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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

JACKSON, MS HEDERMAN DIRECT

A PUBLICATION FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

A NEW VISION for St. Andrew’s

ARCHWAYS 26 | SPRING 2019


THOUGHTS FROM TOM

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hen I arrived at St. Andrew’s in July 2018, I knew I was joining a remarkable community with a long and distinguished past as well as a promising future. Since then, countless experiences have reinforced for me that St. Andrew’s is capable of accomplishing that which may not be possible in all schools. As we fulfill our mission in the years ahead, our recently approved vision statement will serve as a beacon for an endless array of institutional decisions, large and small. In 2021 St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is a beacon of educational innovation, inclusivity, and wellness, empowering generations of Saints to impact the world. The schoolwide process we undertook this year to create this vision for the future would not have been possible without the support and involvement of the entire Saints community. During our visioning sessions throughout the fall and winter and our Visioning Day in January, students, faculty, administrators, parents, board members, and alumni shared their St. Andrew’s stories, as well as their hopes and dreams for how the school might grow in the years ahead. Often the voices were passionate and uplifting, occasionally accompanied by tears, and always essential elements of my own learning process. While the visioning process seemed to me at times all-consuming, the truth is that only now does the most challenging work begin. Over the course of the spring, we will begin the process of implementing our vision, pushing St. Andrew’s forward, finding or making a way as we have always done.

Tom Sheppard, Head of School

Pictured with Tom Sheppard are Will Atkins and Callie Keen, both Class of 2019, and Madison Jones, Class of 2020.


GAZING THROUGH ARCHWAYS

An arch is a support structure spanning an opening, an element

that lends both beauty and strength. An archway is a passage beneath

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THE INSTALLATION OF TOM SHEPPARD

a series of arches – a path defined and supported by the strength and unity of the arch. This issue of Archways focuses on St. Andrew’s Vision for the Future, an ambitious statement detailing where St. Andrew’s will be in 2021, and the steps the school community will take to achieve that vision. The vision statement was written through the

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A NEW VISION FOR ST. ANDREW’S

combined efforts of students, faculty, parents, alumni, and friends, who together envision a St. Andrew’s that continues its legacy as an educational leader.

This issue also commemorates the passage marked by the

convocation and installation of St. Andrew’s new head of school, Tom Sheppard, and his family’s move to Mississippi.

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SPOTLIGHT ON MIDDLE SCHOOL ARTS

With a history of setting and reaching ambitious goals and

an intentional focus on the future, there is no doubt that for St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, the best passages are still to come.

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UP FOR DEBATE

ON THE COVER Head of School Tom Sheppard and Charlie Sewell, Class of 2019, see a bright future ahead for St. Andrew’s.

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ALUMNI UPDATES


contents 4

GRADUATION 2018

FROM NEW JERSEY TO MISSISSIPPI

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AFTER THE BELL RINGS

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PLAYING BY THE RULES MEET IN THE MIDDLE

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FINDING THE RIGHT COLLEGE TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL MAY DAY

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Archways Staff

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and Contributors Editor Emily Gordon ’94

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THANK YOU FOR A JOB WELL DONE SPORTS ROUNDUP BATTER UP!

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MOST VALUABLE PLAYERS

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ALUMNI AWARDS EYE ON ALUMNI

“THE GOOD SHEPHERD” BY SCULPTOR O.C. MCDAVID CONTINUES TO WATCH OVER THE NORTH CAMPUS.

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THE TIES THAT BIND

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LOOKING BACK/ LOOKING FORWARD

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Contributing Editors Elizabeth Buyan ’97 Stephanie Garriga Marlo Kirkpatrick Lauren McMillin ’10 Patrick Taylor ’93 Designer Alecia Porch Photographers Conrad Ebner Robby Followell Patrick Taylor ’93 If you have a story idea or comment for Archways, please contact Emily Gordon, editor, at gordone@gosaints.org. © 2019 St. Andrew’s Episcopal School All rights reserved to copyright notice.

WWW.GOSAINTS.ORG

SAPA PRESENTS

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IT’S A GREAT TIME TO BE A

Saint

St. Andrew’s

was named the Best Private K-12 School in Mississippi and the Best College Prep Private High School in Mississippi by Niche, an independent organization that ranks every K-12 school in the United States. The readers of the Clarion Ledger agreed, voting St. Andrew’s Episcopal School the Best Private School in Mississippi. Pictured are David Caddle, Class of 2019, Ryan Ward, Class of 2031, and Amelia McCaughan, Class of 2025. 3


GRADUATION 2018 MAY 25, 2018, WAS A DAY OF CELEBRATION AS THE 97 MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 2018 MARKED THEIR COMMENCEMENT FROM ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL.

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“ONE THING THAT I AM SURE ALMOST ALL OF US HAVE THOUGHT ABOUT IN THE PAST FEW MONTHS AS WE PREPARE TO LEAVE THIS SCHOOL, LEAVE HOME, AND FOR MANY OF US, LEAVE MISSISSIPPI, IS HOW TO BALANCE LOOKING FORWARD AND LOOKING BACK…The often-repeated sentiment that we can only fully appreciate something in its absence rings true…We will all bring with us our memories of this place, but this school will never again be quite like the one that exists in our memories. No matter how much nostalgia we have, we will never get our nostos, our homecoming, to this place exactly as we knew it. I don’t say this to be sad or discouraging; rather, I hope that we will remember and appreciate the unique and un-recreatable set of people and places and events that converged to form our time here...We have learned so much here, progressed so much with this group of people, and been transformed by this environment. With this in mind, the only way for us to go is forward.” — Excerpted from a speech by Charley Hutchison, recipient of the Trustees’ Medal for Academic Achievement

“I BECAME THE PERSON I AM TODAY BECAUSE MY CLASSMATES WERE CONFIDENT ENOUGH TO ACCEPT THEMSELVES WITHOUT HESITATION. IF IT WERE NOT FOR ST. ANDREW’S AND ALL OF MY CLASSMATES, WHO I AM NOW PROUD TO CALL MY FRIENDS, I WOULD HAVE NEVER LEARNED THAT A PERSON COULD BE SO MUCH MORE THAN WHAT THEY LOOKED LIKE ON THE OUTSIDE …Every day for the past few years, I have been inspired by the people with whom I am about to get my diploma and throw my graduation cap. Each of my classmates has taught me to accept differences, to learn from others’ passions, and to become the best possible version of myself...My advice to incoming freshmen would be to stop and smell the roses. While the phrase is cliché, I couldn’t think of anything more valuable to say than learn to prioritize relationships, because understanding the people around you is the best way to expand your education.” — Excerpted from a speech by Parker Grogan, recipient of the Adele Franks Medal

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AND THE AWARD GOES TO… THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS OF ST. ANDREW’S STUDENTS WERE RECOGNIZED ON HONORS DAY 2018. AMONG ALL THE ACCOMPLISHED STUDENTS THREE STAND OUT, MERITING SPECIAL RECOGNITION AS THE RECIPIENTS OF THE SCHOOL’S HIGHEST AWARDS.

THE TRUSTEES’ MEDAL FOR ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT CHARLEY HUTCHISON Presented to the senior who has maintained the highest GPA over four years, as well as a mature, responsible attitude toward learning CHARLEY HUTCHISON IS A FRESHMAN AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY studying math and physics. He received a substantial scholarship as a finalist in the Regeneron Science Talent Search, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science competition for high school seniors. One of Hutchison’s favorite activities at Harvard is working at WHRB, the university’s student-run radio station. “St. Andrew’s provided an excellent preparation for Harvard, including instilling the habits and skills needed to tackle the heavy workload. My St. Andrew’s experience allowed me to move into upper level courses at Harvard in my freshman year. What I miss the most is the small, tight-knit community of St. Andrew’s. I enjoyed knowing all of my classmates well and feeling like the whole community cared about me.”

THE ADELE FRANKS MEDAL PARKER GROGAN Presented to the senior who, in the view of the faculty, has demonstrated the same qualities of leadership, initiative, and creative thinking exemplified in the lifelong achievements of St. Andrew’s founding headmistress, Mrs. Adele Franks PARKER GROGAN IS A FRESHMAN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA majoring in advertising. She received the Presidential Scholarship, a full tuition, five-year scholarship, and is a University Fellow. Grogan is a columnist for the Crimson White, a member of Capstone Men and Women, and a member of Freshman Forum. “St. Andrew’s emphasis on learning from the community around you is the best thing I could’ve understood coming to college. St. Andrew’s prepared me for my college experience, but more than that, it prepared me to be a person of service and a lover of learning, two traits that have defined my college experience.”

SAINTS’ MEDAL FOR UNSELFISH SERVICE EMILY KRUSE Presented to the student who views his or her work in terms of where that service will do the most good for the most people within St. Andrew’s and not in terms of personal gain or recognition EMILY KRUSE IS A JEFFERSON SCHOLAR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. Awarded to students who demonstrate extraordinary leadership potential, the Jefferson Scholarship covers the cost of attendance and enrichment experiences, including study abroad, for four years. She volunteers with multiple service organizations and is a member of the Virginia riding team. “St. Andrew’s prepared me to be a self-advocate and to develop relationships with my professors. As a student at a large university, making vital connections with my professors has been important to my success here. The thing I miss the most about St. Andrew’s is my teachers. I was able to develop close teacher relationships where there was a lot of trust and respect. St. Andrew’s teachers are one of a kind.” 7


THE INSTALLATION OF TOM SHEPPARD, ST. ANDREW’S 12TH HEAD OF SCHOOL

“MAKE YOUR SCHOOL PROUD, MAKE YOUR PARENTS PROUD, MAKE YOURSELF

PROUD.” THE ST. ANDREW’S COMMUNITY GATHERED ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH CAMPUSES ON AUGUST 15, 2018, FOR THE OPENING CONVOCATION AND INSTALLATION OF HEAD OF SCHOOL TOM SHEPPARD.

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Callie Keen, Class of 2019, Will Atkins, Class of 2019, and Madison Jones, Class of 2020 with Head of School Tom Sheppard.

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“BEING YOUNG IS A WONDERFUL THING BECAUSE IT MEANS YOU EACH HAVE MANY YEARS AHEAD TO GROW AND DEVELOP IN A WAY THAT CONTINUES TO MAKE YOU SOMETHING SPECIAL… WHERE WILL YOUR JOURNEY LEAD this year and in the years ahead? No one really knows, but I do know that if you spend time developing your own unique talents, you will enjoy a happy and fulfilling journey that is uniquely yours…As you do, I’d like to leave you with one simple standard…’Make your school proud. Make your parents proud. Make yourself proud.’ If you believe that everything you do from the moment you wake up until the time you go to bed would make your school proud, make your parents proud, and make yourself proud, then you have done a great deal to ensure that you grow in a way which continues to make you something special.” — Excerpted from Head of School Tom Sheppard’s address to the lower school

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THE INSTALLATION OF TOM SHEPPARD

“IN THE YEARS AHEAD, WE WILL ENSURE THAT THE QUALITY OF OUR EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM REMAINS A HALLMARK OF A ST. ANDREW’S EDUCATION AS IT HAS BEEN SINCE THE SCHOOL’S FOUNDING… e will also explore a growing body of science which makes clear that those who lead the most fulfilling and successful lives as adults display a strong sense of resilience, determination, initiative, open mindedness, social awareness, and other essential character skills that have become a focal point of educational science today. We will do all of this in a spirit of collaboration while fully appreciating and working to enhance the various aspects of diversity which make our Saints’ community stronger. “You, our students, are our primary focus. We will surround you with experiences that encourage your intellectual, spiritual, social, athletic, and artistic development, the combination of which will lay the foundation for your future successes. Along the way, you have an important role to play as well by taking full advantage of the opportunities before you. This is no easy task given the degree to which society has complicated your lives in ways my generation never encountered at your age. Should you ever reach a point where it all becomes too complicated, know that my door is always open. Also know that you can cut through the complications of any

situation you encounter if you judge your actions against one simple standard which I may ask you to reflect upon from time to time throughout the year. ‘Make your school proud. Make your parents proud. Make yourself proud.’ “If you believe that the choices you make in all aspects of your life can be measured in the affirmative against this benchmark, you will have done your part to strengthen the St. Andrew’s community and will have given us the greatest measure of our success.” Excerpted from Head of School Tom Sheppard’s address to the middle and upper schools 11


A NEW VISION FOR ST. ANDREW’S IN 2021 ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL IS A BEACON OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION, INCLUSIVITY, AND WELLNESS, EMPOWERING GENERATIONS OF SAINTS TO IMPACT THE WORLD. IN FEBRUARY 2019, ST. ANDREW’S UNVEILED a new Vision for the Future, an ambitious statement detailing where the school will be in 2021. While the St. Andrew’s mission statement expresses why the school exists, the vision statement expresses where the school’s journey will lead, and gives rise to strategic objectives – the concrete steps St. Andrew’s will take to achieve its vision. The Vision for the Future is the culmination of a sixmonth process during which Head of School Tom Sheppard met with parents, students, teachers, administrators, trustees, and alumni around the country. Over numerous coffees, lunches, and small gatherings, these members of the St. Andrew’s community shared their highest aspirations for St. Andrew’s in the years to come. “The school community felt we were starting from a place of strength, but there was a shared drive to continue to grow and to be even better,” says Tom Sheppard, head of school. “My most important takeaway was that so many people care so deeply about what the school means or has meant to them and their children. Their greatest desire was to see St. Andrew’s continue to move forward. There was no complacency.”

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“THIS VISIONING DAY WAS DESIGNED TO BE A COMMUNITY PROCESS, AND THE ST. ANDREW’S COMMUNITY RESPONDED.”

“IT’S EASY TO CONTINUE DOWN A CERTAIN PATH UNQUESTIONINGLY, ESPECIALLY WHEN THE SCHOOL REMAINS SUCCESSFUL IN ITS PURSUITS. FORCING OURSELVES AS A COMMUNITY TO DO SOME SELF-EXAMINATION AND VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE IS GREAT FOR COMBATING COMPLACENCY.”

St. Andrew’s student.“While no VISIONING DAY school can or should be all things to all The largest and final event took people, it was encouraging to hear the place on January 26, when some many different avenues through which 150 Saints gathered for St. Andrew’s people feel connected to St. Andrew’s.” Visioning Day. Students, parents, fac“I feel so fortunate to work at a ulty, staff, trustees, alumni, and parschool that values the contributions ents of graduates broke into small and input of all constituencies,” says groups to discuss their ultimate vision Emily Philpott, parent and upper for the school. Their individual and school teacher. “Our vision statement collective input led to 17 vision stateABRAM ORLANSKY ’02, is stronger as a result.” ment drafts. These drafts were prePARENT AND PRESIDENT, ALUMNI “Being a member of a commusented to the Vision Writing CommitBOARD OF DIRECTORS nity requires one to actively particitee, which used the 17 statements as pate within that community whenthe basis for one, cohesive Vision for the Future that was then approved by the St. Andrew’s ever possible,” says Khalil Jackson, Class of 2019. “The decision to engage in the visioning process stemmed Board of Trustees on February 21. “This Visioning Day was designed to be a community from my desire to help the community. My time is process, and the St. Andrew’s community responded,” well spent being used for the betterment of those who Sheppard says. “Anyone who participated in the previ- come after me. The opportunity to spend a part of my ous sessions or on Visioning Day will see something they last year at St. Andrew’s offering input on the school’s future was wonderful.” contributed reflected in the final statement.” “I was thrilled to be included in such a substantial and meaningful exercise,” says parent Renée Ebner. “I REALIZING THE VISION could not recall in our experience an event where the par- “Writing the vision statement is the easy part,” Tom ent community, students, faculty, alumni, trustees, and Sheppard, says. “Living into that vision is the real work. friends were invited to actively partake in the construc- The next question for our community is, ‘How do we tion of the school’s vision statement. The prospect of col- live into this vision?’” laboration was extremely important to me as a parent.” “My favorite part of the process was hearing the wide EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION range of priorities that are important to the students, fac- St. Andrew’s will examine every aspect of the learning ulty, and alumni who participated,” says Abram Orlansky experience, from cutting edge technology to the color ’02, parent of Sam, Class of 2030, and Adeline, future of the paint on the walls. 14


Building Upon Our Mission To CREATE A VISION FOR THE FUTURE

MISSION Why we exist

To nurture a diverse community in the Episcopal tradition, fostering spiritual growth, moral responsibility, academic excellence, and artistic and athletic pursuits, while preparing for a life of service to our community and the world.

VISION

Where our journey is headed In 2021 St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is a beacon of educational innovation, inclusivity, and wellness, empowering generations of Saints to impact the world.

2016-2021

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES How we will fulfill our journey

PURSUE EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

ENSURE OPTIMAL ENROLLMENT

Continuously commit to challenging and supporting our students.

Invest in marketing, financial aid, tuition, and other strategies.

Offer innovative, transformative, and developmentally appropriate learning opportunities and contexts.

Leverage facilities to recruit and retain students.

Hire and support a diverse, caring, world-class faculty. Promote a culture of professional adaptation and innovation.

Establish new local partnerships. Expand non-traditional partnerships.

ENSURE CONTINUED FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY

NURTURE A DIVERSE AND SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY

Grow reserves for future needs.

Prioritize opportunities for active and authentic engagement in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion initiatives for diverse generations of Saints.

Optimize existing resources. Develop alternative revenue streams. Nurture and grow a culture of philanthropy among all constituents.

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Expand efforts to seek regular input from internal and external constituencies. Prioritize differentiated instruction and wellness.

FULFILL OUR PUBLIC PURPOSE

Utilize and expand our existing network of partnerships and relationships. Offer facilities and resources to our greater communities for missionappropriate activities. Internally connect Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion efforts with our larger public purpose.


“FULFILLING OUR VISION WILL REQUIRE THE SUPPORT OF EVERYONE IN THE ST. ANDREW’S COMMUNITY.”

“CHANGE CAN BE A DIFFICULT PROCESS. CONTRIBUTING TO THE CREATION OF THE VISIONING STATEMENT WAS A REMINDER THAT IMPACTFUL ACTION IS THE RESULT OF HARD WORK. IF THERE IS A CHANCE FOR YOU TO MAKE YOUR OPINIONS AND BELIEFS HEARD IN A MEANINGFUL WAY, TAKE IT. IF YOU CAN ENACT POSITIVE CHANGE, DO IT.”

the school has formed of life and the balance between work three learning environand play, including course loads and ment taskforces, one for class schedules. each division. Faculty St. Andrew’s formed a character members on the taskforce have been skills and social and emotional learnworking to assess every detail of the ing task force. The taskforce will look environment in which St. Andrew’s at how character skills and social/ students learn, from lighting to furemotional learning can be intentionniture, from acoustics to actions. ally integrated across the curriculum Taskforce members visited other and in each division to cultivate the schools across the Southeast to confull array of skills that lead to profesduct research and see cutting edge sional success and personal fulfillment. examples of how to support teachers and students in the classroom. INCLUSIVITY In early March, taskforce mem St. Andrew’s is a diverse community. bers convened for an all-day retreat Under the leadership of The Rev. Annie to begin assessing how that which Elliot, school chaplain, St. Andrew’s is KHALIL JACKSON they had learned might advance the exploring new and more intentional CLASS OF 2019 school’s new vision, and how the ways to make sure every member of that new vision might guide the redecommunity not only feels “accepted,” sign of St. Andrew’s learning environments. but also feels he or she truly belongs, has a voice, and This summer, one classroom in each division will be sees him or herself reflected in the curriculum, comrenovated to reflect that ideal environment and will serve munity life, and leadership of the school. as a model moving forward. Initiatives include forming student/faculty discussion groups; creating opportunities for families to share their WELLNESS cultural stories with their students’ grade levels and diviWellness is more than physical education. St. Andrew’s sions; and being even more intentional about speakers will assess everything related to our students’ quality and assembly topics. 16


CLARIFYING THE STRATEGIC PLAN In 2016, St. Andrew’s unveiled a five-year strategic plan that ends in 2021. As a part of the visioning process, the school’s strategic objectives were revisited and updated to reflect developments since 2016 and to clarify objectives for 2019 through 2021. “This was the perfect time to refine our strategic plan,” says Tom Sheppard. “We wanted to make sure the plan was current and in keeping with our new vision.” A COMMUNITY VISION “Fulfilling our vision will require the support of everyone in the St. Andrew’s community,” Sheppard says. “Everyone can and should be involved. It’s the Saints community fulfilling its own vision for what we want the school to be. “This isn’t a goal we’re setting that we will reach and be done,” Sheppard continues. “There is no end to this process. St. Andrew’s should always be evaluating the degree to which we are fulfilling our mission and preparing students for a future that includes a continually changing workforce.” Moving ahead, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is in the enviable position of building on 71 years of leadership and success. “St. Andrew’s has succeeded since 1947 because we are a community that dares to dream and imagine what is possible,” Sheppard says. “As it has done many times in the past, St. Andrew’s is positioning itself to continue its legacy as a leader in education and set a standard that can only be achieved through hard work, diligence, and vision – the big picture.”

THE VISION WRITING COMMITTEE TIM ALFORD Head of Middle School JULIA CHADWICK Head of Upper School DEWAYNE CUPPLES Director of Athletics COLIN DUNNIGAN Director of College Counseling STEPHANIE GARRIGA Director of Institutional Advancement JASON GREENER ‘92 Trustee DR. CHRIS HARTH Provost KEVIN LEWIS Associate Head of School, Chief Financial Officer JUDY MENIST 1st Grade Teacher CORISSA NEWBURGER 7th Grade History Teacher JAY PHILPOTT Director of Admission and Financial Aid RAVI RAJU ‘88 Chairman of the Board of Trustees TOM SHEPPARD Head of School

CONTINUED SUPPORT OF THE FORWARD SAINTS CAMPAIGN

SEETHA SRINIVASAN Trustee

will ensure that St. Andrew’s facilities keep pace with its visionary programming. As the successes of the Early Childhood Center, Discovery Center, and ARC prove, the possibilities at St. Andrew’s are unlimited so long as the school community has a clear vision.

VANGELA WADE Trustee DAWN WILSON Head of Lower School

gosaints.org/forwardsaints

“MY BIGGEST TAKEAWAY WAS THAT OUR SCHOOL IS IN VERY CAPABLE HANDS. ST. ANDREW’S IS BLESSED WITH A LEADERSHIP TEAM THAT IS WILLING TO UNDERTAKE THIS TYPE OF THOUGHTFUL PLANNING. I’M CONFIDENT THAT ALL VIEWPOINTS WILL BE TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION AS PLANNING BEGINS FOR THE FUTURE. WE FEEL EXTREMELY BLESSED TO BE PART OF SUCH A SPECIAL SCHOOL FAMILY AND LOOK FORWARD TO WHAT LIES AHEAD FOR ST. ANDREW’S.” — RENÉE EBNER, PARENT AND FORMER SAPA CHAIR

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FROM NEW JERSEY TO MISSISSIPPI TOM AND JENNIFER SHEPPARD ON THEIR MOVE TO ST. ANDREW’S

“I WAS TALKING WITH A PAST PARENT AND FELLOW ALUMNUS OF WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY, AND EXPRESSED HOPE THAT attending Washington and Lee would earn me credibility as a Southerner,” Tom Sheppard says with a wry smile. “That notion was dispelled when he replied, ‘Tom, here in Mississippi, do not ever refer to Virginia as the South.’”

Zach, who was enrolled in Jennifer’s alma mater, a boarding school in Delaware coincidentally named St. Andrew’s School. Olivia would have to leave her friends behind and begin eighth grade at St. Andrew’s in Mississippi. But during a visit to Jackson with Tom, Jennifer also felt a strong connection to the St. Andrew’s community. St. Andrew’s parent Kellye Montjoy arranged a brunch with a group of parents, including some who had moved to Mississippi from other states. “They were very real, genuine, and open with me,” Jennifer says. “We talked about everything from life in the South to diversity and politics. They talked about what their kids experienced at St. Andrew’s and how much they loved the school. They answered questions and put everything on the table, which was what I needed. And I had so much fun.” When Tom was offered the position, Jennifer took Olivia to Starbucks to break the news. “Olivia was actually excited about the idea of moving,” Jennifer says. “Although she did add, ‘Okay, but I get to pick my room in the new house.’”

hen Tom Sheppard accepted the position as St. Andrew’s head of school, the Sheppard family relocated from New Jersey to Mississippi. It was a location they had never before considered, but St. Andrew’s led them South. Before Tom applied for the position, his wife, Jennifer, read the profile of St. Andrew’s posted along with the job description. “I was almost disbelieving. St. Andrew’s culture and the values lined up so well with what we had been looking for and the school sounded too good to be true,” Jennifer says. “My first thought was, ‘Are you kidding me?’ I told Tom, ‘Why don’t you apply and see if it’s for real?’ When Tom came back from his first visit, he was convinced. He said, ‘It is for real.’” Jennifer still had hesitations. Accepting the position would bring big changes for the Sheppards’ children, 15-year-old Zach and 13-year-old Olivia. A move to Mississippi would put Tom and Jennifer farther away from 19


OLIVIA, TOM, JENNIFER, AND ZACH SHEPPARD

THE NEW HEAD IS A DEADHEAD “I am a passionate follower of The Grateful Dead,” Tom Sheppard says. “People meet me and say, ‘You do not look like a Deadhead.’ It’s more than music, it’s a movement.”

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WITH HIS FAMILY ON BOARD, TOM AGREED TO SERVE AS ST. ANDREW’S HEAD OF SCHOOL. rom the moment the moving van arrived, the Sheppards have felt welcome. “Everyone here has been so warm, friendly, and welcoming, particularly through the eyes of our daughter,” Jennifer says. “We always have a pack of eighth grade girls at our house. Olivia told me, ‘People here are nice to each other.’ That’s coming from a middle school girl talking about her peers.” While Zach’s visits are limited, he is looking forward to spending the summer in his family’s new home state and making his own connections in Mississippi. “Every week there’s another reassurance that we made the right choice,” Jennifer says. “It’s such an engaging environment. I have not met anyone who isn’t warm and genuine. And St. Andrew’s has been more than we expected. The school is true to its word. Its core and heart are exactly what we were sold.” “I’ve visited and lived in some of the most beautiful and interesting places in the world, but in the end, it all comes down to the people,” Tom agrees. “Life is a book full of travel and adventures – the new and unknown is exciting. Open yourself to something new and you become a better person. This is an exciting new chapter for us.” Their relocation has shown the Sheppards one very significant difference between New Jersey and Mississippi. No, it’s not the heat, or the southern accents, or even the use of the word “y’all.” “Casseroles,” Tom says. “When we moved into our home in Mississippi, all the neighbors greeted us with casseroles. They don’t bring you casseroles when you move to New Jersey.”

EDUCATION IS IN THEIR DNA

The son of a headmaster, Tom Sheppard attended independent schools in Hawaii, Florida, and Maryland before obtaining degrees at Washington and Lee University in Virginia and Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. He was an independent school teacher and also served as a coach and advisor. “I was a senior in college when I knew I wanted to teach,” Tom says. “After five years of teaching, I wondered if there was a way for me to make a difference in the life of the whole school.” Tom went on to serve as a senior school administrator with Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, New York, and Stevenson School in Pebble Beach, California. Prior to joining St. Andrew’s, he was dean of enrollment management and former dean of admission and financial aid at The Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, an elite boarding school considered one of the top five private schools in the country. Jennifer Sheppard also has an impressive background in education. A graduate of Dartmouth College, Jennifer moved to Pebble Beach, California, to become associate director of admission at Stevenson School. That initial role launched a 25-year career in independent school admission and financial aid spanning two coasts, five schools, and student grade levels from pre-K through 12. In addition to running admission and financial aid programs, Jennifer has also served as a resident faculty member and student advisor. She helped develop the SSAT Common Application for the primary grades and has served as a mentor to colleagues entering the admission profession. Prior to relocating to Mississippi, Jennifer served as director of admission and financial aid at Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart. Jennifer has put her background to work at St. Andrew’s as a volunteer in the Early Childhood Center and lower school.

“WE WOULD NOT HAVE GONE TO A SCHOOL THAT DID NOT HONOR DIVERSITY. WATCHING THE MIDDLE SCHOOL PRODUCTION OF ‘THE LION KING,’ I REMEMBER THINKING IT WAS THE MOST DIVERSE SCHOOL PRODUCTION I’VE SEEN IN MY CAREER.” — JENNIFER SHEPPARD

“MORE THINKING WORK” — The Sheppards’ daughter, Olivia, was an honor student at her previous school in New Jersey. When asked how St. Andrew’s compared to her former school academically, Olivia replied, “The volume of the work is the same, but at St. Andrew’s, it’s more thinking work.” 21


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AFTER THE

Bell Rings THE SAINTS SUMMER EXPERIENCE AND AFTER SCHOOL ENRICHMENTS

St. Andrew’s

A CAMP FOR

exceptional programming continues after the school year and the school day end. The Saints Summer Experience and after school Enrichments Program are the right balance of learning, friendship, and fun-filled activities. Parents know their children are doing something more meaningful than playing video games or binging TV shows, and students love sharing exciting experiences with old and new friends. In keeping with St. Andrew’s mission to serve the greater community, both programs are open to students from other schools. Students from First Presbyterian Day School, Jackson Academy, Mannsdale Elementary, McWillie Elementary, Power APAC, St. Richard’s Catholic School, and many other schools, as well as homeschooled students, come to St. Andrew’s for a summer camp or after school program like no other.

EVERY INTEREST

The 2019 Saints Summer Experience will offer more than 100 camps, including: DAY CAMPS Firefly • Pre-K3 Kinder • Pre-K4 – 1st grade Adventure • 2nd – 4th grade Explorer • 5th – 9th grade ACADEMIC CAMPS Reading Clinic All About Animals Writing Workshops Gear Up for Lower School, Middle School, and Upper School

THE SAINTS SUMMER EXPERIENCE St. Andrew’s vibrant summer camp program offers weekly, themed day camps for students in pre-K through 9th grade. Popular, age-appropriate camp themes revolve around dinosaurs, game shows, arts and crafts, world cultures, ancient adventures, nature, movies, and more. Each of the nine weeks offers a different theme and different activities, so campers never get bored. The Saints Summer Experience also includes academic, athletic, and specialty camps for students of all ages. Taught by St. Andrew’s faculty and coaches, camps take advantage of state-of-the-art facilities in the Early Childhood Center, Discovery Center, and ARC to keep students active and engaged. St. Andrew’s upper school students serve as counselors, offering younger students an opportunity to make trusted older friends and teaching older students what it means to be a role model.

ATHLETIC CAMPS Basketball Softball Football Archery Soccer Tennis SPECIALTY CAMPS Sew Fun Studios Bricks 4 Kidz Ballet Various Art/Crafting/Maker Camps Chess Video Game Creation Fun Chinese Cooking Harmonica for Beginners Manners Matter MINDful Kids and MINDful Tweens Mini Hawks Flag Football, Basketball, T-Ball Soccer Shots Storytelling

“ST. ANDREW’S OFFERS THE BROADEST, MOST INCLUSIVE SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM IN THE METRO AREA.” — JAY LOSSET, DIRECTOR OF AUXILIARY PROGRAMS 23


Register Now for the Saints Summer Experience gosaints.org/camps


AFTER SCHOOL ENRICHMENTS PROGRAM

An optional addition to the St. Andrew’s After School Care program, after school Enrichment Programs offer roughly 15 weeks of specialty classes, including art, music, science, languages, athletics, and more, taught by St. Andrew’s teachers and coaches and trusted community partners. Many of the approximately 250 participants in Enrichments come from schools other than St. Andrew’s. In 2018, St. Andrew’s began offering bus service from McWillie Elementary School to the St. Andrew’s south campus for after school Enrichments. A St. Andrew’s bus picks up approximately 50 McWillie students who attend the program. “This is a win-win for St. Andrew’s and for students from other schools,” says Jay Losset, director of auxiliary programs. “The students have access to St. Andrew’s programming, St. Andrew’s has an opportunity to provide a unique experience for students and families in the community, and our St. Andrew’s students get to make new friends from other schools. We’ve also had several students who started coming to after school Enrichments or to the Saints Summer Experience and liked it so much that they are now St. Andrew’s students.”

SAINTS SUMMER EXPERIENCE

BY THE NUMBERS 2018 WAS A BIG YEAR FOR THE SAINTS SUMMER EXPERIENCE. Sign up now to be a part of the fun and to set new records in 2019.

4 DAY CAMPS 399 CAMPERS 109 CAMPERS FROM OTHERS SCHOOLS 71 ACADEMIC, ATHLETIC, AND SPECIALTY CAMPS 609 CAMPERS 120 CAMPERS FROM OTHER SCHOOLS 45 SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 73 STUDENT AND ALUMNI COUNSELORS 41 FACULTY, STAFF, AND PARENTS AS CAMP STAFF 9,000 POPSICLES 960 HOT WINGS 600 HOTDOGS 400 ICE CREAM SUNDAES 400 BAND AIDS ( 0 MAJOR INJURIES) 158 PIZZAS 12 WATERMELONS 10 FIELD TRIPS 1 SNOW CONE MACHINE

ALUMNI, WILL YOU BE COMING HOME THIS SUMMER? If you’ll be visiting family or friends in the Jackson area, sign your kids up for St. Andrew’s summer camp. Your children will make new friends and experience all kinds of adventures while you have a chance to relax or catch up with friends of your own.

100s OF PHOTOS AND VIDEOS TO FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM

Follow us at @gosaintsaux

WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT AFTER SCHOOL ENRICHMENTS? “I LIKE BALLET BECAUSE YOU GET TO TRAIN and practice something until you get it perfect. And it helps me get my emotions out. If I am angry or sad or happy I can express that through dance.”

SIGN UP FOR THE

Adi Bowron, 6th grade, Power APAC

SAINTS SUMMER EXPERIENCE

“I LIKE THE IMPROVISATION ABOUT FLASHLIGHTS.” Ca’Levin Jones, 1st grade, St. Andrew’s

“NOT TO BE BIASED, BUT OUR SCHOOL has the greatest After School Care teachers.”

2019 CAMPS RUN JUNE 3 – AUGUST 2

Levi Coffey, 4th grade, St. Andrew’s

STUDENTS FROM OTHER SCHOOLS ARE WELCOME.

“PICNIC!” Isobel Grant, pre-K3, McWillie Elementary School

FOR A LIST OF CAMPS OR TO SIGN UP, VISIT GOSAINTS.ORG/CAMPS OR EMAIL JAY LOSSET AT LOSSETJ@GOSAINTS.ORG.

“MY FAVORITE PART IS GETTING TO PLAY outside after a LONG hard day of work.”

AFTER SCHOOL ENRICHMENTS OPENS FOR FALL 2019 REGISTRATION IN MID-JULY.

Isabella Gomez-Espinoza, 4th grade, St. Andrew’s

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THE ST. ANDREW’S

Presents

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TOGETHER WE CELEBRATE

Starry Night

APRIL 12, 2019 7:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School North Campus Ridgeland • Regional and cultural treats prepared by St. Andrew’s families • Entertainment by the Jackson Gypsies • $50 per person, adults only

TOGETHER WE PERFORM, PLAY, CREATE, AND EAT

Arts on the Green

APRIL 13, 2019 10:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School North Campus Ridgeland • Main Stage Entertainment

• Children’s Green with Arts and Crafts Activities • The Spirit of St. Andrew’s Fashion Show • Artisans’ Green and Entrepreneurial Alley Food Court All events are free and open to the public. TOGETHER WE BID Place your bid on gifts, restaurant dinners, spa packages, unique events, trips and more at artsonthegreen.info. • The online auction is open until 10:00 PM on April 15.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ALL EVENTS, VISIT ARTSONTHE GREEN.INFO

Farm to Table — St. Andrew’s seventh annual Farm to Table fundraising dinner took a step even closer to the farm this year.

The 2019 venue was the Mississippi Farmers Market in downtown Jackson. With a unique location and the renowned Robert St. John as the celebrity chef, all 226 tickets sold out in one day, or as Farm to Table chair Mona Reddy puts it, “between morning and afternoon carpool.” • “We had a few core concepts that we felt strongly about,” Reddy says. “Include local farmers, keep it relaxed, and be fed well. The final result was even better than our vision. I heard someone say, ‘It’s like we stepped into a painting.’ The Farmers Market was a natural fit. I was pleasantly surprised that several people were introduced to the Farmers Market for the first time because of this event. I hope Farm to Table encourages our school community to engage even more with our farmers and artisan communities.”

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Rules AY L P •

ING BY TH E•

IT’S EASIER TO FOLLOW THE RULES WHEN YOU HAVE A SAY IN MAKING THE RULES. Last fall, St. Andrew’s lower school students – all 488 of them, from pre-K3 through fourth grade – worked together to propose, draft, and ratify four new schoolwide rules. Those rules are:

Be kind to yourself and others. • Be responsible with tools and spaces. Be safe. • Be respectful to everyone and everything. MAKING THE RULES

vention. Some delegates wrote their class’s rules on big sheets of paper, rolled and tied with ribbon, for a more “official” touch. Dawn Wilson, head of lower school, and Shea Egger, associate head of lower school, met with the delegates to condense the initial list of 19 proposed rules into the four final rules, which were adopted during a ratification ceremony at Big Chapel. “Students as young as six years old represented the ideas of classmates, analyzed and combined the thoughts of the representatives at the convention, and came up with a final product that embodies the collective beliefs and responsibilities of our youngest Saints,” says Head of Lower School Dawn Wilson. “All of our students were engaged, having clear conversations and working respectfully through disagreements. It was wonderful to see their enthusiasm for the process and pride in the result.” Students in pre-K and kindergarten didn’t participate in the convention, but were still an integral part of the process.

he rule-making project reflects Responsive Classroom, a teaching approach at St. Andrew’s that focuses on the link between academic success and social and emotional learning and the development of essential character skills. Using Responsive Classroom techniques, lower school teachers create engaging, interactive learning tasks and nurture a sense of belonging so that students feel comfortable working with their peers. Each classroom brainstormed ideas for a list of worthy rules and voted on the most important one to present to administration. Individual classrooms already had their own sets of rules; students used those classroom rules as a springboard, adapting them to benefit the entire school community. One delegate from each classroom in first through fourth grades was chosen to represent his or her peers at a schoolwide constitutional con29


PLAYING BY THE RULES

“IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR STUDENTS TO BE A PART OF THIS BECAUSE WE CAN SHOW HOW WE WANT TO

Help our School and the World.” HAZEL MISENAR, THIRD GRADE DELEGATE

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“I VISITED EACH PRE-K AND KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOM AND SPOKE TO STUDENTS ABOUT THE PROCESS,” SAYS EGGER. “I ASKED THE STUDENTS to point out their classroom rules to me and explain why they were important, and I asked their permission to share their rules with students in grades 1 to 4. I also told them to listen carefully in Big Chapel when we revealed the schoolwide rules and see if they could hear the similarities to their classroom rules. We wanted our youngest students to know that they were part of the process even though delegates from pre-K and kindergarten weren’t part of the convention.” Engaging the students in the process helped them take ownership of the rules and articulate the social and ethical behaviors that enable everyone to learn. “The students are the ones who know what problems they are having,” says fourth grade delegate Alice McElroy. “It’s important for us to speak for our classmates.” “A big component of rule creation is instilling a sense of belonging and security in students,” Egger says. “Our classroom teachers give students the opportunity to

Walking on the

Right Side The new lower school rules inspired fourth grader Ella Johnson to write a song. Ella rewrote the lyrics to “Walking on Sunshine” by Katrina and the Waves to reflect the new rules, then filmed and edited her own video for the remix in the Discovery Center tech lab. Ella plans to show the video to younger students to help them understand the importance of being safe in the hallways and walking on the righthand side.

voice their hopes and dreams for the school year and create rules that will help them achieve those goals. This schoolwide process was a great way to extend that idea and to show students the importance of a shared set of rules for a community.” Students have taken the rules seriously since the ratification ceremony. They are often heard citing the rules to each other or reminding a classmate to “be safe” in the hallway. Next steps include creating rule reminder posters that will hang throughout the lower school and possibly reciting the rules in morning announcements. “We know that students have more ownership and are more willing to follow rules that they help to create,” Egger says. “Our rules have given our community a common, positive language to use with our students.” “It was important for students to be a part of this,” says third grade delegate Hazel Misenar, “because we can show how we want to help our school and the world.”

WALKING ON THE RIGHT SIDE* I used to break rules in the hallway, but that is no more I have quiet feet always, when I walk on the floor Now every time I go through the hallway, I keep my voice down ‘Cause I respect all the work that’s happening around I’m walking on the right side! (WOAH) I’m not yelling in line! (NO) I’m walking on the right side! (WOAH) And don’t it feel good! I used to walk straight through the middle, you know that it’s true But I don’t want to spend my whole day crashing right into you I remember rules after the weekends, and through the whole day, yea, yea, yea We’re walking on the right track, And we’re here to stay (Oh yeah now!) I’m walking on the right side! (WOAH) I’m not yelling in line! (NO) I’m walking on the right side! (WOAH) And don’t it feel good! * Sing to the tune of “Walking on Sunshine”

Above: Dawn Wilson, head of lower school and Shea Egger, associate head of lower school 31


MEET In The MIDDLE MIDDLE SCHOOL CAN BE A CHALLENGING SOCIAL TIME WHEN STUDENTS ARE FORMING THEIR OWN IDENTITIES YET STILL LONG FOR THE SECURITY OF BELONGING TO A TRUSTED GROUP. ST. ANDREW’S CREATES DIVISION-WIDE EVENTS TO FOSTER A STRONGER SENSE OF COMMUNITY AMONG STUDENTS IN GRADES FIVE THROUGH EIGHT.

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St. Andrew’s Diverse Community MAKES THE SOCIAL CHALLENGES OF MIDDLE SCHOOL EASIER. WHEN THEIR PEERS REPRESENT MANY DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS, CULTURES, AND INTERESTS, STUDENTS ARE LESS LIKELY TO FEEL LIKE THE “ODD MAN OUT” AND MORE LIKELY TO FEEL COMFORTABLE BEING THEMSELVES. “THE AMAZING RACE” was a series of challenges, riddles, and physical tasks completed by teams made up of students from different middle school grade levels. A week before the race, the teams met for icebreaker activities. The day of the event, teams worked together to make noisemakers and develop original team cheers, then paraded into the ARC for a fun-filled, spirited competition that found older and younger students working together and making new friends in the process. “This kind of event promotes relationships across grades and helps build a more cohesive community,” says Head of Middle School Tim Alford. “Fifth and sixth graders get to know seventh and eighth graders in a safe, relatively structured, but fun-filled environment.” “I remember my own first year of middle school,” says Catherine Zhou, an eighth grader and president of the middle school student council. “I was the young kid on campus, and to be honest, I was a little afraid of the eighth graders. Fun activities like these bring our middle school community together. On our own, we probably wouldn’t have the opportunity or motivation to interact with people in other grades. These activities gave us time to get to know each other and open up to one another. When you’re having fun and you’re comfort-

able, it allows you to meet new people and broaden your circle of friends.” “The Amazing Race emphasized teamwork and play, collaboration, and hard work,” Alford says. “The physical challenges were more of a stretch for some students than others, and the riddles were the same. Not every student could complete everything for his or her team. We designed it so that a diverse array of talents would carry the day. My favorite part was watching the kids root each other on and seeing eighth grade cross country athletes encouraging their younger teammates to ‘keep up the good work.’” Over lunch, the students discussed the ins and outs of middle school, with the older students sharing their experiences and giving the fifth and sixth graders advice on how to handle challenging situations. The middle school also staged its own pep rally last fall. Upper school students attended, a reminder that middle school students merit the same celebration as their older schoolmates. “Events like this honor the fact that childhood should be fun,” Alford says. “We shouldn’t get so caught up in covering content that we forget to give kids a chance to be silly, nurture their creative and competitive abilities, and make friends.”

FAREWELL TO TIM ALFORD — St. Andrew’s Head of Middle School Tim Alford will be leaving at the end of the school year to accept a position at The Lexington School in Lexington, Kentucky. Alford has also served St. Andrew’s as a teacher and head of the lower school, and played a key role in the design of the Early Childhood Center and Discovery Center. The Lexington School is gaining a talented leader. St. Andrew’s will miss Tim Alford not only as a gifted administrator, but also as a friend. We wish him all the best in Lexington. 33


ng the Right i d n i F

ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE COUNSELORS ARE HERE TO HELP

IS THIS REALLY THE BEST COLLEGE FOR ME? AM I OVERMATCHING OR UNDERMATCHING? HOW MUCH FINANCIAL AID WILL I RECEIVE? AM I REALLY GOING TO LIKE LIVING THERE? ST. ANDREW’S college counselors can help you find the answer. One of the greatest advantages of a St. Andrew’s education is expert college counseling provided by Colin Dunnigan, director of college counseling, and Scott Albert Johnson ’88, associate director of college counseling. “Our job is to know the students and the colleges, dispel myths, and equip our students and parents with the knowledge to navigate the application process and find the best match,” Dunnigan says. Dunnigan and Johnson study admission trends at colleges and universities nationwide. As a result, they’re able to offer St. Andrew’s students a much broader look at the college choices available. The counselors cultivate contacts at colleges, enabling them to provide a more accurate idea of what life on campus will really be like than a catalog or website. And because Dunnigan and Johnson personally know each student they counsel, they’re able to offer guidance based on the individual student, not just on a transcript or resume. “The college counselors at St. Andrew’s truly care about the interests and career goals of each student. They take the time to understand the student as an individual,” says Ankita Moss ’16, a junior at Emory University. “My college counselor helped me curate a list of college choices based on my interests and was always available to answer questions. Without college counseling at St. Andrew’s, I would have not have been able to enjoy the process and find the perfect fit for me.” 34


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“OF COURSE, WE WANT OUR STUDENTS TO CHOOSE COLLEGES WITH OUTSTANDING LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES. BUT WE’RE MOST EXCITED WHEN ST. ANDREW’S STUDENTS CHOOSE A COLLEGE THAT’S ALSO LOCATED IN A GREAT COMMUNITY, WITH PLENTY OF OPPORTUNITIES TO BE INVOLVED IN CAMPUS LIFE, AND WITH ALUMNI NETWORKS THAT ARE WIDE AND STRONG.” Colin Dunnigan, Director of College Counseling

“EVERY COLLEGE IS LOOKING FOR GOOD STUDENTS, BUT THE BEST COLLEGES ARE INTERESTED IN BUILDING COMMUNITIES. THEY’RE LOOKING FOR ATHLETES, ARTISTS, LEADERS, FOLLOWERS, DIVERSITY, AND PEOPLE WHO CAN WORK TOGETHER.”

Jaiya McMillan, Class of 2019, and Colin Dunnigan

wrong college or the wrong major for FINDING THE RIGHT MATCH the wrong reason, we’ve done our job.” The St. Andrew’s college counseling Students may “overmatch,” applyprogram is based not only on knowledge, ing to colleges where they aren’t likely but also on appropriate guidance at every to be accepted or cannot afford the cost step in the process. of attending, or in more cases at St. “At the end of the eighth grade, we Andrew’s, undermatch, overlooking excelmake sure students and parents have Colin Dunnigan lent choices that might be the perfect fit. an awareness of planning for college,” “In many cases, we’re actually increasDunnigan says. “As they move into ninth ing the number of college choices rather grade and beyond, we make sure students know how their years in upper school will affect than narrowing them down,” Dunnigan says. “For examtheir options. By their junior year, we’re helping them ple, if a student is looking at a very selective, expensive select and apply. But, at the same time, we don’t apply college, we don’t discourage them from applying. But overt pressure or make the process any more stressful we do encourage them to apply to schools that offer a similar experience with more financial aid.” than it already seems to be.” According to Dunnigan, the college selection and “Before St. Andrew’s, I was aware of less than 10 uniapplication process is no easier for students convinced versities. Turns out there are over 4,000,” says Carrie they know where they want to go and what they want Stallings ’15, a senior at Grinnell College who plans to attend graduate school at Northwestern University this to study than for students who don’t have any idea. “The majority of students will change their majors,” fall. “Without the direct help I got from Mr. Johnson, I Dunnigan says. “We push students and ask them, ‘Why never would have been exposed to the variety of possido you want to go into that field?’ If we can keep one stu- ble experiences I could have in college, nor would I have dent from becoming miserable because they choose the been able to make such an informed decision.” 36


“The college counselors helped me understand what would be the best fit for me. They also explained why certain schools previously not on my radar would align with my interests,” Moss says. “I also had a lot of questions about financial aid. The counselors bridged that knowledge gap for me. With their help, I understood the details of the financial aid process and how to apply for scholarships.” “Four years later, I am still incredibly grateful to St. Andrew’s and my college counselors for their help in my educational trajectory and success,” Stallings says. “I received hands-on, intentional, purposeful, and effective help. I received constant emails. I was highly encouraged – and somewhat forced – to be in their offices discussing my plans, thoughts, and future. It was what I needed. It’s why I am where I am today.”

What to ask? “We not only help students narrow their college choices,” Colin Dunnigan, director of college counseling says,“we help students increase their choices by encouraging them to think through what they really want. Ultimately, the most important criterion is to visit a college and say, ‘This feels like me.’” QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

“THE COLLEGE COUNSELING PROGRAM AT ST. ANDREW’S is one of the primary reasons I ended up at Sewanee. I knew it was my dream school, but Scott Johnson did a tremendous job of making the college application process easy. He and Colin Dunnigan put so much time and effort into placing each and every student at the best possible school for them, and that is why St. Andrew’s has the best college counseling program in the state.” — J.T. Mitchell ‘16, Junior at Sewanee, the University of the South

What size school are you interested in? “Many students say they want a mid-sized or large university,” Dunnigan says, “but when we ask them what they like about St. Andrew’s, they say the close relationships with teachers, the smaller class size, the chance to be involved in more activities. Those are all attributes of a smaller school.” How much will it cost? Can you and your family afford it? If not, is financial aid available that can make it accessible?

THE INSIDE SCOOP ON FINANCIAL AID HELPING STUDENTS FIND FINANCIAL AID IS A HUGE FOCUS FOR ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE COUNSELORS.

Where is it located? Most students want a college in a town or city that offers at least some activities off campus.

“Private scholarships are out there, but the majority of financial aid comes from the colleges,” Colin Dunnigan, director of college counseling, says. “The best-known schools usually offer need-based aid that makes the experience accessible for those who are accepted. Families should be aware, however, that what the college considers your level of need and your ability to pay may be very different than what you consider your level of need and ability to pay. At many schools, merit-based aid is also available and can make even more choices viable.”

How often can you come home? Will you have to fly? What does “eight hours” really mean in terms of coming and going, emotionally, timewise, and cost-wise? Is this the place I want to live? This is perhaps the most important question. While you can enter almost any field from a variety of colleges, you need to feel comfortable in the place you’ll be calling home for the next four years. “School” is where you’ll eat, sleep, play, and socialize. Your life will center around the campus and surrounding community.

“I HAD SO MANY QUESTIONS. I AM A FIRST-GENERATION, LOW INCOME COLLEGE STUDENT, AND MY FAMILY COULD NOT HELP ME WHEN IT CAME TO APPLYING TO COLLEGE. THIS WAS ESPECIALLY TRUE WHEN I HAD CHOICES AND WAS UNSURE WHAT THE ‘BEST’ CHOICE WAS. I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT FACTORS WERE IMPORTANT OR HOW THEY SHOULD BE PRIORITIZED. WITH THE HELP OF MY COUNSELOR, I KNEW WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK ON MY VISITS AND WHAT FACTORS WERE IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER FOR MY INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES.” — Carrie Stallings ‘15, senior at Grinnell College 37


ddle School Art i M s on

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MIDDLE SCHOOL CAN BE A TIME WHEN KIDS PREFER TO STAY OUT OF THE SPOTLIGHT. BUT ACCORDING TO ST. ANDREW’S ARTS INSTRUCTORS, MIDDLE SCHOOL CAN BE THE BEST TIME TO PARTICIPATE IN PERFORMING ARTS.

“This age group is capable of doing so much, but they can lack confidence,” Scott Sexton, director of choral music, says. “Working as a group to achieve an artistic goal in a safe, creative space builds their confidence and gives them a chance for self-expression in a non-judgmental environment.” “Middle school can be a challenging transitional time for students. That is exactly the reason for this age group to have strong performing arts opportunities, and why we love to teach middle school arts,” Ruthie Taylor ’05,

middle school drama teacher, agrees. “Performing arts trains students in physical and vocal communication and control during a time when they often feel awkward in their own bodies. [Preparing for a performance], they form a supportive ensemble and build trust with a group of peers. Students gain confidence in themselves and their creative abilities, and they gain empathy exploring different roles. Perhaps most importantly, whether in music, drama, or speech and debate, students learn to support each other as they create a work of art together.”

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“THESE STUDENTS STILL HAVE A SENSE OF WONDER ABOUT LEARNING.

Real Joy

IT’S A TO SEE THAT COME ALIVE DAY AFTER DAY.” Dennis Cranford, Director of Bands

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“MIDDLE SCHOOLERS STILL HAVE THAT

Sense of Wonderment, but being older, they can do more. In the intermediate band class, students take ownership of the learning process. They learn to direct each other, which means taking a musical score and studying every part, not just their own part, and teaching the musical selection to the ensemble. They learn to recognize their own role within the ensemble, they experience firsthand the unique qualities and challenges in performing different instruments, and they build empathy for the director!” Rebecca Bernhardt, intermediate band and middle school science teacher

ESEARCH SHOWS THAT arts edu- Dennis Cranford, director of bands, notes there is also cation leads to higher test scores, a scientifically proven connection between artistic purimproved problem-solving skills, suits and brain development. and enhanced creativity, collabora- “Music reading skills, in particular, have been shown to tion, empathy, and time-management influence the way the developing brain thinks and orga– all skills essential to future success. nizes, helping students in other academic areas,” CranThe rehearsals and practice required ford says. “I think it was no coincidence that four of the by performing arts build self-discipline and a strong seven St. Andrew’s students who had perfect ACT scores work ethic. Knowing that every role, even a small one, in 2017 had participated in middle school band.” affects the outcome of a performance instills a sense While little ones are oh-so-cute and older students may of responsibility and teamwork. be more confident, middle school arts instructors are

From Student to Teacher As a St. Andrew’s student, Ruthie Taylor ‘05 competed with the speech and debate team in literature interpretation events. “My freshman year, we had an assembly to showcase some performances for the upper school student body. I was really nervous about performing a monologue in front of all these older students, but as I began to see the emotional impact on the audience members’ faces, my confidence and excitement in performance grew. Sharing that emotional exchange continues to draw me to performance, whether I’m on stage or backstage.”

“THEATER IS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS TO BUILD SOMETHING TOGETHER, SOMETHING bigger than any of them individually, something they can only create with everyone involved and supporting each other fully throughout the process. Through that process they build friendships, skills, and a passion for the arts that lasts a lifetime.” — Ruthie Taylor ‘05, middle school drama and speech and debate teacher 41


“When Ruthie Taylor and I choose shows for the next year, we always think about childhood favorites. ‘The Lion King’ was a huge favorite and a career bucket list show for me. The middle school cast performance was just as magical for me as ‘The Lion King’ movie was when I first saw it in theaters in 1994.” — Scott Sexton

“IN MANY OTHER SCHOOLS,

It Can Be ‘Uncool’

to be in band, choir, or drama. Here, our students and families truly appreciate the arts and the well-rounded curricula that our school offers. It is not uncommon for me to go to a sports game where most of my tenor section is playing baseball or most of my soprano section is playing volleyball. The performing arts is part of our school culture, and many other schools cannot say the same.” — Scott Sexton, Director of Choral Music

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drawn to the quirkiness of the in-between school years. They see the opportunity to help students navigate this challenging time as a privilege. “Middle schoolers are absolutely hilarious and brutally honest. They’re working so hard to figure themselves out while they are being bombarded with social messages about where and how they should fit in,” says Katelyn Kyser, middle school music teacher. “I enjoy working to create a space where they’re expected to be vulnerable, to save space for others’ vulnerabilities, and where they are expected to bring their best and whole selves into the process.” “I love seeing students grow artistically. I love being wowed by students singing on stage or in a concert, particularly by students that barely speak or talk off stage due to being so shy,” Sexton says. “And I love getting letters from the alumni that I least expected to hear from, telling me that I made a difference in their lives.” “Middle school students are often still more willing to play and be silly,” Taylor says. “Their energy and creativity are infectious. If I can help them gain confidence in their creative explorations and decisions in middle school, they’re more likely to continue with that drive to explore and create in all of their pursuits as they get older.” “These students still have a sense of wonder about learning,” Cranford says. “It’s a real joy to see that come alive day after day.”

25 Years as the Leader of the Bands DENNIS CRANFORD IS CELEBRATING HIS 25TH YEAR DIRECTING ST. ANDREW’S BANDS.

“From my earliest school days, I wanted to be a teacher,” Cranford says. “In seventh grade, my beginning band year, band directing became my goal. My first band director was a definite inspiration to me. In high school, my classmates asked, ‘Why don’t you go into science or research?’ My answer was, ‘I want to be a teacher, I want to help people learn.’” Cranford has achieved that goal. Over the past 25 years, he has directed some 130 concerts, played through 170 high school football games, heard the school fight song 850 times in performance (not including rehearsals), played at 1,150 chapel services, and helped instill a love of music in hundreds of St. Andrew’s students. Cranford has collected 25 years’ worth of notes and cards from students grateful that he chose to share his musical gifts through teaching. “For years, you have been a mentor, a role model, and a friend,” a former student wrote. “Your class has given me the opportunity to be a part of something bigger than myself. To you, I will forever be grateful for the life lessons you have taught me over the years.” “You didn’t just teach me how to play an instrument,” another student wrote, “You taught me to be a team player, a good listener, and a leader.” It’s this response from his students that has Cranford looking forward to more performances to direct, more classes to teach, and more lives to inspire. “Seeing the success of my students is the thing I enjoy the most. Whether that’s on the solo or the full band concert stage, at a pep rally or a ballgame, seeing the results of the individual and group work is very rewarding. To see our St. Andrew’s students grow in leadership and personal responsibility means they have been changed by our teaching. That’s the best accomplishment – changed lives.”

Building a Global Reputation Katelyn Kyser first heard about St. Andrew’s innovative arts program in Bosnia. Kyser was living there when she met St. Andrew’s choral music director, Scott Sexton, in a Bosnian folk music workshop. “I was amazed to hear about this special institution that supported a global education so tangibly,” Kyser says. “Since coming to St. Andrew’s in August, it has been an honor to contribute to that mission.”

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ISHAN BHATT, CLASS OF 2019

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ST. ANDREW’S SENIOR ISHAN BHATT WON THE 2018 NATIONAL SPEECH AND DEBATE ASSOCIATION (NSDA) NATIONAL TOURNAMENT, BRINGING HIM RECOGNITION AS THE TOP HIGH SCHOOL LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATER IN THE UNITED STATES.

B

hatt’s win was the latest achievement for St. Andrew’s acclaimed speech and debate program. Prior to the development of a formal program, a few St. Andrew’s students competed in speech and debate independently. The program has grown exponentially since its official founding in 1995 when a handful of students took the stage under the leadership of St. Andrew’s teacher and inaugural speech and debate coach Randy Patterson. “My goal that first year was just to have a team to participate,” says Patterson, who has since retired. “We had no budget and I hadn’t had any speech and debate experience since my own college days. But we had interested students and dedicated parents who pulled together to make it happen.” St. Andrew’s got off to a good start. Andrew Chatham ’98 won second place in extemporaneous speaking in his first tournament and qualified to go to nationals that first year. By the third year, St. Andrew’s was hosting a tournament on campus and, in 2003, St. Andrew’s became the first school in Mississippi awarded a Chair

of Membership in the prestigious Barkley Forum of Emory University, one of the premier forensics organizations in the Southeast. Patterson was eventually named coordinator of speech and debate activities for the Mississippi High School Activities Association and used the role to encourage smaller schools without speech and debate teams to establish their own programs, positioning St. Andrew’s as a leader in developing speech and debate statewide. Assistant coach and upper school history teacher Darin Maier took over the program upon Patterson’s retirement in 2010. During Maier’s tenure, multiple students have reached the finals or placed in national competitions. The annual Saints Classic held on campus has become one of the top tournaments in the South, drawing participants from five states and serving as a qualifying event for national tournaments, including the prestigious University of Kentucky Tournament of Champions. “My goal was to honor the work Randy had done and build on our successes. If that could be done, then we’d likely get our share of titles and championships,” Maier

”DEBATE HAS HELPED ME DO ALMOST EVERYTHING BETTER. IT HELPS DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING and analysis skills, makes finding problems, gaps, and solutions incredibly easy, and gives you the ability to make connections intuitively. I’ve applied something I’ve learned from debate to almost every paper I’ve written or assignment I’ve completed.” — ISHAN BHATT, CLASS OF 2019, Winner of the 2018 National Speech and Debate Association National Tournament 45


“THE ST. ANDREWS SPEECH AND DEBATE PROGRAM WAS CRITICAL TO MY PERSONAL AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT. I’m most thankful for speech and debate for helping me realize the power of my voice. Mr. Maier believed in me and pushed me to excel in policy debate, a category that very few black women entered. He always reminded me that I had something valuable to contribute.” KARNESSIA GEORGETOWN ‘15 Yale University, Class of 2019

Debating Their Way to the Top St. Andrew’s has won the Magnolia Forensic League District Sweepstakes Plaque six times (1999, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018). The plaque is awarded for the best team performance at the District Debate and District Speech Qualifiers for NSDA Nationals. • NSDA named St. Andrew’s a Debate School of Honor in 2010, 2016, and 2018. • Speech and debate coach Darin Maier was named to the Debate Topic Wording Committee for the National Federation of High Schools in 2018. Maier served on the judging panel for the finals of Public Forum Debate last year at NSDA Nationals. • The 2018-19 speech and debate team includes 58 students. Above: Darin Maier

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says. “But that is complementary to the goal of helping students find a voice or develop an interest in ideas. Coaching a champion at a national tournament is an honor, but it’s not the definition of success for our program. When I think of success stories, I think of how speech and debate has given some of our students a venue for ideas that are important to them or another way to be viewed as an intellectual.” “When I entered ninth grade, I remember thinking that I didn’t really have a ‘thing,’ a particular talent or activity at which I had skill and that served as an outlet for me,” says Evan McCarley ’05. “But speech and debate was different. All you needed was a mind and a voice, and you could entertain and inspire audiences, make them laugh, cry, think, and take action. When I first began, I saw kids only a little older than I was do exactly that, and I thought, ‘I want to do what they do.’” “As a student who didn’t always thrive in the classroom, I enjoyed my time on the speech and debate team and the opportunity to learn outside the traditional educational environment,” says Patrick Weems ’04. “I remember shaking the first time I had to debate, but over time having the confidence to compete with the best in New York, Pittsburgh, and Washington, D.C. As a facilitator for the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation and now as the director of the Emmett Till Interpretive Center, I’ve been able to use the many lessons that speech and debate taught me, including listening, finding common ground, and being open and curious to new ideas.” Former speech and debate students point to a long list of life skills they gained from competing, including critical thinking, writing, research, public speaking, creative problem solving, and organizational skills. Caldwell Collins ’01 uses what she learned today as an attorney with Baker Donelson in Nashville. “Three of the most important skills I use as a litigator are the abilities to communicate clearly, think on my feet, and respond to a counter-argument,” Collins says. “I developed those skills in speech and debate at St. Andrew’s. Every time I speak to a jury, judge, or group of clients, I draw on lessons learned under the leadership of Randy Patterson.” “As a journalist, I use the skills I learned in speech and debate every day,” says Shalina Chatlani ’13, a reporter at Nashville Public Radio. “When I competed in policy debate, I had to digest new information quickly and come up with an effective argument. Every time there’s breaking news, I do exactly that – digest new information quickly to develop the story angle based on the facts.” Speech and debate helped shape Evan McCarley’s career even more directly; today, he is the speech and debate coach at Jackson Academy.

HALL OF FAME Randy Patterson, retired St. Andrew’s English teacher and founder of the speech and debate program, was inducted into the National Speech and Debate Association Coaches Hall of Fame in 2014. Patterson now lives in Murray, Kentucky, where he serves as an “unofficial” volunteer coach for the Murray High School speech and debate team.

CSI ST. ANDREW’S Randy Patterson recalls the first meeting he held at St. Andrew’s to gauge student interest in launching a forensics team. “I was excited to see a large group of students show up for the first meeting. I started talking about speech and debate and how happy I was that we would all be starting this new program together. After a few minutes, a student raised his hand and said, ‘What does that have to do with dead bodies?’ When I explained that it was not that kind of forensics team, half the room got up and left.”

“It’s incredibly rewarding to share speech and debate with young people,” McCarley says. “They need the skills it teaches now more than ever, and I’ve always wanted to repay the debt I owe to St. Andrew’s speech and debate by passing it along to others.” “Seeing the success of the program today makes me feel very blessed,” Randy Patterson says. “It makes me feel that I was called to do something truly worthy at St. Andrew’s. I heeded that call and St. Andrew’s did, too, and this is the result. I am not a parent, but when I look at the speech and debate program today, I feel the way I imagine a parent would feel – so proud.”

”STUDENTS WHO COMPETE IN SPEECH AND DEBATE LEARN HOW TO LOOK AT BOTH SIDES OF AN issue critically because they will have to debate both sides of a topic during the course of a tournament. They also learn how to disagree without being disagreeable, which is becoming a lost art in our world.” — DARIN MAIER, upper school history teacher and speech and debate director 47


“BEN AND I HAVE GAINED A RENEWED SENSE OF COMMUNITY BY REACHING OUT TO EVERYONE FOR THE ANNUAL FUND. It’s nice to make connections with other parents and community members who love the school and want to give back. Our children have gained a sense of satisfaction by contributing from their own savings accounts in honor of others. Our whole family has been so pleased to learn about all the ways the Annual Fund enriches the St. Andrew’s experience for us all.” SONJA KERR, ANNUAL FUND CO-CHAIR

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WHEN YOU GIVE TO THE ST. ANDREW’S ANNUAL FUND, YOU HELP ENSURE THAT ST. ANDREW’S REACHES THE NEXT LEVEL – THE NEXT LEVEL OF ENERGY AND ENTHUSIASM, THE NEXT LEVEL OF SCHOOL SPIRIT, AND THE NEXT LEVEL OF SUCCESS. ST. ANDREW’S PARENTS Ben and Sonja Kerr stepped up to the next level by serving as the 2018-19 Annual Fund Parent chairs. With four children in three divisions, the Kerrs have seen first-hand how important the Annual Fund is to the St. Andrew’s experience. “For us, taking it to the next level means jumping in and getting involved 100 percent,” Sonja Kerr says. “We all send our children to this school for a reason. We’re investing in their futures by choosing St. Andrew’s, and it’s not that difficult to take it to the next level when you are truly invested in something. We all can make small sacrifices to contribute and those small contributions add up to big things.” The Annual Fund provides for equipment and experiences that aren’t covered by tuition and allows St.

Andrew’s to respond immediately when unexpected opportunities arise. “Our Annual Fund theme, Taking it to the Next Level, reflects what St. Andrew’s does in all aspects of school life,” says Elizabeth Alley, director of annual giving. “St. Andrew’s is able to take the educational experience to the next level thanks in great part to generous support of the Annual Fund.” “Our goal this year is to have 100 percent parent participation,” Sonja Kerr says. “One hundred percent parent participation sends a clear message that we can come together on a higher level and do great things as a community. If you have not yet participated in the Annual Fund, please join us. Every St. Andrew’s family is important to this effort. We can’t reach our 100 percent goal without you.”

IF DAD WOULD JUST LISTEN HE’D LEARN SO MUCH MORE — ABOUT ALL THE THINGS THE ANNUAL FUND’S FOR. To kick off the 2018-19 Annual Fund, co-chairs Ben and Sonja Kerr and their four children, Hannah Grace, Poppy, Millie, and Jonah, dressed in costume as the Von Trapp family and performed an Annual Fund-themed rendition of “My Favorite Things” from the “The Sound of Music.” To view the Kerrs’ performance, visit gosaints.org/annualfund.

CALLING ALL ALUMNI

GRANDPARENT PARTICIPATION

Alumni account for 25% of Annual Fund giving. St. Andrew’s counts on its alums to take us to the next level. If you haven’t given, please show your support BEFORE JUNE 30.

HAS INCREASED

10% EACH YEAR

FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS.

WHETHER YOU’RE CONSIDERING MOVING UP TO THE NEXT LEVEL OF ANNUAL FUND GIVING OR GIVING AT THE NEXT LEVEL THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU, THERE’S NO BETTER TIME TO SHOW YOUR SUPPORT AND YOUR CONFIDENCE IN ST. ANDREW’S FUTURE. TO MAKE A PLEDGE OR A SECURE GIFT ONLINE, VISIT GOSAINTS.ORG/ANNUALFUND. PICTURED LEFT: ANNUAL FUND PARENT CHAIRS BEN AND SONJA KERR AND THEIR CHILDREN, HANNAH GRACE, CLASS OF 2022, POPPY, CLASS OF 2025, MILLIE, CLASS OF 2027, AND JONAH, CLASS OF 2029. 49


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M A Y D A Y


MAY DAY 2018 CELEBRATED THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF ST. ANDREW’S FOUNDING; THE 70TH BIRTHDAY OF GEORGE PENICK, WHO ATTENDED HIS LAST MAY DAY AS HEAD OF SCHOOL; AND 200 YEARS OF MISSISSIPPI HISTORY. EACH LOWER SCHOOL CLASS REPRESENTED A DIFFERENT DECADE AS THEY DANCED THROUGH HISTORY.

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THANK YOU

FOR A JOB WELL DONE. ST. ANDREW’S WISHES THE FOLLOWING teachers and staff well upon their departures after many years of loyal and creative service. These eight dedicated professionals have invested a combined 234 YEARS in St. Andrew’s and its students.

cutting edge ideas and how we could incorporate those into our classrooms. It not only benefitted our students, it gave us the opportunity to continue to learn and grow as educators.

LADY NOEL • 27 years Middle School Science Teacher Recipient of the Allenburger Faculty Award

ELLEN FORD • 15 years Pre-K Teaching Assistant • Kindergarten Teacher Assistant to the Chaplain • Director of Admissions Teacher and Assistant Director of Summer Camp

Best advice of my career: My dad, John Davis, former St. Andrew’s science teacher, was my mentor. His advice to me was to learn the nature of the children and develop Favorite St. Andrew’s Memory: The way St. Andrew’s my content and methodology on that to build a love of responded to the families displaced during the aftermath science and learning. I have loved teaching 6th grade of Hurricane Katrina. I was working in the admission students. They can still be awed by simple things and office and we entered over 50 children from the Coast the joy of discovery. To be able to share in their joy and New Orleans. The stories that each family carried of discovery is a wonderful gift. When the new upper with them were horrific and they needed a school for school science building was built, I bought a brick to their children that would not just teach academics, but inscribe. I thought long and hard about what I would also would enable their children to feel safe and rekin- leave to posterity. My quote was, “Science has the cooldle hope while their parents began to rebuild their lives. est toys.” I hope my students will agree with that sentiment long after I’m gone.

HELEN GREEN • 36 years 1st Grade Teacher • 2nd Grade Teacher Learning Facilitator

KEVIN O’MALLEY • 34 years Middle and Upper School Latin Teacher • Malone Online Course Instructor • Middle School Scheduler • Middle School What I’ll miss the most: Attending conferences with Dean of Students • Associate Head of Middle School colleagues. We shared notes and excitement about new, Interim Head of Middle School • Director of Technology

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IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO MAKE A GIFT IN HONOR OF RETIRING FACULTY OR STAFF, PLEASE VISIT GOSAINTS.ORG/HONOR

What I’ll miss the most: The push for both employees MARCIA WHATLEY • 40 years and students to be lifelong learners. What I won’t miss Middle School Math Teacher at all: The various flying creatures around Lake SherFavorite St. Andrew’s memories: What special memowood Wise trying to “repaint” my car. ries I have of helping students gain confidence, challenging students to reach their potential, and working with children to experience that “aha” moment! I also love DONNA PATRICK • 27 years reconnecting with many of my former students who are History Teacher • History Department Chair now fellow faculty members or parents of current stuService Learning Coordinator dents. And I’ll truly miss this close-knit community of What I’ll miss the most: In the fall semester, I teach special teachers and the positive atmosphere for teacha course to seniors entitled Contemporary Issues that ing and learning that they created. I’m ever grateful for forces me to stay on top of current events. I fear I will all the special relationships formed with students, colleagues, and their families here at St. Andrew’s. not be as diligent in my following of the news. What I won’t miss at all: Emails and meetings, emails and meetings, emails and meetings. They are both never ending. JAN WOFFORD • 20 years I actually took up knitting a couple of years ago to have Advancement Associate • Swim Team Coach something to help me get through long meetings. Parent Volunteer • Trustee Favorite St. Andrew’s Memory: One of my best memories is Head of School Dave Wood bringing champagne to the development office in 2000 when the Annual Fund went over $250,000 for the first time. Since then, the Annual Fund has reached over $600,000 several times. St. Andrew’s is all about community and I will miss being part of it as an employee, but I am grateful that I will continue to be a part as a grandparent of several students. I love St. Andrew’s. The opportunity to work at the institution that I am passionate about has been a gift to me.

ANNE RANCK • 35 years Kindergarten Assistant • 2nd Grade Assistant 1st Grade Teacher • Learning Facilitator Favorite St. Andrew’s Memory: The annual production of the first grade Christmas play. It was often hectic and we were always doubtful that we could successfully pull it off. But it never failed to be the perfect way to prepare for the sweetness and joy of the Christmas season.

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SPRING 2018

{sports}

BASEBALL State Champions 33-6 TENNIS State Champions 8-6 GIRLS TRACK State Champions ARCHERY 5-1 FAST PITCH SOFTBALL 3-12 BOYS GOLF District Champions 4th in State BOYS TRACK 4th in State

CONGRATULATIONS

TO THE SAINTS STATE CHAMPION BASEBALL, TENNIS, GIRLS TRACK, AND GIRLS SWIMMING TEAMS.

FALL 2018 GIRLS SWIMMING State Champions BOYS CROSS COUNTRY 5th in State GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY 2nd in State FOOTBALL 5-6 BOYS SWIMMING 2nd in State VOLLEYBALL District Champions WINTER 2019 BOYS BASKETBALL 22-10 Final Four GIRLS BASKETBALL 12-15 BOYS SOCCER 15-6-2 North State Champions GIRLS SOCCER 18-5-1 North State Champions POWERLIFTING Regionals

55


Batter {sports}

PICTURED ARE 2018 SENIORS CAMERON DANIELS, BANKS TOLLEY, DICKSON RAY, C.J. CARRON, SAM ROFFWARG, AND EVAN BOWMAN.

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Up!

SAINTS BASEBALL STATE

CHAMPIONS

AFTER SEVERAL YEARS OF COMING OH-SO-CLOSE, THE SAINTS BASEBALL TEAM BROUGHT THE 2018 3A STATE CHAMPIONSHIP HOME. IT WAS THE FIRST STATE CHAMPIONSHIP FOR THE BASEBALL TEAM SINCE 1985.

“The 2018 St. Andrew’s baseball team will always be a special one for me and the memories we had this season will last forever,” says Head Coach Mark Fanning. “We’ve had so many teams get so close the last several years, and I hope that all of those players will feel that this is their championship, too. It was great to see the St. Andrew’s community take over Trustmark Park to support us as we played for the championship. My greatest memory is watching our players as that winning run was scored and seeing them celebrate this long-awaited championship.”

The Saints previously claimed state baseball championships in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1985 under coach Mike Barkett. 57


{alumni awards}

MOST VALUABLE ST. ANDREW’S CONGRATULATES FOUR NEW INDUCTEES TO THE

ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME

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{alumni awards}

JEROME FRANKLIN ’85 A standout on the football field and on the basketball court, Jerome Franklin was also voted Mr. St. Andrew’s. Franklin attended Rhodes College, where he played football all four years and competed in the Division III National Playoffs. His senior year team was inducted into the Rhodes College Athletic Hall of Fame. “St. Andrew’s sports taught me about teamwork and what it takes to succeed in life. I learned how to deal with adversity, how to be a team player, and that no matter how hard you work, things may not go your way. I learned how to prepare for the unexpected and to trust your teammates, which translates to trusting your friends and your spouse.” Franklin’s most memorable moments from St. Andrew’s sports include memorable football catches and basketball triumphs, but his fondest memory is what he saw in the stands. “My biggest memory is of seeing my parents at every game. That’s something I carried forward. I made it my goal to be at every game my own kids played in.” Franklin coached his children’s t-ball, basketball, football, and soccer teams until they were in high school. He was a longtime player in adult league basketball, but now indulges his passion for sports on the golf course. Franklin lives in Lakeland, Tennessee, a suburb of Memphis, where he manages a branch office for a national brokerage firm. He and his wife, Dee, have two children, Alexis, a graduate of Rhodes College, and William, who followed in Jerome’s footsteps and currently plays football as a freshman at Rhodes College.

“MY BIGGEST MEMORY is of seeing my parents at every game.” Jerome Franklin

“OUR TRIP to the playoffs is one of my fondest memories.” Jason Word

“THE GREATEST LESSONS I learned playing sports at St. Andrew’s were how to juggle different aspects of life, not to be discouraged by what other people think of you, and how to be a leader.” LaReina Adams

“I HAD NO IDEA SOCCER would become so popular statewide, but I did think at the time that forming the state’s first high school soccer team would tie in with St. Andrew’s role as a leader.”

the foundation for today’s outstanding Saints athletic program. We helped build that competitive culture at St. Andrew’s.” An Alpha Omega graduate, Word went on to play basketball for both Mississippi College and Mississippi State University before graduating from MSU in 2001. Today, Word is a member of the government affairs team with the Mississippi Economic Council, but he hasn’t left basketball behind. Word’s side business is Champions Basketball Academy, an operation that finds him training basketball players from first grade through college students and pros. Word’s toughest competitor today is his wife, Melissa, who serves as the head basketball coach and athletic director at Canton High School. The two met at the Champion Sports store when Word was a junior at St. Andrew’s; their first date was playing basketball. The Words have two student-athletes at St. Andrew’s, 8th grader Madison and 5th grader Justin. “Sending my children to St. Andrew’s was a no-brainer to me. St. Andrew’s is the number one school academically and despite our love for sports, my family’s first and foremost priority is academics. St. Andrew’s also has a family atmosphere that I loved as a student and that I wanted for my own children.”

LAREINA ADAMS ’05 LaReina Adams smashed basketball records at St. Andrew’s, graduating with the records for leading scorer, leading rebounder, and 14 other individual school records. She was named to the national McDonald’s All-American High School Albert Lyle Basketball Team. Adams also competed in track and field, participating in every event except long distance running, and took   home two gold medals and 53 ribbons from JASON WORD ’96 the regional, district, and south state Missis Jason Word was a four-year letterman in basketball, sippi High School Activities Association meets. Adams earning honors from Most Improved Player to Most also sang in the choir, cheered, and was a member of the Valuable Player over his high school career. He was a homecoming court. member of the first St. Andrew’s team to make it to Adams played basketball at Millsaps College, where the “Big House,” the Mississippi High School Activities she earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology. She also Association’s state playoffs in the Mississippi Coliseum holds a degree from the University of Memphis and a in downtown Jackson. doctorate of nursing practice from the University of “Our trip to the playoffs is one of my fondest memo- Tennessee. She is a nurse practitioner at Sequoia Family ries. We may have lost the game, but to have been a part Medical Center in California. of that team is a great memory. It’s an amazing feeling “The greatest lessons I learned playing sports at St. to know that my teammates and our coaches helped lay Andrew’s were how to juggle different aspects of life,

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{alumni awards}

ABOVE: LAREINA ADAMS, JASON WORD, JEROME FRANKLIN, AND ALBERT LYLE

not to be discouraged by what other people think of you, and how to be a leader. I often got home late in the evening after practices. I had to be methodical when it came to getting my class assignments done, studying for tests, and finding time for family and friends. In college and graduate school, I was able to juggle working fulltime, studying, and playing basketball without much stress as opposed to some of my classmates. “I found in life people will underestimate you. This happened to our St. Andrew’s teams often, and I learned to keep working and be successful in spite of the naysayers. In my job today, many of my newer coworkers look to me to help guide them through certain clinical decisions. I don’t believe I would have this kind of leadership ability if it were not for the St. Andrew’s culture, which helped shaped me into a leader.”  

play,” Lyle recalls. “St. Andrew’s had the only team in Mississippi, so all of our opponents came from out of state. We didn’t have a soccer field, so we added a lower crossbar on the football goalpost and improvised.” Under Lyle’s leadership, that first soccer team put not only St. Andrew’s soccer, but also soccer itself in the Mississippi spotlight. Several years later, other schools followed suit. “I had no idea soccer would become so popular statewide, but I did think at the time that forming the state’s first high school soccer team would tie in with St. Andrew’s role as a leader. Starting the program at St. Andrew’s is one of the happiest memories of my life. Several parents of boys that played on that first team told me that it helped their sons become leaders on and off the field. I run into some of the kids today, and they still tell me how proud they are to have played on the first high school soccer team in Mississippi.” “I had the chance to meet Mr. Lyle the night he was inducted into the Hall of Fame,” says Simón Barinas, St. Andrew’s head boys soccer coach. “It is amazing to hear what he did with small resources and little support of the sport in Mississippi. His accomplishment is something that St. Andrew’s should always be proud of. Without Albert Lyle, I wouldn’t be here, doing what I love. It is an honor to be coaching the program that he started.”

ALBERT LYLE Soccer was still something of a novelty in Mississippi 46 years ago, when St. Andrew’s parent Albert Lyle approached the head of school with the idea of fielding a soccer team. Lyle, who had played soccer on a club team, not only launched a lower school and upper school soccer program, but also volunteered as its coach. “The first question was who were we supposed to

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{alumni awards}

FOR ONE

THE HISTOR Y

BOOKS Ben Wynne ’79 • St. Andrew’s Distinguished Alumnus of the Year

“I HAVE LOVED HISTORY since Wynne holds an undergraduate I was in elementary school, and the degree from Millsaps College, a masDISTINGUISHED ALUMNI South’s complicated history makes it ter’s degree in history from MissisOF THE YEAR AWARD an excellent and interesting region to sippi College, and a doctorate in hisThe highest honor bestowed study,” says noted author, historian, tory from the University of Mississippi. upon an alumnus or alumna, and professor Ben Wynne. “The culHe previously taught at the University the Distinguished Alumni Award recognizes alumni who have ture of the region is my culture, and of Mississippi, Valdosta State Univermade extraordinary personal the more you learn about your own sity, and Florida State University. achievements, professional culture, the more you learn about “By the time you graduate from St. accomplishments, and significant yourself.” Andrew’s, especially if you went there contributions to the community, The author of four well-received from the first grade forward like I did, arts, sciences, or business. books on southern history and culyou have all the intellectual skills you Recipients are individuals whose ture, Wynne is a history professor need to pursue any occupation you exemplary lives and activities both benefit society and reflect at the University of North Georlike. I was better prepared for college honor upon St. Andrew’s gia, where he specializes in antebeland graduate school because I went Episcopal School. One alumnus or lum American studies, the American to St. Andrew’s. We were taught to alumna is recognized each year. South, and the Civil War era. He lives think critically, which is an extremely in Gainesville, Georgia with his wife, useful life skill. It’s a cliché, but if Carly, and their children, Lily and Cotton. you’re going to build a tall building you need a rock-solid An Alpha Omega graduate of St. Andrew’s, Wynne foundation, and that’s what St. Andrew’s offers – a founcredits his St. Andrew’s teachers with helping prepare dation on which you can build for the rest of your life.” him for his writing and teaching career. “All the history teachers we had at St. Andrews made history interesting to me, especially Andy Mullins. When I BOOKS BY BEN WYNNE INCLUDE: started writing seriously, I had a great foundation to build on because at St. Andrew’s we had one great English The Man Who Punched Jefferson Davis: teacher after another. Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Donley, and Mrs. The Political Life of Henry Stuart Foote, Southern Unionist Kitchings were all hall of fame-caliber English teachers. In Tune: Charley Patton, Jimmie Rodgers, and The Roots “Honestly, every teacher I had at St. Andrew’s was inspiof American Popular Music rational in one way or another,” Wynne continues. “I looked up to them and collectively, they laid the foundaMississippi’s Civil War: A Narrative History tion for everything I did after leaving the school. In hindA Hard Trip: A History of the 15th Mississippi Infantry, sight, it’s easy to see how lucky we were to have had all C.S.A., 1861-1865 of those great teachers, from elementary school all the way through high school.” “WRITING SOMETHING WORTHWHILE” “I’d love to be able to say that writing was a passion of mine from an early age, but I didn’t think about writing books until I was in my late twenties,” Ben Wynne says. “Writing something worthwhile takes a certain kind of discipline and I didn’t really cultivate that until a little later on.”

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{alumni awards}

BUILDING ON A

STRONG

FOUNDATION Jack Allin ’96 • The St. Andrew’s Loyalty Award

EARLY PHOTOS OF JACK ALLIN pel will be dedicated in memory of THE ST. ANDREW’S show a toddler building elaborate casBishop Duncan Gray, Jr., who conLOYALTY AWARD tles and houses out of wooden blocks. firmed Allin into the church. Flash forward a few years, and Allin “The chapel is not the kind of buildThe St. Andrew’s Loyalty Award honors St. Andrew’s was constructing garages for his ing you get to design every day. It alumni who, in deed or action, matchbox car collection. Those early means a lot to me personally and it reflect and recognize the photos were a glimpse of things to will have such an impact on the St. importance of being an alumnus come. Today, Allin is an architect Andrew’s campus. The day that buildor alumna of St. Andrew’s; who with Wier Boerner Allin Architecture. ing opens will be an emotional day for demonstrate pride in their alma An Alpha Omega graduate of St. a lot of people. Will I cry? Absolutely.” mater; and whose interest and Andrew’s, Allin’s connection to the Hailey and Jack served on the loyalty are evident by their school didn’t stop when he received capital campaign cabinet to help significant, notable, and his diploma. His wife, Hailey, is the spearhead fundraising for Forward meritorious contributions St. Andrew’s assistant lower school Saints. Thanks to their tremendous toward the advancement chaplain and co-chair of 2019 Starry efforts and all those who served, St. of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Night. The couple has two children at Andrew’s opened the Early Childhood School. One alumnus or alumna is recognized each year. St. Andrew’s, Maury (Class of 2025) and Discovery Centers and the Athand Sarah (Class of 2029). letics and Recreation Center. Allin “I can’t personally claim any more loyalty to St. continues to advance the campaign by serving on the Andrew’s than Hailey can. I just have the benefit of hav- alumni campaign cabinet. He is also a Regent member ing graduated from the school,” Allin says. “St. Andrew’s of the St. Andrew’s Corporation. was a wonderful fit for me, and now it’s a wonderful fit for Hailey and our children.” “I’M GRATEFUL FOR THIS HONOR Allin is handling the architectural design of several projects in the coming phases of the Forward Saints camin part because I see so many other people doing amazing paign, including the chapel. The project means even more work for the school. I was fortunate to have graduated to Allin because it’s the continuation of a family legacy. from St. Andrew’s and I’m grateful for the experiences Allin’s maternal grandfather, Tom Biggs, was the architect St. Andrew’s is giving our children now. There were people of the St. Andrew’s south campus, and his paternal grandwho came before us who paid it forward for our benefit. father, John Maury Allin, Sr., was the Presiding Bishop We owe it to them to do the same.” of the Episcopal Church of the United States. The cha“IT’S EXCITING TO HELP SHAPE THE PLACE THAT WAS SO INFLUENTIAL in my formative years. St. Andrew’s has always emphasized the importance of architecture in the experience of learning, and my own experience at St. Andrew’s has shaped my practice of architecture. As a parent, it’s exciting to know that Maury and Sarah will learn in spaces I designed.” 65


EYE ON

ALUMNI

IF YOU’RE HOSTING OR WOULD LIKE TO HOST A ST. ANDREW’S ALUMNI GATHERING IN YOUR AREA, THE ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE WOULD BE HAPPY TO HELP. CONTACT DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LAUREN MCMILLIN ’10 AT MCMILLINLA@GOSAINTS.ORG.

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2018 Alumni Games Parent of Grad Party Alumni Holiday Party 2018 Alumni Games Alumni Holiday Party Class of 2013 5-Year Reunion New Orleans Alumni Gathering Class of 2008 10-Year Reunion

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ALUMNI AND FRIENDS ITALY ADVENTURE — Wish you could re-live the St. Andrew’s Italy trip? Here’s your chance. St. Andrew’s is thrilled to announce an Italy trip for St. Andrew’s alumni and friends led by beloved former faculty member Patsy Ricks. Scheduled for March 2020, this trip will take you on a journey through the wonders of Italy. In addition to discovering the country’s artistic and architectural treasures, you will experience unique offerings such as tours through Tuscany’s wine region and a lesson with a professional Italian chef at the Florence Cooking School. For more information and to register, visit gosaints.org/italy. Space is limited, so don’t miss out.

HOMECOMING 2019

SAVE THE DATE • SEPTEMBER 27 HOMECOMING 2019 WILL INCLUDE A PRE-GAME ALUMNI TAILGATE AND REUNIONS FOR THE CLASSES OF 1979, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2009, AND 2014. If you’d like to help plan your class reunion, contact Lauren McMillin ’10 at mcmillinla@gosaints.org.

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CLASS NOTES Please email future Class Notes to Lauren McMillin ’10, director of alumni and public relations, at mcmillinla@gosaints.org. 2014 Ann Smithson is an assistant language teacher at a high school in Mie Prefecture, Japan.

2008 Greg McMillin was recently hired by the Cincinnati Reds as the team’s assistant director of international scouting.

2013 Nathaniel Johnson recently spent time studying Japanese at Kansai Gaidai in Osaka, Japan, in a program through Portland State University. He also worked as a head chef at a restaurant in Osaka.

Elise Parker Schneider and her husband, Doug, welcomed their first child, Hewitt, on September 27, 2018. Graham Johnson is the founder of Truly Oreganic, an indoor organic farming company based in Oregon. The company won a 2018 Cultivation Classic Award for mixed ratio GH with cultivated light. Johnson and his business partner were featured in a Washington and Oregon State journal.

2012 Emma Liston graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in May 2018 with an MFA in creative writing and as a Randall Jarrell Creative Writing Scholarship recipient. She has since returned to Jackson and is working in the body donation program at UMMC.

2007 Mary Claire Meeks and Phillip Lyons ’08 were married on January 19, 2019. Among the wedding party were alums Selby McRae Graepel ’07, Jacob Perry ’07, Greg McMillin ’08, Jacob Baker ’06, and John Spann ’08.

2011 Ethan Johnson graduated from Montana State University in Bozeman with a major in anthropology and a minor in history. Two years ago, he moved to Prague to teach English as a second language and is preparing to return to school to study archaeology.

2005 Le’Spencer Walker and his wife, Lauren, welcomed a baby girl, Zoë Lou, on December 24, 2018. In February, Le’Spencer served as the creative director of Target’s Black History Month product development team. The family lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

2010 Lillie Floyd and Drew Townsend were married on July 25, 2018, in Richmond, Virginia.

Tom Allin and his wife, Sarah, welcomed a daughter, Flora Louise, in September 2018. They live in Clemmons, North Carolina.

Christina Holy McRae and Alexander McRae welcomed a baby girl, Harper Ann McRae, on June 21, 2018. Alexander is currently in his third year of medical school at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine and Christina is a dentist at Key Dental Group in Madison.

Brent Smith graduated from the University of Mississippi in 2009 and the University of Mississippi Medical School in 2013. During his time at Ole Miss, Brent was a fouryear member of the varsity football team and the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He completed a four-year residency training in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Alabama Birmingham in June 2017. While in residency he met his wife, the former Mary Katherine McCurdy of Montgomery, Alabama, and they were married in Birmingham,

2009 Sidney Anthony married Matt Schovee in Dallas, Texas, on April 7, 2018. Among the bridesmaids were alums Caroline Peeples ’09, Maggie Woods Roberts ’09, and Mary Katherine Kitchings Woodall ’09.

MEET NEW TRUSTEE ERIN MCCAIN ’98

ERIN MCCAIN HAS JOINED THE ST. ANDREW’S BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND ALSO serves as the St. Andrew’s Parents’ Association (SAPA) chair-elect. A graduate of Millsaps College, McCain is chief operating officer and director of investment operations for WealthPartners, LLP. She and her husband, Cody, have three sons, Cameron, Mason, and Tyler, all of whom are students at St. Andrew’s. “As an Alpha Omega graduate and a parent, St. Andrew’s is woven into my entire being. My time there was instrumental in shaping me into who I am today, and now I see first-hand on a daily basis how the amazing faculty and administration are helping mold my children into empathetic, kind, and thoughtful people. I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve as St. Andrew’s embarks on the first steps of its new vision for the future.” McCain has previously served on the alumni board and on the SAPA executive board. She brings a unique skill set, noting that “as the parent of three, sometimes four athletic boys – this includes my husband who can sometimes revert back to his younger days – I can corral, herd, direct, coach, and console with the best of them.” 68


Harper Ann McRae

Hewitt Schneider

Zoe Lou Walker

Candace and David Williams

Tina and Graham Wells

Alabama, on March 21, 2015. In July 2017 Brent started a 3-year fellowship in gynecologic oncology at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. Brent and Mary Katherine live in Columbus with their four-year-old golden retriever, Belle, and the newest member of their family, daughter Olivia, born in July 2018. 2004 Whitney-Lehr Ray Koening and her husband, Errik, welcomed a daughter in March 2019. Whitney-Lehr also began a new job last year as an advertising executive for the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal.

ANA GOYARROLA AND MIA HAMMOND IN BAKIO, SPAIN

2003 Candace Deer married David Williams on January 12, 2019, in Nassau, Bahamas. Drew Mallette and his wife, Kathryn, welcomed their second son, Thomas Carlisle, on February 20, 2018.

FROM SPAIN TO ST. ANDREW’S A FAMILY TRADITION

Creighton Hardy and his wife, Mary Beth, welcomed a daughter Mary Powell, in August. She is also welcomed by her big sisters and current students, Hensley, Class of 2030, and Sarah Michael, Class of 2032.

IN 1988, ANDER GOYARROLA TRAVELED FROM HIS home in Spain to Mississippi, where he spent a year as an exchange student at St. Andrew’s. “It was the first time I studied abroad. I stayed with two lovely host families, the Fishers and the McCarters. I fondly remember the school. The facilities were great and the teachers had a great dedication. I always felt I was at home. “I wanted my daughter to get to know the American culture,” Ander continues. “I want her to be an open-minded person and I knew that St. Andrew’s was a friendly place where she could learn about new people and discover new things.” Thirty years after he made the trip, Ander’s daughter, Ana, followed in her father’s footsteps. In 2018, Ana studied for three months at St. Andrew’s. Like her father, Ana lived with a “lovely host family,” Bill and Alecia Porch and their daughter, Mia Hammond, Class of 2019. The summer before Ana’s visit, Mia spent five weeks in Bakio, Spain, living with the Goyarrola family. “The first day at St. Andrew’s, I was surprised by how friendly everyone treated me,” Ana says. “That is something that hasn’t changed because my father also loved it. Football games were the best. I loved cheering and singing songs with my friends at the games, and I really enjoyed watching the dance team and the cheerleaders. “[Through me], my father has been able to live again this amazing experience. He has been able to remember beautiful moments and people,” Ana continues. “This has been an amazing experience for my whole family.”

2002 Anna Marsh Selby received a doctorate of philosophy in clinical mental health counseling from Mississippi State University in May 2018. After obtaining her B.A. from Millsaps College in 2006, Selby taught in the Rankin County School District while pursuing a master’s degree in education, as well as a master’s degree in counseling from Mississippi College. In 2010, Selby was the recipient of the Charles M. Scott Award presented by the MC Department of Psychology and Counseling and the Mississippi Counseling Association. Selby is a licensed professional counselor and is currently associated with fellow alumna, Dr. Megan Sones Clapton ’98, director of Mindful Therapy in Ridgeland. Selby is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology and Counseling at Mississippi College. At home in Belhaven, she and her husband, David, are the proud parents of Sarah Jane, Class of 2032, and Virginia Rue. Brooks Vance and his wife, Rebecca Brannan Vance ’05, welcomed a daughter, Olivia, on August 9, 2018. Tina Heitmann married Graham Wells in Highlands, North Carolina, on February 18, 2018. The wedding party included St. Andrew’s alumni Rachel Allen ’03, Marty Hitt Kelly ’03, and Lane Walton Walker ’03. 69


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AN OPPORTUNITY ENGINEERED FOR SUCCESS

CARTER BOYLE ’15 COMPLETED A YEAR OF STUDY and work in automotive engineering in Germany through the Two Steps Ahead Program at the University of Alabama. Boyle spent his junior year in Germany, where he studied at Hochschule Esslingen, a university of applied sciences, and interned at the Daimler AG Mercedes-Benz plant in Sindelfingen. “At German technical universities, the senior-level material is taught by top engineers from the industry. I took a course in electric motor design taught by a chief engineer from Mercedes-Benz. That’s an opportunity you just can’t get in the United States.” Following a semester at Hochschule Esslingen, Boyle completed a six-month internship at Mercedes-Benz, working in electric powertrain development for the renowned automotive company in a country recognized worldwide for its engineering prowess. Boyle will graduate from Alabama in December with a degree in electrical and computer engineering and minors in German and applied mathematics. “The most valuable part of my year abroad stems from being immersed in a foreign language and culture for a full year. Now, whenever I face a new project, I know I can do it in German, and I know it’s going to be that much easier in my native language. It’s an irreplaceable confidence that’s difficult to gain any other way.” His time in Germany came with an added bonus. Boyle connected with the family who hosted him when he visited the country as a St. Andrew’s sophomore. “I visited them a number of times and experienced an authentic German Christmas when I stayed with them over the holidays. I’m amazed how the connections I made at St. Andrew’s have remained in my life four years after I graduated.”

Jessi and Carlton Wall

2001 Carrie Smith recently finished her Ph.D. at the University of Georgia in counseling and student personnel services. Her dissertation was a critical look at collegiate studentathlete academic involvement. Smith serves as the assistant dean of students at the University of Georgia. Carlton Wall and Jessica (Jessi) Bailey of Tupelo were married on April 28, 2018 at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Tupelo, Mississippi. The wedding party included Marshall Wall ’96, Zachary Taylor ’01, and Jenny Taylor ’03. The couple has made a home in Tupelo, where Carlton is a banker for BancorpSouth by day and runs an improv comedy troupe by night. Jessi works at the Itawamba Community College library. 1998 Andrew Chatham and his wife, Carolyn, welcomed a son, Truman, on November 9, 2018. 1997 Michelle Purdy recently released her first solo book, Transforming the Elite: Black Students and the Desegregation of Private Schools, published by the University of North Carolina Press. 1996 Jennifer Allred was recently ordained to the Episcopal priesthood. She lives in St. Paul, Minnesota with her husband and twin daughters. 1978 Tom Mills celebrated 25 years of service in solo private practice of gastroenterology with Digestive Healthcare in Jackson.

CLASS OF 2016 TEAMMATES BEN HEARON, THATCHER SHEPARD, AND JACK HARTH

SUPPORT FOR JACK HARTH ’16

JACK HARTH, ALUMNUS AND SON OF FACULTY members Chris and Michelle Harth, was seriously injured in February when he was hit by a motorist while riding his motorcycle. At the time of this writing, Jack remained hospitalized with months of intense rehabilitation ahead. The St. Andrew’s community has responded through prayer, food deliveries, and by establishing a GoFundMe account to help cover medical expenses beyond what insurance will pay. “Our family has experienced a wide range of emotions, from fear and anger to sadness and uncertainty to joy and gratitude. Every day brings something new and helps Jack recover, both physically and neurologically,” Chris Harth said. “Through it all, we have been buoyed by the love, prayers, and support shown by the St. Andrew’s community, the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi, and friends here and elsewhere. While Jack’s recovery will be long and challenging, we remain eternally grateful that he is here with us, that he is recovering, and that so many have done so much to help him and to help us.” 70


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of Mountain Brook, Ala. (Ed); his sister-in-law, Kathy Keach Allen of Oxford; his two grandsons, Sidney Perry Allen, III and William Julian Allen of Jackson.

IN MEMORIAM Mark Vinson ’80 6/6/1962 – 11/12/2018 Richard Mark Vinson was born June 6, 1962, on his mother’s birthday in Jackson. He attended St. Andrew’s from pre-K through his senior year. He was a devoted Christian as well as a well-respected realtor in the Jackson Metro Area. He loved his profession and helping others. Beyond his career, Vinson had a variety of interests and passions, including photography, animals, music, his church, NASCAR, and great guitar players. Vinson is survived by his companion of 12 years and fiancée, Lisa Key, and his loving and supportive aunt, Lynette Ashley. He is preceded in death by his mother, Jessie Vinson, former St. Andrew’s receptionist and executive assistant, and his father, Richard Vinson.

Ella Weston Former Faculty 1929-2018 Ella Weston was born in McComb, Mississippi. While attending McComb High School, she was a drum major in the McComb High School band. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education at Ole Miss, where she was a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority, a majorette, and a member of the Ole Miss band. Weston later attended Mississippi College where she earned a master’s degree in elementary education. She was inducted into Kappa Delta Pi, an honorary education society, in 1975, the year she earned her degree from Mississippi College. Ella taught at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School for 29 years. She had previously taught kindergarten at St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School in Shreveport, La. William F. Selph, III (Duke), Farrell Payne Weston’s son, preceded her in death, as did her brother, Former Faculty John (Bubba) White. She is survived by a daughter, Deb1948-2018 Former faculty member Farrell Payne passed away on orah Selph Davis and husband, Jerry; three grandchildren August 25, 2018, in Mexico at the age of 70. She taught Span- and their spouses: Scott and Ginny Davis, Stuart and Nikki Davis, and Maggie and Nick Carr. Weston had one preish in the upper school from 1993 through 2000. cious great-grandchild, Lucy Davis. She also leaves behind one very spoiled dachshund and companion, Greta. Sidney Allen Former Trustee Dr. Al Simon 7/22/1950 – 11/10/2018 Former Faculty Born in Greenwood, Mississippi, Sidney Allen was raised 2/9/1927 12/5/2018 in Indianola and graduated in 1968 from The McCallie A native of New Orleans, La., Dr. Albert Simon enlisted School in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He attended the Univerin the U.S. Navy after graduating as a scholar-athlete from sity of Mississippi, where he was a member of Sigma Alpha Jesuit High School. After serving in World War II, Dr. Epsilon Fraternity and a letterman on the men’s tennis Simon went on to play baseball at Louisiana State Uniteam. He graduated from Ole Miss in 1972 with a bachelor versity. In 1950, he joined the U.S. Army when the United of business administration degree. He served in the Missis- States entered the Korean Conflict. Upon his return, he sippi Army National Guard from 1968 through 1974. Allen earned a Ph.D. in health, physical education, and psycholbegan his career working with his father at Delco Devel- ogy at LSU. Through athletics and health studies, Al found opment Company in Indianola, followed by serving as a his lifelong calling as a coach, as a teacher, and as a mentor congressional aide in the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. who encouraged young people to be the best they could Senator James O. Eastland. He returned to Jackson in 1975 be. Named Louisiana Basketball’s Coach of the Year in to serve as vice president of Hancock Mortgage Corpora- 1963, Al continued to coach championship teams on the tion and later as president of Mississippi Mortgage Com- high school and college levels. Simon is survived by his wife pany. He returned to Indianola in 1982 as vice president of Margaret; by his sister Claire Whitney (Bob); by his daughAllen Corporation, before moving back to Jackson in 1984. ters: Nanette Cook (David) and Michelle Dunaway (Lige) He served as a leader in numerous organizations, including of Lafayette; Allison Barrett ’84 of Jackson; Ellen Simons Christ United Methodist Church and St. Andrew’s Episco- (Scott) of Point Clear; Susan Margaret Barrett ’90 (Scott) of Jackson; Leighton Strong ’93 (Chris) of New Orleans; pal School. Perhaps his proudest philanthropic achieveKathryn Meloan Barrett ’96 and Danielle Beard of Jackson. ments came from his service on the board of Friends of He also leaves behind loving grandchildren: Clare (RobChildren’s Hospital, the fundraising arm for Batson Chilert), Emily (Andy), John, Eleanor and Christopher Cook; dren’s Hospital at the University of Mississippi Medical Cen- Dr. David, Kevin and Elise Dunaway; Barrett (Emily), Alliter, our state’s only children’s hospital. Allen is survived by son Douglas and Cyrus Manning; Lauryn Elizabeth, Sarah his loving wife of 39 years, former St. Andrew’s staff mem- Ellen, Jacob and Edward Simons; Charlie, Benjamin, and ber Deborah Wood Allen of Jackson; his son, Sidney Perry Lily Margaret Johnson; Sadie Margaret, Virginia, and ClifAllen, Jr. ’00 of Jackson (Kristin); his daughter, Rachel Wood ton Strong, along with Grayson Simons, his great grandAllen ’03 of Jackson; his brother, Meredith Baird Allen of son, Jill Lucas, brothers-in-law, C.B. Carroll (Jeanne), Jimmy Greenwood (Margaret); his sister, Shirley Anne Stringfellow Carroll; and his precious Boudreaux cousins. 71


THE TIES THAT BIND THE CLASS OF 2018 INCLUDED 47 MEMBERS WITH SIBLINGS OR PARENTS WHO ARE ALUMNI OR CURRENT MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, PATRON SAINTS (OR FORMER TRUSTEES), CORPORATION, OR FACULTY AND STAFF. 48% OF THE CLASS CLAIMS A TIE TO ST. ANDREW’S.

Seph Aleithawe ’12, Ghaith Aleithawe

John Joseph Angel ’14, Elizabeth Angel

Mina Arain, Omair Arain ’11

Sarah McLean Archer ’14, Jack Archer, Lorna Doone Hector Archer ’83

Jeffrey Blackwood ’86, Paige Blackwood

Forrest Bobbitt, Spencer Bobbitt ’16, Zach Bobbitt

Michael Callahan ’15, Katlyne Callahan

Grace Carroll, Gus Carroll ’16

Vallie Castle, Lily Grace Castle ’15

Lorna Lyell Chain ’83, Alison Chain ’16, John Chain, Tippy Reimers Lyell ’58

Fletcher Clark, Griffin Clark ’15

Dennis Cranford (Faculty), Anna Cranford, Ben Cranford ’07

Sam Cupples, DeWayne Cupples (Staff)

Jack Ditto, John Ditto ’90

Taylor Donnelly, Zack Donnelly ’13

Joseph Garner, John Garner Not pictured is Jessica Garner ’15

Ali Garriga ’16, Wynn Garriga, Stephanie Garriga (Staff and Former Trustee)

Marion Gray ’88, Trey Gray, Stephanie Gray (Faculty) Not pictured is Taylor Gray ’16

Parker Grogan, Graham Grogan ’15

Taylor Jones ’05, John Spencer Jones, Elizabeth Jones Marchetti ’08 Not pictured is Thurman Jones ’05

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Elizabeth Kruse ’15, Dae Robinson, Barney Robinson ’84, Emily Kruse

Ike LaRue ’71, Gracie LaRue, Jayne Barksdale LaRue ’78, Ike LaRue

Anne Coursey Little ’14, Tee Little ’16, Betsy Little, Elizabeth Little (Former Faculty)

Isabel May, Sumner May ’13, Emmy Sartin Downey ’85

Wilson Montjoy (Former Trustee and Regent), Wilson Montjoy ’16, Wade Montjoy

Millie Morse ’16, William Morse, Lynda Morse (Staff)

Monica Pani ’10, Satwik Pani

Karson Pettit ’17, Chappel Pettit

Helena Qu ’14, Larry Qu, Phillip Qu ’12

Richard Rein, Joseph Rein ’15

Jessica Rubinsky ’13, Ashley Rubinsky ’15, Tovah Rubinsky, Bert Rubinsky ’79

Chris Scott ’79, Elizabeth Scott, Charlie Scott ’11, Stephanie Quiriconi Scott ’79, Melissa Holy ’12

Katie Seage, Kyle Seage (Regent)

Ann Smithson ’14, Jack Smithson, Betty Black Smithson ’81

Leland Speed (Former Trustee), Isabelle Speed ’15, Warner Speed, Stewart Speed ’82

Jonathan Springer ’16, Sarah Springer

Lee Schmidt ’14, Lauren Tanaka, Meghan Tanaka ’15

Garrison Wade, Vangela Wade (Trustee), Christian Wade

Will Waddell ’15, Drew Waddell

Emily Watson ’17, Louis Watson ’84, Lauren Watson, Jamie Watson (Former Trustee), Jane Ashley Watson ’15

Holly Wiggs (Trustee), Madeleine Wiggs

Zaria Williams ’15, Zoe Williams, Nichole Williams (Faculty)

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I’VE BEEN TEACHING AT ST. ANDREW’S SINCE 1994, INSTRUCTING CLASSROOMS FILLED WITH INQUISITIVE, ENTHUSIASTIC EARLY CHILDHOOD AND LOWER SCHOOL STUDENTS. ven 25 years ago, St. Andrew’s was not a ing the details of what that ideal innovative classroom will school where teachers typically stood in look like, but we know it will include lightweight, modular the front of the classroom and lectured furniture that can be arranged into endless seating arrangestudents seated at rigid rows of desks. ments for presentations, collaborations, and project work. Instead, largely guided by teachers’ We know that it will include wobble stools and standing intuitions, we understood that flexibil- desks along with more traditional options, all integrated ity in the classroom environment was into a classroom space that’s conducive to learning. important to learning. I frequently rear While the most immediate thing peoranged the furniture in my classroom ple may notice is, “Look, new furniture,” “TODAY, I’M to better allow students to collaborate educational innovation is about so EXCITED TO SEE on projects, to create a “new” space out much more. It’s about studying every ST. ANDREW’S of the old to reinforce a new lesson or aspect of what affects a teacher or stuINTENTIONALLY activity, or simply for a change of pace dent during the school day, and making FOCUSED ON to keep my students engaged. sure that we’re doing everything possiassessing our Today, I’m excited to see St. Andrew’s ble to enhance the teaching and learnlearning environment intentionally focused on assessing our ing experience. to make sure we’re learning environment to make sure I’m excited about moving into my new using our space to we’re using our space to the best advanclassroom, but I’m more excited about the best advantage tage for our students. the bigger picture at St. Andrew’s. Our for our students.” Educational innovation is one of school has never rested on its laurels. three areas emphasized in our new Instead, we’ve always focused on what vision statement. As the coordinator of the lower school we can do even better. This is especially evident in the learning environment taskforce, I’ve had the opportunity progress made possible by the Forward Saints campaign. to explore what “educational innovation” at St. Andrew’s The model classroom is just one part of our never-endmight look like over the new few years. My fellow task- ing, visionary effort to prepare our students and our force members and I have conducted research and vis- school for the best possible futures. ited schools in other states to observe different examples If you’re on the lower school campus next fall, please of educational innovation in practice. We’ve brought the stop by my classroom and take a look at the future of best of those ideas, plus our own contributions based on innovative learning. I’ll be happy to pull up a wobble stool years of teaching and the successes we’ve already seen and tell you more about it. in newer buildings like the McRae Science Center, Lois Kennedy Hall, and Gertrude C. Ford Hall, together in Beth Peterson ’78 is the coordinator of the lower school learning the new vision for St. Andrew’s. environment taskforce. Peterson has taught kindergarten, pre In the fall of this year, my third grade students and K, 2nd, and 3rd grade at St. Andrew’s. She is also an alumna; I will learn and teach in a pilot classroom that will put Peterson attended St. Andrew’s from the 7th through 10th grade, these innovative ideas on display and serve as the model when her family relocated to Texas. Peterson is overjoyed to be for upgraded classrooms campus-wide. We’re still finaliz- teaching at the school she loved as a student. 74


THANKS TO GENEROUS SUPPORT, ST. ANDREW’S HAS RAISED NEARLY $900,000 OF THE $2,200,000 NEEDED TO CONSTRUCT A CHAPEL ON THE NORTH CAMPUS.

FOR A VIRTUAL TOUR OF THE PLANNED CHAPEL AND TO MAKE YOUR GIFT ONLINE, VISIT

GOSAINTS.ORG/ EPISCOPALCHAPEL


OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT 370 OLD AGENCY ROAD RIDGELAND, MISSISSIPPI 39157–9714 601.853.6000 | WWW.GOSAINTS.ORG

PLEASE SEND UPDATED ADDRESS INFORMATION FOR ANY OF YOUR FAMILY MEMBERS TO addresschange@gosaints.org.

OUR MISSION

TO N U RTU RE A DI VER SE COMMUNI TY I N THE EP ISCO P A L TRA D ITI ON, F OSTER I NG SPI R I T UAL GR OWTH, M O RA L RESP O N SIBIL ITY, ACADEMI C EXCELLENCE, AND AR TI STI C A N D A THL ETIC P U RSUI T S, WHI LE PR EPAR I NG F OR A LI F E O F SERVICE TO O UR COMMUNI TY AND THE WOR LD.

Profile for St. Andrew's Episcopal School

Archways 26 – Spring 2019  

St. Andrew's is an independent, coeducational, preparatory day school serving students in 3-year-old pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.

Archways 26 – Spring 2019  

St. Andrew's is an independent, coeducational, preparatory day school serving students in 3-year-old pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.