Page 1

CREATIVE STASH AND

SCRAP

QUILTS

NUMBER 01 AUS $19.95* NZ $19.95 (Both incl. GST)


Finishing Ouilts…

warms my family!

Adaptable, intelligent, creative, & powerful. These words encompass everything that you are as a quilter and these same words perfectly describe the HQ Infinity 26. Just as you continuously evolve your quilting designs and methods, this is the machine that adapts along with you. From the flexible stitch regulation to the adjustable handlebars, every aspect of the Infinity is designed to work with you and the way you quilt. No other machine is as innovative, powerful, and feature-rich as the HQ Infinity 26. More quilters choose Handi Quilter Longarm quilting machines than any other brand.

Test drive it today a t your near est Handi Ouil ter Dealer!

The New Infinity 26 as released by Angela Walters in April 2015

Find your nearest dealer at www.handiquilter.com.au or phone (02) 4337 3737


Let your creativity run free with the

Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 All it takes is one look at its unique design to understand that the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 is a sewer’s dream. With Pfaff’s original IDT system guaranteeing even fabric feed from top and bottom, a unique selection of perfectly stitched high-quality 9mm stitches, extra large work space and longest free-arm, the Pfaff Quilt Expression 4.2 will fulfill every quilters’ needs and give your imagination free rein.

Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-573-PF


’ Letter Editors universal lament of all quilters: too much fabric in our stash! I know I am personally “insulating” the house with my stash of fabric; in several areas (insert groaning husband here). However, I do have grand plans to use all of my fabrics … in my lifetime. The big question is, what designs will I use? My stash consists of large and small lengths of fabrics. Some pieces are leftover from a completed project, while others are pieces I just had to have, or were purchased in a specific length for a quilt and did not work when they were required. Sound familiar? Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts is a collection of 19 inspirational quilt patterns from the pages of Quilters Companion magazine. They were chosen to motivate you to start working on your stash, no matter what style of quilter you are. Six of the projects are made using templates, seven projects are rotary cut and the final six are predominately appliquéd. Hundreds of 1in finished squares are used in Confetti by Jenny Reynolds and Flying Colours by Megan Fisher, enough to make your rotary blade itch! Fussy cut fun in the modern styling of Candied Hexagons by Kerry Dear, or traditional French toiles feature in Alison’s French Trip by Barbara Williams and Kaye Brown. Traditional meets modern in the appliqué chapter in Bling Bling Baltimore by Wendy Whellum. This quilt is a four block appliqué, however Wendy’s use of colour and fabrics had created a

A

4 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

contemporary masterpiece. Select fabrics from your stash of reproduction fabrics to create an antique version of Wendy’s quilt. Funky owl appliqués embellish a strip-pieced quilt centre in It’s a Hoot by Tracey Petersen, while funky flowers feature on Atomic Bloom by Wendy Williams. I personally love the extra texture and depth of colour that is created by quilts made from voluminous numbers of fabrics. They may take a little while to prepare, but are visually stunning when completed. And, it justifies having a “stash”.

Pattern Sheets To Print out Pattern Sheets visit www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com


NEW

FAST, E ASY & FU

ULL AUTOM Y ATIC!

CUT TIME. QUILT MORE. ™

Save Time, Fabric & Effort with the GO! Big Electric Fabric Cutter • Our fastest cutter – cuts 2 dies at a time!

• Alleviates hand and arm strain

• Accurately cuts up to 6 layers of fabric

• Compatible with all GO! dies

SEVEN HILLS Unit 17/167 Prospect Highway E info@blessingtongroup.com.au

WEST GOSFORD Unit 22, 13 Gibbens Road P (02) 4337 3737

AccuQuilt Australia

Find your closest stockist at accuquilt-australia.com.au BLES-574-AQ


46

CONTENTS 8

TEMPLATE QUILTS

10 Whirligig Quilt Diamonds and hexagons in this traditional quilt by Brigitte Giblin

38 Flowers for Claire Happy, English paper pieced hexagon quilt by Deborah Louie 44 ROTARY CUT QUILTS

16 Mariner’s Daisy Unusual curved edges on the Mariner’s Compass blocks by Linda Bear

46 Confetti Thousands of 1in finished squares in this scrap delight by Jenny Reynolds

22 Funky Tumblers Chris Jurd updates the old favourite Tumblers block

52 Ministry of Colour Reconstruct your fabric strips into an artwork using this design by Chris Kenna

28 Candied Hexagons Abundant opportunity to fussy cut in this stunning quilt by Kerry Dear 32 Alison’s French Trip A gift of French toiles inspired this quilt by Barbara Williams and Kaye Brown 6 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

22

58 Winderra Carolyn Konig has designed this fabulous project for a boy in your life

70 Japanese Waves Stunning use of Japanese fabrics in this strip quilt by Nerida Richmond Benson

64 Savile Row Stripes, mitres, spots and blocks all feature in this project by Judy Newman

76 Flying Colours Megan Fisher reinvents her scraps into a pieced masterpiece


80 Stars a la Moda Pieced stars float on a scrappy cream background in this queen-size delight by Nic Bridges

`

88 APPLIQUE QUILTS 90 Bling Bling Baltimore Four block appliqué work of art by Wendy Whellum in funky fabrics 96 No Kitchen Sink Jane Morgan has cleverly appliquéd, rather than pieced, the Rose Dream block 100 Vintage Rose of Sharon Medallion of piecing and appliqué by Rhonda Coates

106 Flowers and Stones Pretty and pastel, with a combination of techniques by Deborah Dorward 112 Atomic Bloom Bright, fresh and fun describes Wendy Williams' large quilt 118 It’s A Hoot Gorgeous owl appliqués embellish this quilt by Tracey Petersen 124 THE BASICS

80

130 CONTRIBUTORS AND CREDITS

90 76

28 Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 7


Template Quilts

8 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


12

22

32

blin Whirligig by Brigitte Gi

16

Funky Tumbler s by

Chris Jurd

Kaye Alison’s French Trip by ms Brown and Barbara Willia

Bear Mariner's Daisy by Linda

Candied Hexag ons by

28

40

Kerry Dear

Flowers For Claire by Deborah Louie

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 9


Project One

10 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Whirligig Quilt By Brigitte Giblin The crisp, white fabric makes a stunning background for the coloured fabrics used in the pieced blocks of Brigitte’s quilt. Ideal project for machine or hand sewing, with opportunities to fussy cut along the way. Finished size: 188cm x 205cm (74in x 803⁄4in)

Materials One fat eighth or 15cm (6in) each of at least 25 different bright print fabrics 3m (3¼yd) white background fabric 4.5m (47⁄8yd) backing fabric 60cm (5⁄8yd) binding fabric Batting at least 210 x 225 (82in x 88in) Ecru or pale grey thread for piecing Quilting thread, clear template plastic Fine-point permanent pen, pencil Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: The centre of Brigitte’s Whirligig Quilt comprises 23 hexagon blocks, four half-hexagon blocks and white half-diamonds along the edges of two sides, with quarter diamonds at the corners. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 11


Prepare the templates

Machine piece the blocks and half blocks

1.Templates A to H are printed on page 15. Trace the templates including the ¼in seam allowance onto template plastic with a fine-point permanent pen and cut them out accurately. Identify the templates and mark the grainline. Follow the markings on Template H to create Template G.

1. To make the 23 hexagon blocks, use the chain-piecing technique. Following Diagram 2, join 138 print diamonds to 138 white diamonds. Place the diamonds right sides together, with the print diamond at the bottom with the point up and the white diamond on top with the point down. 2. With the wrong side upwards, press the seams up towards the print fabric. 3. Sew together 138 pairs of background diamonds, bottom diamond point down, top diamond point up, as shown in Diagram 3. With the wrong side upwards, presss the seam allowances down towards the bottom diamond. ond d.

Cut the fabric

From each of 23 print fabrics, cut: ❖ 1 Template A (blocks) ❖ 6 Template C (blocks) From each of four print fabrics, cut: ❖ 1 Template B (half-blocks) From each of another four print fabrics, cut: ❖ 3 Template C (half-blocks) From the 25 print fabrics, cut: ❖ 88 Template E (joining rectangles) ❖ 66 Template F (joining triangles) ❖ 70 Template C (Border 2) ❖ 4 strips, 2in x 18in (top and bottom edges) From the white background fabric, cut: ❖ 42 strips, 2½in x width of fabric. Set 7 strips aside for Border 1. From the remaining strips cross cut 516 Template C diamonds, 446 for the hexagon and halfhexagon blocks and 70 for Border 2. Alternatively these diamonds can be cross cut from the strips using the 60-degree angle on the ruler, following Diagram 1. Leave the strips on the mat and move the ruler to cut at 2½in intervals.

Diagram 2

Diagram 3

4. Following Diagram 4, stitch the two sections together to make one unit and press the seam allowances open. 5. Using one print hexagon and six matching print diamonds for each block, use the pivot method to assemble the units to form each block. Following Diagram 5, with right sides together, the hexagon on top and a print diamond under the hexagon, stitch from the edge of the hexagon and stop 1in from the next corner of the hexagon. 6. Fold the unit away from the hexagon and thumb hum um u mb p press.

Diagram 1

From the remainder of the white strips, cross cut: ❖ 8 Template D ❖ 8 Template G ❖ 2 Template H ❖ 2 Template H reversed ❖ 2 Template I ❖ 2 Template I reversed From the binding fabric, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 2½in x width of fabric 12 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Diagram 4 1in

Diagram 5


7. With the back of the work facing up and working anti-clockwise, position another unit under the hexagon. Stitch from the edge of the hexagon to the centre of the open seam in the previously attached unit. Leave the needle down and lift the presser foot. Pivot the unit into place so the raw edges are aligned. It may be necessary to ‘pop’ two or three stitches to open the seam. Stitch to the outer edge of the block (Diagram 6.) 8. Continue to join units to the hexagon and finally complete the stitching on the first unit (Diagram 7). Press the seams. 9. Complete each of the four half blocks shown in Diagram 8 in the same manner using one print half-hexagon, three print diamonds, eight white diamonds and two white whi hiite te half-diamonds. h

Pivot

2. Join one Template H triangle to the top left and bottom right corners, and one Template H reversed triangle to the top right and bottom left corners. Do not stitch across the seam allowance of these pieces where they meet the Template F triangle. Cease stitching at the points of the triangles so the Template I and I reversed pieces can be added. 3. Add one Template I piece to the top left and bottom right corners and one Template I reversed piece to the top right and bottom left corners. 4. Stitch one 2in x 18in print strip to each half-block at the top and bottom edge of the quilt centre so the edges of the half-blocks are aligned with the blocks and rectangles. The strips are a little longer and wider than required to allow for adjustment. Trim the strips as required so the top and bottom edges of the quilt centre are straight.

Add Border 1 1. Join the seven 2½in white strips to assemble four strips for Border 1 of the quilt. The quilt top should measure 65¾in x 72½in. Adjust the lengths of the strips to fit your quilt and join them to the quilt top following the instructions for Adding Borders in Basics on page 128. Diagram 6

Add Border 2

Diagram 7

Diagram 8

Join the blocks 1. Following the photograph of the quilt, arrange the blocks and half-blocks into three vertical rows each with five blocks and two vertical rows each with four blocks and two half-blocks. 2. To join the blocks, stitch a Template E print rectangle to the top of each full block. Stitch the blocks together in vertical rows. 3. Join a rectangle to the bottom of each row and then stitch the half-blocks to each end of the short rows. 4. Stitch a print rectangle to one side of the blocks and halfblocks along each row, stitch the rows together and add the remaining rectangles. 5. The print joining triangles, Template F, can either be handpieced in place or appliquéd by basting the seam allowance under and pinning and stitching them into position. Brigitte suggests either of these methods is easier than trying to machine stitch the triangles to the rows before assembly.

Square up the quilt centre 1. To square the left and right edges of the quilt centre, stitch four white Template G triangles to each side.

1. To make four pieced strips for Border 2, use the 70 print and 70 white Template C diamonds cut for the border to assemble four strips by joining the print diamonds alternately with the white diamonds. The strips will be a little longer then required to allow for adjustment as they are added to the quilt top. Make two strips each with 17 print diamonds and 17 white diamonds and two strips each with 18 print diamonds and 18 white diamonds. Press the seam allowances in one direction. 2. Measure the length of the quilt top through the centre, trim the two longer strips to this measurement and join the strips to the left and right edges of the quilt top, matching the centre of the side of the quilt top with the centre of the strip. Press the seam allowances towards Border 1. 3. Measure the width of the quilt top through the centre, trim the two remaining strips to this measurement and join these strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt top matching the centres. Press.

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut two, 20in strips from the full length of one of the pieces. Join the strips to opposite sides of the fullwidth piece and press the seams open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Brigitte hand quilted her quilt. She suggests hexagons are awkward to quilt as they do not allow many all-over quilting possibilities. This quilt has been quilted inside the centre hexagons and ¼in inside the printed fabric diamonds. There is echo quilting around the whirligig shapes and inside the edge of the blocks. Two rows of quilting have been stitched in the rectangles and joining triangles and the diamond shape has been echoed around Border 2. 4. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the eight, 2½in strips to bind the quilt. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 13


Whirligig Quilt By Brigitte Giblin Finished size: 188cm x 205cm (74in x 803â „4in)

14 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Whirligig Quilt Template A (whole hexagon)

Example of Template G (not to scale)

Whirlig ig Q Templa uilt te D

Whirligig Quilt Template C

ilt Qu F gig irli late Wh emp T

Mirror reverse Template H along this line to create Template G

Whirligig Quilt Template E

Whirligig Quilt Template I and I reversed

Whirligig Quilt Template B (half hexagon)

Example of Template G Whirligig Quilt Template H and H reversed

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 15


Project Two

16 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Mariner` s Daisy By Linda Bear

Feminise the traditional Mariner's Compass block by using floral fabrics and rounding the edges to make a daisy shape. While one light, floral fabric has been used in all of the compass points of the sample quilt, you could choose to use a variety of light florals instead, to use more of your stash. Finished size: 228cm x 228cm (893⁄4in x 893⁄4in)

Materials 2.8m (2#/4yd) small white print fabric (block backgrounds — A and A reversed) 1.9m (21⁄8yd) white floral print fabric (compass points — C and D) Fat quarter each of 16 different medium-value print fabrics (outer petals and centre circle — B, B reversed and F) Fat1 ⁄16th each of 16 different dark-value print fabrics (inner petals — E) 4.5m (4#/4yd) blue floral print fabric (alternate blocks, setting triangles and border) 90cm (1yd) blue geometric print fabric (folded trim and binding) 7.5m (8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 250cm (99in) square Template plastic and permanent-marking pen Compass and light cardboard Rotary cutter, ruler and mat General sewing supplies www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 17


Cut the fabric From the blue floral print fabric, cut: ❖ 5 strips, 141⁄2in x width of fabric. Cross cut them to yield nine squares, 141⁄2in (alternate squares). From the fabric left over after cutting these squares, cut two squares, 107⁄8in. Cross cut them once on the diagonal to yield four half-square triangles (setting corners) ❖ 2 strips, 211⁄4in x width of fabric. Cross cut them to yield three squares, 211⁄4in. Then cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 12 quarter-square triangles (setting triangles) ❖ 9 strips, 51⁄2in x width of fabric (border) From the blue geometric print fabric, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 1in x width of fabric (folded trim) ❖ 9 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric (binding)

Make the blocks 1. Refer to Making Templates in Basics on page 125 to make Templates A–F. Use the templates to trace shapes on the fabrics, then cut them out on the traced lines. Refer to Using Templates in Basics on page 126. Include the notch marks on your templates and transfer the marks to the seam allowances of your shapes when you trace them. Matching the notch marks on different patches will enable you to ease the curved seams in evenly. 2. Use a compass to draw a circle with a radius of 11⁄4in on light cardboard and cut it out on the line. 3. For each Mariner’s Daisy block, choose one mediumvalue and one dark-value print fabric. From the small white print fabric, cut: ❖ 4 Template A ❖ 4 Template A reversed From the white floral print fabric, cut: ❖ 8 Template C ❖ 8 Template D From the medium-value print fabric, cut: ❖ 8 Template B ❖ 8 Template B reversed ❖ 1 Template F From the dark-value print fabric, cut: ❖ 8 Template E 4. Begin piecing the block by joining each A shape to an A reversed shape along their short straight edges. 5. Join each E shape to a C shape on their curved edges, matching notch marks. Then add a B shape and a B reversed shape to the long straight edges of the C shapes. Join a D shape to the right edge of the E/C/B/B reversed shapes to complete Unit 1. See Diagram 1. Finger press the seams as you work.

E C B reversed B Diagram 1

18 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

D

6. Join the Unit 1 together in pairs along the long edges of the D shapes, matching notch marks. Join an A/A reversed shape to the curved edge of each pair of Unit 1, again matching notch marks, to make a quarter compass. See Diagram 2.

A

A reversed Diagram 2

7. Join quarter compasses together in pairs along the long edges of the D shapes and the edges of the A/A reversed shapes to make half compasses. In the same manner, join the half compasses to make a complete circular block. Join each D patch to its neighbours along their short straight edges. Press the block gently. 8. Work running stitch close to the raw edge of the F shape, leaving long thread tails at the beginning and end. Put the shape face down on your work surface and centre the cardboard circle on it. Pull up the threads to gather the fabric around the cardboard, and press. Gently remove the stitches and cardboard template, and appliqué the F circle in the centre of your block, covering the raw edges of all the D shapes. 9. Repeat steps 3–8 to make a total of 16 Mariner’s Daisy blocks. They should measure 141⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

Assemble the quilt 1. Lay out the Mariner’s Daisy blocks, the nine squares of blue floral print fabric and the setting triangles in diagonal rows. Rearrange the Mariner’s Daisy blocks until you have a spread of colours and prints that you like. 2. Stitch the blocks, squares and setting triangles in each diagonal row together. Then stitch the rows together, carefully matching seams. 3. Join the 1in strips of blue geometric print fabric end to end to make one long strip. Fold it in half, wrong sides together and long edges matching, and press. 4. Starting about half way down one edge of the quilt, align the raw edges of the strip with the raw edge of the quilt. Stitch it in place, stopping 1⁄4in from the corner, with the needle in the down position. Lift the foot of the machine and nick the seam allowance almost to the shaft of the needle. Turn the quilt, lower the foot, and continue stitching the folded strip to the next side of the quilt. Use the same process at each corner. Finish by joining the strips as you would with a quilt binding. 5. Join five of the 51⁄2in strips of blue floral print fabric endto-end to make a long strip. Join the remaining four strips together in pairs.


6. Measure your quilt horizontally through the centre and trim each of the shorter border strips to this length. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 7. Measure your quilt vertically through the centre and cut two strips this length from the long strip. Join them to the left and right edges of the quilt.

Finish the quilt

2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Quilt as desired. Mariner’s Daisy was quilted by machine with a grid pattern in the quilt centre and a curved design in the border. 4. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the nine 21⠄4in strips of blue geometric print fabric to bind the edges of the quilt.

1. Cut the backing fabric into three equal lengths. Remove the selvedges and join the lengths together down their long edges. Press.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 19


Mariner's Daisy By Linda Bear Finished size: 228cm x 228cm (893⁄4in x 893⁄4in)

20 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Mariner’s Daisy C

Mar in

er’s Dais y B

Mariner’s Daisy A

Mariner’s E

Daisy

Mariner’s Daisy D Mariner’s Daisy F

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 21


Project Three

22 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Funky Tumblers By Chris Jurd The use of modern, funky fabric updates the old favourite, Tumbler block. It dates back to the late 19th century, when it was published in the Ladies Art Catalog as block #368. Make your template and grab your stash to create a new version of an old favourite. Finished size: 142cm x 144cm (553⁄4in x 561⁄2in)

Materials 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of 12 large print floral or spotted fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) yellow/brown spotted fabric 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of five print fabrics (border) 50cm (5⁄8yd) binding fabric 3.2m (31⁄2yd) backing fabric Batting at least 160cm (63in) square Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread Freezer paper Pencil Rotary cutter, ruler and mat www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 23


Preparation

Add the border

1. Trace the tumbler and half-tumbler shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto the dull side of freezer paper and cut out on the lines. The templates are finished size: 1⁄4in seam allowances must be added as the pieces are cut from the fabrics. 2. Each template can be reused. Make more freezer paper templates as they are required.

1. Measure the width of the quilt through the centre and trim two 71⁄4in strips for the border to this length. 2. Join the strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and press the seam allowances towards the borders. 3. Measure the length of the quilt through the centre and, using the photograph of the quilt as a guide, use the three remaining 71⁄4in strips to assemble two borders of this length. 4. Join the borders to the left and right edges of the quilt and press the seam allowances towards the borders.

Cut the fabric To cut the tumbler shapes, some features on large floral and picture print fabrics should be “fussy cut”, however other fabrics can be rotary cut by layering three or four fabrics on an ironing board. Iron the freezer paper template, shiny side down, onto the top fabric and move the fabrics carefully to the cutting mat. Using a rotary cutter, ruler and mat, cut out the shapes adding a 1⁄4in seam allowance around the template. Remove the freezer paper template and reuse. From the variety of large print floral and spotted fabrics, cut: ❖ 54 tumbler shapes To cut the half-tumbler shapes, fold the strip of yellow/ brown spotted fabric in half, wrong sides together. Iron the half tumbler template to the fabric in the same manner as the tumbler shape. Cut around the shape through the two layers to yield one half-tumbler and one half-tumbler reversed. From the yellow/brown spotted fabric, cut: ❖ 6 half-tumblers ❖ 6 half-tumblers reversed From each of the five print fabrics for the border, cut: ❖ 1 strip, 71⁄4in x width of fabric From the binding fabric, cut: 6 strips, 3in x width of fabric

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half and cut a strip 32in wide from each piece. Remove the selvedges and join the two pieces to make a backing for the quilt with one vertical join. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Chris machine quilted her quilt with curved lines of stitching through the centre of each vertical and horizontal row of tumbler pieces. She continued the stitching across the borders. 4. Join the 3in strips cut for the binding and, following Bind the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use them to bind the quilt.

Join the shapes 1. Following the Quilt Assembly Diagram, arrange the tumbler shapes into six rows of nine tumblers, alternating the orientation of the shapes. Distribute the fabrics and colours evenly across the surface of the quilt. 2. Place half-tumbler shapes at either end of each row. 3. Join the shapes in rows and press the seam allowances in the odd-numbered rows in the opposite direction to those in the even-numbered rows. 4. Join the rows, butting the seam allowances together at the intersections. 5. Press on the wrong side, pressing the seam allowances joining the rows in one direction. Press from the right side.

24 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Quilt Assembly Diagram


Funky tumblers By Chris Jurd Finished size: 142cm x 144cm (553⁄4in x 561⁄2in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 25


Project Four

26 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Candied Hexagons By Kerry Dear Hexagons offer a world of possibilities. Kerry has six different pieced hexagons placed amongst the larger, fussy cut hexagon blocks. Play with stripes and prints in your blocks, and larger motifs in the whole hexagons. Finished size: 142cm x 144cm (553⁄4in x 561⁄2in)

Materials 1m (11⁄8yd) large floral print fabric (hexagons). Kerry used ‘Kaffe Fassett – Flower Lattice’ fabric, and because she fussy cut the motifs printed on the fabric, she needed more than she might otherwise have. If you won’t be fussy cutting, you only need 70cm (3⁄4yd). Assorted fabrics to total approximately 5m (51⁄2yd) for the remainder of the hexagon blocks and border triangles. Kerry used 27 different fabrics. 25cm (3⁄8yd) dense red spot fabric (Border 1) 75cm (7⁄8yd) white with red spot (Border 2) 45cm (1⁄2yd) red and white stripe (binding) 3.4m (33⁄4yd) backing fabric Batting 170cm (67in) square “Marti Michell Perfect Patchwork Templates” Set H (optional) Lazy Susan-type rotating cutting board (optional) Template plastic and propelling pencil Water-erasable fabric-marking pen Spray bottle or damp cloth Appliqué needles Threads for piecing and appliqué Note: There will be fabric left over after piecing the quilt backing and trimming it to size. If you choose a backing fabric that harmonises with the front of the quilt, make the backing first and use the surplus to piece some of the hexagon blocks for the quilt front. Include some striped fabrics, especially when making Block 4 – Diamond Star Hexagons, as they will form a secondary pattern if each diamond is cut in the same position on the stripe. When placing the completed hexagons into their rows ready for stitching together, take note of the direction of the three clusters of Block 3a and Block 3b hexagons, as they form secondary stars. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 27


Preparation Kerry used a set of Marti Michell Perfect Patchwork Templates to create this quilt but you can easily make your own templates using the shapes printed on the Pattern Sheet. 1. Referring to Making Templates in Basics, page 125, trace Templates A – G onto template plastic. Cut them out accurately and label them. Use them to trace shapes onto the wrong side of the fabrics, except where indicated.

B

B

B

B

B B

Cut the fabric From the large floral print fabric, cut: ❖ 24 Template A (Block 1) (hexagon flowers) From the assorted fabrics, cut: Block 2 – Divided Hexagons (17 in total) ❖ 102 Template B. Kerry used 2 different fabrics in each of the 17 Divided Hexagon blocks. Block 3a – Baby Blocks (9 in total) ❖ 27 Template C. Kerry used 3 different fabrics in each of the 9 Baby Blocks. Block 3b – Baby Blocks (9 in total) ❖ 9 Template C ❖ 72 Template D Block 3c – Baby Blocks (6 in total) ❖ 12 Template C ❖ 24 Template D Block 4 – Diamond Star Hexagons (22 in total) ❖ 264 Template D Block 5 – Hexagon Centred Stars (17 in total) ❖ 102 Template D ❖ 17 Template E ❖ 102 Template F Edge units ❖ 36 Template B (to create 12 half hexagons to complete the left and right edges of the quilt centre) ❖ 20 Template G (isosceles triangles to complete the top and bottom edges of the quilt centre) Border 2 ❖ 76 Template B (border triangles). Mark these triangles on the right side of the fabric using a water-erasable marking pen. From the dense red spot fabric, cut: ❖ 5 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 1) From the white with red spot fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 41⁄4in x width of fabric (Border 2) From the red and white striped fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric (binding)

Divided Hexagons – make 17

C

C C

Baby Blocks 3a – make 9

Blocks 3b and 3c – Baby Blocks 3. Sew four D diamonds together to form a large pieced diamond (see Diagram 1). For 3b join two pieced diamonds to one C diamond, following the diagram. For 3c blocks, join one pieced diamond to two C diamonds, following in ng th the diagram.

D

D

D

D C

Diagram 1 D

D D

D D

D

D

Baby Blocks 3b – make 9

D C

Assemble the blocks Referring to the diagrams for guidance, piece the various hexagon units as follows. Do not stitch into the seam allowance, instead, just sew from one end of the traced line to the other, back stitching at the beginning and end of each to secure. Block 2 – Divided Hexagons 1. Sew six B triangles together in a circular direction to form a hexagon, following the diagram. Block 3a – Baby Blocks 2. Sew three C diamonds together to form a hexagon, pivoting where necessary. 28 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

C

Baby Blocks 3c – make 6

Block 4 – Diamond Star Hexagons 4. Sew six D diamonds together in a circular direction to form a star. Insert six D diamonds around the edges, pivoting where necessary, to form a hexagon (see diagram). Block 5 – Hexagon Centred Stars 5. Sew three F triangles to alternate edges of an E hexagon.


D

6. Insert the Half Hexagon blocks in the sides, de es, s p pivoting where necessary. Finally, the G triangles es ca can nb be inserted in the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 7. Press the quilt top.

D

D D

D D

D D

D D D

1

2

D

5

4 Diamond Star Hexagons – make 22

4

1 F

4

3c

1

2 1

5

5 D

1

3a

3a 3a Hexagon Centred Stars – make 17

6. Stitch a D diamond to either side of an F triangle to form Unit 1. 7. Make three Unit 1 for each block and sew them to the edges to form a hexagon, following the diagram. Half Hexagon Blocks 8. Sew three B triangles together to form a halff hexagon. These will be used to complete the sidess ooff th the he quilt.

B

B B

Half Hexagons – make 12

4

5

4

2

5

1

2

4

4

1

3b

1

4 2

5 1

1 2

5 1

5

3b 3b 4 2

1

3c

3b 3b

4

4 3b 4

2

1

1 5

1

3c

1

5

5

3a 4

4

2 3a 3a 5

4 2

F

1

5

3a

4

1

2 3a 3a

1

4 4

3c 5

2

2

5

4

3b 5

F

F

D

4

5 3b 3b

E

1

1

2 1

2

2

5

4 3c

2 1

1 3c

Quilt Layout Diagram

Add the borders 1. Join the five dense red spot strips end to end to make one long strip. Use it to add Border 1, referring to Adding Borders with Straight Corners in Basics, page 129. 2. In the same manner, join the six white with red spot strips end to end to make one long strip and use it to add Border 2. 3. Because the quilt is a little wider than it is long, when appliquéing the triangles on Border 2, a little bit of ‘fudging’ will have to be done in order to end up with equal spaces at the corners of the quilt. To do this, make the triangles on the longer sides of the quilt (top and bottom) a tiny bit wider. On the sides of the quilt, make the triangles a tiny bit narrower. ‘A tiny bit’ means about the width of a pencil line. 4. Alter Template B by cutting off the 1⁄4in seam allowance from two sides. Leave the seam allowance ce e in place on the base of the triangle (see Diagram 2) 2 2). ).

Assemble the rows 1. Following the Quilt Layout Diagram, lay out the completed blocks in 11 rows. The blocks are first sewn together in rows and then the rows are joined together. Do not stitch into the seam allowance – this will help when pivoting and when ironing the seams flat. If the seams are pressed in one direction, they should lie perfectly flat where they intersect. 2. Begin by piecing Row 1, except for the half hexagon units at each end. 3. When all the rows are pieced together, join the rows in pairs beginning with Rows 1 and 2, pivoting where necessary. 4. Continue in this manner, sewing together Rows 3 and 4, Rows 5 and 6, Rows 7 and 8 and Rows 9 and 10. 5. Then sew pairs of rows together, and then join all the rows together.

B

Diagram 2

5. Place this ‘New B’ template on the right side of the 76 triangles cut for Border 2. Align the base of the template with the bottom edge of the fabric triangles and trace down the two sides of the template with a watererasable fabric pen. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 29


6. Divide the B triangles into two groups of 38. Label one group, ‘top and bottom’, and the other group, ‘sides’. 7. On all the triangles in the ‘top and bottom’ group, fold the two side seam allowances under, just outside the traced lines (see Diagram 3). Pin to hold. Do not turn under the seam allowance along the bottom of the triangle. Gently spray the traced lines with water or dab them with a damp cloth to remove the pen m marks. Then press the seam allowances to hold them iin n pl p place. acc

triangles evenly and ensure that the space at each corner of the quilt is the same. Ideally, this should occur when the corners of the triangles overlap and the sides de of adjacent triangles meet !/4in from the bottom raw edge dge dg ge (see ( ee (s ee Diagram 4).

!/4in

fol d

fo l d

Diagram 4

11.When you are satisfied with the spacing of the triangles, appliqué them in place using thread to match the triangle fabrics.

Diagram 3 – preparing the ‘top and bottom’ triangles

Finish the quilt 8. On all the triangles in the ‘sides’ group, fold the side seam allowances under, just inside the traced lines. This will make them a tiny bit smaller than the triangles in the ‘top and bottom’ group. Pin, spray and press as before. 9. Measure each border and lightly mark the centre. Centre a triangle over this mark, with its raw edge matching the raw edge of the border. Continue nttin ntin inue ue p pinning inni in ning ni n until ng untt you have 19 triangles on each border. 10.Be careful to use triangless fr ffrom rom m tthe h ‘‘top he t p an to aand d bo bottom’ ott t om’ om m’ group for the top and bottom tom mb borders, orrdeers rs, an rs, and d tr tria triangles ia ang n le l s fr from om m the ‘sides’ group for the left le eft ft aand nd right nd rig ghtt b borders. orde or d rs rs. Sp Space pac ace e th the e

1. Cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Remove the selvedges and sew the pieces together along one long edge. Trim to 170cm (67in) square. 2. Layer the backing, batting and quilt top, referring to Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129. Pin or thread baste. 3. Quilt as desired. Kerry quilted Candied Hexagons by hand around each patch and followed the shapes of the larger patches to enhance the pattern. She quilted a flower pattern in the large floral hexagons. Two parallel lines were quilted around the th he tria ttriangles tr riiaang n lees in n the border. 4. Re R Refe Referring efeerr rrin in ng to to B Binding indi in ndiing n tthe hee Q Quilt uilt ui ltt iin n Ba Basics, asiics cs, p page 129, use the sstrips st riips ps ooff re rred d an and d wh w white itee st it striped tri ripe ped pe d fa ffabric bric br icc ttoo bi bind nd tthe hee q quilt. u ui

Candied Hexagons By Kerry Dear Finished size: 151cm x 148cm (591⁄2in x 583⁄8in)

30 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Candied Hexagons Template D

Candied Hexagons Template E

Candied Hexagons Template A

Candied Hexagons Template C ns go a x He B ied plate d n Ca Tem

Ca He ndie Tem xago d pla ns te F

Candied Hexagons Template G

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 31


Project Five

32 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Alison` s French Trip By Barbara Williams and Kaye Brown

Ooh, la, la; there is nothing so French as a toile print! The octagons are a perfect shape to showcase the figures in these French toiles. The coloured borders around each toile allow each piece to be highlighted in the design. Other large scale prints would also be suitable for this design. Make an octagon template and check through your stash. Finished size: 216cm x 216cm (85in x 85in)

Materials A variety of assorted feature fabrics, minimum size 28cm (11in) (octagons) and 17cm (61⁄2in) (squares). See note. A variety of print and striped fabrics totalling approximately 2.5m (23⁄4yd) (octagon borders) 40cm (1⁄2yd) striped fabric (Border 1) 1.6m (13⁄4yd) print fabric (Border 2 and binding) 7.1m (75⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 235cm (93in) square Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread Template plastic Fine-point permanent pen Pencil Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Seven fabrics were used for the octagons in the featured quilt and these fabrics and a variety of others were used for the squares. A total of approximately 2.8m (31 yd) is required. ⁄8 the octagons were chosen to The fabrics used for the borders of complement the feature fabrics. Print fabrics with a striped effect work well if they are cut so the stripe surrounds the octagon. If the fabric used for the second border is less than standard width it may be necessary to cut a fifth strip for the border. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 33


Prepare the templates Template A is printed on the Pattern Sheet. Templates B-F can be found on page 36-37. Use the template plastic to make templates, referring to Making Templates in Basics, page 125.

Cut the fabric From the feature fabrics, cut: ❖ 25 Template A (octagons) ❖ 24 Template C (squares) ❖ 12 Template D (part octagons) ❖ 4 Template F (corner triangles) From the print and striped fabrics, cut: ❖ 8 Template B for each octagon ❖ 1 Template B for each part octagon ❖ 1 Template E for each part octagon ❖ 1 Template E reversed for each part octagon From the striped fabric, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 1) From the print fabric, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 41⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 2) ❖ 9 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (binding)

Make the octagons 1. Following Diagram 1, join eight B patches around each octagon (A), beginning and ending the stitching 1⁄4in in from the edges. Pin the edges together carefully before stitching. Do not press at this stage.

E E

re ve

rs ed

Diagram 2

Assemble the quilt 1. Following the Quilt Layout Diagram, arrange the pieced octagons with the squares and the partial octagons into seven rows. Place three partial octagons along the top and bottom edges and four triangles (F) at the corners. Check placement for an even distribution of colour and fabrics. 2. Join the components in rows, pinning them together before stitching. Once again, begin and end the stitching 1⁄4in from the edges so the alternating octagons and squares can be fitted neatly together. 3. Join the rows, fitting the shapes together neatly. Add the partial octagons to the top and bottom edges and the four triangles to the corners. 4. Press the quilt top well.

B

A

Quilt Layout Diagram Diagram 1

Add the borders 2. Pinning the patches to match them together, join the ends of the B patches around the octagon. Press the short seam allowances around the octagon and the longer seam allowances towards the outside edge. 3. In the same manner, following Diagram 2, join one B patch to the centre side of each partial octagon (D) and add one E patch and one E reversed patch. 34 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

1. Join the eight 11⁄2in strips for Border 1 into four lengths, each two strips long. 2. Use these strips to add Border 1 to the quilt, referring to Adding Borders with straight corners in Basics, page 125. Press the seam allowances towards the border strips. 3. In the same manner, use the eight 41⁄2in strips to assemble and add Border 2 to the quilt.


Finish the quilt 1. Cut C t the Cu tth he length le eng ngth th h off ba b backing ck kin i g fa fabric abr briic bric c iinto nto nt o th thre three re ee eq equa equal ual ual le lengths en ng g and an d from frrom o tthe he ffull ulll le ul llength n th ng ho off tw ttwo wo o of o tthe he ep pieces i ce ie c s cut cut a st sstrip tri rp 26in 26 2 6in w wide. id de. e R Remove em emov mov o e th the e selv se selvedges lve lved ed dge es an and nd jo join oin i tthe he e sstrips tr t ips ip ps to to o opposite pp p pos o it ite sides ssiide d s of o the the he ffull-width ullul l-wi lwidt wi dtth pi piec piece e e an ec and nd pr p press esss th es the e seams seam se am ms open. o en op e . 2. Following Folllow Fo o in i g the th he in inst instructions stru st ruct ruct ctio tio ion nss for for o P Preparing r pa re ari ring g tthe he eQ Quilt uiiltt Sandwich Sand Sa nd ndwi dwi w ch h iin n Basics, B siics Ba cs,, page pa age e 129, 129 29,, pi pin no or b baste aste as te tthe he h q quilt uiiltt ttop, op op, batting ba b att atttin ng a an and nd backing ba back ack ckin ng toge to together. ge eth ther er.

3. The featured quilt was professionally machine quilted by Kaye Brown of The Finishing Touch. The octagons, octagon borders and squares were quilted in the ditch an a and nd th tthe e octagon borders and part octagons were quilted w wi with th t ttwo w p wo parallel arral a lel lel li llines n so ne off sstitching. ti The centres of the o oc octagons cta tago gons go n and ns and squares squ quar ua arress were wer e e quilted quil qu ilte il te ted ed with wiith w h feathered fea eath ther th ther e floral w wr wreath e th ea hd designs. essig esig igns n . ns 4. Fo Following ollllow ow wing in ng Bi B Binding ind n in ng th tthe e Qu Quil Quilt i t in B il Basics, a ics, as ics, p page ag ge 12 129, 29, 9 u use se tthe he ni n nine, ne,, 2 ne 2½ 2½in ½in n sstrips trrip ps to to b bind ind ind th the eq qu quilt. uil ilt. t t.

Alison's French Trip By Barbara Williams and Kaye Brown Finished size: 216cm x 216cm (85in x 85in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 35


36 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Alison's French Trip Template D

Alison's French Trip Template E Reversed

rip nch T 's Fre Alison plate F Tem

Alison's French Trip Template E


Alison's French Trip Template B

Alison's French Trip Template C

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 37


Project Six

38 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Flowers for Claire By Deborah Louie English paper piecing is a perfect, portable sewing project. Requiring only a small amount of fabric complete each flower, hexagons are an economical design for using up your scraps. Deborah's border treatment adds a modern twist to an old classic. Finished size: 203cm x 229cm (80in x 90in)

Materials 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of a wide variety of assorted print fabrics One fat eighth each of six green print fabrics (leaves) 1.5m (15⁄8yd) cream fabric (background), see note 1.7m (17⁄8yd) pink with cream spot print fabric (Border 1 and binding) 2.1m (21⁄4yd) cream with light pink spot print fabric (Border 2) 5m (51⁄2yd) backing fabric Batting at least 225cm x 250cm (88in x 98in) Basting thread Neutral-coloured cotton thread Cotton threads to match fabrics Quilting thread 1.5m (15⁄8yd) of 2.8cm (1in) wide pink, yellow and green ric rac 2m (21⁄4yd) of 2.8cm (1in) wide blue ric rac Three large packets of 1in paper hexagons. A total of 1448 hexagons is required Lightweight cardboard Template plastic Pencil Fine-point permanent pen Spray starch Tweezers Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Deborah used a linen-look cotton fabric for the background areas of her quilt. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 39


Preparation 1. Templates for the hexagon and the appliquéd leaf shape are printed on page 42. Trace each shape including the seam allowance onto template plastic with a fine-point permanent pen and cut them out. Trace a second template for the leaf without the seam allowance and cut it out. Place the plastic hexagon template over the template on the Pattern Sheet and trace around the inner hexagon, the finished size of the hexagon. This line is helpful for fussy cutting the fabric pieces. 2. With a pencil, trace around the leaf template without the seam allowance 41 times onto lightweight cardboard and cut out the shapes accurately.

Prepare the hexagon flowers 1. There are 120 hexagon flowers in the centre of the quilt and 56 hexagon flowers in the border. Each hexagon flower is made from six hexagon “petals” and one hexagon “centre”. 2. To make each flower, choose two fabrics, one for the petals and one for the centre. Select fabrics that complement each other and show the difference between the centre and the petals. With a pencil, trace around the larger hexagon template on the right side of the fabric for the petals six times and cut out the pieces. Trace around the hexagon for the centre once and cut out the piece. 3. Beautiful effects can be achieved by “fussy cutting” the pieces, particularly the hexagon petals. To fussy cut, place the plastic template over a particular design feature of the fabric, for example a flower, trace around the template and cut it out. Trace and cut another five identical pieces from the pattern repeats on the fabric. Use the inner line on the template as a guide to the area of fabric that will be visible in the quilt. 4. As the hexagons are cut, pin the seven pieces for each flower together so each set is easily identified. 5. Trace and cut another 216 hexagons from the cream background fabric. These hexagons will be used to join the rows of hexagon flowers. Place them in a bag separate from the other hexagons.

2. Thread a needle with a basting thread and knot the end of the thread. Ideally, use thread of a contrasting colour to the fabric to make later removal easier. 3. Fold the seam allowance on one side of the hexagon over the paper to the back and insert the needle from the back to the front of the hexagon. Bring the needle to the back approximately three-quarters of the way along the side. Working in an anticlockwise direction, fold the seam allowance of the next side over and take the needle down through the layers. Continue in this manner working around the hexagon. Finish with a double stitch and clip the thread.

Make the hexagon flowers

1. To make each hexagon flower, following Diagram 2, place the centre hexagon right sides together with one of the petal hexagons. Use thread to match or blend with the fabrics and keep the stitches as small and even as possible. The stitches should just catch the edge of the fabrics without penetrating the paper. Begin at the corner with a small knot disguised within the seam allowance and end with a few small stitches over each other. 2. Place a second petal hexagon, right sides together, with the first so they meet perfectly at the corner. Join the petals along the side. Fold the first petal and continue stitching to join the second petal to the centre. Continue in this manner until all six petals are joined around und un d tthe centre.

Baste the hexagons

1. To prepare all the hexagons, following Diagram m 11, place a paper hexagon shape at the centre of the fabric hexagon and pin.

Diagram 1

40 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Diagram 2


Join the hexagons

1. Following Diagram 3, join background hexagons to the lower right and left sides of 108 hexagon flowers. 2. Arrange 12 hexagon flowers with background hexagons attached in a row, distributing the fabrics and colours in a pleasing arrangement. 3. Following Diagram 4, join the hexagon flowers and backgrounds to form a row. Every second flower will be half a hexagon lower.

in six places and work out the average length. 2. Trim the two 31⁄2in strips for Border 1 to this measurement plus 1⁄2in for seam allowances. 3. Place the quilt on a flat surface and align the border strip under the edges of the quilt so there is at least 1⁄2in of fabric under the flowers and there are no gaps between the fabrics. Check that the print on the border fabric is straight. Secure with pins and baste. 4. Measure the width of the quilt in the same manner as the length and trim the two 41⁄2in strips to this measurement plus 1⁄2in. Pin and baste them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 5. Hand-appliqué the edge of the hexagons to the border strips. Join the border strips at the corners. rs. s.

Diagram 3

Add Border 2

Diagram 4

4. Join the hexagon flowers in this manner to make nine rows. 5. Make a tenth row for the lower edge joining only 12 hexagon flowers. This row has no background hexagons attached. 6. Arrange the rows following the photograph of the quilt and join the hexagons, stitching them together in the same manner as the other hexagons. Take care to keep the rows even, with hexagon flowers in horizontal and vertical rows. 7. When all the rows are joined, press thoroughly, spraying with starch to make the quilt very firm. 8. Remove the basting threads carefully and remove the papers. Ideally, keep the quilt on a flat surface.

From the cream with light pink spot print fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 11in x length of fabric 1. In the same manner as Border 1, measure the length of the quilt and trim two of the strips for Border 2 to this measurement plus 1⁄2in. 2. Trim the other two strips 221⁄2in longer than the first two strips. 3. Place ten hexagon flowers at random along ng g each of the two shorter strips. These strips will be e jjoined oiine n d to the left and right edges of the quilt. Use the photograph of the quilt as a guide to placement.

Add Border 1

From the pink with cream spot print fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 21⁄2in x length of fabric (binding) ❖ 2 strips, 31⁄2in x length of fabric (left and right borders) ❖ 2 strips, 41⁄2in x remaining length of fabric (top and bottom borders) 1. Measure the length of the quilt from the top of the flowers

4. Cut lengths of ric rac to form stems. The ric rac should be long enough for one end to be placed under a flower and the other end to be incorporated in the seam joining the border to the quilt. Pin and baste. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 41


5. Leaving 11in free at either end, pin and baste 12 hexagons and ric rac stems to each of the two longer strips for the border. 6. Appliqué the flowers to the background. 7. Join the two shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt and press the seam allowances towards Border 1. 8. Leaving 111⁄4in free at either end, join the two longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and d press. p 9. Pin the border strips together at the corners ner e s fo following olll Diagram 5. Arrange three flowers at each corner and add ric rac stems, placing the inner end of the two outer stems slightly under the centre stem. Pin and baste the ric rac.

2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Deborah machine-quilted her quilt on a domestic sewing machine. She quilted each background hexagon with a flower shape and stitched a daisy design at the centre of each hexagon flower. The hexagon petals were quilted with a continuous floral design. The centre of Border 1 was quilted with a feather design and the design was echoed to the edges of the border. Border 2 was quilted with curving stems and flowers stitched in contrast thread and the background area was quilted with a spiral design. 4. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the nine 2½in strips to bind the edge of the quilt.

ire Cla r fo ers Leaf w Flo Diagram 5

10.Remove the hexagon flowers and join the borders at the corners, incorporating the ric rac stems in the seams. 11.Replace the flowers over the ends of the stems and appliqué them to the background.

`

Applique the leaves 1. Using the plastic leaf template with the seam allowance around the edge, trace and cut 41 leaves from the green fabrics. 2. Place a lightweight cardboard template at the centre of the wrong side of the fabric shapes and baste the seam allowance under in a similar manner to the hexagons. Press and allow to cool. 3. Arrange the leaves around Border 2 and pin in place. Appliqué with small blind stitches leaving the final 2in unstitched. Remove the template with tweezers and complete the stitching. 4. Press the border carefully from the wrong side.

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut one piece in half down the full length. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 42 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Flowers for Claire Hexagon


Flowers for Claire By Deborah Louie Finished size: 203cm x 229cm (80in x 90in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 43


Rotary Cut Quilts 44 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


46

58

76

ds Confetti by Jenny Reynol

Winderra by Ca rolyn

Konig

Fisher Flying Colours by Megan

2 52

64

Savile Row by Judy Newman

70

82

ris Kenna Ministry of Colour by Ch

Japanese Wav e by Nerida Rich mond Benso

Stars a la Moda by Nicole Bridges

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 45


Project Seven

46 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Confetti By Jenny Reynolds The majority of this quilt may be made from simple squares, but use of colour and value has created a masterpiece. Jenny used only fabrics from her stash to create this quilt, even piecing the lengths required for the border. Study the quilt before you start piecing your blocks and play with the placement of light and dark fabrics. Finished size: 202cm x 202cm (791⁄2in x 791⁄2in)

Materials 30cm (1⁄3yd) red print fabric (block centres Borders 2 and 4) Assorted scrap fabrics totalling approximately 5m (51⁄2yd) 4.9m (53⁄8yd) quilter’s muslin 4.4m (43⁄4yd) backing fabric Batting at least 220cm x 220cm (88in x 88in) Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Fabric requirements are based on 112cm (44in) wide fabric. Although Jenny’s quilt was made completely from her fabric stash, she chose her fabrics carefully and used reproductions of late 19th-century prints that combined well in colour, value and print size. This quilt would work just as well with fabrics of other eras, for example, 1930s prints. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 47


Cut the fabric From the quilter’s muslin, cut: ❖ 46 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strips to yield a total of 1280, 11⁄2in squares for the blocks. ❖ 6 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric (Border 1) ❖ 4 strips, 51⁄2in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strips to yield a total of 28, 51⁄2in squares. Cut each square twice across the diagonal to yield 112 quarter-square triangles with the straight grain on the long side (Border 2) ❖ 1 strip, 3in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strip to yield 8, 3in squares. Cut each square once across the diagonal to yield 16 half-square triangles (Border 2) ❖ 7 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric (Border 3) ❖ 7 strips, 25⁄8in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strips to yield a total of 104, 25⁄8in squares. Cut each square twice across the diagonal to yield 416 quarter-square triangles with the straight grain on the long side (Border 4) ❖ 1 strip, 11⁄2in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strip to yield 8, 11⁄2in squares. Cut each square once across the diagonal to yield 16 half-square triangles (Border 4). ❖ 8 strips, 23⁄4in x width of fabric (Border 5) ❖ 8 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (binding) From the red print fabric, cut: ❖ 5 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric. Cross cut the strips to yield a total of 124, 11⁄2in squares for the centres of the blocks and the Nine-patch blocks for Border 2. Use the remainder of the fabric to cut 11⁄2in squares for Border 4. From the assorted scrap fabrics, cut: For each of the 64 blocks ❖ 4 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 1) ❖ 8 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 2) ❖ 12 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 3) ❖ 16 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 4) For each of the 60 Nine-patch blocks for Border 2 ❖ 4 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 1) ❖ 4 squares, 11⁄2in (Fabric 2) For Border 4 ❖ 212 squares, 11⁄2in including a number of o red red ssquares. q

Construct the quilt centre 1. Each of the 64 blocks is made from 61, 11⁄2in squares. Following the Block Assembly Diagram, arrange one red square, four Fabric 1 squares, eight Fabric 2 squares, 12 Fabric 3 squares and 16 Fabric 4 squares. Arrange 20 cream quilter’s muslin squares around the edge of the block. The cream squares are trimmed after the quilt centre is assembled. 2. An accurate 1⁄4in seam allowance is required, particularly in a block with so many small pieces. If necessary, test the seam allowance on your sewing machine before you begin. 3. The block is assembled in diagonal rows, beginning in one corner. Set aside the first cream square and stitch cream squares to opposite sides of the Fabric 4 square in the next row. Press the seam allowances towards the cream squares, as shown in the photograph. Join the five squares of the next row in the same manner and press the seam allowances towards the centre of the row. Continue joining the squares into rows and pressing, alternating the direction of the seam allowances. Set aside the last cream square.

Back of block 4

4

4

3 3 4

4 3

2 2

3 1

4

4 4

4 3

1

4

2 1 3

4

3

1 2

2 3

3 2

2 3

4

2 3

4

4 3

4

Block Assembly Diagram

48 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

4

4. Join the rows, butting the seams together at the intersections. 5. Join the remaining two cream squares to opposite corners of the block. 6. Press the seam allowances joining the rows away from the centre row. 7. Arrange the blocks into eight rows of eight blocks. Join the blocks into rows, taking care to stitch through the centre of the cream squares to form triangles around the edges of the blocks. Align the outer corners of the Fabric 4 squares with those in adjoining blocks. 8. Press and trim the seams joining the blocks to 1⁄4in. 9. Join the rows to complete the centre of the quilt, matching, trimming and pressing in the same manner.


2. Join the squares into three rows of three squares and press the seam allowances in Rows 1 and 3 in the opposite direction to those in Row 2. Join the rows, butting the seams together at the intersections. Press. 3. Following Diagram 2, arrange the blocks into two strips of 14 blocks and two strips of 16 blocks. kss. P Pl Place la the large quarter-scale setting triangles cut from the quilter’s muslin between the blocks and two quilter’s muslin halfsquare triangles at each end.

Front of block

Add Border 1 1. Join the six 21⁄4in strips of quilter’s muslin for Border 1 end to end to create one long strip. Measure the width of the quilt top through the centre and cut two strips this length from the long strip. Join these strips to the top and bottom of the quilt top and press the seam allowances towards the borders. 2. Measure the length of the quilt top through the centre and cut two strips this length. Join these to the two sides of the quilt top and press the seam allowances towards the borders.

Add Border 2 1. 60 Nine-patch blocks are required for the Border 2. To make each block, following Diagram 1, arrange the four Fabric 1 squares at the sides of a red centre tr tre square. Place one Fabric 2 square at each corner.

2

1

1

2

1

2

1

2

2

1

2

1 2

1 1

2

Diagram 1 — Nine-patch block

Diagram 2 — Assembly of Border 2

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 49


4. Sew the large triangles to opposite sides of the blocks, aligning the square corners of the triangles with the corners of the blocks and allowing the points of the triangles to extend past the blocks. Sew the small halfsquare triangles to the blocks at each end of the borders. 5. Join the pieced units to complete each border strip. 6. Join the two shorter borders to the top and bottom of the quilt top and press. 7. Join the two longer borders to the two sides of the quilt top and press.

Add Borders 3 5

1. Use the 7, 21⁄4in strips of quilter’s muslin to add Border 3 to the quilt top in the same manner as Border 1. 2. Arrange 212, 11⁄2in squares cut for Border 4 into two rows of 52 squares and two rows of 54 squares. 3. In the same manner as Border 2, arrange the setting triangles cut from the quilter’s muslin around the squares. Join the triangles to the squares and join the pieced components into borders. Add the shorter borders to the top and bottom of the quilt top and then the two longer borders to the two sides of the quilt top. Press. 4. Join the eight, 23⁄4in strips of quilter’s muslin into four sets of two strips and use these strips to add Border 5 to the quilt top in the same manner as Borders 1 and an 3.

Pieced Border 4 sits between quilter’s muslin Border 3 and Border 5.

Finish the quilt

Nine-patch blocks in Border 2

50 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

1. Cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Remove th the he selvedges and join the pieces along one long edge. Press sss the seam open. 2. Referring to Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics, page 129, layer the backing, batting and quilt top. Pin or o thread baste. 3. Quilt as desired. Jenny quilted Confetti by machine. She quilted the blocks in the ditch. Borders 1, 3 and 5 were quilted with straight lines 1⁄4in from the seams.. T The he shape of the Nine-patch blocks was echoed 1⁄4in from m th the he outside edge and the squares in Border 4 were stitched d in the ditch. 4. Referring to Binding the Quilt in Basics, page 129, bind the quilt using the eight 21⁄2in quilter’s muslin strips.


Confetti By Jenny Reynolds Finished size: 202cm x 202cm (791⁄2in x 791⁄2in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 51


Project Eight

52 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Ministry of Colour By Chris Kenna Do you have any leftover strips that need a home? Random strip widths from 3⁄4in to 11⁄2in are used to make "reconstructed" fabric in this dynamic design. Chris has used all colours, but you could use a smaller palette and create a softer look. Finished size: 150cm x 150cm (59in x 59in)

Materials Approximately 7m (8yd) assorted fabrics in a wide variety of colours (see note) 50cm (1⁄2yd) black and white fabric (binding) 3.3m (35⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 160cm x 160cm (63in x 63in). Chris used 100% cotton Grey cotton thread for piecing Black cotton thread for quilting Template plastic and a fine permanent marker Spray starch Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Sewing machine Note: This scrap quilt uses a large variety of fabrics in different colours, styles and print sizes. These fabrics are randomly strip pieced together to form "reconstructed" fabric. The more fabrics you include, the more scrappy and random the quilt will look. Chris included "hits" of lime green, bright red, yellow and black and white. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 53


Cut the fabric Cut strips in a variety of widths from #/4in to 1!/2in wide across the width of your chosen fabrics. Cut 80 per cent of your strips approximately 1in to 1!/4in wide. The rest can be bigger (up to 1!/2in) or smaller (no less than #/4in). If you want to use scraps less than the width of the fabric, you can piece the strips.

Make the reconstructed fabric

❖ 26 segments, 13⁄8in (Template A and B) ❖ 72 segments, 17⁄8in (border) From the black and white print, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric

Make the blocks 1. Cut 50 of the 4#/4in squares diagonally from m left to right (‘Left’ triangles) and set aside in one pile. le e.

1. Randomly select fabric strips and sew them together using a !/4in seam to make six pieces of reconstructed fabric at least 27in by approximately 42in. It does not matter if the strips in the reconstructed fabric are irregular as they will be cut into triangles and more strips and then rejoined. Alternate the direction you sew the strips to avoid "bowing". 2. From the back, press the seams in one direction. t 3. Square off the six reconstructed fabrics (see se ee Diagram Diia 1).

25in

Left triangles

Right triangles

41in

Diagram 1

Cut the reconstructed fabric

2. Cut the remaining 50, 4#/4in squares diagonally from right to left (‘Right’ triangles) and set aside on another pile (see diagram). It is important to get this right, otherwise the blocks will not look like Chris’. 3. Join a Left triangle to a Right triangle to form a Large triangle (see diagram). Press seam allowance wan anc ce to the left.

From the reconstructed fabric, cut: ❖ 20 segments, 43⁄4in (see Diagram 2). Cross cut each segment into 43⁄4in squares to yield 100, 43⁄4in squares (block triangles)

43⁄4in

Diagram 2

54 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Large triangles


4. Trace Template A from the Pattern Sheet and Template B from page 56 onto template plastic using a ďŹ ne permanent marker, referring to Making Templates in Basics, page 125. Cut them out accurately on the traced line. 5. From the 1#/8in segments, cut 25 Template A and 50 Template B. 6. Following Diagram 3 for guidance, join two large triangles with a B strip between them. Repeat to form the other half of the block. Join the two sides of the block together with one long A strip between them. Mix and match the triangles and the A and B strips pss to achieve a p random placement of colours.

B

A

Diagram 3

7. Make 25 blocks. Spray starch each block, then trim them to 9!/4in x 9!/4in with the A and B strips running through the corners.

Block Diagram

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 55


Assemble the quilt 1. Lay out the blocks in five rows of five blocks each. Join the blocks in each row together, then join the rows together to complete the centre of the quilt.

1. Join three of the 13⁄8in border strips end to end to make a strip approximately 75in long. Trim it to 61in. Repeat to make six long strips like this. 2. Sew the six strips together down the long side to make a panel. It will become the border for one side of the quilt. 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make another three panels. 4. Referring to Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics, page 128, use the panels to add the border to the quilt. 5. Press the mitred seams open.

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the backing fabric into two equal lengths. Remove the selvedges and sew the pieces together along one long edge. 2. Layer the backing fabric, batting and quilt top, referring to Layering the Quilt Sandwich in Basics, page 129. Pin, thread or spray baste. 3. Quilt as desired. Chris closely machine-quilted Ministry of Colour. She used stipple and two other close quilting patterns within the triangles, a single row of straight stitching down the centre of the sashings (A and B) in the blocks and then used vertical curved lines on the border. 4. Use the 2!/4in strips cut from black and white fabric, to bind the quilt, referring to Binding the Quilt in Basics, page 129.

56 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Ministry of Colour Template B

Make the border


Ministry of Colour By Chris Kenna Finished size: 150cm x 150cm (59in x 59in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 57


Project Nine

58 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Winderra By Carolyn Konig This wonderful, whimsical quilt by Carolyn Konig is perfect for the little man in your life. The red, blue and black fabrics in a variety of prints set the tone of the quilt. The appliqué block and border add an extra dimension. Try pinks and aquas for a feminine version. Finished size: 118cm x 144cm (461⁄2in x 561⁄2in)

Materials 28 fat eighths in a variety of light/medium and medium/dark fabrics. Carolyn used small florals, stripes and checked fabrics in blue, black and red, many with a cream background (blocks and appliqué) 30cm (3⁄8in) light print fabric (appliqué background) 1m (11⁄8yd) striped fabric (border) 20cm (1⁄4yd) red print fabric (scallops) 40cm (1⁄2yd) binding fabric 3.2m (31⁄2yd) backing fabric Batting at least 135cm x 145cm (53in x 57in) Cotton thread to match appliqué fabrics Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread Freezer paper 8cm x 15cm (3in x 6in) template plastic Pencil Fine-point permanent pen Lightbox, optional Rotary cutter, ruler and mat. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 59


Cut the fabric From light/medium value fabrics for the blocks, cut: ❖58 squares, 35⁄8in and cut each square once across the diagonal to yield a total of 116 half-square triangles (corners of the blocks). Cut the 58 squares in 29 matching pairs as each block requires four matching triangles. ❖118 squares, 25⁄8in. Cut the squares in 59 matching pairs as each block requires two matching squares for the halfsquare triangle units. From medium/dark value fabrics for the blocks, cut: ❖ 60 squares, 35⁄8in and cut each square once across the diagonal to yield a total of 120 half-square triangles (corners of the blocks). Cut the 60 squares in 30 matching pairs as each block requires four matching triangles. ❖ 118 squares, 25⁄8in. Cut the squares in 59 matching pairs as each block requires two matching squares for the halfsquare triangle units. From the striped fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 6in x width of fabric (border) From the red print fabric, cut: ❖ 5 strips, 11⁄4in x width of fabric (border scallops) From the binding fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric

Make the applique block

`

2. Fold the square of background fabric in half twice across the diagonal and press lightly to create guidelines for the placement of the appliqué. 3. Using a lightbox or a well-lit window, centre the fabric over the appliqué design on the Pattern Sheet matching the guidelines and lightly mark the design on the fabric with a pencil. 4. To make the bias for the stems, cut four 1⁄2in x 51⁄2in lengths of bias from one fabric. Fold one edge of each bias strip under and fold the other edge over it to make a 1 ⁄4in bias. Baste and press. 5. Pin the stems in place on the background and appliqué with small blind stitches. 6. Trace the appliqué shapes from the design onto freezer paper and iron them to the wrong side of the fabrics chosen for the appliqué. Cut out the shapes, adding a ¼in seam allowance. 7. Appliqué the smaller stars to the top of the four outer stars and the centres to the buds and remove the freezer paper. 8. Appliqué the large centre star over the ends of the stems and add the leaves. Add the buds, covering the outer ends of the stems. Add the four outer stars. 9. When the appliqué is finished, remove all the papers and press the block well from the wrong side. Trim to 101⁄2in square.

Make the Pinwheel blocks 1. Four half-square triangle units are required to make each of the 59 blocks. Following Diagram 1, rule a diagonal line across the wrong side of two matching light/medium / 25⁄8in squares.

Appliqué block

1. Carolyn uses freezer paper designs pressed to the wrong side of the fabrics for her appliqué. She folds the edges of the fabric over the paper and needleturn appliqués them to the background with a small blind stitch. She cuts a slit in the background fabric and removes the papers. Use cotton thread to match the shape being stitched. Any excess seam allowance should be trimmed and concave curves should be clipped. Any preferred method of appliqué could be used. 60 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Diagram 1


2. Place each square right sides together with two corresponding medium/dark squares and stitch 1⁄4in either side of the line. Cut along the line and press the seam allowances towards the medium/dark fabric. 3. Following Diagram 2, arrange the four units in two rows of two, placing the triangles to create a pinwheel effect. Stitch cee towards the rows together and press the seam allowances ing n tthe ng he seam he the medium/dark fabric. Join the rows, butting allowances together at the intersection and press.

5. Join triangles to opposite sides of the unit and press the seam allowances towards the triangles. es. s

Pinwheel block

Assemble the quilt Diagram 2

1. Following the photograph of the quilt, arrange the blocks into nine rows of seven blocks, substituting the appliquéd square for four blocks in the second and third rows as Carolyn has done or as desired. Distribute the colours and fabrics evenly across the surface of the quilt. ilt lt. t

4. Place the pinwheel units ‘on point’ and, following Diagram 3, arrange four matching triangles cut from the 35⁄8in squares around the unit. The triangles are cut larger than the pinwheel units to create a ‘floating’ effect within wit ithi hiin the blocks.

Diagram 3

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 61


2. Stitch the blocks together in rows and press the seam allowances in the odd-numbered rows in the opposite direction to those in the even-numbered rows. Join the rows, butting the seam allowances at the intersections. In the two rows that include the appliquéd block, join shorter sections and join these to opposite sides of the block before incorporating them with the remainder of the rows.

Add the border

1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and join the two pieces to make a backing with one vertical join. Press the seam open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Carolyn’s quilt was machine-quilted. She quilted the background of the appliqué block with rows of stitching echoing the design. Each pinwheel was quilted with a continuous loop design and the corner triangles of the blocks were quilted with wavy lines. The inner edge of the border was quilted in the ditch and the outer edge of the scallops was echoed on the border with a line of stitching 1 ⁄4in from the edge of the scallops. The remainder of the border was quilted with lines of meandering loops. 4. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the six 21⁄4in strips to bind the quilt.

Winderra Scallop Template for Border

1. Use the seven strips cut for the border to assemble two lengths 6in x 55in and two lengths 6in x 65in. Match the stripes carefully at the joins. 2. Centre two of the 11⁄4in strips for the scallops at one edge of the two shorter borders, matching the raw edges. Baste them in place. The strips for the scallops are shorter than the border strips and the ends will be incorporated in the mitred seams at the corners. 3. Use the three remaining strips to assemble two 50in lengths and baste them to the two longer border strips. 4. Following the instructions in Basics on page 128 for Adding Borders with Mitred Corners, join the borders to the quilt top, incorporating the edge of the strip for the scallops in the seam. 5. Trace the scallop template onto template plastic and cut it out.

Finish the quilt

6. With a pencil, trace the scallop shape onto the outer edge of the scallop strips, adjusting the curves so the scallops meet neatly at the corners. Trim and clip the fabric and needleturn appliqué it in place. 7. Press the quilt top well.

62 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Winderra By Carloyn Konig Finished size: 118cm x 144cm (461⁄2in x 561⁄2in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 63


Project Ten

64 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Savile Row By Judy Newman Tailored elegance is achieved by the clever use of the striped fabrics in this quilt by Judy Newman. The overall impression is of men's business shirts, but there is a wonderful combination of patterned prints between the striped blocks. Finished size: 185cm x 193cm (73in x 76in)

Materials 30cm (1⁄3yd) each of 10 to 12 striped fabrics, see note 30cm (1⁄3yd) each of 6 spot or print fabrics 2.1m (21⁄4yd) wide striped fabric (border) 60cm (2⁄3yd) binding fabric, see note 4.2m (45⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 201cm x 208cm (79in x 82in) Neutral-coloured thread for piecing DMC No 8 Perlé theads for quilting. Judy used mid blue (931) and dark brown (938) Embroidery needles for quilting Template plastic marked with grid Fine-point permanent pen Pencil Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Smaller scrap pieces of striped and spotted fabrics can be used in this quilt. Judy used the same striped fabric for the border and binding of her quilt. She cut the strips for the border down the length of the fabric and cut the strips for the binding across the width. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 65


Prepare the templates

Join the triangles

1. Templates A, B and C for fussy-cutting perfectly matched triangles are printed on page 68. Following the instructions for Making Templates in Basics on page 125, prepare three templates for machine sewing. 2. To cut sets of four identical triangles to be joined into squares, following Diagram 1, place the appropriate template on a striped fabric at exactly the sa same am me e place.

1. Following Diagram 2, join each set of four identical triangles into a square, matching the stripes around d iit. tt..

Diagram 2

Diagram 1

Assemble the squares and rectangles 1. The assembly of the components is based on multiples of 3in. For ease of piecing, the squares and rectangles are joined to form 12 sections, which are then n jjoined oiine to form the quilt top.

Cut the fabric From the wide striped fabric for the border, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 61⁄2in x length of fabric, taking care that the stripes are placed identically on each strip. The remainder of this fabric can be used in the quilt. From the binding fabric, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric From the variety of striped fabrics, in sets of 4, cut: ❖ 28 Template A ❖ 88 Template B ❖ 148 Template C Using a rotary cutter, ruler and mat, from the variety of spot or print fabrics, cut: ❖ 2 rectangles, 31⁄2in x 121⁄2in ❖ 22 rectangles, 31⁄2in x 91⁄2in ❖ 23 rectangles, 31⁄2in x 61⁄2in ❖ 5 squares, 91⁄2in ❖ 11 squares, 61⁄2in ❖ 23 squares, 31⁄2in Diagram 3

66 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Quilt Layout Diagram

2. Following the Quilt Layout Diagrams, arrange the components for each section. Join Section 1 following Diagram 3 and then join the other sections in the same manner. 3. Join the sections to form the centre of the q quilt. u lt. ui ltt.

Add the border 1. Referring to Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics on page 128, join the four 61⁄2in strips to the edges of the quilt, taking care that each seam is at exactly the same point on the striped fabric. 2. Mitre each corner following the instructions in Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics on page 128.

Finish the quilt

Quilt Layout Diagram

1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut two 20in strips from the full length of one of the pieces. Join the strips to opposite sides of the fullwidth piece and press the seams open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Judy hand quilted her quilt with No 8 Perlé threads using an embroidery needle with a large eye. 4. She quilted around the squares made from the striped fabrics using the lines of the fabric as a guide. 5. A series of circles is provided on page 68 to be used as a guide for quilting the spot and print squares and rectangles. The circles can be used as desired, single, overlapping or to form concentric circles. 6. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the eight 21⁄2in strips to bind the quilt. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 67


68 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Sa Te vile m R pl ow at e C

Sa Te vile m R pl ow at e B

Sa Te vile m R pl ow at e A Savile Row Quilting Designs


Savile Row By Judy Newman Finished size: 185cm x 193cm (73in x 76in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 69


Project Eleven

70 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Japanese Waves By Nerida Richmond Benson Simple strip piecing is used effectively in this quilt made from Nerida’s stash of Japanese textiles. The light squares float through the main, pieced medium and dark fabric strips. Sashiko stitching on the border completes the design. Finished Size: 204cm x 277cm (80in x 109in)

Materials A wide variety of assorted scrap fabrics. As this is a scrap quilt, the more numerous and varied the fabrics, the more attractive the final result will be. With reference to the quilt photo, select a similar range of Japanese-style fabrics, including different indigos/dark blues, Japanese florals, blue and white/cream prints, Japanese reds and some purples, greens and plain whites. When purchasing fabrics, select fat eighths and fat quarters of a variety of fabrics to add to the scrappy look (quilt centre, Border 2 and binding) 3.1m (31⁄2yd) dark blue fabric (Borders 1 and 3) 6.7m (73⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 218cm x 292cm (86in x 115in) Dark blue threads for machine piecing and quilting White sashiko thread or Perlé No 5 or 8 Sewing needle with large eye for sashiko stitching Spray starch Rotary cutter, ruler and mat

www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 71


Making the " matchstick " units

1. This quilt is made of 399 “matchstick” units each comprising one rectangle and one square. 2. Nerida suggests the rectangles and squares be cut and assembled as sections are made, rather than cutting all the components before commencing construction. To make the whole quilt, 399 each of 2in x 8in medium/dark value rectangles and 2in light-value squares are required. To make each of the four Section 1, from medium/ dark value fabrics, cut: ❖ 63 rectangles, 2in x 8in From the light-value fabrics, cut: ❖ 63 squares, 2in To make each of the three Section 2, from medium/ dark value fabrics, cut: ❖ 49 rectangles, 2in x 8in From the light-value fabrics, cut: ❖ 49 squares, 2in 3. To make each matchstick unit, following Diagram 1, join a square to the end of a rectangle and press the seam allowance open.

Diagram 1

Make the sections 1. To make the sections, work from the top of the quilt, beginning with a Section 1. Use a design wall or spread the units on a large flat surface or floor. Arrange the units, ensuring the matchstick heads form the correct wave design. Stand back and assess the arrangement of colour and print. Avoid areas of the same or similar fabrics. Rearrange the units until you are satisfied with the result. 2. To make each Section 1, arrange nine rows each with seven matchsticks (see Diagram 2). To make each Section 2, arrange seven rows of seven matchsticks (see Diagram 3). 3. Join the matchstick units into rows and press the seam allowances open. 4. Join the rows together, carefully pinning and matching seams. Press seam allowances towards the bottom of the quilt. Do not trim the sides of the sections at this stage. 5. As each section is completed, lightly spray it with starch and press. A light application of spray starch provides body to soft fabrics and makes them easier to handle. It can also make rotary cutting easier. Some quilters recommend that spray starch be washed out on completion of the quilt, as there is a possibility the starch may attract silverfish and moths. 72 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Diagram 2

Diagram 3

Join the sections 1. Beginning at the top of the quilt with a Section 1, arrange the sections, alternating them down the length of the quilt to end with a Section 1. Take care to align the rectangles and squares to form the wave designs. Stand back from the quilt and assess the placement, rearranging sections if necessary. When you are satisfied, check again that the waves flow correctly. 2. Join the sections together, carefully pinning and matching the seams. Press the seam allowances towards the bottom of the quilt. 3. Using a rotary cutter, ruler and mat, trim the left and right edges using the broken lines on the diagrams as a guide but leaving 1⁄4in seam allowances in place. The off-cuts could be used in Border 2. 4. Lightly spray starch the front of the quilt top op a op and press.


Add the borders

Sashiko stitching

1. All three borders are joined together for each of the four sides before being added to the quilt. The borders are joined with mitred corners and extra length has been allowed for mitring. From the fabric for Borders 1 and 3, cut: ❖ 8 strips, 5in x width of fabric ❖ 10 strips, 7in x width of fabric For Border 2, from the variety of assorted scrap fabrics, cut: ❖ 2in squares and join the squares to assemble 2 strips, 90in and 2 strips, 120in 2. Use the eight 5in strips for Border 1 to assemble: ❖ 2 strips, 5in x 70in for the top and bottom edges of the quilt ❖ 2 strips, 5in x 90in for the left and right edges of the quilt 3. Use the 10, 7in strips for Border 2 to assemble: ❖ 2 strips, 7in x 90in for the top and bottom edges of the quilt ❖ 2 strips, 7in x 120in for the left and right edges of the quilt 4. For each of the four sides of the quilt, join the three borders, carefully matching the centres. Pre Press rre e the seam allowances towards Borders 1 and nd 3. 3

1. Before assembling the quilt top with the batting and backing fabric, with double sashiko thread or single Perlé thread, stitch a line of sashiko stitching on either side of the pieced Border 2 and the inner edge of Border 1. Stitch 1 ⁄4in from the seamlines. 2. Traditionally, sashiko stitches are formed in a ratio of 3:2 in length, right side/wrong side of fabric. The stitches are slightly larger than the spaces between the stitches. The evenness of the stitching is more important than stitch size. Keep stitches even, straight and consistent in length. 3. To turn corners, leave the sashiko thread a little loose on the back of fabric. 4. To avoid wear on the sashiko cotton thread, do not pull the needle through after each stitch, but rather take up six to 10 stitches on the needle before gently pulling thread through the fabric. After making a run of sashiko stitches, hold the fabric at each end of the run of stitches and gently tug. This causes the sashiko stitches to loosen a little and pop up on the surface like grains of rice.

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the backing fabric into three equal lengths and cut strips 37in wide from the full length of two of the pieces. Join one strip to either side of the full-width piece to make a backing for the quilt with two horizontal joins. Press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Nerida’s quilt was professionally machine quilted with a continuous, meandering design by Carol Ikin. A smallscale version of the same design was used to quilt Borders 1 and 3. 4. Before joining the binding around the edge of the quilt, use a rotary cutter, mat and ruler to trim and square the quilt top, batting and backing fabric so Border 2 measures 6in wide. 5. From the variety of assorted scrap fabrics, cut strips 3in wide to make a length totalling 390in. Join the strips with diagonal seams and press the seam allowances open. 6. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the strips to bind the edge of the quilt.

5. Join each pieced border to the quilt centre, referring to Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics on page 128. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 73


Japanese Waves By Nerida Richmond Benson Finished size: 204cm x 277cm (80in x 109in)

74 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Good to Great Sewing

Go from

WITH THE EXCLUSIVE SENSOR SYSTEM™ TECHNOLOGY Experience the wonder of the EXCLUSIVE SENSOR SYSTEM™ technology that automatically senses your fabric thickness and delivers an even feed no matter what the fabric type. Add to this an Automatic Thread Cutter and Bobbin Thread Sensor and you have a machine that is optimised for quilters that desire the ultimate in modern convenience. The OPAL™ 690Q computerized sewing and quilting machine offers built-in assistance that will change the way you sew for the better!

for Patchwork, Quilting and Creative Sewing My secret to style... M My My Husqvarna Viking!

Find your nearest dealer at www.husqvarnaviking.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-575-HV


Project Twelve

76 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Flying Colours by Megan Fisher With so many pieces in this quilt, accurate cutting and piecing will be essential. A variety of shades of blue fabric offer a cohesive element to the multitudes of light and dark fabric squares pieced together to make the main body of the quilt. Finished size: 229cm x 272cm (90in x 107in)

Materials 5m (51⁄2yd) white print fabric A wide variety of assorted scrap fabrics to total approximately 4.3m (43⁄4yd) One fat quarter each of 10 mid-blue tone-on-tone print fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) yellow tone-on-tone print fabric (border) 2.1m (23⁄8yd) mid-blue tone-on-tone print fabric (borders and binding) 7.5m (81⁄2yd) backing fabric Batting at least 244cm x 287cm (96in x 113in) Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Press seams open except where otherwise noted. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 77


3. In the same manner, following Diagram 2, make six Variation A nine-patch units, each with five scrap squares arranged at the four corners and the centre of the unit and four white squares. Make six Variation B nine-patch units, each with five white squares arranged at the four corners and the centre of the unit n and four scrap squares.

Variation A — make 6 Variation B — make 6 Flying Colour Block

Make the Flying Colour blocks

Diagram 2

4. Following Diagram 3, arrange four Variation A units and four Variation B units around the blue a and white nine-patch unit.

To make each of the 30 Flying Colour blocks required for the quilt, from the white print fabric, cut: ❖ 3 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric and cross cut the strips into 11⁄2in squares From the variety of assorted scrap fabrics, cut: ❖ 54 squares, 11⁄2in From one fat quarter of blue tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 5 squares, 11⁄2in ❖ 4 squares, 37⁄8in. Cross cut each square once on the diagonal to yield a total of 8 half-square triangles 1. Following Diagram 1, arrange the five 11⁄2in blue squares with four 11⁄2in white squares in three rows each with three squares. 2. Sew the squares in each row together and press the seam allowances towards the blue squares. Join the rows. The nine-patch unit should measure 31⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge.

Diagram 3

Diagram 1

78 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

5. Sew the units in each row together and join the rows, carefully matching the seams. The pieced unit should measure 91⁄2in square from raw edge to raw edge. 6. Trim 1⁄4in from each of the four sides so the pieced unit measures 9in square from raw edge to raw edge. If your unit does not measure exactly 91⁄2in square, alter the amount trimmed to yield a 9in square. Small variations in size of the pieces around the outer edge will not be obvious in the finished quilt.


7. Following Diagram 4, join blue half-square triangles to two adjacent sides of each of the four remaining ninepatch units, two of Variation A and two o off V Variation a B.

Diagram 4

Make the sashings From the remainder of each of the 10 fat quarters of blue fabric, cut: ❖ 9 squares, 11⁄2in From the white print fabric, cut: ❖ 46 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric and cross cut the strips to yield a total of 1278 squares, 11⁄2in From the variety of assorted scrap fabrics, cut: ❖ 1278 squares, 11⁄2in 1. To make sashing squares for the inner area of the quilt use blue and white squares to make ten Variation A nine-patch units and 10 Variation B nine-patch units. 2. To make sashing squares for the remainder of the quilt, use assorted scrap squares and white squares to make 11 Variation A nine-patch units and 11 Variation B units. 3. Use the remaining white print squares and assorted print squares to make 142 Variation A nine-patch units and 142 Variation B nine-patch units. 4. Following Diagram 6, assemble the units to make 71 sashing strips.

8. Following Diagram 5, join the two pieced units with Variation A units to opposite sides of the centre. Add the two pieced units with Variation B units to the other two sides. The completed Flying Colour block lo should measure 121⁄2in square from raw edge to o raw raw aw edge.

Diagram 6

Assemble the quilt centre

Diagram 5

9. As the 30 blocks are assembled, cut the blue squares and triangles for three blocks from each of the 10 fat quarters of blue tone-on-tone print fabric. 10.Any left-over white squares can be used tin other components of the quilt.

1. Following Diagram 7, to make each of the six rows of blocks and vertical sashings, arrange five Flying Colour blocks with six sashing strips, taking care to alternate the placement of the nine-patch units at the corners of the blocks and the units in the sashing strips. Check placement to ensure the squares of scrap fabrics are alternated with white squares across the rows. 2. Join the components, taking care to match the seams. 3. Following Diagram 8, to make each of the two sashing strips for the top and bottom of the quilt, arrange five sashing strips with three nine-patch units of each variation. 4. Check the placement and join the components, matching the seams. 5. Following Diagram 9, to make each of the five remaining horizontal sashing strips, arrange five sashing strips, two blue and white nine-patch units of each variation and one nine-patch unit of each variation made from scrap and white fabrics. 6. Check the placement and join the components, matching the seams. 7. Arrange the rows of blocks and vertical sashings and horizontal sashings and corner squares. Check the placement and join the rows. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 79


Diagram 7

Diagram 8

Diagram 9

Add Border 1 From the white print fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric and cross cut 243 white squares, 11⁄2in From the variety of assorted scrap fabrics, cut: ❖ 243 squares, 11⁄2in From the yellow tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 3⁄4in x width of fabric and cross cut 14 strips, 3⁄4in x 61⁄2in, 4 strips, 3⁄4in x 121⁄2in and 4 strips, 3⁄4in x 123⁄4in From the mid-blue tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 7 strips, 31⁄4in x width of fabric and cross cut 14 strips, 31⁄4in x 61⁄2in, 4 strips, 31⁄4in x 121⁄2in, 4 strips, 31⁄4in x 123⁄4in and 4 rectangles, 31⁄4in x 31⁄2in 1. Using the 11⁄2in squares of scrap fabric and white print fabric, make 27 nine-patch units of Variation A and 27 nine-patch units of Variation B. 2. Following Diagram 10, join the units in sets tss of three to make nine of each of the two pieced units. nittss..

Diagram 10 3. Join each 3⁄4in yellow strip to a corresponding blue toneon-tone strip. 4. To make each of the Border 1 strips for the top and bottom edges of the quilt, following Diagram 11, join two 121⁄2in blue/yellow strips, three 61⁄2in blue/yellow strips and two of each of the pieced units of nine-patch units, taking care with the placement of the pieced nine-patch units.

5. Join the pieced borders to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 6. To make the Border 1 strip for the left edge of the quilt, following Diagram 12, join two 31⁄4in x 31⁄2in blue rectangles, two 123⁄4in blue/yellow strips, four 61⁄2in blue/yellow strips, three pieced nine-patch units with white squares at the corners and two pieced nine-patch units with scrap squares at the corners. 7. To make the Border 1 strip for the right edges of the quilt, following Diagram 13, join the same components as the strips for the left edges but use three pieced nine-patch units with scrap squares at the corners and two pieced nine-patch units with white squares at the corners. 8. Join the borders to the left and right edges of the quilt, taking care with the placement of the squares.

Diagram 11

80 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Diagram 12 & 13


Add Border 2 From the mid-blue tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 10 strips, 31⁄4in x width of fabric 1. Measure the width of the quilt through the centre and from the strips assemble two strips of this length. Join them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Measure the length of the quilt through g the centre, assemble two strips of this length and join them m to to the th he left left ft aand nd rright ig ght h edges of the quilt.

Finish inish the quilt

2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Layers in Basics on page 129 pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Megan’s quilt was professionally machine quilted by Jo Nicholls of Thirroul Custom Quilting. She worked a wavy edge-to-edge pattern across the surface of the quilt. From the mid-blue tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 10 strips, 21⁄4in x width of fabric 4. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the strips to bind the edge of tthe h quilt. he qui uilt l. lt

1. Cutt th the he ba backing ack ckin i g fa in fabric abr bric ic iinto ic ntoo th nt three hreee eq equal qual ual le ua lengths. eng gth t s. s R Remove em emov mov o e th thee selvedges, ved edgees, edge s, join joi o n the th he pieces p ec pi eces e along es along loong ng their the h ir long lon ong edges ong edge ed gess and ge and press an p es pr esss the the seam am m allowances allllow wan nce ces open open. op pen en en.

Flying Colours By Megan Fisher Finished size: 229cm x 272cm (90in x 107in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Qu Quilts | 81


Project Thirteen

82 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Stars a la Moda by Nicole Bridges Every star block in Nicole Bridges quilt has been pieced from a different fabric combinations, with the pieced setting triangle cut from scraps of creams and beige. The use of a blue/red/green colourway has given this a very classic look. Update this quilt with funky prints and colours for a modern look. Finished size: 213cm x 223cm (84in x 88in)

Materials Assorted cream and beige print fabrics totalling 4.4m (5yd) (block backgrounds and setting triangles) Assorted blue, red and green print fabrics totalling 2m (21⁄4yd) (stars) 50cm (5⁄8yd) beige print fabric (Border 1) Assorted blue print fabrics totalling 2m (21⁄4yd) (Borders 1 and 2) 70cm (3⁄4yd) blue print fabric (binding) 5.9m (61⁄2yd) backing fabric Batting at least 235cm x 245cm (92in x 96in). Nicole used cotton-blend batting Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Neutral thread for machine piecing Matching thread for machine or hand quilting General sewing supplies Sewing machine, plus 1⁄4in patchwork foot www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 83


Cut the fabric From the assorted cream and beige fabrics for the block backgrounds and setting triangles, cut: ❖ 92 squares, 3in (A). Nicole cut 4 squares from the same fabric for each star block ❖ 46 squares, 33⁄4in. Cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 184 quarter-square triangles (B). Nicole cut 2 squares from the same fabric for each star block ❖ 56 squares, 83⁄8in. Cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 216 quarter-square triangles (G) From the assorted blue, red and green print fabrics, cut: ❖ 46 squares, 33⁄8in. Cross cut each square once on the diagonal to yield 92 half-square triangles (C). Nicole cut 2 squares from the same fabric for each star block ❖ 23 squares, 61⁄4in. Cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 92 quarter-square triangles (D) ❖ 92 squares, 21⁄4in (E). Nicole cut 4 squares from the same fabric for each star block ❖ 23 squares, 4in (F). Nicole cut 1 F square from each fabric that she used for the E squares From the beige print fabric for Border 1, cut: ❖ 10 squares, 83⁄8in. Cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 40 quarter-square triangles (G) From the assorted blue print fabrics for Borders 1 and 2, cut: ❖ 11 squares, 83⁄8in (Border 1). Cross cut each square twice on the diagonal to yield 44 quarter-square triangles (G) ❖ Strips 4in wide of various lengths. You will need sufficient so that when they are sewn end to end, you have a strip at least 160in (Border 2) ❖ Strips 6in wide of various lengths. You will need sufficient so that when they are sewn end to end, you have a strip at least 200in (Border 2) From the blue print fabric for the binding, cut: ❖ 9 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (binding)

Make the Home cks grown Star blocks B

A

C D C

D

B

B

B E

A

A

C D

D

C

B

B

F

E

E

B C

B

D

D C

A

E B

A B

Block Assembly Diagram

Make the setting triangles

1. Following the diagram, lay out four G triangles cut from different beige print fabrics for a large setting triangle. 2. Join two G triangles along their long sides to make a square. 3. Join the remaining two G triangles to adjacent sides of the square. 4. Repeat to make 48 setting triangles.

B E

A

1. Following the Block Assembly Diagram, lay out the patches for a complete Home-grown Star block. To make blocks like Nicole’s, you will need 4D and 4C patches cut from the same fabric; 1F and 4E patches cut from the same fabric; and 4A and 8B patches cut from the same fabric. 2. Join each A square to a C triangle along one short edge of the triangle. Press seams towards C. 3. Join each A+C unit to a D triangle. Press seams towards D. 4. Join two B triangles to adjacent sides of each E square. Press seams towards the triangles. 5. Join a B+E+B unit to either side of two A+C+D units. 6. Join the two remaining A+C+D units to opposite sides of the F square. 7. Join the three resulting units to make the star. 8. Repeat to make a total of 23 stars.

B F

E

E

B

B

D

C

G

D C E

A B

B

Home-grown Star Block

84 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

G

A

G

G

Large setting triangle - make 48


5. To make a small setting triangle, join two G triangles cut from different beige print fabrics together along their short sides (see diagram). 6. Repeat to make 12 small setting triangles.

G

4. Join the diagonal strips of setting triangles+Home-grown Star blocks together. Complete the row by joining the remaining two small setting triangles to make corners. 5. Repeat these steps to make three Row A.

G

Small setting triangle – make 12

Assemble the quilt 1. Following the diagram, lay out ďŹ ve Home-grown Star blocks, eight large setting triangles and four small setting triangles for Row A. 2. Sew a large setting triangle to opposite edges of three of the Home-grown Star blocks (see Diagram 1). Press seams towards the setting triangles. 3. Sew a large setting triangle to one edge only of the remaining two Home-grown Star blocks and on the opposite edge, sew a small setting triangle (s (see se Diagram 2).

Diagram 1

Diagram 2

Row A – make three

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 85


6. Following the diagram, lay out four Home-grown Star blocks ro and 12 large setting triangles for Row B.

2. Sew them together to form a strip. Repeat to make four Border 1 strips. 3. Sew the strips to all four sides of the quilt centre. 4. Join two blue G triangles together along their short sides to make border corners. Repeat to make four corners. Sew a border corner to all four corners of the quilt.

Add Border 2 1. Join random lengths of blue print fabrics cut 4in wide to make one long strip. 2. Measure the quilt vertically through the centre and trim two strips to this measurement for the side borders. Sew them to the left and right edges of the quilt. 3. Join random lengths of blue print fabrics cut 6in wide to make one long strip. Measure the quilt horizontally through the centre and trim two strips to this measurement for the top and bottom borders. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt.

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the backing fabric into two lengths. Remove the selvedges and join along one of the long edges. Press. 2. Referring to Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics, page 129, layer the backing, batting and quilt top. Pin or thread-baste. 3. Quilt as desired. Stars a la Moda was custom machine quilted using spirals and stars to add movement, texture and interest to the quilt. 4. Referring to Binding the Quilt in Basics, page 129, bind the quilt using the blue 21â „2in strips.

Row B – make two

7. Join the setting triangles to the Home-grown Star blocks to make diagonal strips as before and then join the strips and corners to complete the row. 8. Repeat to make two rows like this. 9. Lay out the completed rows, alternating Row A and Row B. Join the rows together to form the centre of the quilt.

Add Border 1 1. Following the diagram, lay out 10 beige G triangles cut for Border 1 and nine assorted blue G triangles.

Border 1 strip - make four

86 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Stars a la Moda By Nicole Bridges Finished size: 213cm x 223cm (84in x 88in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 87


` Quilts Applique

88 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


90

100

112

Bling Bling Baltimore by Wendy Whellum

Vintage Rose of Sharon by Rhonda Coa tes

Atomic Bloom by Wendy Williams

No Kitchen Sink Here by Jane Morgan

96

106

Flowers and St ones by Deborah Dor ward

118

It's a Hoot by Tracey Peterson

Creative ti Stash and Scrap Quilts Q | 89


Project Fourteen

90 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Bling Bling Baltimore By Wendy Whellum This project will require you to raid your stash for the background and border, but your scraps and leftovers for the appliqués. While the design inspiration may have been from traditional-style four block appliqué quilts, the fabric palette is definitely modern. However, it is your stash that will determine the look of your quilt. Finished size: 170cm x 170cm (67in x 67in) Finished block size: 51cm (20in)

Materials 1.2m (13⁄8yd) quilter’s muslin or light-value background fabric 50cm (5⁄8yd) black and white striped fabric (sashing and Border 1) One 15cm x 20cm (6in x 8in) rectangle of red print fabric (corners, sashing and Border 1) 1.9m (21⁄8yd) bright print fabric (Border 2) 1m (11⁄8yd) green print fabric (appliquéd vine and stems) A variety of assorted print fabrics for the appliqué. Include bright colours, including yellow and interesting prints Fat eighths and coordinating scrap print fabrics for the four vases 50cm (5⁄8yd) black and white spot print fabric (binding) 3.8m (41⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 186cm (73in) square Cotton threads to match fabrics for appliqué Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread Appliqué needles Template plastic or freezer paper Tracing paper such as greaseproof paper Black fine-point permanent pen Pencil Water-erasable pen, optional White appliqué marker 1 ⁄8in, 1⁄4in and 3⁄8in bias bars Light box, optional Rotary cutter, ruler and mat

www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 91


Block 1

Block 2

Block 3

Block4

92 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Making the quilt The appliqué designs for the blocks and border are printed on the Pattern Sheet #1, side A & B.

`

Applique

the blocks

From the quilter’s muslin or light-value background fabric, cut: ❖ 4 squares, 22in. These squares are larger than required, to allow for adjustment 1. Wendy used the needleturn appliqué technique to make her quilt. Any preferred appliqué method could be used. 2. Fold each background square in half twice and press lightly to create guidelines for placement of the appliqué shapes. 3. The designs for the appliqué are printed on the Pattern Sheet. Using a light box or well-lit window, tape each square of background fabric over the design, aligning the guide lines. Trace the design lightly with a sharp pencil or water-erasable pen. 4. Trace the appliqué shapes onto template plastic or freezer paper and cut them out on the line. 5. Trace around the shapes on the wrong side of the fabrics for the appliqué and cut them out, adding a scant 1⁄4in seam allowance. Take care to turn asymmetric shapes over to the wrong side before tracing. 6. Use bias bars, following the manufacturer’s instructions, to prepare lengths of bias for the stems and the vine for the border. 7. Following the numerical order printed on the designs, pin the shapes to the backgrounds and needleturn appliqué. With the tip and side of the needle, roll the edge under to the outline marking and blind stitch in place. Any excess seam allowance should be trimmed as the appliqué is stitched and concave curves should be clipped. Use thread to match the appliqué shape. 8. When the blocks have been completed, press them lightly from the wrong side and trim them to 201⁄2in square.

`

Applique Border 2 From the bright print fabric for Border 2, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 11in x length of fabric 1. Fold each strip in half and press lightly to mark the centre. 2. Create master copies of the appliqué designs. Cut two lengths of tracing paper 11in x 46in and one length, 11in x 66in. 3. Using the designs on the Pattern Sheet and following the placement shown in the photograph of the quilt, trace the designs onto the lengths of paper. Use the longer strip for the left and right border design. The same design is used for both these borders but the design is placed so it flows around the quilt.

4. The top and bottom borders each have a different appliqué design at the centre, but the same design at either end. Reverse the design to create the mirror images. 5. Complete the appliqué in the same manner as the blocks but leave a short section at either end of both the top and bottom borders incomplete, as the appliqué shapes cross the seams joining the borders. Complete these areas after the whole border has been added to the quilt. 6. When the majority of the appliqué has been completed, press and trim the strips to 101⁄2in wide.

Add the sashing and Border 1 From the black and white striped fabric, cut: ❖ 6 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric. Trim four strips to 21⁄2in x 421⁄2in and from the other two strips, cross cut four strips, 21⁄2in x 201⁄2in From the rectangle of red print fabric, cut: ❖ 5 squares, 21⁄2in 1. Following the photograph of the quilt, arrange the four blocks into two rows of two blocks. Place the 21⁄2in x 201⁄2in black and white strips between the blocks to create vertical and horizontal sashings. Place one red 21⁄2in square at the centre. 2. Join the blocks and vertical sashings to make two rows. Join the horizontal sashings to either side of the red square. Press the seam allowances towards the sashing strips. 3. Join the pieced sections, butting the seam allowances together at the intersections. Press the seam allowances towards the centre. 4. Join 21⁄2in x 421⁄2in black and white strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards the strips. 5. Join 21⁄2in red squares to either end of the other two strips and press the seam allowances towards the strips. Join these strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards the strips and squares.

Add Border 2 1. Check the dimensions of the quilt top. It should measure 461⁄2in square. If necessary, make adjustments to the lengths of the strips for Border 2. 2. Trim the length of the appliquéd strips for the top and bottom borders to 461⁄2in and join them to the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards Border 1. 3. Trim the length of the appliquéd strips for the left and right edges of the quilt to 661⁄2in, join them to the quilt and press. 4. Complete the border appliqué at each corner of the quilt.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 93


Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut two strips 16in wide from the full length of one of the pieces. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Layers in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Wendy hand quilted her quilt. She stitched in the ditch around the appliqué shapes and stitched rows of cross hatching across the background of the blocks. The sashings and Border 1 were quilted with three parallel lines of stitching and the background of Border 2 was echo quilted. Wendy added quilting to the appliqué shapes to complement the designs. From the fabric for the binding, cut: ❖ 7 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric 4. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the strips to bind the edge of the quilt.

Left border

Right border

Close up of Top border

Top border

Bottom border

94 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Bling Bling Baltimore By Wendy Whellum Finished size: 170cm x 170cm (67in x 67in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 95


Project Fifteen

96 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


No Kitchen Sink Here By Jane Morgan The Rose Dream block used by Jane Morgan in this quilt was published in the Kansas City Star in 1930. It can be pieced, or appliquéd, as Jane has chosen to do. Alternating light and dark versions of the block create the centre of the quilt, complemented by the vine and leaf border. Finished size: 168cm x 198cm (66in x 78in) Finished block size: 15cm (6in) square

Materials 30cm (1⁄3yd) each of 20 different ‘30s print fabrics (blocks, border and binding), see note 3.5m (37⁄8yd) light cream tone-on-tone print fabric (blocks and border), see note 4.3m (43⁄4yd) backing fabric Batting at least 183cm x 213cm (72in x 84in) 9.5m (101⁄2yd) of 6mm (1⁄4in) black ricrac 2m (21⁄4yd) of 90cm (36in) wide fusible web Lightweight tearaway stabiliser Light neutral-coloured cotton thread for piecing Black rayon machine-embroidery thread Black Bobbinfil Template plastic Black fine-point permanent pen HB pencil, rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Fewer print fabrics can be used but they will be repeated more often. When choosing the light cream tone-on-tone print fabric, test it over the ‘30s print fabrics as the prints may show through the cream fabric. Either use a denser cream fabric or use double layers of the cream fabric for the appliqué on the blocks. Additional cream fabric will be required if double layers are used. Jane recommends using a straight stitch plate (see your sewing-machine dealer) when sewing straight seams in her patchwork. She uses a No 70 needle, No 50 cotton and a 1 ⁄ in foot to ensure accurate piecing. It is advisable to make a sample 4 block before starting. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 97


Cut the fabric From the variety of ‘30s print fabrics, cut: ❖ 7 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (binding) ❖ 49 squares, 61⁄2in (blocks) From the light cream tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 9 strips, 61⁄2in x width of fabric and cross cut 50, 61⁄2in squares (blocks) From the remaining length of cream fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 61⁄2in x 68in (border)

Prepare the applique `

1. Trace Templates A and B from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic with a black fine-point permanent and cut out the templates on the lines. Template A is the curved shape at the centre of each block and Template B is the leaf shape on the border. 2. Using Template A, trace 99 curved shapes onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving 1⁄2in between the shapes. Cut out the shapes leaving a margin around the edge. 3. Fuse 49 shapes to the wrong side of the cream fabric and cut them out accurately on the lines. 4. Fuse 50 shapes to the wrong side of the variety of ‘30s print fabrics and cut them out accurately on the lines. 5. Using Template B, trace 112 curved shapes onto the paper side of the fusible web and cut them out in the same manner as the other shapes. Fuse these shapes to the wrong side of the variety of ‘30s fabrics. 6. Cut 2in-wide strips of fusible web and fuse them to the wrong side of the remaining ‘30s print fabrics and the cream fabric. 7. With a rotary cutter, cut 98, 15⁄8in cream squares and 100, 15⁄8in print squares. Ensure that there are two print squares to match each Template A print shape.

3. Remove the paper from two 15⁄8in squares and fuse them to diagonally opposite corners of the 61⁄2in square at the ends of the guideline. Align two raw edges of the small squares with the edges of the large square. 4. Remove the paper from a matching Template A shape and fuse it to the block along the guideline. The tips of the shape should just touch the inner corners of the squares. 5. Complete the edges of the appliqué shapes with buttonhole stitch worked with black thread. Jane used Stitch 15 on Menu F of her Husqvarna Viking Designer 1 machine (2mm x 2mm). Alternatively, use a small zigzag stitch or a hand-worked buttonhole stitch. Jane used black rayon thread on the top of the machine and black Bobbinfil. Place lightweight, tearaway stabiliser under the block and stitch around the appliqué following the arrows shown in Diagram 2. When the stitching is complete, carefully remove the stabiliser. Place the blo block lo o right side down on a towel and press from the wrong ro ong sside. id id

Diagram 2

Make the blocks 1. The centre of the quilt comprises 99 blocks, 49 with a print background, two cream squares and one cream curved shape and 50 with a cream background, two matching print squares and one matching curved shape. 2. To make each block, following Diagram 1, fold a 61⁄2in square in half across the diagonal and press lightly to create a guideline for the placement of thee appliqué ap p shapes.

Assemble the blocks 1. Following the photograph of the quilt, arrange the blocks into 11 rows of nine blocks each, alternating the cream and print fabric backgrounds and the placement of the appliqué shapes to create a diagonal design across the surface of the quilt. 2. When you are satisfied with the placement, join the blocks in rows and press the seam allowances open to make machine quilting easier. Join the rows, matching the intersections of the blocks carefully. Press the seam allowances open.

Add the border

Diagram 1

98 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

1. The vine on the border of Jane’s quilt was created free-form. Draw a gentle curve down the centre of each cream border strip with a pencil. Stop the line approximately 6in from either end of each strip. Pin black ricrac over the pencil line, leaving excess at either end. 2. Stitch the ricrac in place with black rayon thread and straight stitch.


3. Fuse Template B leaves randomly along the ricrac vine, saving sufficient to complete the corners. Place approximately 29 leaves along each of the left and right borders of the quilt and 27 along each of the top and bottom borders of the quilt. 4. Complete the edges of the leaves in the same manner as the appliqué on the blocks. 5. Measure the length of the quilt through the centre and trim two border strips to this measurement. Pin the excess ricrac outt of the way and join the strips to the left and right edges gees off tthe he eq quilt. u lt ui lt.. Pr P Press esss the seams open. 6. Measuree the the width widt wi dtth off the the quilt qui u lt through thr hrou ough ou gh the the h centre cen entr t e and trim tr the two rema re remaining em in nin ng bo b border rd der e strips str trip i s to ip to tthis hiss me hi meas measurement. asur as urem ur emen ent. e t. JJoin oin oi n the strips pss tto p o th the he top to op an aand nd bo bottom ott ttom om m eedges dg ges e ooff th thee qu quil quilt. illt. t 7. Curve th the he ends en nds d ooff the the ricr ri ricrac icr crac acc to to complete comp co mp m ple ple lete ete e the the vvine ine in e around d the the h eedge dge dg ge off tthe hee quilt quilt uiilt lt aand nd d sstitch tiitc tch h in i p place. lace la ce. A c Ad Add dd th the e remaining nin ng le leaves, eave av ves es, stitch es, stit st ittch c tthe hee edges h edg dges aand nd p press. r sss. re

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut two strips, 16in wide from the full length of one of the pieces. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. No Kitchen Sink Here was professionally quilted by Kim Bradley using the Merrily pattern stitched in cream cr rea thread. 4. Fo F Foll Following ollllow win ng th the e in instructions nst s ru uct ctio i for Binding the Quilt in Basics on p page age ag e 12 1 129, 29, 9, u use se e tthe he sseven, e en, ev en, 21⁄2in strips en strrip ps of o print p fabrics to b bi bind ind n tthe he h e edge dge dg e off tthe he eq quilt. uilt ui ltt.

No Kitchen Sink Here By Jane Morgan Finished size: 168cm x 198cm (66in x 78in) Finished block size: 15cm (6in) square

Creative Cre eative Stash and Scrap Q Quilts | 99


Project Fourteen

100 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Vintage Rose of Sharon By Rhonda Coates This stunning, full-size quilt is an excellent design to use up your scraps and utilise both your piecing and appliqué skills. The timeless elegence of the Rose of Sharon appliqué block has maintained its popularity from the mid 1800s to today. Finished size: 241cm x 241cm (95in x 95in)

Materials 2.5m (23⁄4yd) cream tone-on-tone print fabric (appliqué background) 70cm (3⁄4yd) green tone-on-tone print fabric (leaves and stems) 80cm (7⁄8yd) red tone-on-tone print fabric (flowers) One fat quarter of yellow/gold tone-on-tone print fabric (flower centres) One fat quarter of burgundy/red print fabric (flowers) One fat quarter of brown/red fabric (flowers) 90cm (1yd) brown print fabric (Borders 1 and 5) 304, 4in squares of assorted light value fabrics 304, 4in squares of assorted medium/dark value fabrics 80cm (7⁄8yd) brown fabric (binding) 7.9m (82⁄3yd) backing fabric Batting at least 265cm (103in) square Silk or cotton threads to match appliqué fabrics (Rhonda uses YLI silk threads) Neutral-coloured thread for piecing Quilting thread 6mm (1⁄4in) bias maker and fusible tape Template plastic Fine point permanent pen, pencil White gel marker or marking pen Water-soluble basting glue (optional) Appliqué pins Size 10 appliqué needles Spray starch Lightbox (optional) Sandpaper covered board Small square ruler Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Rhonda used the needleturn technique for the appliqué on her quilt. Instructions are provided for this technique. However, any www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com preferred appliqué technique could be used.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 101


Cut the fabric From the cream tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 1 square, 24in (centre background) and from the remaining fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 101⁄2in x length of fabric (Border 3) From the brown print fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 11⁄2in x 26in (Border 1) ❖ 10 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 5) From the brown fabric for the binding, cut: ❖ 10 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric

Make the half square triangle units 1. Using a sandpaper covered board to prevent the fabrics slipping, rule a diagonal line across the wrong side of each of the 304, 4in squares of light value fabrics. 2. Place each square right sides together with a corresponding medium/dark value square and stitch 1⁄4in either side of the line, following Diagram 1. These squares can be stitched using the chain piecing technique, stitching one pair of squares immediately after the other without clipping the threads. 3. Clip the threads and cut along the ruled lines to yield two half-square triangle units from each pair of squares, a total of 608 units. Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric. 4. Trim each unit to 31⁄2in square.

Prepare the floral applique

`

1. Trace the shapes for the appliqué from the Pattern Sheet onto template plastic using a fine-point permanent pen and cut them out on the line. 2. Trace around the shapes on the right side of the fabrics with a pencil or white marker. Leave a margin of at least 1 ⁄2in between the shapes. You will need: ❖ from the green fabric, 96 leaves and 16 rufflededge leaves ❖ from the red fabric, 40 small flowers and 5 large flowers ❖ from the yellow/gold fabric, 45 flower centres ❖ from the burgundy/red fabric, 5 large centres ❖ from the brown/red fabric, 20 heart shapes 3. Cut out the appliqué shapes, adding scant 1⁄4in seam allowances.

Prepare the bias stems and vine 1. Spray starch the remaining green fabric and cut bias strips a generous 1⁄2in wide for the stems and vine. It will be necessary to join some strips to make the required lengths. You will need: ❖ 8 lengths, each approximately 25in ❖ 8 lengths, each approximately 15in ❖ 24 lengths, each approximately 4in 2. Feed the bias strips through the 1⁄4in bias maker, pressing the bias as it comes through the opening at the other end. Iron the fusible tape to the back of the bias strips as you go.

Centre appliqué block

Diagram 1

102 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


`

Applique the centre square

1. Fold the square of cream background fabric in half twice and across each diagonal and press lightly to create guidelines for the placement of the appliqué. 2. Using a lightbox or well-lit window, place the square of fabric over the Pattern Sheet, aligning the guidelines on the fabric with those on the design. With a pencil, lightly trace the stems and a few lines to indicate the placement of each flower and leaf. 3. Peel the paper from the back of the green bias strips and centre the stems and vines over the lines. Pin and iron to fuse in place. 4. Using thread to match the green fabric, appliqué the edges of the stems with a small blind stitch. 5. To needleturn appliqué, with the tip and side of the needle roll the edge of the fabric under to the line and blind stitch in place. Excess seam allowance should be trimmed and concave curves should be clipped. Assemble the flowers and appliqué the upper layer or layers before appliquéing each flower to the background. For the large centre flower, needleturn appliqué the yellow centre to the burgundy/red circle and appliqué to the red flower shape. Add the brown/red heart shapes. Appliqué a yellow/gold centre to each small red flower shape. 6. Needleturn appliqué the layered flowers and the leaves to the background. 7. Press the completed centre block lightly from the wrong side and trim to 221⁄2in square.

eight strips each with 16 half-square triangle units, again ensuring the lights and darks are all placed correctly. Following Diagram 3, join the strips to make two sections, each comprising four strips, and join these sections s to the top and bottom edges of the quilt.

16 units Diagram 3

Add Border 3

1. Referring to Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics on page 128, use the four, 11⁄2in x 26in brown strips to add Border 1 to the centre block. The strips have been cut longer than required to allow excess fabric for mitring the corners. Press the seam allowances towards the border.

1. The appliqué on Border 3 is partially completed before the cream strips are joined to the quilt. The appliqué is completed after the corners of the border are mitred. The strips have been cut wider and longer than required to allow for adjustment. 2. Fold each cream strip in half and press lightly to mark the centre. Then, using the design for the border on the Pattern Sheet, complete the appliqué in the same way as the quilt centre but do not complete the last few leaves at the ends of each border and leave the outer ends of the vines free. 3. Press the borders lightly from the wrong side and trim their width to 9 1⁄2in. 4. Referring to Adding Borders with Mitred Corners in Basics on page 128, join the borders to the four edges of the quilt, matching the centres. 5. Complete the vines and leaves and add the large corner flowers in the same manner as the quilt centre.

Add Border 2

Add Border der 4

1. Border 2 is made from 192 of the half-square triangle units. 2. Join units to make eight strips, each with eight halfsquare triangle units. Ensure the lights and darks are all placed correctly. Following Diagram 2, join the strips to make two sections, each comprising four strips and join these sections to the left and right edges of the quilt. 3. Join units to make

8 units

Add Border 1

4 units Diagram 2

Diagram 4

1. Border 4 is made from the remaining 416 half-square triangle units. 2. Following Diagram 4, arrange the units in sets of four to make 104 pieced squares with the dark triangles forming a diamond shape at the centre. To piece each square, join the units in pairs and join the pairs.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 103


Vintage Rose By Deborah Dorward Finished size: 165cm x 165cm (65in x 65in) Finished block size: 23cm (9in)

104 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


3. Join pieced squares to make four strips each with 11 pieced squares. Following Diagram 5, join the strips in pairs to make two sections and join these to o the left and right edges of the quilt.

Add Border 5

1. The quilt should now measure 901⁄2in square. Measure the width and length of your quilt through the centres and, from the 10, 21⁄2in strips of brown print fabric, assemble four strips for Border 5, each strip longer than required to allow for mitring the corners. 2. Join the border to the quilt in the same manner as Border 1.

Finish the quilt

11 pieced squares

1. Cut the backing fabric into three equal lengths and cut 29in wide strips from the full length of two of the pieces. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Quilt as desired. Rhonda machine quilted her quilt. She stitched the backgrounds of the centre and Border 3 with lines of cross hatching and she quilted Border 1 in the ditch. Each triangle of Border 2 was quilted with an arc and the light and dark diamond shapes created with the half-square triangle units in Border 4 were each quilted with a curved motif. 4. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the 10, 21⁄2in strips of brown fabric to bind the qu quilt. u

Diagram 5

4. Join pieced squares to make four strips each with 15 pieced squares. Following Diagram 6, join the strips in pairs to make two sections and join these to the top and bottom of the quilt.

15 pieced squares Diagram 6

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 105


Project Seventeen

106 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Flowers and Stones By Deborah Dorward 'Happy' and 'scrappy' are the two words that come instantly to mind when looking at this quilt by Deborah Dorward. The white background fabric floats all the pieced and appliquéd elements of this quilt and showcases the beautiful quilting. Finished size: 165cm x 165cm (65in x 65in) Finished block size: 23cm (9in)

Materials 3.5m (37⁄8yd) white background fabric. See note 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of two purple print fabrics (vase) 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of three mauve/purple print fabrics One fat quarter each of two green print fabrics (stems and vines) 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of five green fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of two pink print fabrics 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of three pink print fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) red print fabric 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of three red print fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) each of two orange print fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) blue print fabric 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of three blue print fabrics 20cm (1⁄4yd) dull yellow print fabric 10cm (1⁄8yd) each of two bright yellow fabrics 3.7m (41⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 185cm (73in) square White and neutral-coloured thread for piecing Cotton threads to match appliqué fabrics Black stranded embroidery thread Quilting thread Template plastic Fine-point permanent pen Pencil 9mm (3⁄8in) Clover bias maker and fusible web, optional Light box, optional Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: Deborah used white tone-on-tone fabric for the background of her quilt. The suggested quantity includes fabric for the binding. The four 101⁄2in wide strips for the background of the appliqué border can be cut side by side across the width of the fabric, provided the fabric is at least 107cm (42in) wide. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 107


Cut the fabric From the white background fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 2in x width of fabric and cross cut 64, 2in squares (Rolling Stone blocks) ❖ 4 strips, 23⁄8in x width of fabric and cross cut 64, 23⁄8in squares (Rolling Stone blocks) ❖ 7 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (binding) ❖ 2 strips, 101⁄2in x 48in down the length of the fabric ❖ 2 strips, 101⁄2in x 68in down the length of the fabric ❖ 1 square, 30in

Make the Rolling Stone blocks 1. To make each of the 16 Rolling Stone blocks, in addition to the 2in and 23⁄8in squares of white fabric already cut, choose four print fabrics. From Fabric 1, cut: ❖ 1 square, 31⁄2in (centre) From Fabric 2, cut: ❖ 8 squares, 2in (star points) From Fabric 3, cut: ❖ 4 squares, 2in ❖ 8 rectangles, 2in x 31⁄2in (background) From Fabric 4, cut: ❖ 8 squares, 2in ❖ 4 squares, 23⁄8in (coloured surround) 2. Following Diagram 1, rule a diagonal line across the wrong side of four 23⁄8in white squares and place each square, right sides together, with a corresponding square of Fabric 4. 3. Stitch 1⁄4in on either side of the line and cut along the ruled lines to yield a total of eight half-square triangle units.

Diagram 1 4. Following Diagram 2, make four Flying Geese units from four 2in x 31⁄2in rectangles of Fabric 3 and eight 2in squares of Fabric 4. 5. Rule a diagonal line across the wrong side of each of the squares. Place a square at one end of a rectangle and stitch along the line. Trim the excess, leaving a 1 ⁄4in seam allowance, and press the triangle back over the line of stitching. Add a second triangle to the other end of the rectangle in the Diagram 2 same manner. 6. Make another four Flying Geese units for the star points in the same manner from the remaining four rectangles of Fabric 3 and the eight 2in squares of Fabric 2. 7. Following Diagram 3, assemble the pieced units w with the centre square, the four 2in squares of Fabric riic 3 an a and four 2in squares of white background fabric.

Diagram 3

Diagram 3

Rolling Stone block

108 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

8. Join the components, following the diagram, to make three sections. Join the sections to form the block.


Prepare the bias stems and vines 1. A total of approximately 330in of 3⁄4in wide bias cut fabric is required to make the stems for the quilt centre and the vine around the border of the quilt. Strips of varying lengths are required. Deborah used two green fabrics and varied their placement. 2. From the two fat quarters of green fabric, cut bias strips 3⁄4in wide and, following the manufacturer’s instructions, feed the strips through the bias maker to make lengths of bias with fusible web on the back.

Applique the quilt centre ` 1. Deborah used the needleturn technique for the appliqué for her quilt. However, any preferred technique could be used. 2. The centre background square has been cut slightly larger than required so it can be trimmed after the appliqué has been stitched. Fold the square in half twice and press lightly to create guidelines for the placement of the appliqué. 3. The designs for the appliqué are printed on the Pattern Sheet. Using a light-box or a well-lit window, pin the square of fabric over the design for the quilt centre, aligning the guidelines. With a pencil, trace the design lightly onto the fabric. 4. With a fine-point permanent pen, trace the shapes onto template plastic and cut them out. Label similar shapes so they can be distinguished. 5. Using the photograph of the quilt as a guide to colour and fabric choice, trace around the shapes on the right side of the fabrics with a pencil and cut out the shapes, adding a scant 1⁄4in seam allowance.

6. To stitch the appliqué, use cotton thread to match the appliqué shape. 7. Peel the paper from the stems, arrange them on the background and press lightly to fuse in place. Appliqué the edges with small blind stitches. 8. Appliqué the vase, flowers, leaves and butterflies, noting where one shape is placed under another. To needleturn appliqué, with the tip and side of the needle, roll the edge of the shape under to the line and blind stitch in place. Any excess seam allowance should be trimmed and concave curves should be clipped. Assemble the circle flowers and appliqué the upper layers before appliquéing the flowers to the background. In the same manner, appliqué the circles to the butterfly wings before appliquéing the butterflies to the background. 9. Create the butterfly antenna with embroidery worked with two strands of black thread. Stitch a French knot at the end of each antenna. 10.When the appliqué has been completed, press the background lightly from the wrong side and trim the square to 271⁄2in, with the design centred.

Add the Rolling Stone border 1. Arrange the 16 blocks around the quilt centre, following the photograph of the quilt and distributing the various colours and fabrics evenly. 2. Join three blocks for the left and right edges of the quilt, press the seam allowances in one direction and join the pieced strips to the sides of the quilt centre. 3. Join the four blocks for the top and bottom of the quilt, press the seam allowances in one direction and join the pieced strips to the quilt centre.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 109


Add the appliqued ` border 1. The white background strips for the border have been cut slightly longer than required so they can be trimmed after the appliqué has been completed. Complete as much of the border appliqué as possible before trimming the borders and joining them to the quilt. 2. Fold each border strip in half and press lightly to mark the centre. In the same manner as the quilt centre, trace the appliqué design from the Pattern Sheet onto the fabric. Reverse the design at the centre of each side of the border and trace the design so it will flow around the quilt. 3. Trace the appliqué shapes for the flowers and leaves onto template plastic and cut them out. Trace around the shapes onto the fabrics in the same way as the quilt centre. 4. Begin by fusing the sections of vine to the background in the same manner as the stems on the quilt centre. 5. Add the flowers and leaves in the same manner as the quilt centre. 6. Press the borders from the wrong side and trim to 101⁄2in x 451⁄2in and 101⁄2in x 651⁄2in. 7. Join the two shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt and press the seam allowances towards the border. Join the two longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 8. Complete the appliqué at the corners of the quilt, taking care to match the vines. Press the corners from the wrong side.

110 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Finish the quilt 1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half and cut two strips 16in wide from the full length of one of the pieces. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Deborah’s quilt was professionally quilted with a longarm machine by Susan Campbell of Rowdy Flat Quilting in Yackandandah, Vic, (03) 6027 1387. The appliqué shapes were quilted in the ditch and the shapes were echo quilted. The remaining areas of the background were filled with swirling lines. The seams of the Rolling Stone blocks were quilted in the ditch and the centre square of each block was quilted with a star design. 4. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the seven, 21⁄2in strips to bind the quilt.


Flowers and Stones By Deborah Dorward Finished size: 165cm x 165cm (65in x 65in) Finished block size: 23cm (9in)

Creative ive Stash and Scrap Quilts | 1111


Project Eighteen

112 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


Atomic Bloom By Wendy Williams Raid your stash of Kaffe Fassett fabrics to stitch this explosion of colour by Wendy Williams. It is an excellent use of machine piecing and raw edge appliqué. A very modern medallion quilt. Finished size: 208cm x 208cm (82in x 82in)

Materials 4.5m (47⁄8yd) white homespun fabric 25cm (3⁄8in) orange spot print fabric 20cm (1⁄4yd) blue spot print fabric 30cm (1⁄3yd) each of 20 assorted print and spot fabrics (includes fabric for binding) 4.5m (47⁄8yd) backing fabric Batting at least 225cm (88in) square White cotton thread for piecing Cotton threads to match fabrics for circle and leaf appliqué shapes White quilting thread 1m (11⁄8yd) fusible web Template plastic Fine-point permanent pen Pencil Baking paper 22.5-degree wedge ruler, see note Appliqué foot and walking foot for sewing machine, optional Rotary cutter, ruler and mat Note: A 22.5-degree wedge ruler simplifies cutting of the pieces for the blocks in the quilt. Alternatively, a template for the wedge shape is provided on the Pattern Sheet. www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 113


Prepare the templates 1. Template A for the triangles in Border 2 is printed on the Pattern Sheet. Make a template from template plastic, referring to Making Templates in Basics on page 125. 2. If necessary, prepare a template for the 22.5-degree wedge shape and use it to mark the shapes along the strips of fabric.

Cut the fabric From the white homespun fabric, cut: ❖ 5 strips, 8in x width of fabric and, following Diagram 1, from the strips cross cut 64 wedges using the 22.5-degree wedge ruler. Align the ruler with the edge of the strips and cut along the sides of the ruler (centre blocks) ❖ 7 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric and cross cut 8 strips, 21⁄2in x 121⁄2in and 8 strips, 21⁄2in x 161⁄2in (centre block edges) ❖ 9 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric and crosscut 78 strips, p 11⁄2in x 41⁄2in (floating squares)

8in

Diagram 1 ❖10 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric and crosscut 114 strips, 11⁄2in x 31⁄2in (floating squares) ❖6 strips, 23⁄4in x width of fabric (Border 2 edges) ❖8 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 3 four-patch units) ❖8 strips, 71⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 4) ❖20 Template A triangles (Border 2) From the orange spot print fabric, cut: ❖8 strips, 1in x width of fabric and crosscut 8 strips, 1in x 161⁄2in and 8 strips, 1in x 171⁄2in (centre blocks — borders) From the blue spot fabric, cut: ❖5 strips, 11⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 1) From each of the 20 assorted print and spot fabrics, cut: ❖1 strip, 1in x width of fabric. From these strips crosscut a total of 64 strips, 1in x 81⁄2in (centre blocks) From the variety of assorted print and spot fabrics, cut: ❖8 strips, 21⁄2in x width of fabric (Border 3 four-patch units) ❖39, 11⁄2in x 41⁄2in strips (floating squares) ❖16 Template A triangles (Border 2) ❖20, 1in x 61⁄2in strips (Border 2 stems) ❖4, 1in x 81⁄2in strips (Border 2 stems) ❖sufficient 2in strips to make a 350in continuous strip (binding)

114 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Prepare the applique shapes 1. Designs for the appliquéd circles and leaves are printed on the Pattern Sheet. Trace the shapes onto the paper side of fusible web and cut them out, leatving a margin around the edge. 2. Fuse the shapes to the wrong side of the print fabrics and cut them out on the line. 3. Make 88 circles for the quilt centre and Border 2, four large circles for the block centres and 20 pairs of matching leaves for Border 2.

Make the centre blocks 1. Accuracy is very important in the construction of this quilt. As each component is assembled, measure and make adjustments if necessary. 2. To make each of the four centre blocks, stitch a 1in x 81⁄2in print strip to the right edge of each of 16 white wedge shapes. Press the seam allowances towards the printt fa fabric. 3. Place the wedge ruler or template on the new wedge dge e shape and re-cut to the ruler size, trimming the extra white fabric. 4. Following Diagram 2, join the 16 wedges 121⁄2in together to form a circle. Press the seam allowances towards the print fabrics. 121⁄2in 5. Cut the circle to Diagram 2 make a 121⁄2in square. The corners of the square should be directly at the centre of a 1⁄2in print strip. 6. Following Diagram 3, in a similar manner to a Diagram 3 Courthouse Steps 1 block, join 2 ⁄2in x 121⁄2in white strips to the top and bottom edges of the block. Press the seam allowances towards the strips. Join 21⁄2in x 161⁄2in strips to the left and right edges of the block and press. 7. Remove the paper from 16 small circles and fuse them over the ends of the strips, placing them so the strips appear to be of varying lengths. Fuse one large circle over the hole at the centre of the block. Place a piece of baking paper under the block to protect the ironing surface. 8. Using thread to match the print fabrics, machine-appliqué the edges of the circles. 9. The block should now measure 161⁄2in square. If necessary, trim the edges.


10. In the same manner as for the white strips, join the four orange spot strips to the block. Press the seam allowances towards the orange strips. 11. The block should now measure 171⁄2in square.

Add the floating squares 1. Following Diagram 4, join 11⁄2in x 41⁄2in white strips to either side of each of the 39, 11⁄2in x 41⁄2in print strips. Press the seam allowances towards the print strips. 2. Cross cut each pieced unit into three 11⁄2in x 31⁄2in segments gm to yield a total of 117 segments (Unit A).

Add Border 1 1. From the five 11⁄2in strips of blue print fabric, assemble two 11⁄2in x 431⁄2in strips and two 11⁄2in x 451⁄2in strips. 2. Join the two shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt and press the seam allowances towards the strips. 3. Join the two longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and press. The quilt should now measure 451⁄2in square.

Add Border 2 1. Following Diagram 9, cut each of the 20 white Template A triangles in half and insert a 11⁄2in x 61⁄2in print strip.

11⁄2in Unit A Diagram 4 photo of border 2 3. Join one 11⁄2in x 31⁄2in white strip to 111 of the segments following Diagram 5. Press the seam allowances towards the Unit B white strips (Unit B). 4. Following Diagram 6, make six pieced strips each with eight Unit B and one Unit A joined Diagram 5 to the end. 5. Following Diagram 7, make three pieced strips each with 21 Unit B and one 31⁄2in white strip joined to the end. 6. Following Diagram 8, join the four centre blocks with the he pieced strips. The quilt should now measure 431⁄2in square. sq quarree..

Diagram 6

Diagram 7

Diagram 8

Press the seam allowances towards the print strips. 2. Trim the triangles to the template size. 2 3. Using the template as a guide to placement, fuse two 3 wo o

trim cut

Diagram 9 Diagram 1

leaves to each white trim triangle and appliqué them in place. Diagram 10 4. Following Diagram 10, make four strips each with four print triangles and three white triangles. Press the seam allowances towards the print triangles. 5. Join 23⁄4in white strips to 5 one side of the pieced strips. Trim the ends even with the edges of Diagram 11 the triangles. 6. Fuse circles over the ends of the stems and appliqué. 7. Following Diagram 11, join the pieced and appliquéd borders to the four edges of the quilt. 8. Following Diagram 12, join the remaining eight white triangles in pairs, inserting a 1in x 81⁄2in print strip between them. Press the seam allowances towards the strips and trim the excess fabric. Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 115


9. Join 23⁄4in white strips to the outer edges of the triangles. Allow approximately 21⁄2in extra length on the trim strips. 10. When two strips have been joined trim to each triangle, trim the excess even with the long edge of the pieced triangle. Diagram 12 11. Fuse circles over the ends of the stems and appliqué. 12. Following Diagram 13, join the triangles to the four corners of the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards the print fabric triangles. 13. The quilt should now measure 601⁄2in square.

5. Taking care with the placement of the units so they form a chequerboard pattern around the quilt, join the two shorter strips to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards Border 2. 6. Join the two longer strips to the top and bottom edges of the quilt and press. 7. The quilt should now measure 681⁄2in square.

Diagram 15

Add Border 4 1. Join the eight 71⁄2in white strips in pairs to make four strips for Border 4. 2. Trim two of the strips to 681⁄2in. Join them to the left and right edges of the quilt. Press the seam allowances towards the strips. 3. Trim the other two strips to 821⁄2in. Join them to the top and 3 bottom edges of the quilt and press.

Finish the quilt

Diagram 13

Add Border 3 1. A total of 64 four-patch units is required for Border 3. Following Diagram 14, join each of the eight 21⁄2in print nt strips to a corresponding white strip. Press the seam am

21⁄2in

Diagram 14 allowances towards the print fabric. 2. Cross cut each pieced strip to yield 16 segments, 21⁄2in, a total of 128 segments. 3. Join the segments in matching pairs, butting the seam allowances at the intersection to make 64 four-patch units. 4. Following Diagram 15, join the units to make two pieced strips each with 15 four-patch units and two pieced strips each with 17 units. 116 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

1. Cut the length of backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and cut one strip in half along the length. Join the strips to either side of the full-width piece and press the seam allowances open. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Wendy machine-quilted her quilt. She used outline stitching around the straight lines and appliqué shapes and quilted the white background areas with a stipple design. 4. Following the instructions for Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the 2in strips of print fabric to bind the edge of the quilt.


Atomic Bloom By Wendy Williams Finished size: 208cm x 208cm (82in x 82in)

Creative ive Stash and Scrap Quilts | 1117


Project Nineteen

118 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


It` s a Hoot By Tracey Petersen

Owls are always so popular, and with designs this cute, it is not hard to see why. The centre of this quilt is simple piecing and the insertion of the corner blocks looks trickier than it really is. Those super cute owls are completed using raw edge appliqué techniques. Finished size: 169cm x 169cm (661⁄2in x 661⁄2in)

Materials One jelly roll or 42 assorted 21⁄2in strips One layer cake or at least 14, 101⁄2in squares Assorted scraps of fabric to tone with the jelly roll and layer cake fabrics (owl appliqué) 1.2m (13⁄8yd) white fabric 40cm (1⁄2yd) turquoise tone-on-tone print fabric (binding) 3.7m (4yd) backing fabric Batting at least 180cm (72in) square Double-sided fusible web Black permanent-marking pen Rotary cutter, ruler and mat General sewing supplies

www.quilterscompanion.wordpress.com

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 119


Cut the fabric

Add the borders

From the jelly roll, choose: ❖ 4 strips. Trim them to 21⁄2in x 301⁄2in (F) (Border 1). ❖ 6 strips. Cross cut them to yield 16 strips, 12in (G) (owl block borders) From the remaining strips in the jelly roll, choose: ❖ 12 dark strips ❖ 12 light strips Group these strips into sets of three. You will need four sets that have two dark strips and one light strip; and four sets that have two light strips and one dark strip From the layer cake, choose: ❖ 4 squares (owl block backgrounds) ❖ 10 squares. Cross cut them to yield 20 rectangles, 5in x 61⁄2in (H) (Border 3) From the white fabric, cut: ❖ 4 strips, 6in x width of fabric. Trim each strip to 6in x 301⁄2in (C) (Border 2) ❖ 4 strips, 5in x width of fabric. Cross cut each strip to yield one strip, 5in x 14in (D) and one strip, 5in x 181⁄2in (E) (Border 3) From the turquoise tone-on-tone print fabric, cut: ❖ 7 strips, 2in x width of fabric (binding)

1. Sew each F jelly-strip rectangle to a C white it rectangle along their long edges.

Make the blocks 1. Sew the three jelly roll strips of dark and light fabrics that you’ve chosen for each of your ‘sets’ together along their long edges. You will have four A strip sets and four B strip sets. Cross cut each strip set into six squares, 61⁄2in. See the diagram.

61⁄2

61⁄2

Diagram 1

2. Sew an F+C panel to the top and bottom edges of the quilt centre. 3. Lay out four G strips around one of the layer-cake squares chosen for the owl block backgrounds. To join the block borders to the background squares, start by stitching a G strip to the top edge of the background square: referring to Diagram 2, start at the left edge and sew for about 7in towards the right. Stop sewing and work back stitch to secure the seam when you are about two-thirds of the way along the top of the background square. Pr Press res ess the G strip away from the background square.

G

A strip set – make 4

61⁄2

61⁄2

B strip set – make 4 Diagram 2 2. Choose 45 of the pieced squares from Step 1. You will have three left over; they are not used in this project. 3. Lay out 35 of the pieced squares in seven rows of five squares each. Rotate every second square by 90 degrees so that you have alternating vertical and horizontal seams. See Diagram 1. 4. Mix and match the squares until you have an array of colours and prints that you like. Sew the squares in each row together. 5. Sew the rows together, carefully matching seams. 120 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

4. Sew the second G strip to the left edge of the background square in the usual manner. Sew the third G strip to the bottom edge of the background square and the fourth G strip to the right edge of the background square. Then go back and complete the stitching to join the first G strip to the top edge. See Diagram 3.


G

G

G

G Diagram 3

5. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for the remaining background squares and G strips. 6. Lay out the remaining 10–pieced squares in two rows of five down the left and right edges of the quilt centre. Alternate the squares horizontally and vertically as before so that they continue the pattern in the quilt centre. Sew the squares in each row together. 7. Sew an F+C panel to one edge of each of these rows of squares. Sew a bordered square from steps 3–5 to each end of these panels. Then sew these panels to the left and right edges of your quilt, referring to Diagram 4. 8. Lay out the 20 H rectangles in four rows of five rectangles each – short edges matching. Mix and match the rectangles until you have an array of colours and prints that you like. Sew the rectangles in each row together. 9. Join a white D rectangle to each end of two of these rows. Sew them to the top and bottom edges of the quilt. 10.Join a white E rectangle to each end of the remaining two rows. Sew them to the left and right edges of the quilt.

Complete the applique

`

1. Trace the appliqué shapes from the Pattern Sheet onto the paper side of the fusible web, leaving about 1⁄2in between them. You will need to trace shapes for four large owls and 12 small owls. Cut out the shapes about 1⁄4in outside the lines. There’s no need for precision at this stage.

2. Fuse the shapes to the wrong side of your assorted scraps of fabric. Tracey chose to make one large owl and three small owls in matching fabric selections. Cut out all the shapes on the traced lines. 3. Remove the backing paper and arrange the shapes for each large owl in the corner squares and the shapes for three small owls in the white C strips alongside them. Overlap the shapes as required, referring to the Pattern Sheet and the photograph for guidance. Fuse the shapes in place. 4. Appliqué the shapes in place. Tracey worked her appliqué by machine: she free-motion stitched three times around the raw edges of each shape using ng g tthreads to match the appliqué fabrics. You could use blanket, satin or zig zag stitch as an alternative, or blanket stitch by hand if you prefer.

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 121


C F

C

F

F

C

F C

Diagram 4

Finish the quilt

1. Cut the backing fabric in half, remove the selvedges and join the two lengths together down one long edge. Press. 2. Following the instructions for Preparing the Quilt Sandwich in Basics on page 129, pin or baste the quilt top, batting and backing together. 3. Quilt as desired. Tracey quilted It’s a Hoot on her long-arm machine with white thread. She outlined the appliqué shapes and worked a number of different designs elsewhere. 122 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

4. Following Binding the Quilt in Basics on page 129, use the e seven 2in strips of turquoise tone-on-tone fabric to bind the he edges of the quilt. 5. Use a black permanent-marking pen to add the pupils in each of the owls’ eyes.


It's a Hoot By Tracey Petersen Finished size: 169cm x 169cm (661⁄2in x 661⁄2in)

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 123


Basics Grain line

Rotary cutting

Lengthwise and crosswise threads are used to make woven fabric. The fabric is finished on either side with a selvedge. The lengthwise grain of the fabric runs parallel to the selvedges and has the most stable grain, the least amount of stretch. The crosswise grain runs at right angles to the selvedges and has a little more stretch than the lengthwise grain. These grains are both straight grains. The bias grain is across the diagonal of a woven fabric and is at a 45 degree angle to the selvedges. The bias grain has the greatest amount of stretch and is used to cut stems and vines for appliqué and to make the binding for some quilts, particularly if the quilt has curved corners or a scalloped edge. The arrow on templates in Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts indicates the straight grain of the fabric.

To cut strips across the width of the fabric, fold the fabric wrong sides together so the selvedges are aligned. The fabric is now approximately 21in (53cm) wide. Place the fabric on the cutting mat with the fold closest to you and ensure that the fabric is smooth and flat. If you are right handed, start working from the raw edge on the right side. If you are left handed, start working from the left side. Create a straight edge by aligning one of the horizontal lines on your ruler exactly with the fold in the fabric and trim the raw edge. Turn the fabric and ruler 180 degrees. To cut strips, position the ruler on the fabric, measuring in the width of the required strip from the cut edge. For example, to cut a 2in (5cm) strip, align the raw edge of the fabric with the 2in (5cm) markings across the Rotary cutting strips ruler, aligning one of the horizontal lines on the ruler exactly with the fold in the fabric. Cutting away from you, cut across the fabric through both layers. If necessary, stop to reposition your hand on the ruler to ensure that it doesn’t slip as you cut. To cut a second strip, reposition the ruler and cut again. The term “cross cut” is frequently used in cutting instructions. After a strip is cut it’s simple to use your rotary cutter to make shapes that are commonly used such as squares, rectangles and triangles. To cut 2in squares for example, unfold the 2in strip and align a horizontal line on the ruler with the top edge and close to the selvedge. Remove the selvedge with a vertical cut. Turn the strip around 180 degrees, align the raw edge of the strip with the 2in vertical line on the ruler and cut. Continue cutting along the strip 7

7

6

6

5

5

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

1

2

Selvedge

Lengthwise grain

as

Bi

Selvedge

6

Cutting the fabric Whether you are using templates to mark and cut pieces for piecing or appliqué or cutting the pieces using a ruler and rotary cutter, long borders, sashing strips and bindings are usually cut first so the fabric is cut economically. Unless it is specifically mentioned, all measurements in Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts projects are provided with a seam allowance of !/4in (6mm) included.

124 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

5

3

6

2

7

7

6

5

5

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

2

5

3

4

4

5

3

2

8

9

10

1

6

6

Grainline

4

4

7

1

Crosswise grain

3

5

6

1

7

8

9

10


every 2in until you have the required number of squares. Once you understand the process, you may prefer to cut the squares while the strip of fabric is still folded. You will be cutting through two layers of fabric and creating two squares with each cut.

Cross cutting squares and rectangles Cut rectangles in the same manner except that the length of the shape will be different from the width of the strip. Cut across the diagonal of a square once to yield two halfsquare triangles. These triangles have the straight grain on the two short sides and the bias grain on the long side and they are frequently used at the corners of blocks and borders.

Cutting half-square and quarter-square triangles Cut across the diagonal of the square twice to yield four quarter-square triangles. These triangles have the straight grain on the long side and the bias grain on the two short sides and they are frequently used along the sides of blocks and borders.

plastic with a fine-point permanent pen and cut out the shape. Templates can be made from cardboard; however, there is an additional step required to transfer the design, as it cannot be traced. Templates in Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts have two lines. The solid line is the sewing line and the broken line includes the seam allowance. To prepare accurate pieces, cut out templates on the inside edge of the traced line, identify the templates and mark the grain line. Check the accuracy of your templates by making a trial block. To prepare templates for hand-piecing, most quiltmakers prefer to trace the sewing line and cut out the template. They trace around the template on the wrong side of the fabric and cut it out adding the seam allowance. Alternatively, particularly for fussy cutting, two sets of templates can be prepared, one to be used for tracing and cutting the pieces and the other for marking the seam allowance. Beautiful effects can be achieved by fussy cutting pieces, for example to make hexagon “flowers”. To fussy cut, trace the sewing line onto the plastic template that includes the seam allowance and use it as a guide to the area of fabric that will be visible in the quilt. Place the template over a particular design feature of the fabric, for example a flower, trace around the template and cut out the fabric piece. Trace and cut the required number of identical pieces from the pattern repeats on the fabric. Turn the pieces over to the wrong side and use the smaller template to mark the sewing line. To prepare templates for machine-piecing, trace the broken line of the templates on the Pattern Sheet so the seam allowance is included in the templates. To prepare templates for appliqué, it is usual to trace the design without a seam allowance and add it as the shapes are cut from the fabrics. Follow the instructions for the particular appliqué technique used in the project.

Making templates Some quiltmakers prefer to use templates for making their quilts and some quilts or parts of quilts are more easily made with templates. For example, it’s easier to trace around a small hexagon-shaped template and cut it out with scissors than attempt this with a rotary cutter and ruler. A template is a durable pattern piece used to trace the shape onto the fabric. Make templates by tracing a shape from the Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts Pattern Sheet onto template

Making templates

Fussy cutting — hexagon flower

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 125


Using templates Use a mechanical pencil or a well-sharpened pencil to mark the fabric with the template shape. There is a selection of special marking pencils available in quilt shops. If you use one of these, follow the manufacturer’s directions. Place the template right side down on the wrong side of the fabric, aligning the grain line on the template with the grain of the fabric. Keep in mind that the edge of any piece on the outside of a block or quilt should be cut on the straight grain to minimise stretch. Position the outlines at least !/2in apart so the seam allowance can be added when the pieces are cut. A piece of fine sandpaper or a sandpaper-covered board is useful for preventing the fabric slipping as templates are traced.

Hand piecing

Machine piecing

Using templates — tracing pieces with templates

Hand piecing Pin shapes with right sides together. Place pins at each corner and along the sewing lines. Begin with a small knot and stitch along the line with a small running stitch. To make the seam stronger, take a backstitch every time the thread is pulled through. Finish a seam with a two backstitches. Do not sew across seam allowances, stitch from seam line to seam line. When you are joining pieced units, do not stitch the seam allowances down, stitch up to the seam, stitch a small backstitch against the seam, pass the needle through the seam, stitch a backstitch on the other side of the seam and continue stitching. Do not iron hand piecing until a block is finished. Simply finger press the pieces as they are stitched. When a block is completed, place it on a towel on the ironing board right side up and press from the top with a dry iron. Where lightcoloured pieces are joined to dark-coloured pieces, press the seam allowance as much as possible towards the darker fabric. Apart from this, to prevent bulk, allow the seams to go as they want rather than forcing them in a particular direction.

Align the edges of the fabric pieces with the right edge of the foot of the machine. Check the distance to the needle is the required seam allowance. If not, adjust the position of the needle or place a piece of masking tape on the throat place of the machine the correct distance from the needle and use it as a guide. Chain piece units where possible. When chain piecing, there is no need to begin each seam with a backstitch as each seam will be sewn across during the assembly process. A minimum of pinning is required since each piece has an identical seam allowance. Avoid bulky seams when joining pieces by alternating the direction of the seam allowances at joins. Press carefully and gently with a dry iron to avoid pleating in the seams and distorting the pieces.

Chain piecing

126 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts


towards the darker fabric. To speed up the process when making a number of these units for a block or for a whole quilt, the units can be chain pieced.

`

Needleturn applique

The most common hand appliqué technique is needleturn appliqué. Lightly trace the appliqué design onto the background fabric and pin the appliqué shapes in place. With the tip and side of the needle, roll the edge under to the outline marking and blind stitch in place. Any excess seam allowance should be trimmed as the appliqué is stitched and concave curves should be clipped.

`

Fusible web applique Butting pieces together Two of the most common machine-pieced units in quiltmaking are the four-patch unit and the half-square triangle unit.

Four-- patch units To make four-patch units, join light and dark strips in pairs and press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric. From the pieced strips cross cut segments, aligning the ruler with the centre seam and not the raw edges so the cut edges will be perpendicular to the seam line. Arrange the segments in pairs, placing the matching squares diagonally opposite. Join butting the seam allowances together at the intersection.

A popular and simple appliqué technique is fusible-web appliqué. The finished appliqué will be a mirror image of the way it appears on the pattern unless the design has been reversed in preparation for this technique. If a design has not been reversed, trace it from the back of the design using a light box or a well-lit window. Trace the appliqué shapes onto the paper side of fusible web leaving at least !/2in (12mm) between them. Cut out the shapes, leaving a margin around the edge. Press the shapes to the wrong side of the chosen fabrics to fuse them and cut out each shape accurately on the line. Remove the paper, position the shapes on the background fabric and press to fuse. Hand or machine stitch around the raw edge of each shape with matching thread. For hand stitching, buttonhole or blanket stitches are normally used to finish the edges of the shapes. These stitches can also be used for machine stitching the edges. Some quiltmakers prefer to use satin stitch, zigzag stitch or two or three rows of straight stitch.

Bias strips

Four-patch units

Half-square triangle units

For flower stems and curved appliqué shapes, such as meandering vines and for binding curved edges, cut strips on the bias of the fabric; that is, diagonally across the straight grain of the fabric. Prepare a square or rectangle of fabric, remove the selvedges and ensure the edges are straight. Place the ruler at a 45-degree angle to the edge and make a cut. Place the ruler along the cut edge of the fabric to the width of the required strip and cut. Continue cutting strips across the fabric, cutting sufficient strips to make the length required. Stitch the strips together end to end with the seams at 45 degrees to the edge of the strips.

6

7

8

9

10

1

5

45

4

11 1

1

2

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

°

2

3

4

5

6

7

To make half-square triangle units, using a pencil, rule a diagonal line across the wrong side of the lighter of two squares. Following the diagram, place the square right sides together with a corresponding medium or dark square and sew !/4in on either side of the ruled line. Cut on the ruled line to yield two half-square triangle units. Press the seam allowance

Half-square triangle units

Cutting bias strips

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 127


Joining bias strips

Adding borders with straight corners To add borders with straight corners to your quilt, place your quilt on a at surface and measure the length through the centre. Cut two strips of the required width to this length. Pin mark the strips and the left and right edges of the quilt in quarters and join the strips to the quilt matching the pins. Press the seam allowances towards the strips. Measure the width of the quilt, including the added borders, through the centre. Cut two strips of the required width to this length. Pin mark the strips and the top and bottom edges of the quilt in quarters and join the strips to the quilt matching the pins. Press the seam allowances towards the strips.

Adding borders with mitred corners quilt and each border strip. Attach the border to the quilt, beginning and ending the stitching !/4in (6mm) from the quilt edges. There will be excess fabric at each end for the mitre. Place the quilt right side up on the ironing board with the borders pressed out. Fold the border strips under to create 45-degree angles. Check the angles with a ruler. Press lightly. Match the fold lines at each corner, also matching any print in the fabric. Pin and stitch from each corner out to the edge. Trim the excess fabric, leaving !/4in (6mm) seam allowances and press the seam allowances open

Finishing the quilt Marking the quilting design

Adding borders with straight corners

Adding borders with mitred corners To add borders with mitred corners to your quilt, cut strips of the required width, the length of the sides of the quilt plus twice the width of the border plus at least an extra 4in (10cm). To add each border, mark the midpoint of each side of the

128 | Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts

Quilting is simply a running stitch worked by hand or machine that holds the three layers together. Quilting enhances a quilt, adding texture and dimension. Try to stitch an even amount of quilting across the surface of your quilt. Before your quilt top is basted or pinned together with the batting and backing fabric, any quilting designs you want to use should be marked on it. Press the completed quilt top well. To mark a quilting design from the Pattern Sheet, place the design on a light box, if you have one, and place the quilt over it. Transfer the design with your preferred marker: a pencil or chalk pencil or marker. Use a white or silver pencil or marker on dark fabrics. It is wise to test any pencil or marker on a


scrap of fabric before using it on your quilt. Check that the markings can be removed. If you don’t have a light box, a light placed under a glass-topped table works well. To mark around quilting stencil designs, place your quilt on a firm surface and trace around the stencil.

Preparing the quilt layers The batting and backing fabric should be at least 3in larger than the quilt top on all sides. Press any seam allowances in the backing open and secure the smoothed out backing fabric, right side down, on the floor or any other large surface with pins or masking tape placed every 4in (10cm). Place the batting over the backing fabric and centre the quilt top, right side up, over the batting. Pin or thread baste the three layers together beginning at the centre and working outwards. Baste around the edge of the quilt.

Adding a sleeve To display a quilt on a wall or at an exhibition, a sleeve along the top edge of the back is needed. Cut a strip of fabric, ideally using excess backing fabric, 6in to 8in (15cm to 20cm) wide by the width of the quilt. Fold the ends under twice, press and stitch. Fold the strip in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. After the quilting is completed, and the batting and backing fabric have been trimmed, align the raw edges of the sleeve with the top of the quilt back and baste in place. The sleeve will be incorporated in the seam joining the binding. Move the lower edge of the sleeve a little towards the top of the quilt, so a rod will fit into the sleeve without distorting it, and blind stitch the lower edge of the sleeve to the quilt backing. Take care that the stitching does not penetrate the front of the quilt.

along one side at the front of the quilt, leave a tail of binding approximately 6in (15cm) long, and align the raw edges of the binding and the quilt top. Stitch through all layers, stopping !/4in (6mm) from the corner. Backstitch and cut the threads. Remove the quilt from under the sewing machine foot. Fold the binding upwards and away from the quilt, creating a diagonal fold. Hold the fold in place and bring the binding in line with the next edge of the quilt. Begin sewing again !/4in from the quilt edge. Continue in this manner around the edge of the quilt. On the final side of the quilt, leave an unstitched gap of 8in to 10in so it is easy to work with the tails of binding. Backstitch to secure the stitching. Place one tail down flat and with a chalk marker make a line at the end equal to the total width of your binding. Lay the second tail flat and very slightly stretched so it overlaps the first tail. The chalk line on the first tail will dust off onto the second tail. Trim the second tail at the chalk line. Open out the ends of the tails and pin them, right sides together, at right angles. Mark a stitching line at a 45-degree angle across the corner of the binding and stitch along the marked line. Trim the seam allowance and press the seam open to distribute the bulk. Pin the binding flat along the edge of the quilt and stitch to complete the seam attaching the binding. Turn the folded edge of the binding to the back of the quilt and blind stitch in place. At each corner check the mitres are neat and fasten with a few invisible stitches.

Adding a sleeve

Binding the quilt When the quilting is completed, check that the quilt is square. Trim the batting and backing fabric, leaving sufficient batting around the edge of the quilt top to fill the binding after it is folded around the edge of the quilt. Some quiltmakers like to stitch a row of basting around the edge of the quilt at this point to keep the edges straight and secure before attaching the binding. In Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts, the quilt binding is usually French-fold or doubled unless otherwise stated. Join the strips cut for the binding, usually 2!/2in (6.5cm) wide, into one continuous length with diagonal seams. Trim the seam allowances to !/4in (6mm) and press them open. Fold the binding in half, wrong sides together, and press. Roll the prepared binding around a piece of cardboard. Beginning

Binding the quilt

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 129


CREATIVE STASH AND

SCRAP

QUILTS Editor Michelle Marvig Technical Editors Robyn Brookman, Megan Fisher Pattern Artist Sue Cadzow of Red Pepper Graphics Photography Mark Heriot, Andrew Payne, Mel Koutchavlis Stylist Abbie Mitchell, Sandy de Beyer Designer Doreen Milo Advertising Rob Jordan (02) 9887 0359, 0411 424 196, Fax (02) 9805 0714 Email: rjordan@universalmagazines.com.au Advertising Production Kate Martin Marketing Coordinator Hannah Klomp Associate Publisher Karen Day For subscriptions and mail order, phone 1300 303 414 Circulation enquiries to our Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399.

Chariman/CEO Publisher Chief Financial Officer Associate Publisher Associate Publisher Circulation Director Creative Director Print Production Manager Editorial Production Manager Prepress Manager Marketing & Acquisitions Manager

Prema Perera Janice Williams Vicky Mahadeva Emma Perera Karen Day Mark Darton Kate Podger Lilian Ohanessian Anastasia Casey Ivan Fitz-Gerald Chelsea Peters

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6-8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Unit 4, Level 1, 150 Albert Road, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. Printed by: Distributed by: NZ Distributors:

UK Distributors:

USA Distributors:

Singapore:

Toppan Printing, China. Network Services, (02) 9282 8777. Needlecraft: (06) 356 4793, fax: (04) 355 4594, website: www.needlecraft.co.nz Netlink: (09) 366 9966 The Cotton Patch: +44 (0) 121 702 2840, mailorder@cottonpatch.co.uk Manor House Magazines: +44 (0) 167 251 4288, info@manorhousemagazines.co.uk Brewer Quilting & Sewing Supplies — ph: toll free 1 800 676 6543, fax: 1 800 216 2374, website: www.brewersewing.com Car Kit Pte Ltd: Ph: +65 6 282 1960, fax: + 65 6 382 3021, website: www.magazines1source.com

Subscriptions can be purchased from: Needlecraft, NZ, The Cotton Patch, UK, Manor House Magazines, UK, Brewer Sewing, USA, Car Kit Pte Ltd, Sng. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure that the projects featured in this issue of Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts are the original work/s of the respective artist/s, no responsibility is taken by the publisher in the event that originality is disputed, and all proof of original design or otherwise lies with the artisans. Inspiration from other sources and the reworking of traditional patterns and designs in new and unique ways is, however, regarded as constituting ‘originality’ as acknowledged by the artisan/s and the publisher. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but the shifting sands of time may change them in some cases. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements which appear in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must therefore be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. * Recommended retail price ISBN 978-0-9924500-0-7 Copyright © Universal Magazines MMXV ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au Please pass on or recycle this magazine. We are a member of

Contributors`List for Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts Linda Bear Blog: pinmoneyquilts.blogspt.com.au Kaye Brown The Finishing Touch 180 Moores Way Glenmore, NSW 2570, Australia Phone; (02) 46545328 Brigitte Giblin brigittegiblinquilts.com Chris Jurd Email: chris.jurd@bigpond.com Ph (02) 4739 8396 Blog: chrisquilts.blogspot.com.au online shop: www.PatchworkFun.etsy.com Carolyn Konig 85 Brewer Drive, Wodonga Vic 3690. Ph: (02) 6059 1702, Email: Carolyn@carolynkonigdesigns.com, website: www.carolynkonigdesigns.com Deborah Louie Email: deborahlouie@optusnet.com.au Website: http://www.deborahlouie.com.au/ Blog: http://deblouie.blogspot.com.au/ Ph: (02) 9528 7443 Mobile : 0414 406 009 Jane Morgan Jem31@bigpond.net.au Ph: (02) 9816 5379 Judy Newman averyfinehouse09.blogspot.com.au Tracey Petersen Peppermint Patch Quilts 4 Boomarra Court, Annandale, Townsville, QLD, 4814 Ph: (07) 4725 5212, fax: (07) 4655 0166 Email: peppermint_1987@yahoo.com.au Wendy Whellum Email: legendandlace@gmail.com Legends and Lace Designs PO Box 127, Daw Park, SA, 5041 Ph: 0417 084 245 legendandlace.blogspot.com Wendy Williams Flying Fish PO Box 638 Drummoyne NSW 2047 Mobile: 0416 253 703 flying.fish@optusnet.com.au

Creative Stash and Scrap Quilts | 130


The difference is in the details! Discover the PFAFF® quilt ambition™ 2.0 sewing machine and feel the difference. With specially selected quilt stitches and two additional presser feet the PFAFF® quilt ambition™ 2.0 sewing machine allows you to find your inner quilting star!

Amazing features compared to leading brands in this price range: • The PFAFF® Original IDT™ System • 200mm sewing space • The largest high resolution touch screen • Bobbin thread sensor • 201 built-in stitches • 4 alphabets

Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-576-PF


Cut your ironing time by half! Mountains of shirts, t-shirts, trousers or sheets,

heavy-duty textiles or finest fabrics, tricky ruffles or delicate collars, perfectly smooth or a quick touch-up - with your

PFAFF® Steam Ironer everything goes faster and easier than ever… and without the effort.

The New Steam Ironer from PFAFF® Isn't it about time you spent more time on yourself!

Find your nearest dealer at www.pfaff.com/au or phone (02) 4337 3737 BLES-577-PF

Scandinqilts  
Scandinqilts  
Advertisement