Page 52

Dal basso, pianta del piano terra e pianta del primo piano. Nella pagina a fianco, dall’alto, gli spogliatoi e un particolare della scala, con il corrimano disegnato secondo principi di geometria frattale. From bottom, plans of the ground floor and first floor. Opposite page, from top, the locker rooms and detail of the staircase showing the banister designed along the lines of fractal geometry.

50

K

urokawa belongs to that school of thought that makes the elsewhere the focus of all its design. As one of the authors of the Manifesto Metabolism 1960 - Proposals for New Urbanism, Kurokawa has always worked beyond the bounds of architectural design. For instance, in metabolist urban design, the elsewhere implies going beyond the notion of urban or national boundaries, a basic assumption that finds its expression in many theoretical projects of which Metapolis is perhaps the most elaborate. It is for this reason that Metapolis is considered a possible archetype for living in the Third Millennium. Another potential elsewhere studied by Kurokawa is fractal geometry (which has become easier to apply with the advent of computers), whose irregularities, fractures and discontinuous forms, deriving from the exploration of dynamic systems, suggest a new idiom for an architecture that is related to the world of the infinitely small, and which offers interesting applications when expanded to the human scale. The sinuous shape of the Fujinomiya Golf Club Clubhouse in Shizuoka illustrates the application of fractal theory to the project. The genius loci is not so much the physical location itself, as it is the energy generated from chaos. In its basic assumptions, Fractalism positions itself as an internal universe: “Fractalism is all those places that the mind cannot perceive or imagine, minutely described in a timeless, ordered chaos, without a specific location, beginning or end” (from the Manifesto of Fractalism). The Clubhouse is the result of the meeting of two parallel worlds. In one world, direct perception of the place itself is re-ordered by removing Euclidean geometry to fully integrate the building in the complex design layout of Shizuoka hill. In creating a mental location we discover another world, based on a theoretical platform in which space becomes a three-dimensional flux buried in the depths of the subconscious. In this respect, Kurokawa’s work must be understood in relation to other experiences, like the 1950s and ‘60s when Fluxus, a group of artists and intellectuals, sought to transcend the idea of art as a universe unto itself confined in its own historical sphere. Fluxus was in favor of art based on process, on the dynamics of the evolutionary process itself as a source of meaning. Nomadism as an architectural design paradigm based on the exploration of various codes. For Kurokawa, re-creating a semantics of architecture necessarily implies a return to the verbal code, which is antithetical to the sensorial code of architecture, but which is also rich in conceptual links and connections. Kurokawa explained this when he wrote about the design of Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo, 1972, in Metabolism in Architecture, Boulder, CO, USA, Westview Press, 1977: “Words (like capsules) are parts, separate parts. But every word moves man and can trigger new hypotheses and ideas. Thought fragments, expressed in separate words, create new hypotheses and new ideas in a chain reaction, like a neutron hitting a uranium nucleus. No existing system of thought can remain static. The words break up and divide themselves into a thousand sharp shards, which spread like new seeds.”

51

arcVision 9  

Un approfondimento sul concetto di limite. Da un lato la propensione tutta umana a superare ogni confine attraverso uno sviluppo continuo de...

arcVision 9  

Un approfondimento sul concetto di limite. Da un lato la propensione tutta umana a superare ogni confine attraverso uno sviluppo continuo de...

Advertisement