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MMAC's Reid to Lily - The Business Journal

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From the The Business Journal: http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2001/03/26/tidbits.html

Everybody's Business

MMAC's Reid to Lily The Business Journal Date: Sunday, March 25, 2001, 11:00pm CST Bill Reid, 32, government affairs director for the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce since January 1998, has left MMAC to become a public affairs director for Eli Lilly & Co., the Indianapolis-based pharmaceuticals maker. Reid will serve as manager of public affairs for the drug company's Midwest region, covering five states, including Wisconsin. He will work out of an office in Madison, his home, according to an MMAC spokesman. For the past three years, Reid has been MMAC's main lobbyist on business and environmental policy. He coordinated the activities of the MMAC Legislative Committee, Environmental Management Council and Education Committee. He also managed the MMAC Political Action Council and Conduit. Prior to working at MMAC, Reid was a policy adviser and Assembly liaison for Gov. Tommy Thompson. Reid's last day at MMAC was March 16. Reid was at a Lilly training program in Indianapolis this week and could not be reached for comment. He will officially begin his duties at Lilly in the first week of April. -- Julie Sneider Time warp tour Maintaining uniformity at its production plants around the world is key to ensuring products made by Johnson Controls Inc. meet quality standards -- even in struggling former Soviet republics. Johnson Controls chairman and chief executive officer James Keyes, in prepared remarks during The Business Journal Power Breakfast March 16, told of a recent trip to Slovakia to visit the company's automotive plant there. As Keyes' jet landed at an airport in eastern Slovakia, he was stunned to see abandoned Russian military aircraft lining the runway. "We looked down, and all along the runway are MIG fighters," Keyes said. "They looked like they were ready to take off. There must have been three dozen MIG fighters and 100 Russian trucks. They just left all that equipment there and walked away. It was kind of a

http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2001/03/26/tidbits.html?s=print

25/07/2011


MMAC's Reid to Lily - The Business Journal

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time warp." The abandoned military equipment was just one of the signs dramatizing the vast gap between the economies of the United States and Slovakia. "This is a very poor area that really hadn't been touched much by Western civilization," he said. In 1998, Johnson Controls acquired an automotive seating and interior systems plant in Bratislava that supplies a nearby Toyota plant. "I wondered what kind of plant we had," said Keyes, who also visited other Johnson Controls plants in Europe on the same March tour. "When we got there, it was like any other plant we had in the world. It was the same quality. That to me is what globalization is all about." -- Rich Rovito City seeks new theater owner The board of the Pabst Theater is seeking to transfer ownership of the theater to a nonprofit organization as part of its plans to cut the city of Milwaukee's responsibilities for the city-owned property. Under the plan, the ownership and management of the 106-year-old landmark on East Wells Street would be acquired by a local nonprofit organization or government entity. Board chairman Dennis Conta said the title to the theater would not remain with the city of Milwaukee. Other officials involved with the Pabst Theater previously told The Business Journal the city would retain ownership of the theater, but planned to turn over the management to another party. The transfer of ownership would relieve the city of subsidizing the cost of running and maintaining the theater, Conta said. The city provides a subsidy of $225,000 a year to the Pabst Theater. Transferring ownership of the Pabst to a nonprofit organization would be different from a sale of the theater, Conta said. A deal could be made with a nonprofit group without any money changing hands. The terms of the transfer are to be determined between the board and the nonprofit organization seeking ownership and must be approved by the Milwaukee Common Council. If a for-profit organization or a private citizen seeks ownership of the Pabst, however, the transaction would require financial terms equal to the fair market value of the theater. No assessment is available for the tax-exempt property, which is planning a $9.3 million renovation. -- David Schuyler Beer and brise soleil

http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2001/03/26/tidbits.html?s=print

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MMAC's Reid to Lily - The Business Journal

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Beer references aside, Milwaukee looks good in a March 26 Newsweek article about art museum expansions across the country. The Milwaukee Art Museum's $100 million, Santiago Calatrava-designed expansion -complete with "a winged, 200-foot-wide movable brise soleil" -- is the lead example in "State of the Art." In the story, reporters Cathleen McGuigan and Peter Plagens describe how "ultramodern showplaces are betting big on marketing culture to middle America." The article quotes museum artistic director Russell Bowman, includes a rendering of the project and a photo of Calatrava construction site, and makes reference to Milwaukee "homeboy" and media magnate Walter Annenberg's $1 million donation. Milwaukee keeps company in the article with the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Guggenheim/Hermitage in Las Vegas and Boston's Museum of Fine Arts. But no national story about Milwaukee is complete without beer -- McGuigan and Plagens say "local boosters are counting on (the Milwaukee Art Museum) to become the new icon for a city that's always been most famous for brewing beer." Maybe they haven't heard about Miller Park. -- Joan Bahr Merida goes national Former Milwaukee Journal reporter Kevin Merida, already a high-profile reporter and columnist for the Washington Post, will now appear in a Post-syndicated column with his wife, Post columnist Donna Britt. Merida and Britt write individually bylined columns packaged for use in newspaper opinion or lifestyle pages. Merida's writings will run twice per month and Britt's, two to four times a month. Britt was previously syndicated by the Post to 55 newspapers, but went on hiatus in May 2000. The husband-wife column package began appearing in newspapers the week of March 19. Merida joined The Milwaukee Journal in 1979 after completing a minority journalism program at the University of California-Berkeley. He left the Journal in 1983 for the Dallas Morning News, where, in 1987, he joined the paper's Washington bureau. Merida joined the Post in 1993 to cover national political issues. Merida, 44, is a Post associate editor, Pulitzer Prize finalist and in 2000 was named the National Association of Black Journalists "Journalist of the Year." The new Post columns don't have a name and will cover a wide range of lifestyle and social issues, Merida said. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has not yet discussed whether it will carry the column, a spokeswoman for the newspaper said.

http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2001/03/26/tidbits.html?s=print

25/07/2011

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25 march 2001  

Everybody's Business MMAC's Reid to Lily

25 march 2001  

Everybody's Business MMAC's Reid to Lily

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