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{institutional advancement}

BEHIND the CURTAIN

“THE ST. ANDREW’S BAND PROGRAM WELCOMES ALL STUDENTS, from beginning to advanced levels. As would be expected, we give each student the opportunity to learn to play a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument, and that, of course, involves learning how to read notes and rhythms and how to form their lips and position their fingers. This is our first and most immediate goal – musical literacy and technical ability. Our second goal, however, goes much deeper and reaches to the very heart of why I do music: it is to give the gift of music itself – the ability to enjoy and appreciate good music, the ability to communicate in a language that is universal, and the ability to work together to create a work of art-in-time that is bigger than what the individual can accomplish on his own.”— Dennis Cranford, Band Director

“THE AGE GROUPS I TEACH – PRE-K3, PRE-K4 AND Kindergarten – experience music with their whole being. At this tender age, children enjoy music unselfconsciously and with intensity, excitement, and delight. What profound enthusiasm these students exhibit for every song, dance, and musical story! Through a wide variety of singing, playing, moving, listening, and creating, my students are encouraged to recognize and respond to their own inherent musical nature. While enhancing the joy of these preschoolers and building confidence in their own powers for music-making, we also establish a foundation for concepts of steady beat, rhythm, and melody that serves as the basis for music curriculum throughout Lower School.”— Susan Lawler, Preschool Music Teacher

ment of self-expression, as well as practicing the skills necessary to work with others toward a common goal. Choir is the place where students find a rewarding break in the day from their academic program. We are kind of like a big family, and the skills they learn here can be used forever.”— Libby Walden, Director of Seventh and Eighth Grade and Upper School Choral Music

“AS THE CHORAL ACCOMPANIST I WATCH THE amazing growth in musical development in the St. Andrew’s choir students. Most choir students start in Middle School. As they move up from grade to grade, they master music that is more complex harmonically, melodically, and rhythmically. They learn to sing with greater confidence. It is gratifying to me to work in a school that so heartily supports the arts and where stu“ONE CAN FIND OUR STUDENTS ACTIVELY SING- dents are exposed to concerts and dramatic productions ing, playing classroom instruments, dancing, or busy as part of their education.”— Maureen McGuire, Choral working on their next performance project. We empha- Music Accompanist size making our students an active part of the music making process. My favorite moment of teaching music “PERFORMING ARTS INTRODUCES FIFTH AND is seeing the pride that students feel after they have per- sixth grade students to basic dramatic movement and formed a piece, whether it is a 30-second piece in the continues to broaden their knowledge of music. Our classroom or a 30-minute musical for the school com- class time is full of creativity and energy! Using basic themunity. It’s my hope for each student to discover his or ory, musical notation, singing, dancing, good diction, and her music potential and to equip them for a journey to movement, students tap their creativity daily to explore a lifelong appreciation of music.”— Scott Sexton, Lower music and drama. All students have the opportunity to School Music Teacher sing in a musical revue each year and use their newfound dramatic knowledge to perform their own short skits. “ALL CHOIR CLASSES STUDY THE BASIC ELEMENTS These skills not only prepare our students with knowlof vocal production and music theory, which enhance edge of music and drama, but also equip them with the the sight-reading and performance skills that are used confidence and presence needed in their everyday classthroughout their choir careers. A choir student also has rooms and throughout life.”— Anna Johnson, Fifth and the opportunity to develop his or her voice as an instru- Sixth Grade, Performing Arts Teacher

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Archways 19 – Spring 2014  

Archways is the flagship publication from St. Andrew's Episcopal School, an independent, coeducational, preparatory day school serving stude...

Archways 19 – Spring 2014  

Archways is the flagship publication from St. Andrew's Episcopal School, an independent, coeducational, preparatory day school serving stude...