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CURRENT The American River

ACTIVE SHOOTER:

LRPD TRAINS COLLEGE EMPLOYEES TO RUN, HIDE, FIGHT IN CASE OF GUNMAN ON CAMPUS PAGE 2

/ARCurrentcom

Vol. 67, Ed. 5

@ARCurrent

ARCURRENT.COM

SAC CITY REPORT:

INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF SCC SHOOTING SAID THAT ‘HUMAN ERROR’ CAUSED EMERGENCY TEXT DELAY PAGE 3

@ARCurrent

November 4, 2015

AN AMERICAN RIVER CURRENT SPECIAL REPORT

VETERANS RECOUNT THE TRANSITION FROM SOLDIER TO STUDENT, MADE EASIER THROUGH THE VRC AFGHAN IMMIGRANTS SPEAK OUT ABOUT LIVING IN FEAR OF TALIBAN VIOLENCE

W

ithin the next few years, those beginning in college or joining the military will have little to no memories of an America that wasn’t involved in conflict in Afghanistan—though for many Americans, the reality of war never hit home. Even though the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan officially ended last year, President Barack Obama announced last month that 9,800 U.S. troops will remain there until the end of 2016 at the earliest. Three members of American River College’s veteran community—one of the largest in the state—spoke about their time serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the transition to life back home, which presents unique challenges. For those born and raised in Afghanistan, the pressing choice to stay or flee is their reality. Two Afghans, Mahjabeen Zazai and Hamid Hafezy, made the decision to leave—both under threat of death from the Taliban. People from both walks of life can be found in America, and also at American River College.

Hamid Hafezy, left, meets thenAfghan President Hamid Karzai at the Afghan Embassy in New Delhi in 2012. Hafezy, now an ARC student, said that he told Karzai about the conditions for Afghan scholars in India. Photo courtesy of Hamid Hafezy

FOR PROFILES OF ARC’S VETERANS AND AFGHAN IMMIGRANTS, TURN TO PAGES 4, 5 AND 6.

Student recounts strong-arm robbery VICTIM WAS ATTACKED AT THE BUS STOP ON COLLEGE OAK DRIVE By John Ferrannini jferr1995@gmail.com After her nighttime English class got out on Oct. 19, American River College student Monea Mitchell was waiting alone for the No. 1 bus on College Oak Drive. Within minutes, the first-semester, 18-year-old ARC student was the victim of a strong-arm robbery, just a few yards from the administration building. “I was just looking at my phone, and a man approached me and

said ‘My friend said you stole his phone, an iPhone,’ ” said Mitchell. The man, who crossed the street from the divide in the middle of College Oak, was quickly joined by another, who came at Mitchell from the staff parking lot. “I was backing away. He (the first man) took my longboard. He said ‘If you give me the phone, I’ll give you the longboard,’ ” said Mitchell. “I was fumbling through my phone, whether to call the police or call my mom. The recents

came up and I accidentally called my mom. “He (the second man) said ‘If she tries to call anyone, just shoot her ass, just cap her ass.’ ” Mitchell said that she initially thought of handing over her cellphone in exchange for her skateboard, but that after her life was threatened, she didn’t want to lose her only way of getting help. “That’s what made me feel so terrified. I wouldn’t feel safe without my phone,” said Mitchell.

ROBBERY | PAGE 2

John Ferrannini / jferr1995@gmail.com

Monea Mitchell’s replacement skateboard, given to her by her mother and stepmother, is inscribed “Never Let Anyone Steal Your Sunshine.”

Volume 67 Edition 5  
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