Urban Stage (LBB downtown revitalization)

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DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

URBAN STAGE 2015

AVE_J




DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR : PROJECT DESIGN TEAM DIRECTOR:

DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION Andrew Vernooy, Dean, College of Architecture, TTU

Maria Perbellini, Digital Design and Fabrication, Associate Dean, College of Architecture, TTU

DDF STUDIOS | DESIGN AND FABRICATION TEAM: PROFESSORS : Christian Pongratz Dustin White

|

Director Digital Design & Fabrication Program

|

Director Fabrication Shops | Instructor

STUDENTS :

Annette Bajema / Daniel Garcia / Aaron Hermann / Andrew Toney / Johan Venter / Andrew Triplett / Taylor Patton / Tyler Jones / Blake Arnold / Jackie Tu / Rodrigo Avila / Talon McCart / Milad Fereshtehnezhad / Paola Muniz-Garcia / Xavier Encerrado / Sven Nevlida / Abraham Gutierrez / Vicente Carrasco / Tyler Mason

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS :

Hamza Mohammed / Fadhil Fadhil / Justin Leal / Joshua Evans / Brendan Ho Ryan Thomas / Humberto Ramirez /Jacobo Prado / Jenna Meeks /

STAFF : Wood Shop Unit Coordinator: Fred Porteous Model Shop Unit Coordinator: Mike West STUDENT WORKERS: Shane Davis / Carlton Shartle / Rachel Gruber / Mark Freres / Christopher Pope / Giovanni Velazquez Miguel Dobbs VOLUNTEERS:

Kyle Meeks / Dennis Pate

c

Copyright 2015 Christian Pongratz, Dustin White All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording without permission in writing from the authors. Edited by Christian Pongratz, Dustin White For Additional information please write: DDF - Digital Design and Fabrication Texas Tech University College of Architecture 1800 Flint Avenue Lubbock, TX 79409 USA T:+1.806.742.3136 F:+1.806.742.1400 For more information on the Digital Design & Fabrication Program please visit: http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Ddf_lab


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Urban Stage was made possible with the generous support of The College of Architecture Texas Tech University The City of Lubbock We want to credit Associate Dean of Graduate Programs, Professor Maria Perbellini, for her invaluable contributions from the earliest phases of the masterplan design to the final installation of Urban Stage in downtown Lubbock. We are thankful for her insistence convincing us to stay on the project despite many hurdles and difficult schedules, which she made almost invisibly disappear. Without her leadership as project team design director and her role as a liason between the President, the Dean, David Driskill and many others, encouraging with tireless support to keep this project going at a high level of quality, Urban Stage would not have happened. This book is dedicated to her. We also want to acknowledge the assistance of Sven Nevlida in the production of various layout materials and in the compilation of the student works. We are thankful to the students of the advanced design studios in fall 2014 for their commitment and their project contributions.


EXISTING SITE CONDITION

INSTALLED SITE CONDITION


URBAN STAGE The idea of Urban Stage is to rethink downtown and also rethink the typical street design and greenery of Lubbock under its location as a natural gateway to the plains with a library of desert cacti and native plants. Ave J becomes a didactic example, the downtown Botanic Garden, in order to revive the city through natural gardens, reduced traffic and with lively entertainment in newly appropriated pedestrian areas. Ave J becomes a place where people meet and enjoy themselves, but also a place for learning. It is as much about youth education and inspiring environmental stewardship as well as an oppertunity to develop community goals for a future oriented vibrant downtown and city. For the last hundred years the people of Lubbock have battled nature to create a lifestyle of individualism and wealth. Sacrificed in the process are the prairie, the aquifer, and clean air. Lubbock holds the bottom ten statuses in more than one health and safety category including body fat, criminal assault, and as an environment for raising children. Urban Stage envisions an ecologically sustainable downtown Lubbock, which begins to knit the fractured city back together to create a healthy, economically viable downtown. The proposal transforms an exemplary portion of Ave J, a central axis of downtown, into a conceptual extension of the dry riverbed at the base of the canyon. Envisioned are several strategies to transform the “HardScape” into an urban soft “GreenScape” with strategies of water harvesting via permeable paving and xeriscaping, which generate ideas for revived plazas and urban fields creating an environment of conservation and health. The design reconnects the community to the downtown areas as a center for commerce and living, encouraging bordering properties to be developed with measurable improvements in economic viability, health, public safety, lower water use per capita and a lower carbon footprint for Lubbock.

DESIGN INNOVATION In the development process for Ave. J, digital design and fabrication techniques are used to generate a new streetscape, and various strategies to implement xeriscaping.
 A portion of Avenue J is conceived as a linear park to establish a new place to live, work, and be entertained in downtown. Climate projections for Lubbock and much of the West are expected to become hotter and dryer. The design cools the space and conserves water. A best practices analysis provides the following proven choices: slowing traffic by narrowing streets, reducing the amount of hardscapes to lessen the heat island effect, introducing permeable surfaces to provide water harvesting opportunities, using water-collecting vegetated infiltration basins, control ing flooding towards water feature installations and/or plaza zones, encouraging development in the form of a linear park. Adaptation – The design is inspired by water harvesting techniques. Xeriscaping with selected succulent plants and climate tolerant indigenous trees and shrubs distributed into “fields” mimic a natural landscape on a smaller urban scale, so citizens can be encouraged to be part of the ecology. Specific didactic zones are created to encourage an interactive learning for all ages, from various types of grasses, shells, rocks, and other locally found natural items and species. Ave J turns into a system of


paths and fields to be explored in a kind of guided tour of our natural environment, providing in-depth information on desert flora. Environmental – Establishing smart surfaces as a colorful carpet on Avenue J within a larger ecosystem is the primary concept. Water is collected via “fields = xeriscaped zones” thus introducing the concept of the permeable street. Horizontal shading systems typical for hot urban areas of southern Europe are introduced to reduce the heat impact onto the streets. The integration of existing bricks from the historic street into the street design assures a low carbon footprint and forms the materiality of a permeable surface. In the future, hydroponic systems may be integrated into vertical “grow walls” or horizontal photovoltaic clad surfaces and roofscapes which can provide storage for solar energy. Scalability – Public space provides the most direct interface for communities and landscapes to re-connect to the natural environment in which they reside. This design proposal adds many layers and scales of design to an otherwise engineered environment. Ideas taken from here can be adopted in full or parts to other areas of Lubbock. Replicability – Dry and semi-arid urban developments have traditionally used streets as drainage channels. Conceptualizing the street as a permeable dry riverbed, which both absorbs and channels the water is a transferable concept. Autochthonous design is an opportunity for all environments. Functionality
- The design collects rainwater as a resource for irrigation and celebrates the storm runoff by directing it into abstracted water features within the street “fields”. The carbon footprint of the city is lessened by the carbon-absorbing landscape in lieu of hardscape and the use of brick paving units in lieu of asphalt or concrete.














































2D: POINTS INTERACTION,RELAXATION

(B) At the beginning of the project, goals were established for the final design. First, the materials needed to be inexpensive and found locally, and second these materials had to be recyclable. Third, the project needed to full-fill a need after the installation was taken down. In order to accomplish these goals, we began a search of local materials that could be donated locally. There was a range of material possibilities but ubiquitous shipping pallets proved to be good solution. In fact, several of the materials for other projects would be shipped using these wooden pallets. Design and prototyping began on how these pallets could be used as benches, stands, planters, lounges and separators. The concept of lounging was chosen to accent the project and provide distributed zones for users to lounge while enjoying live entertainment.

were made by combining three units together using simple hardware. In total, seven modules made of three pallets each were constructed to be used either as separate lounges or stacked together to form larger gathering spaces. The final element of the lounges were the pillows. To accommodate the weather, these pillows were constructed from colorful water repellent vinyl, and filled with donated local cotton from the Texas Tech Fiber and Bio-polymer Research Institute. Each module featured multi-colored pillows and also a clear pillow to highlight the use of locally grown natural cotton. During the installation, these modules were moved to react to the events of the day, and after the installation was over, they serve as public seating for architecture students at College of Architecture.

These lounges were designed to be a comfortable and engaging addition to the street scape, music reactive LEDs were used at night to illuminate the area. Colors would change and flash along with any music, voices, or other sounds creating a reactive installation. Another important aspect of these lounges is their ease of transport. Modules

keywords: recyclable economical local movable interaction community relaxation illumination

QTTY

UNIT

TOTAL

21pc 18$ 390$ TEAM2 - 2D POINTS | 53

















141'-2 3/4"

4'-0"

3.4°

149'-2 1/4"

Figure (A) and (B) shows the isolation of the blue and green lines. Our team construct each line separately to help increase the accuracy of each line’s measurement.

TEAM3 - 2D LINES | 69



TEAM3 - 2D LINES | 71









TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 79



TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 81



TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 83





A

B

C

D

E

A) Plants B) 2’ and 6’ sticks C) Dyed sand E) Bracing detail and structure platform.

TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 87







2D: FIELDS PARABOLIC APERTURES

Parabolic Apertures develops pockets and or gaps between one another in order to create light spaces and shadows. These pockets highlight the existing urban landscape but create contrasts from the newly implemented thread pattern. The thread pattern goes against the grain of the existing landscape and creates new directionality and texture. The design of the thread pattern was meant to showcase the existing street as sort of a canvas while using the weaving pattern to highlight the different light pockets and shadows previous-

ly mentioned. The technic of the parabolic curve enhanced that ability to bend the focus of the eye into a curve which created not only a straight line appeal, but that of a smooth curve.

QTTY

UNIT

TOTAL

50k yd 250$ 500$ TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 93



44

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39 40

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33

9 02

28

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26

23

4 52

2

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20

21

6 71

15

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9

8

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1 3 2 5 4

1

18

13

3 32

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

50

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4

42

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5 63

34

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7 82

2

5 24

26 2

2 21

23 2

20 19

18 17 16

15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

A

45

44

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41

39 40

38

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34

33

28

9 02

27

26

4 52

2

23

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19

6 71

15

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11

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9

8

7 6

1 3 2 5 4

1

18

13

3 32

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

41

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33

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28

3 22

24 2

21 20

19 18 17

16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

3

44

54

64

74

84

94

4 50

2 34

4 53

6 25

2 27

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

B A) Diagram showing the progression of the thread field completely finished, along with elevations. B) Diagram showing the progression of the thread field with 40 thread lines.

TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 95



5 61

45

44

43

42

39

0 14

38

37

36

35

32 33

34

31

30

28

29

27

26

2 32

19

20

21

18

1 17

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7 6

1 3 2 5 4

42

2 25

4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

5 24

9 04

48

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46

45

44

43

33

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30

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28

2 21

23 2

20 19

18 17 16

15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

2

63

73

83

93

03

14

4 42

4 53

62 72

5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

A

5 61

45

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39 40

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4 52

2

23

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7 6

1 3 2 5 4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

5 24

9 04

48

47

46

45

44

43

5

63

73

83

93

03

14

4 42

2 21

23 2

20 19

18 17 16

15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

82

92

02

13

23

33

3 34

62 72

5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

B

45

44

43

42

41

39 40

38

37

36

35

34

33

28

9 02

27

26

4 52

2

23

22

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9

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1 3 2 5 4

1

18

13

3 32

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

C

41

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3 22

24 2

21 20

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16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

3

44

54

64

74

84

94

4 50

2 34

4 53

6 25

2 27

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

A) Diagram showing the progression of the thread field with 35 thread lines. B) Diagram showing the progression of the thread field with 30 thread lines. C) Diagram showing the progression of the thread field with 25 thread lines.

TEAM 4 - 2D FIELDS | 97



Nested sheets for the base of the thread field. These pieces were cut out using a CNC machine for accuracy and time saving reasons.

TEAM 4 - 2D POINTS | 99





















STEEL RING 1/2” Holes 2”

1/4” Holes

1’8”

The steel ring is 20 inches in diameter. It has 30 holes for the PEX pipes and 8 holes for the steel cable. This was plasma cut from a autocad file.

BENCH 18”

18”

8”

The benches have an 18 inch circle to house the Canopy. Along with the benches there will also need to be circular sockets for the cardboard tube to connect to. TEAM6 - 3D POINTS | 119







3D: POINTS TRIPOD, LIGHT

The urban points are seen as an opportunity for a procession along a series of beacons to light the way. The project strategy was to illuminate single points along the urban stage. Based on earlier studies of industrial design precedents, tripod lamps were investigated due to their unique form while still being structural. The design was directed to incorporate lighting using led light strips embedded into a tripod system. The main challenge with this was how to power the strips without the use of a power cord. Battery packs were encased in the tripod to allow the tripods to be easily distributed wherever they were needed. These tripods are held together with steel tube sections welded together that are each uniquely angled. A set of 6 unique tripods were produced

and placed along the procession of Ave. J.

QTTY

UNIT

TOTAL

6pc 40$ 240$ TEAM6 - 3D POINTS | 125



MATERIAL EXCAVATION

1

2

3

4

5

1.25” x 1.25” Wood

Belt Sander to create tapered end

Table Router to create rounded corners

Milling Machine to excavate hollow space

Milling Machine to create recessed lip


FABRICATION PROCESS MILLING PROCESS Tooling: Left: 1-1/8”x 5/16” Router Bit with Table Router Right: 1/2 “ x 1/2 “ Drill Bit and Milling machine (5/8” x 5/8” Drill Bit for Recessed Lip)

1-1/8”x 5/16” Radius

.5 “ Depth

Top Right: Milling material (detail) Bottom Right: Aligning material on mill

Top Left: Initial miter saw cut Bottom Middle: Creating radius edges

128 | 2D: POINTS - TEAM1


WELDING PROCESS

8.5”

8.5”

8.75”

Top Middle: Welding material Bottom Left: Aligning weld (detail)

Top Right: Tripod with welded joints Bottom Right: Steel Joint (detail)

TEAM6 - 3D POINTS | 129



TRIPOD LIGHT

20” 18”

6.25”

*See Detail Exploded diagram

Welded Joint Battery Back with Sensor 1.25” x 1.25” Wood Stick

LED Light Strip Masking Tape Acrylic Strip

18.25” 23.25”

35”

TEAM6 - 3D POINTS | 131



1.25” x 1.25” Wood Stick Recessed Lip

TRIPOD LIGHT

LED Light Strip Masking Tape Acrylic Strip

Drilled Hole for Wiring Tapered End 1.25” x 1.25” Steel Tube

Welded Connection

Battery Pack with 4 AAA Batteries Remote Sensor

TEAM6 - 3D POINTS | 133


134 | 2D: POINTS - TEAM1


























3D: LINES SADDLE POLYHEDRA WALL

QTY

UNIT

TOTAL

80pc 3.2$ 633 $ TEAM9 - 3D LINES | 159










DESIGN IDEA/ LINE MORPHOLOGY

2’

2’

3’

5’

3’

Average Human Seating 1’8”

168 TEAM9 - 3D LINES |

Children Seating

9”

5’


2’

2’

3’

3’

5’

2’

2’

Average Human Standing Table 3’

TEAM9 - 3D LINES | 169


LINEAR BENCH

170 | 3D: LINES - TEAM 09



(1)

ASSEMBLY/ PRICING

Zinc-Plated Hex Nuts 1 Package 50 Req. @ $4.27

1”x4” Furring Strip Board (8’ Long) 95 Boards Req. @$1.99 /Ea.

Crown Bolt 1/2” Threaded Rod (3’ Long) 13 Rods Req. @$5.41 /Ea.

Pricing Breakdown: Zinc-Plated Hex Nuts .................................................................................................................. 1 x 4.27 = $4.27 1”x4” Furring Strip Board ...................................................................................................... 95 x 1.99 = $189.05 Crown Bolt 1/2” Zinc Plated Fine Threaded Rod ................................................................ 13 x 5.41 = $70.33 TOTAL ........................................................................................................................................................ $263.65

172 TEAM9 - 3D LINES |










SECTION A

SECTION B

SECTION C

A0

B11

C21

A1

B12

C22

A2

B13

C23

A3

B14

C24

A4

B15

C25

A5

B16

C26

A6

B17

C27

A7

B18

C28

A8

B19

C29

A9

B20

C30

A10

C31

TEAM10 - 3D FIELD | 181



SECTION F

SECTION G

F45

G52

F46

G53

F47

G54

F48

G55

F49

G56

F50

G57

F51

G58

G59

TEAM10 - 3D FIELD | 183


(1)

SECTION H

H60

H64

H68

H61

H65

H69

H62

H66

H63

H67

184 | 3D: FIELD - TEAM10


.0

0

.7

48 2 243.58∞

13

54.

45

42

52.

2

3∞

153.4

.0

57.12

58.19

7∞

44

213.2

8∞

.66 84

412.22

23 .18 170 .5

(1)

PLAN

TEAM10 - 3D FIELD | 185



TEAM10 - 3D FIELDS | 187



WEAVE

WEAVE DETAIL

TEAM10 - 3D FIELD | 189







3D: LINES

The bench is set with a max height of 18 inches, with one side of the bench being flat and the other with an upright back rest for comfort. The bench is 15 feet long and at one end it extends past the end of the bench to give a sensation that the bench carries on or goes into the ground. The frame of the bench was fabricated out of 3/16 inch steel on a laser cutter. The frame was made so that everything can be assembled with 3/8 and 1/4 inch bolts and capped off with lock nuts. Each rib is spaced out 1 foot apart to give support for the tubing. Each piece is connected by a strait brace and 2 diagonal braces to give a good support to the bench overall. The bench contains thirteen 4 inch drainage tubing 16 feet long. The tubing is then tied down to the frame every foot through the holes at each connection point. The bench is detailed with end caps that were painted the same color as the string.

QTTY

UNIT

TOTAL

1pc 295$ 295$ TEAM11 - 3D LINES | 195


FRAME - AXONOMETRIC

5I 4I 3I 2I I

CONNECTION DETAIL

H G F E

196 | 3D: LINES - TEAM11


FRAME - PLAN VIEW

15’

D C B 4A 3A 2A A

1’ 1/4” steel rib @ 1’ o. c.

1’

TEAM11 -3D LINES | 197


PARTS A

2A

3A

A-2

4A

2A-2

3A-2

4A-2

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A-1

B

2A-1

3A-1

4A-1

C

D

B-2

E

C

C

D-2.1

D-2 A

B

A

B

C

E-2

A

E-2.1

B

B-1 A

C

B

B

A

C-2 D-1

A

B

E-1 A

B

B

A

C-1

4I

C

5I

C

4I-2

4I-2.1

B A

B

4I-1

C

5I-2

A

198 | 3D: LINES - TEAM11

C

5I-2.1

B

A A

B

5I-1


C

F

H G-2

F-2

C

C

G

C

C

C

H-2

G-2.1

H-2.1

F-2.1

A

A

B

A

B A

B

A

A

B

B

B

H-1 G-1

F-1

I

C

2I

C

I-2

C

I-2.1

2I-2

B

A A

B A

C

3I-2

A

B

C

2I-2.1

3I-2.1

B

A A

B

I-1

B

2I-1

A-1 (A)

J-1

2A-1 (B)

C-1 (A)

A-1 (B)

J-2

2A-1 (A)

C-1 (B)

2A-1 (A)

J-3

3A-1 (B)

D-1 (A)

2A-1 (B)

J-4

3A-1 (A)

D-1 (B)

3A-1 (A)

J-5

4A-1 (B)

E-1 (A)

3A-1 (B)

J-6

4A-1 (A)

E-1 (B)

4A-1 (A)

K

B-1 (B)

F-1 (A)

4A-1 (B)

L

B-1 (A)

F-1 (B)

B-1 (A)

M

C-1 (B)

G-1 (A)

B-1 (B)

3I

C

N

C-1 (A)

G-1 (B)

O

H-1 (A)

D-1 (B) D-1 (A)

P Q

E-1 (B) R

E-1 (A) F-1 (B)

S

F-1 (A)

T G-1 (B)

U

G-1 (A)

V W

H-1 (B) X

3I-1

H-1 (A)

Y Z

2I-1 (A)

AA-1

2I-1 (B)

4I-2

A-1

1

4I-2

2

3I-2

2A-1

2

3A-1

I-1 (B)

3I-2

3

2I-2

3A-1

3

4A-1

5I-1 (B)

H-1 (B)

5I-1 (A)

5I-2

1

AA-2

I-1 (A)

2I-2

4

I-2

4A-1

4

3I-1 (A)

AA-3

2I-1 (B)

I-2

5

H-2

B-1

5

3I-1 (B)

AA-4

2I-1 (A)

H-2

6

G-2

x2

x84

x76

B-1 C-1

C-1

6 7 8

D-1

4I-1 (A)

AA-5

3I-1 (B)

G-2

7

F-2

D-1

4I-1 (B)

AA-6

3I-1 (A)

F-2

8

E-2

E-1

5I-1 (A)

AA-7

4I-1 (B)

F-1

9

G-1

5I-1 (B)

AA-8

4I-1 (A)

G-1

10

H-1

H-1

x14

2A-1

11

E-1 F-1

I-1

I-1

12

2I-1

2I-1

13

3I-1

3I-1

14

4I-1

4I-1

15

5I-1

TEAM11 -3D LINES | 199



THE RIB

Bolt - 1/4”

5I

Bolt - 3/8”

5I-2

1

4I-2

1/4” hole for construction twine used to tie tube down. Bolt - 1/4”

28”

5I-2.1

Bolt - 3/8”

5I-2

Nut - 1/4” B B

AA-7 Nut - 3/8” AA-8

A

14”

A

Part #15

42

1

5I-

15’ The Bench was segmented into four modules which provided easy transportation and assembled on site.

TEAM11 - 3D LINES | 201


202 | 3D: LINES - TEAM11


TEAM11 -3D LINES | 203


URBAN STAGE 2014 PARTICIPANTS City of Lubbock • Thomas Harris, III, Coordination of Permitting and City Staff • Rob Allison, Coordination City Urban Design Goals and imagineLUBBOCKtogether

Texas Tech University • M. Duane Nellis, President, TTU • Lawrence Schovanec, Provost, TTU • Suzanne Taylor, Liaison to the Office of the President, TTU • Darryl James, Liaison to the Office of the Provost, TTU • Andrew Vernooy, Executive Director, Dean, College of Architecture, TTU • Maria Perbellini, Project Design Team Director, Digital Design and Fabrication, Associate Dean, College of Architecture, TTU • Christian Pongratz, Project Design Leader, Digital Design and Fabrication Director, College of Architecture, TTU • Dustin White, Project Design Leader, Fabrication Shop Director, College of Architecture, TTU • David Driskill, Events Director, Urban Tech Director, College of Architecture, TTU • Clay Martin, Entertainment Director, Department of Theater and Dance, TTU • Betty Blanton, Fun Run, Associate Director, Recreational Sports, TTU Community • Jim Seideman, Oktoberfest event major vendor • Bob Chandra, Hub Theater Group events • Paula Chandra, Hub Performing Arts School events • Larry Simmons, Event Consultant, Tornado Gallery • Research Team • Annette Boles, Garrison Institute on Aging Community, Outreach Division • Adam Cohen, Health, Exercise and Sports Science • David Driskill, Director, Urban Tech, College of Architecture, TTU • Christian Pongratz, Director, Digital Design and Fabrication, TTU


THE DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION PROGRAM AT TEXAS TECH UNIV. COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE WOULD LIKE TO THANK: TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY THE CITY OF LUBBOCK COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE DEAN ANDREW VERNOOY ASSOCIATE DEAN MARIA PERBELLINI CARPET WORLD CARPET IFCO CORP. PALLETS FIBER AND BIOPOLYMER RESEARCH INST. RAW COTTON ANVIL MFG STEEL PIPES AND PIPE BENDING TEINERT STEEL SHEETS TEXGRAPH PLASMA CUTTING TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY GROUNDS PLANTS TEXAS ROCK AND FLAGSTONE GRAVEL AND SAND QUALITY COATINGS POWDER COATING FOR ALL THEIR SUPPORT IN MAKING POSSIBLE THE URBAN STAGE INSTALLATIONS