph, and the second will be a Xerox collage. This project also introduces you to the process of conceptualizing. A strong concept that is not cliché is vital to the success of this project. In the preliminary course at the Bauhaus, Moholy-Nagy gave a project where he taught students the difference between the internal construction of material, its natural surface, and its artificially prepared surface. The medium for Moholy-Nagy’s project was photogram. This preliminary Bauhaus project is very similar to AU’s Design Problem 2; however, AU’s project differs by having a greater conceptual

CO N

NG AWI DR

AL 4 GO

3−D

GOAL 2

OR THEORY COL

GOAL 3

25

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

Diptychs are composed of t wo separate, but conceptually and visually related images. Collages are images constructed from visual or verbal fragments initially designed for another purpose.

L5 OA DEV.

1

Photogram done by a Bauhaus preliminary student under MoholyNagy. The piece on the opposite page is called the “Promethean” by Brinson McGowan. The piece on the next spread is titled “Forever There” by McKenzie Stokes. (Photographed by Kelly Johnson)

G

approach with the incorporation of communicating external and internal characteristics.


student work: foundations 105

design problem 3: contour drawing This problem serves as your introduction to drawing. Drawing is the beginning of the creative process for many purposes in many art disciplines. This project is highly representational. You will learn how to draw from direct observation, and will be assigned various practice-drawing assignments before you are given the actual problem. By the end of this project, you should be able to show your ability to look carefully, draw intentionally confident lines, and deliver an accurate description of the subject. Design Problem 3 is similar to what was taught in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus in terms of learning how to draw from observation. This particular Foundations project is not conceptual.

G

ON NG AWI DR

AL 4 GO

3−D

GOAL 2

OR THEORY COL

GOAL 3

29

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

Contour lines are lines that describe the edges of a form and suggest three-dimensional volume. The student artist of the piece on the opposite page is unknown. Representational shapes are derived from specific subject matter and are strongly based on visual observation.

L5 OA DEV.

1

Drawing exercise done by a preliminary student at the Bauhaus. (Photographed by Kelly Johnson) Skul l dr aw ing on the r ight b y unknown AU student/


student work: foundations 105

On the right a close up of Iina Kobayashi’s drawing, Opposite is her full-scale piece.


student work: foundations 105

design problem 4: art historical inspiration sculpture This problem is the only three-dimensional project you will have in the Fall Foundations course. For this problem, you will select a non-objective painter from art history, and use his or her two-dimensional work as inspiration for your three-dimensional sculpture. You will have to closely observe the elements and principles utilized in the painting to figure out how to incorporate those elements and principles into your sculpture. Design Problem 4 is very similar to projects that were given in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus. For one project at the Bauhaus, Itten had his students explore the different textures with different materials. Design Problem 4 also requires students to carefully choose the materials they use in this project. Another project at the Bauhaus required the students to create a three-dimensional sculpture that was inspired by a two-dimensional object. For AU’s project, students do just

PT CE

AL 4 GO

3−D

2−D

OR THEORY COL

GOAL 3

33

GO AL

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

CO N

L5 OA DEV.

1

The project of a Bauhaus preliminary student who created a 3-D cradle that was inspired by a 2-D baby blanket. On the opposite page, the image on the left is the AU student sculpture by Lindsey Gerlock. She was inspired by “Arrest 2” by Bridget Riley, which is on the bottom right. The image above that is a close-up of Gerlock’s sculpture. (Sculpture photos by Kelly Johnson)

G

that except the inspiration must come from an art historical piece.


student work: foundations 105

Pictured is an art historical piece by Josef Alber s w hich w as the inspiration for Nicole Standridge’s sculpture (right). (Photo on right by Kelly Johnson)


student work: foundations 105

design problem 5: introduction to color This is the final problem you will complete for Foundations 105. It deals with the most complex and powerful element of art: color. This problem requires you to solve six visual problems in relation to color, which range from purely formal to conceptual. You will learn and practice the different aspects of color. The first composition relates to the relationship of value as a component of color. The second examines the different color schemes, and the last composition should illustrate the expressive potential of color and composition to convey content. The final composition incorporates a conceptual element. Design Problem 5 is very similar to projects done in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus. The Bauhaus focused heavily on color theory and had their students do various color studies. The difference is that AU’s project includes a conceptual component. Students do not just create color studies; they are

CO N NG AWI DR

AL 4 GO

3−D

GOAL 2

OR THEOR Y COL

GOAL 3

37

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

Value is the relative lightness or darkness of a surface.

L5 OA DEV.

1

The image above is a color study done by a student at the Bauhaus in the Preliminary course. The pieces on the opposite page are conceptual color studies by AU students. The left piece was done by Joy Hiller and conveys “isolation.” The composition below conveys “frenzy” and was done by Hayden Oliver. The color studies on the next page were done by Ellie Youngs.

G

also asked to examine the expressive potential of color.


student work: foundations 106

design problem 1: drawing: value and perspective This marks the first problem of the spring semester of Foundations. For this problem, you will draw from a still life that consists of both boxes and fruit. You select an area of the constructed still life in order to create an interesting composition. The composition and your rendering should communicate an illusion of form and space on the flat surface of the drawing paper. This project should be highly representational. In order to achieve this, you will have to pay close attention to perspective cues, values, and the relative size and shape of the objects in relation to one another. This design problem does not include concept development. It is similar to drawing projects taught in the basic course at the Bauhaus and any introductory drawing course. Design problem 1 simply teaches you how to draw using perspective and translating value.

PT CE

AL 4 GO

−D

2−D

OR THEOR Y COL

GOAL 3

41

GO AL

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

ON

L5 OA DEV.

1

Perspective is a form of geometric perspective in which parallel lines are represented as converging in order to give the illusion of depth and distance.

G

Above is a drawing by a student in Itten’s preliminar y course at the Bauhaus. The drawing on the right was done by Iina Kobayashi.


student work: foundations 106

On the left is a piece done by Emily Heinz. The piece on the opposite page drawn by Hayden Oliver.


student work: foundations 106

design problem 2: fortune telling (value diptych) This project combines the drawing skills learned in the previous project as well as the concept forming skills learned in other projects. This problem requires the creation of a diptych (like Problem 2 in 105). The first panel will be a rendering from direct observation of a fortune cookie, and the second panel will illustrate your symbolic interpretation of the fortune found within the cookie. Like the diptych in 105, this project is heavily conceptual. You will need to find an original and creative visual interpretation of your fortune. Design Problem 2 is unlike any project given in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus. It takes the drawing skills learned in the fruit and boxes project and pushes them a step further by adding a conceptual element. It is similar to the Bauhaus in that it helps refine technical drawing skills, but it is different in terms of concept development.

PT CE

AL 4 GO

−D

2−D

OLOR THEORY

GOAL 3

45

GO AL

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

CO N

L5 OA DEV.

1

G

Pictured on the opposite page is a project by Railey Collins (with detail). The work on the next page was done by Hayden Oliver.


student work: foundations 106

design problem 3: color mixing For this problem, you will deal with the optical, not physical, mixing of color. It stems from artists like Seurat and Signac who are known for their pointillist work. This problem is usually a favorite among those who want to become graphic designers. It requires the mixing the colors cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (CMYK). These are the four colors of ink that are used in the printing process. Along with figuring out how to mix these four colors to get a wide range of colors, you will have to select, modify, and combine at least two black and white photographic images. With these images, you will create a completely new composition. The combination of these two images should be highly conceptual. From these images, you will translate the value in the photographs to the value in color. The color palette you choose to use with these images must also relate back to your concept. This problem is different from any project assigned in the basic course at the Bauhaus. It is synonymous in terms of learning about coloring mixing, but the medium and conceptual approach is dissimilar. Design Problem 3 is done in Prismacolor marker while Bauhaus preliminary color studies were done in gouache paint.

CO N

AL 4 GO

3−D

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

OR THEOR Y COL

GOAL 3

49

L5 OA DEV.

1

Pointillism is the juxtaposition of small dots of pure color on the canvas that are then optically mixed by the human eye and brain. From up close, it is difficult to distinguish anything except the individual dots of color. Only from a distance does the eye “mix” the color so that the brain perceives a single hue. Medium refers to the substance the artist uses to create his or her artwork

G

The piece on the right was done by Joy Hiller.


student work: foundations 106

Close ups from left to right are by Sarah Leugemors, Heather Burton, Iina Kobayashi, and Brinnan Wimberly.


student work: foundations 106

design problem 4: public sculpture monument This problem requires that you take two-dimensional foam board to construct an abstracted or non-objective three-dimensional form. You will create a threedimensional model of a public sculpture monument that would hypothetically be built in a larger size. Along with the challenge of working with foam board, you will need to have a strong concept behind the purpose of your monument. The public sculpture monument project holds a strong parallel to a project given in the basic course at the Bauhaus. At the Bauhaus, students were asked to transform two-dimensional paper into a three-dimensional sculpture. At Anderson, students take flat foam core and create a sculpture from it, but Anderson’s project is different from the Bauhaus’s. Design Problem 4 requires the students to come up with a concept for what they are making; they are not just making something visually interesting. They are creating something that

CO N

AL 4 GO

OR THEOR Y COL

GOAL 3

53

3−D

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

PT CE

GO AL

2−D

Abstract form is a form derived from visual reality that has been distilled or transformed, reducing its resemblance to the original source.

L5 OA DEV.

1

Above is a project that was done in the preliminary course at the Bauhaus. The sculpture on the right, by Joy Hiller, is a monument advocating the envrionmental fight against toxic industrial materials.

G

has meaning and serves a purpose.


student work: foundations 106

Brinson McGowan created this momument model about the Chernobyl nuclear reactor explosion. Photos by Brinson McGowan.


student work: foundations 106

design problem 5: who are you really? This is the last problem in the Foundations program. With this problem, you will create a self-portrait, which have been done throughout the history of art. Here, you will create an abstracted self-portrait using gouache paint that communicates an aspect of your personality that could not be captured with a photograph. You will also use color to express the aspect of your personality you wish to convey. Every design decision you make must be thoroughly though out; this is another conceptual problem. Leading up to the self-portrait you will be given the opportunity to experiment with the gouache paint. You can only use red, blue, yellow, white and black paint. Any colors that you want to use must be mixed using those colors. You will create a color wheel, value study, and intensity study with gouache before you begin your self-portrait. The assignments leading up to the self-portrait of this project are almost identical to projects given in the basic course at the Bauhaus. Bauhaus students also completed color wheels, value studies, and intensity studies with gouache paint. Anderson takes those color mixing studies a step further and asks students to use color to convey something about themselves; thus, AU requires the application

G

of concept with color.

PT CE

AL 4 GO

3−D

2−D

OR THEOR Y COL

GOAL 3

57

GO AL

GOAL 2

NG AWI DR

CO N

Intensity is the purity, saturation, or chroma of a color. For example, fire engine red is a high-intensity color.

L5 OA DEV.

1

Above is a color wheel that was done by a student in the Preliminary course at the Bauhaus. The piece on the right was done by AU’s Brinson McGowan.


student work: foundations 106 spring

Annie Churdar’s piece is above. The piece on the right was done by Hayden Oliver. On the oppsoite page, the image on the left is by Ashley Shannon titled “En las profundidades del oceano.” The piece to the far right is by Iina Kobayashi titled “Climbing Art.”


art faculty

contact information

Jo Carol Mitchell-Rogers, Chair

Polly Gaillard

MFA, Clemson University

MFA, Vermont College of the Arts

PhD, University of Georgia

Photography

Art Education, Drawing, Foundations

pgaillard@andersonuniversity.edu

jmitchell-rogers@andersonuniversity.edu

Nathan Cox, Associate Dean

Clarissa P. Brand達o

MFA, Bradley University

MFA, Georgia State University

Ceramics, Foundations

Graphic Design, Foundations

ncox@andersonuniversity.edu

cbrandao@andersonuniversity.edu

Peter Kaniaris

Candace Weddle

MFA, University of Houston

MA, Tulane Univeristy

Painting, Drawing

PhD, University of Southern California

pkaniaris@andersonuniversity.edu

Art History cweddle@andersonuniversity.edu

Jane Dorn BFA, Louisiana State University Graphic Design jdorn@andersonuniversity.edu

Tim Speaker MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison Graphic Design tspeaker@andersonuniversity.edu

61


credits

Hannah Isennock

Ashley Readler

Cover Design

Cover Design

Layout Design

Layout Design

Herbert Bayer

The Bauhaus

Jan Tschichold

Theo van Doesburg

Foundations 106 Research

Lazlo Moholy-Nagy

AU Curriculum Wheel Design

105 Design Problems 1-3

106 Design Problems 2-3

Body Copy Editor

Sarah Leugemors

Bessie Love

Cover Design

Cover Design

Layout Design

Layout Design

Typesetting

Table of Contents

About This Magazine

Foundations 105 Research

Piet Zwart

Student Work Photographer

Josef Albers

106 Design Problems 4-5

Bauhaus vs. Anderson University

Sources

Bauhaus Preliminary Body Copy

Special Thanks

AU Foundations Body Copy

Page Numbers

Degrees and Facilities Design Problems Body Copy 105 Design Problems 4-5 106 Design Problem 1 Faculty Contact Information


sources

websites http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre http://www.thecityreview.com/bauhaus.html http://www.olivertomas.com/information-design/a-selection-of-graphicsfrom-bauhaus-publications/ http://www.arch.ttu.edu/people/faculty/Neiman_B/pedagogical/ poeticsfa08/03.00.2_kandinskyarticle.pdf http://www.designishistory.com/ http://www.slideshare.net/rogerpitiot/bauhaus-2007 http://www.ariehsharon.org/BauhausDessau/The-Vorkurs/16368658_ hfdJh2#!i=1233459479&k=c7LPgHc http://www.theartstory.org/movement-bauhaus.htm http://www.das-bauhaus-kommt.de/en/ausstellung

books Droste, Magdalena. Bauhaus. Kรถln: Taschen, 1998. Print. Fiedler, Jeannine, Peter Feierabend, and Ute Ackermann. Bauhaus. Cologne: Kรถnemann, 2000. Print.


special thanks

Tim Speaker for overseeing the production of this magazine. Jo Carol Mitchell-Rogers for explaining Foundations’ story. Nathan Cox for providing all the Foundations paper work. Jane Dorn for giving valuable suggestions and feedback. Kelly Johnson for providing pictures of student work. Anderson University art students for providing the artwork.


316 Boulevard Anderson, SC 29621 admission@andersonuniversity.edu www.andersonuniversity.edu 800-542-3594

Non-Profit Org. US Postage PAID Permit 306 Greenville, SC 29607


Anderson University VIsual Arts Foundations