Digital Design and Fabrication _ Vol 01

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Maria R Perbellini | Christian R Pongratz | Digital Design & Fabrication

Vol. 01

Maria R Perbellini Christian R Pongratz

DIGITAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION



Texas Tech University College of Architecture Digital Design & Fabrication Program Digital Design & Fabrication Program College of Architecture Texas Tech University


[credits] Š 2015 Maria R. Perbellini Ž all rights reserved No part of this volume may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from the author Design by Maria R. Perbellini, M. Jena Meeks Final layout revision by Sven Nevlida Edited by Maria R. Perbellini, Christian Pongratz Work completed by DDF students in courses taught by Upe Flueckiger, Kuhn Park, Maria R. Perbellini, Christian Pongratz, Daniel Pruske and Dustin White at the College of Architecture, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Ddf https://www.facebook.com/texasdesignresearch DDF Program Director, Christian Pongratz

DIGI TA L DESIGN AND F ABRICA TION


[digital design & fabrication] [digital design & fabrication]

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ttu ddf | introduction

[introduction]


I am delighted to share our recent publication on the emergent trajectory and progress of the graduate Digital Design and Fabrication program at the College of Architecture, Texas Tech University. The program has been growing fast since its foundation and it continues to attract strong US and international students through the innovative Graduate Certificate and the post-professional Master of Science in Architecture. The transformational impact of the DDF program on our graduate curriculum is extended to the undergraduate level disseminating digital savvyness across design studios and technology-based courses. Our most talented post-professional students have the opportunity to transfer their knowledge and skills to the youngest students, actively contributing to inform the undergraduate sequence of courses with instructional tasks and teaching assistantships. The effects of this curricular contamination are visible in the significant improvement of our student digital skills, in the broader range of inquiries and experiences, and in the quality of design work and applications. This book illustrates an inter-disciplinary, creative and imaginative approach to the discipline of architecture, allowing students to explore ideas, experiment design processes and research on material properties and performances. The expressed “ materialâ€? sensitivity is a form of design research, while digital fabrication methods and design techniques are producing novel opportunities for the designer and the architectural practice. Our graduate Certificate offers 14 credit hours associated with a professional Master of Architecture. The post-professional Master of Science in Architecture with a specialization in Digital Design and Fabrication is a 1 ½ year plan with 34 credit hours, which is including a summer of international studies linked with our Study Abroad programs. A varied selection of studios and seminars nurtured by our faculty research interests is reinforced by a constant offer of workshops lead by experts and emerging designers. A state of the art fabrication shop is the house of laser, 3-D printing, CNC and Robotics technologies and it is currently undergoing a large expansion, which will increase available spaces, tools and machinery. Collaborations with other colleges, departments, professionals, industry, organizations and communities on the Texas Tech campus and outside are vital and propelling forces for the success of integrated projects, efforts and initiatives. I hope you will enjoy our faculty and student works, the vision that this program initiated, the critical discourse, results and perspectives that is carrying on, while is enhancing the research presence of the College of Architecture.

Maria R. Perbellini

Professor | Associate Dean for Graduate Programs

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ttu ddf | director’s note

[re_tooling the discipline]


In the last 20 years, Architecture went through revolutionary changes, from the paperless studio and a predominantly theory influenced agenda, towards a global digital practice and material driven canon fostered by the proliferation of dynamic associative design environments and the convergence of distributed design sensibilities. With a pervasive flexibility and extendibility, everything seems to be connected. At the same time the conventional practice, where some still believe that an initial approach to research is sufficient to inform the successive design phases, is turning into a practice of variability. The focus on design research in its many facets and contaminating the entire design process is needed in order to catalyze our now inclusive operations. Furthermore, the broad effects of technological change ushered through widespread computation not only open up a whole new domain of explorations in academia and practice but pose questions on how to revise pedagogy accordingly. Hence, the Master of Science with specialization in Digital Design and Fabrication (DDF) is positioned at the intersection of architecture, engineering and computation fields and oriented towards an interdisciplinary direction. While a main interest is into design strategies and their influence on emerging material systems, the pursuit to deal with imminent questions of a more and more “digital-craft” based professional practice, affords its own curriculum. In concert with ongoing efforts of retooling the discipline, the program engages three major research areas, design computation and geometry, materials and fabrication, and new processes of construction assembly. Through courses, advanced design studios and workshops, students widely investigate the parametric associative paradigm and employ its technological potential, which facilitates the capturing of design intentions associated to multiple aspects and promotes an integrative “systems thinking”. In order to learn more about creating synergetic structures on several scales, current knowledge in the building process is expanded into areas such as innovative materials and digital manufacturing logics through research projects, which form part of the many pedagogical avenues in the program. This book is a snapshot of works ranging from installations and furniture to architectural projects, and from interactive sensor driven environments to material performances.

Christian R. Pongratz Professor | DDF Program Director

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ttu ddf | contents

[contents]

000


02 - 11

[research]

12 - 97

building envelopes

12 - 39

interactive architecture

40 - 53

design build

54 - 77

products [program operativity]

03[4|dp.003]

about DDF

78 - 97

98 - 127

100 - 103

workshops

104 - 109

master of science degree

110 - 115

people

116 - 119

DDF shop & tools

120 - 127

reference

128 - 132 02[5|jg+mm.088]

courses

m-185

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[about digital design & fabrication]

ttu ddf | about ddf

001


Texas Tech College of Architecture Digital Design & Fabrication Program The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University offers a Master of Science in Architecture with a specialization and a Graduate Certificate in Digital Design and Fabrication where the integration between computational design and material-driven processes are explored with an interdisciplinary attitude. By advancing building technology the DDF program acts as a catalyst for innovation.

Market Changes in Professional Practice A change in the process of architecture through the technological evolution of “drawings� is occurring today, but in contrast with the renaissance, it is reconfiguring the whole building industry, involving the architect in an emerging networked team of design and construction specialists. New communication and knowledge exchange techniques supported with information technology (IT) are disrupting time frames and spatial relationships between key players and facilitating inclusiveness and collaborative project delivery. The cyberarchitect in the new role of the integrative generalist or design specialist forms part of the emerging creative class, to use a term suggested by Richard Florida of Carnegie Mellon University. The current project delivery process in the construction industry in the US, is shifting from a traditional design- bid- build process to a streamlined design- build process . This emerging trend is supposed to become more dominant in the years to come in particular driven by new market players such as design engineering firms and media savy construction developers. Individual architecture firms not ready for this change will ultimately fall behind, unless they deliberately follow up by engaging new expertise in the field of computational design related to fabrication and construction technology advances.

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes

[building envelopes] [building envelopes]


Design projects which explore the potential of digitally crafting building envelopes that are proposing novel performance solutions by investigating computational geometry, material systems and fabrication processes. systems and fabrication processes. solutions by investigating computational geometry, material ing building envelopes that are proposing novel performance Design projects which explore the potential of digitally craft-

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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | sphenoid wall

[sphenoid wall] The Sphenoid wall is an outcome of the Fab_Lab studio, which explored the process of “digital_craft� and the material flow between computation, fabrication and construction. The studio investigated structural surfaces by interpreting new geometric species as key members of building envelopes and roof_scapes. While emerging design strategies proliferate new means of customization, contemporary practices also investigate nonlinear modularity. Several student teams evaluated in workshops the question of topology through alternative design options for platonic solids. Successively groups of students pursued the final installation of a polyhedron type by optimizing many aspects such as geometry and joints, material design mix, fabrication and mold design reaching to site adaptation strategies and assembly methods. ARCH 5501 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Fall 2013 | Christian Pongratz Venter, Johannes Porter, Tyler R. Confidential Laurence, John L. Arnold, Blake A. Alma Luna Sierra, Valeria Meeks, Justin K. McCart, Talon G. Avila, Rodrigo A. Nedunuri, Jesse V. Velazquez, Giovanni McGill, Eloisa R. Carrasco, Vicente


002

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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | sphenoid wall

003


fabricating & testing Concrete mixes were designed throughout the semester and changing ratios of the admixtures had to accomodate many performance based criteria and the complex formwork. The major design challenge was the inclusion of a recycled paper product from GREENSTAR, a startup from Tech. The recycled paper within the mixtures on the one hand reduced weight as it replaced more standard aggregate such as sand and gravel. The designmixes were refined by changing the sequence of admixtures and varying the amount of paper used, which also influenced minor color changes. The components have different material compositions to allow for perfomance evaluations during a longer time period.

004

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wall assembly phase 10

phase 5 total : 77 M1 - 2 M2 - 8

total : 117 M1 - 6 phase 5 total : 77 M1 - 2 M2 - 8 phase 9 total : 111 M1 - 4

phase 4 total : 67 M2 - 6 M3 - 4 phase 4 total : 67 M2 - 6 M3 - 4

phase 8 total : 111 M1 - 4

phase 3 total : 57 M2 - 4 M3 - 6 phase 3 total : 57 M2 - 4 M3 - 6

phase 7 total : 107 M1 - 10

phase 2 total : 47 M2 - 5 M3 - 17 phase 2

ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | sphenoid wall

total : 47 M2 - 5 M3 - 17 phase 6

phase 1 total : 25 MB1 - 12 MB2 - 13

total : 85 M1 - 4 M2 - 4 phase 1 total : 25 MB1 - 12 MB2 - 13

005


006

007

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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | sphenoid wall

008


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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | deep surface

[DEEP surface] DEEPsurface investigates surface structures that propose new exciting spatial environments through landscapes of differentiated textures. Processes developing scaled micro forms will be conditioned by factors of materiality in order to simulate performance parameters. Computational scripting techniques incorporating design, fabrication and material parameters facilitate the shape control during the generation of self similar variations. ARCH 5501 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Fall 2010 | Christian Pongratz Saucedo, Amador M. Parks, Wesley C. Fortuna, Edmundo A. Buchanan, Mark J. Washburn, Tyler S. Powitzky, Christopher L. Krantz, Joshua P. Davis, Christopher P. Wills, Brian R. Rooker, Jared S. Monahan, Sean J. Diaz, Ramiro L.


009

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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | deep surface

010


011

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ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | deep surface

012

013


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10ft

ttu_ddf | research | building envelopes | deep surface

014

20ft

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016

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[collective form] This studio utilized specific notions of Emergence in relation to Complexity Theory so as to create architectures rich with conceptual depth, as well as formal, spatial, and experiential variety. Specifically, the over arching concept of Collective Form will be used to develop structures comprised of various interwoven and colliding systems / sub-systems, serving both functional and poetic aims.

ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | collective form

At the outset of the studio, students are responsible for eschewing notions of the singular in favor of the manifold. Rather than nurture outdated design philosophies dealing with singular all-encompassing concepts, this studio will cultivate multiple conceptual / thematic approaches at all times, fostering and enforcing the idea that architecture is devoid of singular authorship. While this method of development / inquiry into architecture draws on the complexity of life for inspiration, it does not do so with the explicit intent to generate formally complex architectures. The underlying purpose of this methodology is the development of reasoning, and strategic skill-sets to be used in dealing with the multivalent intricacies of architecture. Additionally, the studio focuses on the formulation of design strategies carrying specific, multifaceted, functional aims. These inclusive strategies will be developed integrating multiple systems to create a comprehensive project rich with both literal and phenomenal depth. Such strategies can be used to gain ground environmentally, and develop buildings which might not otherwise support the creation of architecture due to limitations such as budgetary constraints. ARCH 5901 | Collective Form | Spring 2011 | Daniel Pruske Simon Alvarez Aaron Beavers Tyler Mason Marc Anderson Kevin Boutte Martin Medina

Kyle Meeks Cecilia Stewart

Andrew Triplett


017

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | collective form

018

019


020

03[4|dp.003]

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | collective form

021


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022

023


024

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | collective form

025

026


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ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture

[interactive architecture] [interactive architecture]


Interactive Architecture, introduces students to computation in design as a programming tool exploring logical thinking and algorithmic design in order to create responsive enviroments. The digital-physical prototypes are actuated by hardware and software tools, from Processing to Firefly, Environmental sensors, Actuators and Arduino. sensors, Actuators and Arduino. software tools, from Processing to Firefly, Environmental The digital-physical prototypes are actuated by hardware and algorithmic design in order to create responsive enviroments. in design as a programming tool exploring logical thinking and Interactive Architecture, introduces students to computation

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ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | meta TOUCH

[aMachine | meta TOUCH] [meta] TOUCH is an explorative concept questioning our perceptions of touch and interactivity. With increasing social networking through cellular smart phones, we are challenging our conceptions of how we touch devices and connect to each other. Extending beyond the haptic, [meta]TOUCH is a digital extension of space to users, and at the same time, also the medium in which to see the connections between users. Through touch, the “skin� extension of the design actuates, reaches out in response, while revealing a second layer underneath. In other words, dual levels of this information technological skin add another layer of spatial understanding to our environment: besides the personal and haptic, our physical skin and the immediate boundary of space around us, a kind of meta skin permeates through the digital realm dynamically interacting through space with others. This digital driven machine is not physically felt, but it is metaphysical, engaging our thoughts, ideas, and our consciousness of space and machine. ARCH 5503 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Spring 2012 | Kuhn Park Kyle Meeks Jose Sanchez Winston Holloway


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ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | meta TOUCH

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int APin1 = analogRead(1); Serial.println (analogRead(1)); delay(20); int APin4 = analogRead(4); Serial.println (analogRead(4)); delay(20); int APin5 = analogRead(5); Serial.println (analogRead(5)); delay(20); servo13.write(Remap_Numbers(APin0,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(11, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin0,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo12.write(Remap_Numbers(APin1,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(6, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin1,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo9.write(Remap_Numbers(APin4,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(5, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin4,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo8.write(Remap_Numbers(APin5,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(3, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin5,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20);

void loop() { int APin0 = analogRead(0); Serial.println (analogRead(0));

void setup() { servo13.attach(13); servo12.attach(12); servo9.attach(9); servo8.attach(8); pinMode(11, OUTPUT); pinMode(6, OUTPUT); pinMode(5, OUTPUT); pinMode(3, OUTPUT); Serial.begin(9600); }

Servo servo13; Servo servo12; Servo servo9; Servo servo8;

//******************** End Function Definitions ********************

}

//******************* Begin Function Definitions ******************* //Remap Number Function: Remap a value into a new numeric domain. double Remap_Numbers(double x, Interval _in, Interval _out) { return (x - _in.t0) * (_out.t1 - _out.t0) / (_in.t1 - _in.t0) + _out.t0;

//Domain Function: Create a numeric domain from two numeric extremes. Interval Domain(double _v1, double _v2){ return Interval(_v1, _v2);

}

*/ #include "FFCasts.h" #include <Servo.h>

/* Firefly Code Generator by Andy Payne Copyright 2011 All Rights Reserved Code Generated on 03/23/2012 04:39:48 Special thanks to Panagiotis Michalatos. For more information visit: www.fireflyexperiments.com

ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | meta TOUCH

030


}

//******************* Begin Function Definitions *******************

//Remap Number Function: Remap a value into a new numeric domain. double Remap_Numbers(double x, Interval _in, Interval _out) { return (x - _in.t0) * (_out.t1 - _out.t0) / (_in.t1 - _in.t0) + _out.t0;

//Domain Function: Create a numeric domain from two numeric extremes. Interval Domain(double _v1, double _v2){ return Interval(_v1, _v2);

}

*/ #include "FFCasts.h" #include <Servo.h>

/* Firefly Code Generator by Andy Payne Copyright 2011 All Rights Reserved Code Generated on 03/23/2012 04:39:48 Special thanks to Panagiotis Michalatos. For more information visit: www.fireflyexperiments.com

}

}

int APin1 = analogRead(1); Serial.println (analogRead(1)); delay(20); int APin4 = analogRead(4); Serial.println (analogRead(4)); delay(20); int APin5 = analogRead(5); Serial.println (analogRead(5)); delay(20); servo13.write(Remap_Numbers(APin0,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(11, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin0,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo12.write(Remap_Numbers(APin1,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(6, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin1,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo9.write(Remap_Numbers(APin4,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(5, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin4,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Domain(0,255))); delay(20); servo8.write(Remap_Numbers(APin5,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179))); analogWrite(3, Remap_Numbers(Remap_Numbers(APin5,Domain(0,1023),Domain(0,179)),Domain(0,179),Doma in(0,255))); delay(20);

void loop() { int APin0 = analogRead(0); Serial.println (analogRead(0));

void setup() { servo13.attach(13); servo12.attach(12); servo9.attach(9); servo8.attach(8); pinMode(11, OUTPUT); pinMode(6, OUTPUT); pinMode(5, OUTPUT); pinMode(3, OUTPUT); Serial.begin(9600); }

Servo servo13; Servo servo12; Servo servo9; Servo servo8;

//******************** End Function Definitions ********************

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ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | floriculture machine

[aMachine | floriculture machine] The Floriculture machine emulates botanical systems through adaptive and transformative properties. Analogous to the germination of a seed, the machine evolves from a dormant bud. While typically concealed within its shoot, the bud remains inactive. However once activated, the machine reveals surprising hidden mechanics by “swelling� into action. Suddenly the apparatus becomes a kinetic manifestation of tensile resistance and celebrates its activation with an intelligent interaction. It reacts to light, proximity and sound. The design proposes an innovative solution to building envelope questions of apertures, morphological variation and automated user interaction. ARCH 5503 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Spring 2014 | Kuhn Park Triplett, Andrew John Charbonneau


031

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032

ALUMINUM CHANNEL 3/8” MACHINED SET COLLET 6-32 LINKAGE JOINT 1/8” ACRYLIC

ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | floriculture machine

2-56 NYLON BOLT

1/4” ACRYLIC STANDOFF

1 - 1/4” PVC

6-32 ROD

6-32 BOLT

6-32 NUT

1/8” ACRYLIC

VELLUM PETALS

10 GA. STEEL FRAME

1 - 1/4” PVC PIPE

033


032

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ttu ddf | research | interactive architecture | floriculture machine

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ttu ddf | research | design build

[design build] [design build]


The design build initiatives of the ddf program open up this concept of “making” to several scales. While the faculty engages students in building small houses such as the poets cabin, many recent projects engage the public through urban installations as a form of interactive community outreach. Typically, the broad scope of urban impact envisioned to catalyze ideas for the university and the city of Lubbock, involves interdisciplinary team work. disciplinary team work. ideas for the university and the city of Lubbock, involves intercally, the broad scope of urban impact envisioned to catalyze installations as a form of interactive community outreach. Typicabin, many recent projects engage the public through urban engages students in building small houses such as the poets concept of “making” to several scales. While the faculty The design build initiatives of the ddf program open up this

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | ave J city green scape

[ave J | city green scape] The projects for Ave J form part of a collaborative project between the two studios of Prof Perbellini and Prof Pongratz with the departments of Theater and Dance, Music, and Art. The underlying goal is to revitalize a defunct and abandoned downtown Lubbock with strategic urban insertions which generate a new street scape and plazas for public events. By drawing deliberately from a mix of installation type projects, sculptural art pieces, performance spaces and music, the perception of public space is one of colorful activity. In a final culmination all participants and their projects were introduced to the public in a performance spectacle during the yearly Lubbock Arts Festival.

ARCH 5501 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Spring 2011 | Maria R. Perbellini & Christian Pongratz Pongratz studio: Denman, William Garland, Jesse Guevara, Isela Holloway, Winston Sanchez, Jose Diaz, Ramiro Gomez, Jordan Hemmelgarn, Gregory Larriva, Adrian Wong, Kim Perbellini studio: Bustamante, Luis Enciso, Joseph L. Everett, Gregory S. Mayor, Nicholas A. Pace, Jonathan A. Davis, Christopher P. Engelhardt, Joseph S Liebelt, Christina Molina, Debbie J. Saucedo, Amador M.


037

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | ave J city green scape

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | ave J city green scape

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ttu ddf | research | building envelopes | ave J city green scape

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ttu ddf | research | design build | urban stage

[urban stage] The idea of Urban Stage is to rethink downtown and also rethink the typical street design and greenery of Lubbock under its location as a natural gateway to the plains with a library of desert cacti and native plants. Ave J becomes a didactic example, the downtown Botanic Garden, in order to revive the city through natural gardens, reduced traffic and with lively entertainment in newly appropriated pedestrian areas. Ave J becomes a place where people meet and enjoy themselves, but also a place for learning. It is as much about youth education and inspiring environmental stewardship as well as an opportunity to develop community goals for a future oriented vibrant downtown and city. It should be noted that the Urban Stage project lasted less than two months from initial brainstorming of ideas, concept design, fabrication and installation of more than 17 team projects. With a low budget of $10.000, students were responsible for deep material research, fabrication of parts, and masterplan revisions, in order to allow for material delivery and budget adjustment in the given short time frame.

ARCH 5502 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Fall 2014 | Christian Pongratz & Dustin White Xavier Encerrado Andrew Toney Paola Muniz-Garcia Vicente Carrasco Blake Arnold Talon McCart Daniel Garcia Sven Nevlida Daniel Garcia Andrew Triplett Johan Venter Jackie Tu Milad Fereshtehnezhad Annette Bajema Abraham Gutierrez Rodrigo Avila Tyler Mason Aaron Herman Taylor Patton


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ttu ddf | research | design build | urban stage

2D POINTS

050

2D LINES

2D FIELDS colorful balls team 04 | pg.

fireflies team 01 | pg.

tape lines team 03 | pg.

stick field team 04 | pg.

pallet benches team 02 | pg.

colorful strings team 04 | pg. chalk circles team 03 | pg.

the deck team 05 | pg.


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mushroom team 01 | pg.

3D FIELDS

wood benches team 07 | pg.

pipe bench team 10 | pg.

balloon team 06 | pg.

pvc canopy team 06 | pg.

planters team 08 | pg. tube bench team 11 | pg. tripod lights team 06 | pg.

cast wall team 09 | pg.

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ttu ddf | research | design build | urban stage

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[sustainable cabin & ladder]

ttu ddf | research | design build | sustainable cabin & ladder

The Sustainable Cabin, completed in 2010, serves as an experimental research station in sustainable design and living at a remote site on the American High Plains, operating entirely off the conventional power grid, utilizing rain water harvesting, waste compost, photovoltaic solar-power, and passive solar design. Historical precedents informing the design were Henry David Thoreau’s cabin at Walden Pond near Concord, Massachusetts, and Le Corbusier’s “Cabanon” Roquebrune-CapMartin in Southern France. Each of these works was built under significant budgetary constraints which are seldom considered in academic design studios. The project involved a large amount of students from Product Design courses, and continued to include student involvement in 2014 with the addition of a ladder installed on the interior. Unlike other design build projects which are handed over to a private client upon completion, the client of the Sustainable Cabin is a not-for-profit foundation on the High Plains. By mutual agreement and support, the university and the foundation funded both the Cabin and the site so that future students can visit and study the Sustainable Cabin. The Cabin will serve as a Collaborative Living Research Laboratory for generations of student to come, allowing for the testing of successes and shortcomings in the project, with the possibility of upgrading its components as technology develops. The Project has been published in Cabins by Philip Jodidio. ARCH 5502 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Spring 2008 - Fall 2010 | Upe Flueckiger Garik Rowe Kenneth Roberts Summer 2009 Sara Bradshaw Spring 2008 Parker Sands Andrew Stiglmeier Ian Britt Bradshaw, Deborah Nicholas Genzer Amador Saucedo Andrew Tyler Stephanie Hanlon Amanda Glidewell Mecklin, Justin Brian Wills Spring 2010 Cherese Wheeler Ginger Kapalka Gregory Hemmelgarn Austin Wilson Fall 2009 Sergio Lainez Summer 2008 Brendon Hoffman Taylor Coleman Jenna Murphy Piotr Chicinski Jonathan Lemaster Fall 2010 Crystal Davis Jordan Mussett Folsom Cory William Cotton Christina Liebelt William Denman Eric Ritchie Michael Driskill Jason Fancher Gilberto Lopez Edmundo Fortuna Chelsea Sekula Brandon Pryor Michael Franks Phillip Miller Kory Murphy Daniel Takahashi Ji Eom Michael Morow Douglas Zimmerman Jonathan Pace Fall 2008 Kenneth Olson Lauren Rentschler Joshua Atkins


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ttu ddf | research | design build | sustainable cabin & ladder

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ttu ddf | research | products

[products] [products]


The ddf program pursues many avenues in exploring the new paradigm of digital design and its impact towards a customization of products by capitalizing on the excellent fabrication shop facilities. While courses explore directly product design through specific themes, such as lighting fixtures, design studios attempt to employ the creative expertise of faculty and students in many community outreach projects. students in many community outreach projects. studios attempt to employ the creative expertise of faculty and through specific themes, such as lighting fixtures, design shop facilities. While courses explore directly product design ization of products by capitalizing on the excellent fabrication paradigm of digital design and its impact towards a customThe ddf program pursues many avenues in exploring the new

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ttu ddf | research | products | product design

[product design | lighting fixtures] Product Design is an introduction to the design and executed construction of a prototypical piece of furniture or other design product using an architectural design process. Students are introduced to 20th and 21st century design methods and processes of product design and industrial design. Key features are to study the work of Charles and Ray Eames, and the blurring between industrial and architecture design. Architecture design, industrial product design, the process of design and fabrication is radically changing because of the digital design and productions process, and therefore the class pushes forward in the methods of fabrication. ARCH 5302 | Product Design | Fall 2010 | Upe Flueckiger Summer 2009 Sara Bradshaw Spring 2008 Ian Britt Bradshaw, Deborah Nicholas Genzer Stephanie Hanlon Amanda Glidewell Mecklin, Justin Cherese Wheeler Ginger Kapalka Fall 2009 Sergio Lainez Summer 2008 Taylor Coleman Jenna Murphy Piotr Chicinski Crystal Davis Jordan Mussett Folsom Cory William Denman Eric Ritchie Michael Driskill Edmundo Fortuna Chelsea Sekula Brandon Pryor Kory Murphy Daniel Takahashi Douglas Zimmerman Jonathan Pace Fall 2008 Lauren Rentschler Joshua Atkins

Kenneth Roberts Andrew Stiglmeier Andrew Tyler Spring 2010 Gregory Hemmelgarn Brendon Hoffman Jonathan Lemaster Christina Liebelt Gilberto Lopez Phillip Miller Michael Morow Kenneth Olson

Garik Rowe Parker Sands Amador Saucedo Brian Wills Austin Wilson Fall 2010 William Cotton Jason Fancher Michael Franks Ji Eom


068

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ttu ddf | research | products | product design

069


070

072

071

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ttu ddf | research | products | product design

073 074

075


076

_85


ttu ddf | research | products | product design

077


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ttu ddf | research | products | LHUCA reception desk

[LHUCA reception desk] Three reception tables on casters, which can be assembled in a variety of combinations. These were design built as part of ARCH 5302 Product Design, an elective in the Spring of 2013, but formed also a part of a two month design service learning project for the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts in Lubbock, Texas. In a design charrette the students proposed first their individual designs for a new reception table. The jury, Karen Wiley, Linda Cullum and Tonja Hagy together with the course instructor selected the final design. The design plays homage to industrial materials and colors and is successfully used since spring of 2009 on the LHUCA Campus. ARCH 5503 | Advanced Architectural Design Studio | Spring 2014 | Upe Flueckiger Brian, Avalos. Daniela, Ettedgui. Jennifer, Lopez. Majed, Alquimi. Bradly, Rich. Garrett, Hull. John, Garcia. Mitchell, Fuqua.

Valeria, Sierra.


078

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96.00 4.50

49.50

27.75

33.00

13.00

4.50

17.75

A

6.50 27.50

29.00

A

B

48.00

19.00

13.00

19.50

4.50

side elevations

back elevation

plan view

B

ttu ddf | research | products | LHUCA reception desk

A

079

080


081

_91 _66


ttu ddf | research | products | TEDx stage design

[TEDx stage design] Designing, fabricating, and installing an architectural scenographic design using recycled plastic bottles. The project engaged many people through multidisciplinary on–campus and off–campus collaborations, which involved in the process entities such as, the College of Architecture, the Department of Theatre and Dance, the University Student Housing, Moonlight Musicals and Effortless Recycling.” TEDx conference | Fall 2013 | Kuhn Park & Heather Warren-Crow Kuhn Park: Associate Professor, College of Architecture, Texas Tech University (TTU) Heather Warren-Crow: Assistant Professor, College of Visual Performing Arts, TTU Rachel Burch: Graduate Student, College of Architecture, TTU Ty Mason: Graduate Student, College of Architecture, TTU John D Conner: Graduate Student, College of Visual Performing Arts, TTU


082

_93


ttu ddf | research | products | TEDx stage design

083

084


086

085

_95

087


ttu ddf | research | products | TEDx stage design

R_055

088

R_056


R_057

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ttu ddf | program operativity

[program operativity] [program operativity]


The ddf program created its own curriculum in order to project beyond technology driven changes in the profession and to engage the next challenge through design research with digital tools. The MS degree serves like an umbrella under which various courses, design studios as well as workshops investigate faculty based research in the three main areas, computation & design, fabrication & materials and construction assembly. design, fabrication & materials and construction assembly. faculty based research in the three main areas, computation & ious courses, design studios as well as workshops investigate tools. The MS degree serves like an umbrella under which varengage the next challenge through design research with digital beyond technology driven changes in the profession and to The ddf program created its own curriculum in order to project

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ttu ddf | program operativity | courses

[courses]

89


Courses In general there are three areas of the teaching and research which compliment each other and define the Master of Science specialization and graduate certificate in Digital Design and Fabrication, they are : Design, Fabrication and Construction. The program offers courses that deepen knowledge in those three areas closely related to recent and emerging technologies that reshape the current practice of architecture and the construction industry as a whole. The acquired skills are brought to the forefront in a DDF design Studio.

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Robotics a digital design media driven class, where technology is used to teach specific design research skills

[5301]

Product design introduction to the design & construction of a prototypical piece of furniture or other design product using an architectural design process.

[5302]

Smart materials approved technology elective dealing with the advanced study of technical building methods and means.

[5303]

ttu ddf | program operativity | courses

Design process explores emerging methods of computation as generative drivers of the design process, where design intent captured through algorithmic processes and parametric modeling enables design alternatives.

[5304]


[5352]

Computer application to architecture survey of digital computer applications to the issues & processes of architecture and planning.

Topical studio

[5501]

topical studio that explores design, theoretical and/or technological issues that affect current architectural thought and practice.

Topical studio

[5502]

topical studio that explores design, theoretical and/or technological issues that affect current architectural thought and practice.

Research digital design workshop

[7000]

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ttu ddf | program operativity | workshops

[workshops]

090


Design & Computation Workshops The DDF program organizes workshops on design computation 1-2 times per academic year. Students together with visiting faculty such as Marc Fornes, Kris Leese, Luis Quinones, Rob Eleazer and our graduate instructors explore specific design problems at the center of our ongoing design research. In a week long workshop, students learn about algorithmic logic and the generation of space related to material and fabrication concerns. The workshops and their final installations or prototypes are also a good opportunity for students to learn and engage the various fabrication and numerically controlled equipment in the shops, such as laser cutters, 3D printers, CNC machines or robotic arms.

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ttu ddf | program operativity | workshops

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workshop project In the workshop on geometry bifurcation and branching in Fall 2011, taught by Robbie Eleazer and Luis Quinones, students explored various geometry related topics from digital attractor systems to physical output with CNC milling. In a final installation of the workshop a hanging structure developed after a series of exercises with recursive branching, assembly methods with modules and curve delaminations, was fabricated and erected in the entry hall way of the College of Architecture. The building prototype, a branching system of 4 individual towers, is made of two colors of laser cut acrylic sheets, stiffened by steel cables, and post tensioned between CNC milled ceiling and floor plates.

95

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ttu ddf | program operativity | master of science thesis

[master of science thesis]

97


Master of Science with a Specialization in Digital Design & Fabrication Thesis The Master of Science in Architecture with specialization in Digital Design and Fabrication (DDF) is dedicated to advance design knowledge and pursue innovation in the process of making architecture. The program is positioned at the intersection of architecture, engineering and computation with a profound sustainable and interdisciplinary direction. The program engages in research and development that concern emerging material issues in a “digital-craft� based professional practice beyond the design related disciplines. With a focus on digital technologies, the program explores new material processes across different fields and the related fabrication and building methodologies. The goal is to form a set of skills, which build up a designer’s creative potential through material oriented strategies. Research models and innovative approaches are in direct response to questions of inquiry brought forward through our network of partners in professional practice and industries. The program is intended to prepare students for recent market changes with an exponential increase in digital and information-driven design-build projects.

Digital Design & Fabrication Certificate The DDF Graduate Certificate is a specialty component of the Digital Design and Fabrication Program. A Certificate of specialization can be obtained by professionals outside the University, by anyone with an approved undergraduate degree from any college or school at Texas Tech, or from any other university in the world by taking a minimum of 14 hours of core courses in the DDF program. MArch graduates that wish to pursue the MSpecialization in DDF after receiving the MArch with a certificate in DDF can transfer 12 hours from the certificate specialty into the MS program with a specialization in DDF.

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[Dung Do] Fall 2011 Emerging Architecture: Associating Point-Clouds with Multiple Datasets Voronoi Algorithm

[Rob Diaz] Spring 2012 Intelligent Facade Engineered through Morpho-Ecogenetic Aggregates

[Jose Joaquin Sanchez] Spring 2014 Water Harvester: Building Envelope for Rainwater Harvesting

ttu ddf | program operativity | master of science thesis

[Majed Alquimi] Spring 2014 New Techniques to Use Dates Palm Fronds in Architectural Applications

[Alma Luna] Spring 2014 Smart Wind Technology Applications in Architecture


B.Fabrication

1 3.a

3.b

3.c

3.5d

3.e

3.f

3.5c

3.5d

3.5e

3.5f

00.3 | single square panel with aperture

3.5a

3.5b

00.35 | single square panel with several apertures

2

3

Fig. 5.6.3: Perspective view of the Vernal Equinox form 4 1. Cutting the fronds into the same length (17 inch). 2. Making a ring around both ends of the frond. 3. Making the tenon. 4. The fronds ready to assemble. 00.4 | process.open.front 5. The chair sides are ready after cutting by CNC on one inch Baltic Birch.

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methods [Rob Diaz | “iFemea� | Morpho-Ecogenetic facade system]

9. Final pour

13. Final sample A-1

3.a

10. PU in mold, evaporating

11. Curing

12. Curing

14. Final sample

15. Final sample A-2

3.c

3.b

3.5d

103

3.e

3.f

3.5e

3.5f

3.5a

3.5c

3.5b

3.5d

00.35 | single square panel with several apertures

last stage of skin manipulated by magnetic energy input.

00.4 | process.open.front iron filings for a positive magnetic attraction.move concave

- 01.50

- 0.75 - 0.50 - 0.25 - 0.15 - 0.0

- 01.25

- 0.1.00

ttu ddf | program operativity | master of science thesis

00.3 | single square panel with aperture

acrylic frame for component system 00.5 | process.open.back

104


00.1 | triangular

00.2 | curvilinear

1.a

1.b

1.c

1.d

1.e

1.f

2.a

2.b

2.c

2.d

2.e

2.f

2.5a

2.5b

2.5c

2.5d

2.5e

2.5f

+ 1.50 + 1.25

00.25 | with apertures

+ 1.00 + 0.75 + 0.50 + 0.25 + 0.15

00.6| process.open.front

skin assembly. polycarbonate 6.b

6.a

6.c

polyurethane tube poly joint.vertical system sensor control poly joint.magnetic structure system

6.e

6.d

6.f

silicon liquid gel

iFemea Rob Diaz

105

polyurethan tube

sensor system

00.8| skin elevation

ma.06

0’-6�

ma.05

polyurethane tube

ma.04

polycarbonate membrane

poly joint.vertical system

electro-magnet force ma.03

poly joint.vertical system electro-magnet ma.01

magnet force

poly joint.vertical system

skin assembly. polycarbonate wire polyurethane tube

sensor control poly joint.magnetic structure system ma.02

- 1.50 - 1.25

106

00.9| section

- 1.00

- 0.75 - 0.50 - 0.25

00.7| skin.structure.facade

iFemea

Rob Diaz

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ttu ddf | program operativity | people

[people]

107


People COA DDF faculty: Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger, Kuhn Park, Maria Perbellini, Christian Pongratz, Dustin White. guest DDF faculty: Kyle Meeks Daniel Pruske guest instructors: Gil Akos Rob Eleazer Marc Fornes Kris Leese Ronnie Parsons Luis Quinones

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Urs Peter ‘Upe’ Flueckiger Urs Peter “Upe” Flueckiger teaches and practices architecture in Lubbock, Texas where he is a Full Professor of Architecture at Texas Tech University. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. He is the author of the book: “Donald Judd, Architecture in Marfa Texas.” His design work has been published in the “New York Times”, “Texas Architect Magazine”, and other books, journals, and magazines.

Maria Perbellini Maria R. Perbellini graduated from the IUAV (Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia, Italy), and obtained the MasterARCH at Pratt Institute, New York, USA. Before establishing her own practice, she worked in New York, USA for Eisenman Architects, John Reimnitz Architect and the Regional Plan Association of New York. She taught at the School of Architecture, University of Texas (UT) at Lubboch, USA, and she has been a visiting professor at Yeungjin Jr. College, Taegu, Korea.

ttu ddf | program operativity | faculty

Dustin White Dustin L White is an architectural designer and educator teaching in the areas of digital fabrication, material experimentation and design. Dustin White has consulted on numerous built and un-built works with Field Office (Clemson SC) and Pongratz-Perbellini Architects (Verona IT). In the fall of 2010 Dustin White became a Visiting Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University and currently is the Director of the Fabrication Shops and an Instructor teaching undergraduate and graduate courses.


Christian Pongratz Christian R Pongratz is co-founder of pONGRATZ pERBELLINI Architects/ Cyberstone LLC, Director of Digital Design and Fabrication and Professor of Architecture, College of Architecture, Texas Tech University. His firm won numerous international awards and honors developing research into the digital to material, which evolved into several books and cultivated design innovation, such as in natural stone design.

Kuhn Park Kuhn Park indulges in perpetual discrepancies between digital and physical manner of architectural design and media, with finesse. From his background in Computational Design at Carnegie Mellon University, he runs aMachine: architectural machine studio and DiMeND: digital media in neoteric dimension at TTU, offers an annual workshop at International League of Higher Education in Media and Communication, and co-directs Interactive Media Design Center at the Communication University of China in Beijing.

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ttu ddf | program operativity | DDF shop & tools

[DDF Shop & Tools]

108


Digital Design & Fabrication Shop The Digital Design and Fabrication shops specialize in computational design, computeraided manufacturing CAD/CAM, and rapid prototyping technology. A state of the art facility, students and faculty from many departments work together on their research into geomety and material systems. With about 10,000 sqft of existing shop space shared between wood and metal working and rapid prototyping, a new addition of 2,000 sqft with robotics and materials research, and more than 8,000 sqft of partially covered outdoor assembly areas, it is one of the largest fabrication shops in the mid west.

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ttu ddf | program operativity | DDF shop & tools

109


Pedestrian Pathway

Assembly & Finishing Expansion

Wet Lab ( 900 sq ft )

Experimental 3D Printing & Waterjet Cutting ( 676 sq ft )

( 1030 sq ft )

Robotics Lab

Material Delivery

Storage

Ramp

Material Delivery

Laser & Blade Cutters ( 831 sq ft ) ( 225 sq ft )

( 1748 sq ft )

Egress

( 512 sq ft )

Interactive Lab

( 512 sq ft )

Materials Lab/Library

( 343 aq ft )

Rapid Prototyping

Exhibition

Lockers

COURTYARD

Joining, Finishing, Assembly

3D Scanning

( 1071 sq ft )

3-Axis Machines: Routing & Milling

Vacuum Form

Storage

Storage

Egress

( 1024 sq ft )

Possible Wood Shop Expansion

( 666 sq ft )

Small TableTools

Exhibition Lockers

Egress

( 550 sq ft )

Assembly Workspace

Egress

( 575 sq ft )

Material Delivery

( 1024 sq ft )

Wood Shop

( 1657 sq ft )

Wood Shop

Assembly Workspace

Storage

Egress

Egress

( 1260 sq ft )

Welding Expansion

( 660 sq ft )

MetalShop Expansion

above

Gallery Expansion

( 660 sq ft + 1260 sqft +?)

( 1600 sq ft )

Embankm. Welding

Storage

20’

10’

5’

1’

Egress

Paint

Egress

trolley

110

Overhead I-beam

FABRICATION LAB RENOVATION & CONSTRUCTION

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N

add. Lab ( 1000 sq ft )

add. Lab

INTERDISCIPLINARY DESIGN RESEARCH CENTER AND EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCE LAB


ttu ddf | program operativity | DDF shop & tools

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ttu ddf | program operatiity | reference

[reference]

119


About DDF 000 Surface structure | Prof. Pongratz | Sven Nevlida | Fall 2012 001 La spezia, module variation | Prof. Pongratz | Sven Nevlida, Matus Sceranka | Fall 2012

Building Envelopes Sphenoid Wall 002 003 004 005 006 007 008

Final assembly of scaled cast components | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Fabrication strategy | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Phases of production | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Assembly phases | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Final assembly full scale | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Final assembly full scale | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013 Assembly of wall at Urban Stage downtown | Prof. Pongratz | Kyle Meeks | Fall 2013

Deep Surface 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016

Cladding test | Prof. Pongratz | Powitzky Chris | Fall 2010 Wireframe | Prof. Pongratz | Powitzky Chris | Fall 2010 Smooth surface texture | Prof. Pongratz | Powitzky Chris | Fall 2010 Fabrication images of various phases | Studio Pongratz | Fall 2010 Cnc milling in progress | Studio Pongratz | Fall 2010 Prototype | Prof. Pongratz | Amador Saucedo | Fall 2010 Wall rendering | Prof. Pongratz | Chris Powitzky | Fall 2010 Transparency study of cast prototype | Prof. Pongratz | Chris Davis | Fall 2010

Collective Form 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026

Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective Collective

form form form form form form form form form form

3D 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D 3D

printed printed printed printed printed printed printed printed printed printed

model model model model model model model model model model

| | | | | | | | | |

Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof. Prof.

Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske Pruske

| | | | | | | | | |

Simon Alvarez | Spring 2011 Martin Medina | Spring 2011 Kyle Meeks | Spring 2011 Simon Alvarez | Spring 2011 Kyle Meeks | Spring 2011 Simon Alvarez | Spring 2011 Ty Mason | Spring 2011 Prof. Pruske | Spring 2011 Ty Mason | Spring 2011 Prof. Pruske | Spring 2011

Interactive Architecture aMachine | meta TOUCH

027 Build model | Prof. Park | Kyle Meeks, Jose Sanchez, Winston Holloway | Spring 2012 028 Process photos | Prof. Park | Kyle Meeks, Jose Sanchez, Winston Holloway | Spring 2012 029 Model documentation | Prof. Park | Kyle Meeks, Jose Sanchez, Winston Holloway | Spring 2012

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030 Perspective rendering | Prof. Park | Kyle Meeks, Jose Sanchez, Winston Holloway | Spring 2012

aMachine | Floriculture machine 031 032 033 034 035 036

Build model | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014 Process photos | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014 Model documentation | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014 Build model | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014 Build model | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014 Visualization | Prof. Park | J.Charbonneau, A.Triplett | Spring 2014

Design Build Ave J | city green scape

Pongratz studio: Denman, William Diaz, Ramiro Perbellini studio: Bustamante, Luis Davis, Christopher P.

Garland, Jesse Gomez, Jordan

Guevara, Isela Holloway, Winston Hemmelgarn, Gregory Larriva, Adrian

Enciso, Joseph L. Everett, Gregory S. Engelhardt, Joseph S Liebelt, Christina

Mayor, Nicholas A. Molina, Debbie J.

Sanchez, Jose Wong, Kim Pace, Jonathan A. Saucedo, Amador M.

ttu ddf | program operatiity | reference

037 Snapshot media bubble, rendering | Diaz R., Larriva A., Wong K., Holloway W. | studio Pongratz | Spring 2011 038 Model at an urban scale with streetscape for two city blocks | 3d printed and laser cut | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 039 Rendering at an urban scale with streetscape for two city blocks | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 040 Full scale installation piece in plywood and steel brackets | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 041 Scaled model of installation piece, laser cut | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 042 Rendering of streetscape interior | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 043 Image sequence from final project review with visitors Edgar Stach and Lancelot Coars to snapshots from the public project installation with integrated dance performances, all during the Lubbock Arts Festival 044 Rendering of a streetscape | studio Perbellini | Spring 2011 045 Masterplan streetscape “Dornroeschen” | studio Pongratz | Spring 2011 046 Rendering streetscape “Dornroeschen” | studio Pongratz | Spring 2011 047 Masterplan model streetscape “Dornroeschen” | laser cut and 3d printed | studio Pongratz | Spring 2011 048 Rendering streetscape “Dornroeschen” | studio Pongratz | Spring 2011

Urban Stage

049 Street scene on Ave J | photo by Denny Mingus, SP2014 050 Masterplan and snapshots from the various team projects | Prof. Pongratz and Prof. White 051 Rendering based on some of the initial ideas of students | Sven Nevlida | Prof. Pongratz and Prof. White 052-055 Photos taken by Denny Mingus during several events such as Oktoberfest and Tech game days 056-058 Close ups of some of the installations by Denny Mingus

Sustainable Cabin & Ladder

059 Cabin exterior | Prof. Flueckiger | photo by D.Mingus | Fall 2010 060 Cabin exterior | Prof. Flueckiger | photo by D.Mingus | Fall 2010 061-064 Construction Photos | Built up from an existing double wide mobile home platform, cut down to necessary size and redesigned with sustainable materials such as bamboo flooring, natural pine cladding, & recycled thermal insulation. In addition the cabin is self sufficient with solar panels, reusing recycled rain water and compost. The


shelf was entirely designed by Product Design students and permanently placed in the project | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Fall 2010 065-066 Ladder documentation | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Fall 2010 067 Ladder detail | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Fall 2010

Products product design | lighting fixtures

068 Lamp | Prof. Flueckiger | Milad Fereshtehnezhad | Spring 2014 069 Lamp | Prof. Flueckiger | Matthew Kendal | Spring 2014 070 Lamp | Prof. Flueckiger | Blake Arnold | Spring 2014 071 Lamp | Prof. Flueckiger | Giovanni Velazquez | Spring 2014 072 Lamp | Prof. Flueckiger | Rodrigo Avila | Spring 2014 073-076 Lighting fixture | Prof. Flueckiger (fabrication), Prof. Pongratz (design consultant) | Dung Do | Spring 2011 077 Chair documentation | Prof. Flueckiger | Andrew Triplett | Spring 2013

LHUCA Reception Desk Brian, Avalos. Bradly, Rich. 078 079 080 081

Desk Desk Desk Desk

Daniela, Ettedgui. Garrett, Hull.

Jennifer, Lopez. John, Garcia.

Majed, Alquimi. Mitchell, Fuqua.

Valeria, Sierra.

| Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Spring 2014 documentation | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Spring 2014 | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Spring 2014 detail | Prof. Flueckiger | Studio Group | Spring 2014

TEDx 082 083 084 085 086 087 088

Pattern detail | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Stage design | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Stage design | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Process photos | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Process photos | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Process photos | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013 Stage design | Prof. Park | Rachel Burch, Ty Mason, John D Conner | Fall 2013

Program Operativity 089 Studio fabrication | Studio Pongratz | Fall 2013 090 Workshop geometry, render | tutors: Robbie Eleazer and Luis Quinones | Dung Do | Fall 2011 091 Grasshopper workshop flyers | 092 Grasshopper workshop flyers | 093-096 Workshop geometry | tutors: Robbie Eleazer and Luis Quinones | Rob Diaz | Fall 2011 097 DDF project | Prof. Pongratz | Diaz, De La Vega | Fall 2009 098 Emerging Architecture: Associating Point-Clouds with Multiple Datasets , MS Thesis | Prof. Pongratz | Dung Do | Fall 2011 099 Intelligent Facade Engineered through Morpho-Ecogenetic Aggregates, MS Thesis | Prof. Perbellini | Rob Diaz | Spring 2012

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ttu ddf | program operatiity | reference

100 Water Harvester: Building Envelope for Rainwater Harvesting, MS Thesis | Prof. Perbellini | Jose Joaquin Sanchez | Spring 2014 101 New Techniques to Use Dates Palm Fronds in Architectural Applications, MS Thesis | Prof. Pongratz | Majed Alquimi | Spring 2014 102 Smart Wind Technology Applications in Architecture, MS Thesis | Prof. Park | Alma Luna | Spring 2014 103-106 Thesis documentation | Rob Diaz | Spring 2012 107 Project presentation/critiques 108 Cladding test | Studio Pongratz | Fall 2010 109 FANUC robotic arm 110 Basement and courtyard plan 111 Model shop 112 Courtyard 113 Model shop 114 Model shop 115 Courtyard 116 Courtyard 117 Model shop 118 Courtyard 119 Advanced Design Studio | Prof Pongratz | Eloisa McGill, Jesse VK Nedunur, Tyler Porter | Fall 2013


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