AN Summer 2020 Source Material

Page 1

Source Material Summer 2020

The latest on residential construction, timber, facades, windows, and walls.


2 Editor’s Note

Masthead

Info

Interesting Times

Publisher Diana Darling

East Editorial Advisory Board Paola Antonelli / Aaron Betsky / M. Christine Boyer / Peter Cook / Whitney Cox / Odile Decq / Tom Hanrahan / Betti Sue Hertz / Craig Konyk / Peter Lang / Jayne Merkel / Signe Nielsen / Joan Ockman / Chee Pearlman / Anne Rieselbach / Terence Riley / Raymund Ryan / Ken Saylor / Darius Somers / Michael Speaks / Mark E. Strauss

Associate Publisher Dionne Darling Director of Operations Matthew Hoffman Executive Editor Samuel Medina Managing Editor Jack Balderrama Morley Art Director Ian Thomas Web Editor Jonathan Hilburg Market Editor Gabrielle Golenda Interiors Editor Adrian Madlener Associate Editors Matt Hickman Shane Reiner-Roth

COURTESY VITRO ARCHITECTUR AL GL ASS

The country, and everyone in it, has been living with the novel coronavirus pandemic for at least five months now. With each passing month, we at The Architect’s Newspaper, like so many others in the AEC industry, trepidatiously await the release of the latest sector reports. The worst seems to have come and gone with April, when the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) posted record lows. The closing of “nonessential” construction sites and project slowdowns contributed to depressed demand and billings across all regions. But as cities reopened in May, business picked up: June’s ABI showed flashes of recovery, particularly in the Midwest and West. Signs of optimism appeared elsewhere, only to be followed—below-the-fold, as it were—by disclaimers. In home building, single-family demand has grown markedly since April, although this may have more to do with extremely low mortgage rates than any animating factors endemic to the sector. Whatever the reason may be, sector leaders welcomed the news, even as Robert Dietz, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders, tempered the mood by pointing out the increasing costs of raw materials. Builders, Dietz said in a statement, “face challenges in growing costs, particularly rising prices for lumber.” The problem is even more acute outside residential construction. In its June report on nonresidential construction, which parsed data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Producer Price Index, the Associated Builders and Contractors cited a rise in input prices of 2.2 percent. The uptick follows May’s rise and betrays disruptions in the global supply chain induced by the pandemic. While it’s true that rebounding oil prices largely explain June’s increase, the price of softwood lumber rose by 11 percent in the same time frame. The issue is worrisome, as nonresidential construction—an umbrella category encompassing commercial, institutional, and industrial sectors— will likely be the hardest hit by the current downturn. So suggests the AIA’s midyear report, which projects a steep decline in architectural design billings across these sectors, particularly in office space and retail. And like the material price increases, the billings decline is likely to carry into 2021. Even businesses considered “essential” Front cover image: Ema Peter

at the start of the lockdown, and thus free from mandated stoppages, aren’t exempt from interruptions. Float glass production has been continuous; manufacturers process hundreds of tons of industrial sheets of glass daily, preparing them to be shipped to and modified by fabricators. According to Nicole Harris, president and CEO of the National Glass Association, the sticking point for float glass is not manufacturing inputs—sand remains cheap and plentiful. Rather, it’s “really more about the workforce and the crunch time on job sites,” Harris told AN in June. “A lot of companies have already started laying off their workers, right? If the job sites are closed and the factories are closed, then the fabrication facilities are closed.” In other words, the supply of float glass is holding steady, but the fabricators that incorporate the glass into construction-ready products are not immediately able to use it. But we might resist the temptation to paint too dour a picture. After all, demand for both architectural services and building materials is up in certain sectors, notably healthcare and research laboratories. Meanwhile, respondents to our State of Manufacturing survey (facing page) were split on the pandemic’s effects and potential aftermath for their respective companies. Some reported little to no change in production or raw material costs. Others expect to see revenue gains in the coming year. None seemed too bothered by the postponement of industry trade shows, those roving emporiums that once marked the passage of time, bracketing the “busy” midyear months on company calendars. The pandemic has a way of scrambling, and accelerating, time. Five months somehow seems an inadequate container for the numerous disturbances—economic, social, and otherwise—we’ve already experienced; but that same span also feels plodding. Industry reports such as those cited above register the economic effects only belatedly, while forecasts project a recovery that seems ever out of reach. There is, we sense, a mismatch between firsthand experience and macro trends. This discrepancy exists in any time period, but the pandemic has nestled into everyday life to such an extent that the macro feels micro (and vice versa).

Program Manager Matthew Marani Programming and Special Events Director Susan Kramer

West Editorial Advisory Board Frances Anderton / Steve Castellanos / Erin Cullerton / Teddy Cruz / Mike Davis / Neil Denari / Devin Gharakhanian / Jia Yi Gu / Brooke Hodges / Craig Hodgetts / Walter Hood / Jimenez Lai / Priscilla Lovat Fraser / David Meckel / Kimberli Meyers / Anna Neimark / Kyong Park / John Parman / Simon Sadler / Roger Sherman / William Stout / Warren Techentin / Andrew Zago Midwest Editorial Advisory Board Robert Bruegmann / Sarah Dunn / Zurich Esposito / Martin Felsen / Sarah Herda / Reed Kroloff / Edward Lifson / Robert McAnulty / Ben Nicholson / Donna Robertson / Zoë Ryan / Elizabeth A. T. Smith / Julie Snow / Martha Thorne Southwest Editorial Advisory Board Anthony Alofsin / Marlon Blackwell / Nate Eudaly / Carlos Jiménez / Sheryl Kolasinski / Tracy Zeeck

Events Marketing Managers Charlotte Barnard Karen Diaz

General Information: info@archpaper.com Editorial: editors@archpaper.com Advertising: ddarling@archpaper.com Subscriptions: subscribe@archpaper.com Reprints: reprints@parsintl.com

Graphics Manager Sarah Hughes

Vol. 18, Issue 6 | Summer 2020

Audience Development Manager Ankit Rauniyar Account Executives Tony Fasano Tara Newton

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3

Source Material

Reader Survey

Summer 2020

Reader Survey Midway through 2020, and several months into the coronavirus pandemic, we can confidently say that the building industry has changed. But exactly how it has changed—and how permanent these changes may turn out to be—is difficult to parse. So, we polled manufacturers and architects among our readership to hear more about the specific challenges they and their companies have faced thus far.

We asked about production stoppages, disruptions in supply chains, the rising prices of raw materials, the rise and fall of demand for building products and materials, losses of leads, revenue projections, and more. The 38 responses, aggregated and reproduced in the following charts and quotes, tell us a few different things. The pandemic is definitely hitting budgets, and layoffs and furloughs

Has your company experienced any of the following changes due to the current pandemic?

Layoffs

Budget cuts Furloughs

Pay cuts

Has your company experienced interruptions in production? If so, how would you describe them?

have been common. That much we suspected. More surprisingly, respondents reported only mild changes to supply chains and construction input prices. Which is not to suggest that architects, manufacturers, and fabricators haven’t been, or won’t be, affected by these shifts—but only time will tell for sure.

“Companies that were already adept at online selling and marketing aren’t experiencing as many issues as those that did not previously make the change.” Has your company experienced any disruptions in supply chains? If so, how would you describe them?

Severe

Severe

None

None

Moderate

Moderate

Pay cuts Mild

Mild


4

Source Material

Have the prices of raw materials that your company uses changed?

Increased

Reader Survey

The Architect’s Newspaper

“Trade shows have become less and less effective in the past decade.”

Stayed the same Decreased

“With AIA-approved courses and the ability to run our own, we have supplemented any lead losses.”

Has demand for your company’s latest products/ materials met your revenue targets for the year?

Demand has grown

Demand has stayed the same Demand has fallen

How do you expect your company’s revenue to change in 2021?

How do you expect your industry sector’s revenue to change in 2021?

Stay the same Stay the same

Increase

Increase

Decrease Decrease


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Windows & Walls 6

Windows & Walls

Case Study Products

The Architect’s Summer 2020 Newspaper

HUF TON + CROW

The following pages showcase some of today’s most impressive windows and walls—operable or not—installed in a variety of projects, including an outdoor office, a garage accessory dwelling unit, and a large college campus. Plus, special product listings featuring hygienic design solutions for the COVID-19 era, including physical barriers, automatic openers, and touchless hardware. By Gabrielle Golenda


SLIDING GLASS WALLS THAT STACK REMOTELY

OPEN CORNERS

© 2020 NANA WALL SYSTEMS, INC.

SWING DOORS SLIDE AWAY WITH PANELS

NanaWall® HSW systems’ single track sliding glass walls offer unlimited numbers of panels up to 12 feet tall, helping you develop striking architecture with wider, more sweeping views. Resistant to weather and commercial use, panels may be easily stacked remotely in parking bays or hidden closets.

Free your space at nanawall.com/hsw.


8

Windows & Walls

Location: Surfside, Florida Architect and designer: Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel Window/wall system: Schüco HSS 65

from beach morphologies. “Specifically, sand dunes. That’s reflected in the stone colors and the pyramid shape,” Karp noted. Within each of Arte’s 16 units, living spaces spill out onto spacious, ipe-decked balconies, thanks to operable walls from Schüco. These are supplemented by a gridded window system that runs down the middle of the facade to create a bit more privacy for residents. Karp said that after studying three or four window systems, the designers chose the Schüco system because of its thin profile and operable and fixed options. The Tecnoglass windowpanes were impact-tested to ensure they could withstand hurricanes and tropical storms. The distinctive, knife-edged balconies were shaped by structural engineering and local zoning requirements. Pretensioned slabs help them cantilever from the facade without any vertical supports that might block the view, and setback regulations meant that every second floor needed to retreat further from the shore, creating a terracelike feel with plenty of shade. The building features many bells and whistles that cater to a rarefied market (a 75-foot indoor swimming pool, a rooftop tennis court, climate-controlled parking, lobby art by Olafur Eliasson, etc.), but it’s the giant sliding doors that really turn these condos into the stuff of fantasy as they open onto ocean, sand, and sky. JBM

Arte

Architect of record: Kobi Karp Architecture & Interior Design Structural engineer: Thornton Tomasetti Facade consultant: Giovanni Monti & Partners General contractor: Americaribe & Moriarty Joint Venture (AMJV) Window glass: Tecnoglass Window frame coating: AkzoNobel Lexus Bronze TRI-ESCENT II ULTRA Arte, a 12-story, ziggurat-shaped luxury condo building, stands on the beach of Surfside, Florida, like some kind of glossy totem. Slabs of travertine seem to float above one another with only large glass windows between them. The effect is both effortless and luxe, appropriate for this affluent stretch of the Atlantic coast between Bal Harbour and Miami Beach. The building’s designers—Milan, Italy– based firm Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel (ACPV) and Miami-based architect of record Kobi Karp Architecture & Interior Design (KKAID)— drew on their respective backgrounds “to create an architecture able to perfectly adapt to the location, while preserving an Italian soul,” said Antonio Citterio. For Citterio, a cofounder of ACPV, the sea-forward lifestyle of the Mediterranean was a constant reference, while Kobi Karp, founder of KKAID, drew inspiration

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

KRIS TAMBURELLO

INTERIOR FINISH BY OTHERS

ES-7525 CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM - LMI TYP. HEAD DETAIL

H1 D1.1

1"

ES-6025-011

112 "

1 " 2

1 " 2

ES-7525-001

AT MULLION: " DIA. KWIK BOLT-3 EXPANSION ANCHOR (1) PER SIDE 3 12 " MIN. EMB. 3 3 4 " MIN. EDGE DISTANCE 6 12 " MIN. SPACING AT JAMB: (2) 12 " DIA. KWIK BOLT-3 EXPANSION ANCHOR STAGGERED 2 14 " MIN. SPACING

4"

G4

B9

1 2

G2

212 " 3 " 4

G7

KRIS TAMBURELLO

G.B.

ES-6025-008

ES-7525-006

(2) 14 " DIA. BOLTS WITH WASHER AND NUT

SILICONE SEALANT DC790 & BACKER ROD MULLION CAP D.L.O.

913 16 "

5 16 " DIA. WEEP HOLES.

#14 x 1" SMS AT 8 14 " O.C.

3 " 4

G1

G.B.

G7

R.O.

EXTERIOR

ES-7525-006

FRAME HEIGHT

3 " 4

212 "

B4

ES-6025-TBA2

G1 G7

G.B.

ES-7525-003

H2 D1.1

ES-7525 CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM - LMI TYP. TRANSOM DETAIL

TYP. ES-7525 SMI DETAIL

3 " 4

G.B.

G1 G8

3 " 4

1 4 " DIA. WEEP HOLES.

G.B.

DC 995 SILICONE

B4

G8 G1

1 9 16 "

3"

D.L.O.

514 "

INTERIOR SEALANT BY OTHERS

INTERIOR GASKET

T.O.F.F.

H3

ES-7525-005

ES-7525-006

3"

T.O.S.S.

B9

G.B.

212 "

2"

ES-6025-008

B4

D1.1

3 " 4

G1 G7

G4

LOAD BEARING SHIMS AT EACH SIDE OF CLIPS. MAX 1"

1"

ES-7525-001

ES-7525 CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM - LMI TYP. SILL DETAIL

Top: Arte’s windows and operable walls open onto balconies that overlook the South Florida shore.

Above: Balconies create deep overhangs that shade the building’s glass walls.

Above right: The building’s beachfront facade mixes gridded and single-pane windows to balance privacy and views.

Right: A typical detail of the curtainwall system

ES-6025-011

11

16 "

TYP. 1/2" 1" MAX

1"

2"

KRIS TAMBURELLO

SILICONE SEALANT DC790 & BACKER ROD

10 12 "

BITUMINOUS PAINT BY OTHERS

7 3 16 "

AT MULLION: " DIA. KWIK BOLT-3 EXPANSION ANCHOR (1) PER SIDE 3 12 " MIN. EMB. 3 3 4 " MIN. EDGE DISTANCE 6 12 " MIN. SPACING AT JAMB: (2) 12 " DIA. KWIK BOLT-3 EXPANSION ANCHOR STAGGERED 2 14 " MIN. SPACING

1 2

COURTESY ACPV


9 Sponsored Content

Windows & Walls

Case Study

August 2020

Innovation formparts.fab by Rieder Causes a Stir in Berlin Bollinger + Fehlig Architects, BDA, and Stoeckert Architects sent an important signal with a new three-dimensional concrete facade made of Rieder products for Lichtfabrik, an office building in Berlin’s Luisenstadt district. The innovative formparts.fab concrete facade elements played a major role in creating a synthesis between historic preservation requirements and contemporary aesthetics. The Luisenstadt conservation area, in which Lichtfabrik is located, is subject to specific requirements to protect its urban character. The architects found a solution that met historic preservation guidelines and integrated the new building into the existing urban fabric. This resulted in a unique facade that at first glance appears subordinate to the surrounding structures. On closer inspection, however, you can see how intelligently and sensitively

the facade of the new building forges its own path. With the formparts.fab products made of glass fiber reinforced concrete, the architects succeeded in articulating the building’s careful design.

formparts.fab as flexible solution for creative architecture Sophisticated architectural concepts like Lichtfabrik’s can often quickly reach the limits of feasibility, but Rieder has specialized for many years in realizing the wishes and visions of special design ideas. In close cooperation with the metalworker and the facade processor, a tailor-made solution was found to manifest the vision of the project’s architects. A prefabricated substructure was delivered to the Rieder factory, where the formparts.fab

elements were assembled and prepared for delivery to Berlin. Most of the facade structure was made of polygonal, tilted, and tinted curtain-type concrete elements. “If the virtually animated flowing dress represents a maximum of formal freedom and the faithful replica of a Berlin made of stone represents maximum restriction, then this curtain wall is our synthesis, our way of echoing this discourse through the medium of construction,” said architect Michael Pape of Stoeckert Architects about the concept for the street-facing facade.

Much more than just decoration: the new formparts.fab Because of their low weight and large span widths, Rieder’s formed parts are perfect for

facades with challenging geometries. The new sharp-edged formparts.fab products are not formed from one slat like the conventional formparts.mono; they are assembled from several parts. This makes the elements even more flexible. While the flat concrete skin panels are available in sizes up to about 22 feet long and in a wide range of surfaces, textures, and colors, their substructure is just as straightforward and economical as a facade with straight panels. For more information about Rieder, visit www.rieder.cc. Rieder NORAM INC. N3840 2nd St., Weyerhaeuser, WI 54895, US

COURTESY RIEDER

Lichtfabrik, a new office building in Berlin designed by Bollinger + Fehlig Architects, BDA, and Stoeckert Architects, uses Rieder facade products.


10

Windows & Walls

Case Study

The Bryant

The Architect’s Newspaper

COURTESY MAT TIAS KUNZ/DAVID CHIPPERFIELD ARCHITECTS

COURTESY HFZ CAPITAL GROUP

Left: The Bryant is located next to landmarks like the New York Public Library and the American Radiator Building, whose masonry informed David Chipperfield Architects’ design.

Above left: The gridded facade is built of precast concrete panels with a terrazolike aggregate. The minimal sightline of the window framing highlights their materiality and outward views.

Above: Each of the windows on the north and south elevations are operable and are fronted by a Juliet balcony.

COURTESY HFZ CAPITAL GROUP

Location: New York City Architect: David Chipperfield Architects Window system: Vitrocsa Invisible Wall system Architect of record: Stonehill Taylor Structural engineer: Severud Associates Facade consultant: Vidaris MEP: WSP Project management: T.G. Nickel & Associates (now part of Consigli Construction) Glazing manufacturer: Guardian Glass Precast manufacturer: Gate Precast Overlooking New York’s Bryant Park, the residential tower The Bryant cuts a striking yet austere figure in the crowded Midtown skyline.

Designed by the primarily London-based firm David Chipperfield Architects (DCA), the 34-story high-end high-rise is notable for its perfect grid of oversize post-and-beam concrete slabs and operable window bays. Bryant Park is bounded on three sides by office towers, done up in styles that span the better part of the 20th century. While mirrored glass and other conspicuous finishes that scream “the eighties” predominate, there is also the charcoal brick of the eclectic Gothic art deco American Radiator Building; the park’s fourth edge is defined by the Beaux Arts New York Public Library, clad in milky Vermont marble. DCA, which has an exten- sive background with sensitive infill, devoted considerable effort to pairing the tower with

its neighbors, with particular attention to the building’s material composition. Terrazzofinished precast concrete panels—an effect achieved with an aggregate of white marble, quartz, and variegated limestone—frame generously sized glazing bays, into which ninefoot-tall floor-to-ceiling windows are set. Operable windows are not in and of themselves novel features in the city’s residential skyscrapers. However, the system used here, Vitrocsa’s Invisible Wall sliding window doors, is notable for its remarkably slender 3⁄4-inch vertical sightlines, which pair well with the tower’s crisp, rectilinear forms. Manufactured at Vitrocsa’s Culver City, California, plant, the operable windows appear on the north and south facades and are fronted

by Juliet balconies of black vertical pickets. Compared with a typical curtain wall, Vitrocsa’s system is effectively structural glazing engineered to be operable at both ground level and tower heights. At The Bryant, the 7-foot9-inch by 9-foot-7-inch modules are outfitted with the manufacturer’s MODULAR or TH+ profiles, which are capable of handling greater wind loads. Each module comprises an external and internal insulated glass unit, both of which are operational, with tracks attached to an aluminate plate and water- proofed with silicone and a 1/16-inch sill pan. The building is expected to open this fall. Matthew Marani


11

Windows & Walls

Products

Summer 2020

Hygienic Hardware

Who touched it last? To mitigate inevitable contact with bacteria, the latest hardware employs easyto-clean materials, inherently bactericidal elements, and antimicrobial coatings. By Gabrielle Golenda

Prestige Series with Microban Antimicrobial Technology Baldwin Hardware Available in the summer of 2020, Baldwin’s Prestige Series Spyglass products feature a matte black finish with Microban antimicrobial protection. The treated hardware inhibits the growth of bacteria via a continuous coating that won’t wash off or wear away from use or maintenance.

INOX MicroArmor Unison Hardware

Kwikset with Microban Kwikset

Unison Hardware now offers a silver ion antimicrobial coating on its entire hardware catalog in three finishes: stainless steel, plated, and ceramic. MicroArmor latches, levers, and knobs are ideal for high-traffic areas, including in hospitals and schools.

Kwikset offers a variety of indoor and outdoor locks and handles protected by Microban’s SilverShield silver ion coating, which helps to hinder the growth of bacteria. Applied in the manufacturing process, the coating has a lifetime warranty.

unisonhardware.com

kwikset.com

baldwinhardware.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Verdura Rocky Mountain Hardware

Arch Collection Sun Valley Bronze

DL series Sugatsune

The Verdura collection is cast in CuVerro, a bactericidal copper alloy proven to kill bacteria with routine cleanings. Designed by multinational architecture firm HOK, the series comprises levers and door hardware offered in rose, silicon, and white bronze with brushed or matte finishes.

Made from copper alloys, the Arch Collection is inherently bacteria-resistant. In keeping with the company's standards, no lacquers or coatings are applied, preserving the antimicrobial properties of the material. The collection is available in several finishes, including silicon bronze, white bronze, and brass.

Sugatsune America’s DL series handles are popular for nurses’ stations, diagnostic equipment, and hospital millwork not only because of their stainless steel, but also for their low projection—making them less obstructive in a medical environment.

antimicrobialbronze.com

sunvalleybronze.com

sugatsune.com


12

Windows & Walls

Survey

Postpandemic Practice

The Architect’s Newspaper

Leaders in the AEC industry discuss how COVID-19 has disrupted projects and the processes the industry was forced to alter or halt in response to state mandates. They describe what course correcttion looked like and how new practices might be retained in the postpandemic future. By Gabrielle Golenda

COURTESY GUARDIAN INDUSTRIES

COURTESY VITRO ARCHITECTUR AL GL ASS

COURTESY YKK AP AMERICA

Eric Wroldsen Director of Marketing – Americas, Guardian Industries

Emily Losego Architectural Services Team Leader, Vitro Architectural Glass

Jamilla Walcott Director of Marketing & Product Management, YKK AP America Inc.

Guardian Glass has stayed in close communication with our customers, partners, and employees as the pandemic has progressed. Regular contact means we can be responsive and helpful in addressing their needs to move us all through this crisis. Like many companies, Guardian is utilizing digital tools. However, we’ve ramped it up to take advantage of our glass expertise and serve architects’ need for continuing-education credits. In May, we offered the course we planned to debut at the since-canceled AIA Conference on Architecture as part of a trio of live sessions. Continuing-education offerings on glass fabrication, the evolution of glass, and understanding the glass selection process saw great attendance and interaction thanks to promotion and sharing through social media and email outreach. Guardian Glass is on schedule for commercial product launches in 2020. Digital communication will allow our architects to capitalize on these and all Guardian high-performance, low E-coated glass products for the next generation of projects.

It’s been challenging to connect with architects, who are now working from home on projects. Many of their office voicemails are full, creating a heavier reliance on email. Samples are another area that has been impacted. We’ve adjusted by sending samples to individual architects’ homes, instead of their offices. In some cases, this has required us to send samples concurrently to multiple team members, which has been an unwelcome added expense. Vitro had already made considerable investments in our own web-based infrastructure, so the transition to “work from home” and internal collaboration was seamless. Extreme western Pennsylvania weather gave us ample opportunity to test the system, and both the equipment and our people were ready when the company was early to institute work-fromhome orders. It has also validated our corporate leadership’s internal communications commitment and tools, such as companywide video town hall meetings and new e-newsletters, to create a climate of solidarity and transparency throughout the organization. Some of the web-based communications tools we’ve developed, such as remote continuing-education webinars and live chat, will certainly be with us for the foreseeable future. They are a highly efficient means for connecting architects with important information. As circumstances have required us to find creative solutions, we’ve also discovered some hidden talents and skills of our coworkers, beyond the normal scope of their jobs. There is no doubt that as a new normal takes shape, these newly discovered capabilities will help us better serve our customers and designers.

The biggest pandemic-related disruption from a building products marketing standpoint was the cancellation of industry events for which we had been preparing. Organizers faced tough decisions, while exhibitors and participants didn’t know how to plan. I’ve never experienced anything like it. As everyone came to the realization that in-person events aren’t happening this year, it was interesting to see organizers shift to virtual platforms as well as the adaptation to new forms of relationship development. Because of reduced travel and our efforts to limit in-person meetings, we’ve seen a similar shift internally. We’ve increased our use of videoconferencing drastically. This climate has made everyone more open to participating on camera, and we are taking greater advantage of the flexibility technology brings. Our sales division is now working to connect with customers virtually, which enables members of the team to engage who wouldn’t have participated before. We have been conducting job interviews online, which is another practice I am sure will continue postpandemic. Internally, our COVID-19 task force has been working diligently to ensure employees have a safe work environment. We have implemented “new normal” procedures, including social distancing, expanded sanitizing measures, and temperature screenings at our largest manufacturing locations, and are encouraging the use of masks. Employees are adapting, and we are constantly engaging in ways to stay on top of the everchanging tides of this pandemic. When I’m not participating in the task force, some days it is nice to focus on work and “forget” that we are in the middle of a global crisis.

COURTESY TECTONIC PHOTO

The Arquitectonica-designed Ellipse luxury apartments in Jersey City, New Jersey, include Guardian SunGuard AG 50 coated glass.

COURTESY VITRO ARCHITECTUR AL GL ASS

Jacobs Medical Center, designed by CannonDesign, at UC San Diego Health is enveloped by a Vitro glass skin.

L AURIAN GHINITOIU

The Heights Building in Arlington, Virginia, designed by BIG, features a cascading facade with YKK’s unitized wall system.


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facadesplus.com

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14

Windows & Walls

Products

The Architect’s Newspaper

Touchless Openings

Public bathrooms, offices, healthcare facilities, and even homes are full of doors that might require gripping, pushing, or pulling. These solutions supplant hand-operated, germ-spreading mechanisms to enable automated opening in even high-traffic areas. By Gabrielle Golenda

6300 Series Low Energy Operator Norton Door Controls

Featuring a slim profile, this automatic door system fits discreetly on standard frames. The Wi-Fi–compatible operator is outfitted with sensors and offers wave-to-open switches as well as obstruction detection, power close, and latch assist functions.

Autoslide automatic doors Autoslide and EVO Systems

ESA100 Sliding Door dormakaba

Retrofit existing patio, pet, and pocket doors with this teethedtrack opening system. Its easy installation entails plugging its motor systems into a wall outlet and positioning a cog that entwines with its tracks.

Intended for commercial applications, ESA100 doors are furnished with a self-monitoring control system and overhead safety/activation sensors. The series is available with narrow or medium stiles and a transparent or dark bronze anodized finish.

autoslidebyevo.com

nortondoorcontrols.com

dormakaba.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Elevator Call System Mitsubishi Electric

Theatrica Pirnar Doors

Dura-Glide 2000/3000 STANLEY Access Technologies

This smartphone application enables users to call a compatible elevator from anywhere in a building by tapping the screen. To help waiting passengers, the app displays the assigned elevator’s location in real time and notifies the user when it arrives.

With a hingeless design, this door seemingly disappears into the wall. It uses facial-recognition technology to automatically unlock and open for registered users without any physical contact.

Equipped with a high-horsepower motor and wide, load-bearing roller wheels, Dura-Glide opens and closes easily. Added security features include alarm alerts, delayed egress, remote monitoring, and security strobes.

pirnardoors.com

stanleyaccess.com

mitsubishielevator.com


15

Windows & Walls

Products

Summer 2020

Office Partition System

Enforcing boundaries to protect personal space and reduce unwanted exposure, the latest workplace dividers foster ongoing social distancing. By Gabrielle Golenda

Flek 3form

Enclose Haworth

Flek is aptly dubbed for its terrazzo-like texture, which it gets from its core material: recycled trim edges encased in new panels. The collection is offered in six colors in 48" by 96" and 48" by 120" sizes.

This partition system comprises unitized, factory-assembled panels and requires little to no setup upon arrival. Once installed, any panel or door can be removed or replaced without dismantling the entire system—making it progressively adaptable for changing work arrangements.

3-form.com

haworth.com

KOVA Commercial Glass Wall System KOVA KOVA’s glass partition system can be reconfigured and reused to serve different functions—from conference rooms to office fronts to partitions. The glass is offered in clear, opaque, or tinted treatments with optional custom ceramic printing. kovaproducts.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Velaria Rimadesio

Residence Work Spacestor

Air³ Orangebox

Featuring shimmering mesh glass panels, this built-in and wall-fixed rail system provides veiled transparency for privacy. Custom-made in both height and width, Velaria moves smoothly along Rimadesio track systems, even in the largest of compositions.

Virtually soundproof, Residence Work creates a quiet haven within open offices. It is available in sitting or standing configurations, with either glass or solid backing.

In a clever pairing of insulated glass and soft acoustic paneling, Air³ furnishes physical and auditory privacy in open-plan layouts. Orangebox’s sizable library of interchangeable panels allows for easy design adjustments like changing colors or swapping fabrics.

rimadesio.it

spacestor.com

orangebox.com


Case Studies In Brief 16

Windows & Walls

Case Studies

The Architect’s Newspaper

These projects demonstrate innovative applications of windows and walls across types as diverse as ADUs and sports stadiums. By Gabrielle Golenda

123 North Wacker Chicago

Architect: Wright Heerema Architects General contractor: Leopardo Companies

Product: NanaWall SL70 folding glass wall

On the top floor of the 30-story 123 North Wacker office building in Chicago, a recently renovated community space provides open-air views of the Windy City. Chicago-based practice Wright Heerema Architects punctured the east side of the floor with three 10-foot-high,

26-foot-wide NanaWall SL70 folding glass wall systems to provide daylight and ventilation. The glass doors open to reveal nearly invisible glass railings; visitors can step right up to panoramic views of the cityscape beyond.

COURTESY WRIGHT HEEREMA ARCHITECTS

Riverdale Country School The Bronx, New York

Architect: PBDW Architects Glass consultant: Forst Consulting and Architecture Acoustic consultant: Longman Lindsey Audiovisual consultant: Cerami & Associates

Construction manager: Shawmut Design and Construction Glass installer: Diversified Glass & Storefronts Product: Custom faceted monolithic glass panel assembly with DuPont SentryGlas interlayers

In the Bronx, New York, at the Riverdale Country School, Manhattan, New York–based PBDW Architects designed The Egg, an elliptical 400-square-foot meeting space nestled in the center of a lobby. The Egg, which contains an array of LED monitors visible to passersby, is fashioned from 18 uniquely shaped floor-to-

ceiling glass panels. Each panel comprises two half-inch-thick, heat-strengthened, lowiron laminated glass pieces with a 0.09-inchthick Dupont SentryGlas interlayer with a custom ceramic frit. The frit pattern is illuminated by floor LED strip lighting, accentuating the structure’s geometry. COURTESY FR ANCIS DZIKOWSKI PHOTOGR APHY

Landscape Forms Headquarters Outdoor Office Kalamazoo, Michigan Designer: Landscape Forms internal design team Glass installer: StruXure

Product: Landscape Forms Upfit adaptive outdoor structure system

Outdoor furniture purveyor Landscape Forms wanted to give employees at its Kalamazoo, Michigan, headquarters a place to work outside during the few warm months of the year. The resulting space features semi-enclosed work areas shaped with the company’s Upfit adaptive structures, which are made of base units that measure 16 by 16 by 10 feet and support a set of interchangeable wall panels,

tables, seating, roofing, power modules, and lighting. Wall and roof panel options include louvers, slatted glass, and mesh growing panels with integrated weather sensors. Landscape Forms outfitted the 903-squarefoot arrangement with interstitial partitions to create a comfortable and quiet alternative to the open floor plan inside. COURTESY PETE MCDANIEL , STUDIO DVDP


17

Windows & Walls

Case Studies

Summer 2020

San Diego Garage Conversion San Diego

Designers: Modern Granny Flat and Prismática Architects General contractor: Treadlight Construction Installer: California Coastal Garage Doors

Products: C.H.I. Overhead Doors, Dixieline Lumber and Home Centers windows, custom sliding doors

In order to provide a flexible space that could accommodate a family’s in-laws, Prismática Architects collaborated with Modern Granny Flat to renovate the existing garage of a newly purchased home into an accessory dwelling unit. The team designed custom sliding walls to divide living areas that surround the central kitchen and bathroom. Mobile panels open up

or close off the bedroom, and a Murphy bed integrated into a bookcase converts the living room into a guest bedroom. Meanwhile, mobile islands allow for different configurations of the kitchen. COURTESY MODERN GR ANNY FL AT

Alley Cat Seattle

Architect: SHED Architecture & Design Structural engineer: Todd Perbix

Products: LaCantina aluminum lift slide door, Andersen E-Series windows, FAKRO center pivot skylights

Seattle-based studio SHED Architecture & Design was approached by a local couple to design a detached accessory dwelling unit with an open floor plan and primary functions on one level to accommodate aging in place. Named Alley Cat, the project is located on the east side of a Seattle lot, nestled between an alley-facing garden and a parking space. Shaped like a cat ready to pounce, the gable is scaled to adjacent buildings with an asymmetrical ridge oriented to maximize sun exposure. In an upstairs space, four parallel skylights provide daylight. Down- stairs, strategic pri-

vacy openings include a bathroom awning window and a peekaboo window along the kitchen counter. A sliding door opens the living space to the garden and patio while providing afternoon sun. COURTESY MODERN GRANNY FLAT

MARK WOODS

Phoenix Law Group Phoenix, Arizona Architect: Studio Ma

Products: Arcadia windows and doors, VELUX skylights, custom glass partitions fabricated by Studio Ma

Phoenix Law Group approached Phoe- nixbased firm Studio Ma to convert an existing building into an environmentally sus- tainable workplace that could foster company culture. “The reimagined building needed to feel and operate as one large open office with strong visual connections among staff members, while also accommodating private offices where the firm’s lawyers conduct sensitive, confidential work,” said Christopher Alt, cofounder and principal of Studio Ma. Custom interior glass partitions acoustically isolate enclosed offices and confer- ence

rooms while providing transparency to encourage collaboration. Daylight from skylights as well as the large glass windows and doors that line the building’s exterior filters in throughout. For ventilation, the operable skylights let fresh air into work areas while venting hot air to the roof. A skin of Kebony wood louvers envelops the structure and shades it from the desert sun.

COURTESY STUDIO MA

Twin Cities Orthopedics Performance Center Eagan, Minnesota

Architect: Crawford Architects General contractor: Kraus-Anderson Engineer: Henderson Engineers

Installer: Overhead Door Company of the Northland Products: Custom Schweiss bifold liftstrap doors

Kansas City, Missouri–based Crawford Architects designed a new facility for the National Football League’s Minnesota Vikings and the team’s official orthopedic provider, Twin Cities Orthopedics. Located on 35 acres outside Minneapolis, the site comprises four practice fields, a 6,500-seat outdoor stadium, and a 98-foot-tall field house. A weight room features two floor-to-ceiling Schweiss bifold

glass liftstrap doors that open to outdoor practice fields. To allow players quick access to the weight room from the field, the designers included custom doors measuring 20 feet by 14 feet that create an 11-foottall opening when the doors are folded up. The access point is outfitted with sensors for automatic opening, as well as manual latch systems in case of a power outage.

BERGERSON PHOTOGR APHY


18

Windows & Walls

Products

The Architect’s Newspaper

Screens and Desk Dividers

How do you address social distancing measures in the office? These new screens and desk dividers can be easily reconfigured or moved, limit the passage of air between work spaces, and provide acoustic absorption. By Gabrielle Golenda

Ridge Arktura

Discovery Space Artemide

Nomad Screens Nienkämper

This partition system is made up of modular panels that piece together in multiple configurations to create semi-enclosed work spaces. Fashioned from either lightweight, antimicrobial felt or corrugated fiberboard, Ridge provides privacy in shared environments.

Artemide plans to install Discovery Space panels between desks at the company’s HQ, outside Milan. When installed vertically, the light fixture offers an inventive solution for separating workstations. Thanks to its varying degrees of transparency and different color options, all of which can be adjusted through an Artemide app, it can suit a range of environments.

These mobile screens are designed for office areas that need to adapt quickly. Available in acoustical or upholstered options, the system supports private and collaborative work and is easily paired with elements like digital screens, whiteboards, and storage cabinets.

arktura.com

artemide.com

nienkamper.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Clear Freestanding Protective Acrylic Shield Poppin

Shell Uhuru

MixMax Unika Vaev

Made of lightweight acrylic panels, this three-sided separation solution functions as a sneeze guard or portable shield. Offered in four easily movable sizes—27", 43", 48", and 58"—the self-supporting system can comfortably protect individual space in group meetings or provide separation between desks.

Retrofit desks or workstations with privacy panels that can be easily added and removed without damaging existing furniture. Single and group dividers are available in 18" or 24" heights and two materials: clear, frosted, or smoked acrylic, for a transparent or semitransparent look; and Zintra, a flame-retardant felt that reduces noise reflection.

This accordion-like screen folds in a jiffy for flexible configuration in ever-changing open office layouts. The system is covered in 100 percent wool felt available in over 30 colors.

poppin.com

uhurudesign.com

unikavaev.com


19

Windows & Walls

Products

Summer 2020

Commercial Partitions

These durable, transparent barriers facilitate safe interaction in commercial areas. They address issues in a variety of environments, including offices that need cubicle dividers and hair salons that need barriers between chairs, and represent the latest partition systems to promote healthy workplaces. By Gabrielle Golenda

CRL Portable Protective Barrier Posts C.R. Laurence

Perfect for supporting glass or acrylic barrier screens, this system has an easily deployable, freestanding design. Posts are available in standard heights of 24" and 36", with an optional center beam to connect multiple panels. crlaurence.com

Cardinal SHIELD Glass Barriers HMI Cardinal

glassSCREENS>Shield CARVART

Factory assembled for quick installation, these partitions are available in various premade arrangements to suit different applications. Made with Cardinal 10, a protective surface treatment, the system is easy to clean and will resist scratching.

Available as fixed or sliding screens, CARVART’s adjustable shields allow users to control their level of exposure. In response to social distancing guidelines, CARVART developed a frameless version for maximum visibility and portability.

hmicardinal.com

carvart.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

be! Clear Clarus

Invisiguard GAMCO

PPE – Sneeze Guards Plexi-Craft

This sneeze guard on wheels features a cutout for taking temperatures or exchanging money, albeit at a distance. Made from antimicrobial, nonporous glass, the surface inhibits the growth of microorganisms and can easily be wiped clean.

This standing barrier system is an easy way to add clear tempered glass partitions to counters and desks. The nonporous panels have a hydrophobic coating, which repels oil and water (and respiratory droplets) to allow simple cleaning.

Manufactured in New York City, each of these acrylic partitions is cut and glued to custom specifications. Possible configurations include trifold screens, desk partitions, and screen covers—all of which are convenient to pick up and move around.

clarus.com

gamcocorp.com

plexi-craft.com


20

Windows & Walls

Resources Dividers and Screening Arktura arktura.com Artemide artemide.com Loftwall loftwall.com Nienkämper nienkamper.com Poppin poppin.com Uhuru Design uhurudesign.com Unika Vaev unikavaev.com

Hardware Accurate Lock & Hardware accuratelockandhardware.com ASSA ABLOY assaabloy.com Autoslide Automatic Doors by EVO autoslidebyevo.com Baldwin Hardware baldwinhardware.com Bronze Craft Corporation bronzecraft.com C.R. Laurence crlaurence.com FritsJurgens fritsjurgens.com Häfele hafele.com Halliday + Baillie hallidaybaillie.com Hawa Sliding Solutions hawa.com Kwikset kwikset.com Lowe Hardware lowe-hardware.com Mitsubishi Electric mitsubishielevator.com Norton Door Controls nortondoorcontrols.com OMNIA Industries omniaindustries.com Rocky Mountain Hardware rockymountainhardware.com SARGENT sargentlock.com Schweiss Doors bifold.com

STANLEY Access Technologies stanleyaccess.com Sugatsune sugatsune.com Sun Valley Bronze sunvalleybronze.com Unison Hardware unisonhardware.com Yale yalecommercial.com

Resources

Sliding Systems and Doors Anyway Doors anywaydoors.be

Boon Edam United States boonedam.us Boral North America boralamerica.com Brombal discoverbrombal.com

Office Systems

C.H.I. Overhead Doors chiohd.com

3form 3-form.com

Crown Doors crowndoors.com

Allsteel allsteeloffice.com

dormakaba dormakaba.com

Cardinal hmicardinal.com

Euro-Wall Systems euro-wall.com

CARVART carvart.com

JELD-WEN jeld-wen.com

Ceco Door cecodoor.com

LaCantina Doors lacantinadoors.com

Clarus clarus.com

panoramah! panoramah.com

DIRTT dirtt.net

Pirnar Doors pirnardoors.com

Haworth haworth.com

Ply Gem Residential Solutions plygem.com

Hufcor hufcor.com

Raydoor raydoor.com

KOVA kovaproducts.com

Reveal Windows & Doors revealwd.com

Krownlab krownlab.com

Reynaers Aluminum reynaers.com

Landscape Forms landscapeforms.com

Sapa sapabuildingsystem.com

Lualdi lualdiporte.com

Schüco schueco.com

Modernfold modernfold.com NanaWall nanawall.com

Solarlux solarlux.com

Orangebox orangebox.com PK-30 System pk30system.com

Weather Shield weathershield.com WinDoor windoorinc.com

Plexi-Craft plexi-craft.com

Windows

Rimadesio rimadesio.it

Accoya accoya.com

Spacestor spacestor.com

Andersen andersenwindows.com

Teknion teknion.com

Arcadia Custom arcadiacustom.com Crystal Window & Door Systems crystalwindows.com

The Architect’s Newspaper

Danpal danpal.com Duo-Gard Industries duo-gard.com DuPont dupont.com ESWindows eswindows.com FAKRO fakrousa.com GAMCO gamcocorp.com GGI generalglass.com Guardian Glass guardianglass.com Kalwall kalwall.com Kawneer kawneer.com Libart USA libartusa.com Marvin marvin.com MI Windows and Doors miwindows.com Pella pella.com Pulp Studio pulpstudio.com Reflection Window + Wall reflectionwindow.com Skyline Windows skylinewindows.com Standard Bent Glass standardbent.com Superior Windows & Doors swdimports.com TGP fireglass.com Tubelite tubeliteinc.com Viracon viracon.com Vitro Architectural Glass vitroglazings.com Vitrocsa vitrocsausa.com Walker Glass walkerglass.com Wausau Window and Wall Systems wausauwindow.com YKK AP America ykkap.com Zola zolawindows.com


Domestic Details 21

Residential Construction

Products

Summer 2020

For our first-ever special section on residential construction, step into case studies that explore the makings of domesticscale buildings from inside out. These include origami-like townhouses in Portland; an Oza Sabbeth house in Sag Harbor, New York; and a Long Island passive house. The product pages survey the latest smart home devices, kitchen and bathroom fittings, weather and air barriers, and more. By Gabrielle Golenda

L AUR A EGGER


22

Residential Construction

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

Architect: Wayne Turett Location: Greenport, New York

Greenport, New York, on the North Fork of Long Island. Architect Wayne Turett designed the residence as his own home. Drawing inspiration from the local barn vernacular, the carbon-neutral project was made to show how designers can address the climate crisis without sacrificing contemporary expectations of comfort and style. Turett considered three key elements in the design of the Passive House: “First, the building envelope, which had to be completely sealed so that there was no leakage of air; then the insulation, to ensure that heat would not escape or cold air enter; and finally, the added elements like roof overhangs that

protect the house from receiving too much sunlight in the summer,” he said. As a result of these decisions, the Greenport Passive House consumes nearly 90 percent less heating energy than existing homes and 75 percent less energy than average new construction. The home also benefits from triple-glazed windows and energy-recovery ventilation, which brings in and takes out air. The home’s exterior is shiplap gray cedar and cement with an aluminum roof. The insulation works in combination with a proprietary sheathing taped to form the air barrier, allowing for an airtight building envelope. The all-electric home is heated and cooled with a

duct mini-split system aided by an ERV. Inside, a neutral color scheme and light wood materials along with white walls and upholstery create a bright, airy aesthetic. A combined kitchen, dining, living room, and porch were intentionally programmed on the second level with views to the water. Below, bedrooms and bathrooms are accessed via an outdoor shower to smooth the transition from the site’s sandy shores. As an integrated project, the home fuses Turett’s modern aesthetic with a performative building envelope. Eric Baldwin

Greenport Passive House Contractor: The Turett Collaborative Plumbing: Duravit, Hansgrohe Axor Exterior siding: Fabricated by Vector East Flooring: Heart Pine with Woca White Pigment Oil Hardware: Kenwa, Ranpo, Kwikset HVAC: Mitsubishi Roofing: Atas Aluminum Standing Seam Windows: Bildau & Bussmann by Eco Supply The Greenport Passive House is an energy-efficient project in the harbor town of

ELIZABETH GL ASGOW

1

R O O F & WA L L 2

CO N S T R U C T I O N 3 4

5

F LO O R & WA L L CO N S T R U C T I O N

COURTESY THE TURET T COLL ABOR ATIVE

Top: In the living areas, operable glass walls can provide ventillation in warm weather.

Above left: An airtight thermal envelope and heat pumps keep the house conditioned.

Above right: Beneath a standing seam metal F O U N D AT ION CO N S T R U (2), CTION roof (1), an adhered ice and water shield six inches of poly-iso insulation (3), weather and air

COURTESY THE TURET T COLL ABOR ATIVE

barrier (4) cover the structure. Four inches of poly-iso insulation (5) fill the exterior walls.


Lucy™ TILE w/silver and gold mirror ©2018 modularArts, Inc.

Dune™ PANEL ©2003 modularArts, Inc. U.S.

SaoPaulo™ TILE ©2010 modularArts, Inc.

AuralScapes® Flo™ Sound Absorbent Wall Panels @2020modularArts, Inc. (15 panels shown)

Apollo™ BLOCK ©2011 modularArts, Inc. U.S. Patent 8,375,665

Hive BLOCK ©2012 modularArts, Inc. U.S. Patent 8,375,665 ™

Panels, Tiles & Screen Wall Blocks

modulararts.com

206.788.4210

Made in the U.S.A.

Architectural Features in Modular, Glass-Reinforced Gypsum.


24

Residential Construction

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

Architect: Oza Sabbeth Architects Location: Sag Harbor, New York

Located on the edge of Long Island in Sag Harbor, New York, the East End House by Oza Sabbeth Architects takes cues from the surrounding landscape. Sag Harbor developed as a working port on Gardiner’s Bay and was designated as the first port of entry to the United States. Today, the village is home to a range of vernacular structures associated with whaling. Inspired by this context and the densely vegetated pond on-site, the East End House reinterprets both regional forms and materials. The project is bookended by the pond and a busy turnpike. To create a tranquil sense of

place, the home’s form turns away from the sights and sounds of street traffic and toward the pond and forest. The building features a sequence of moments that showcase its layout and materials. The entry is composed of a dense bulwark of concrete and wood, as well as an intimate forecourt. From there, an entrance foyer opens up to the landscape and pond. The organization in plan generated a private front and an accessible backyard with multiseasonal outdoor spaces on the lowest level. Oza Sabbeth experimented with using substrates as finish materials for the home. The

roof and walls are designed as a rainscreen assembly of exposed rubber (EPDM) and mahogany decking material. “The substrate, EPDM in this case, is revealed in instances and slips behind the mahogany shell where needed,” said Oza Sabbeth principal Nilay Oza. The flooring is a poured self-leveling concrete, typically used as a substrate for tile. For the millwork and wall panels, the team used a Baltic birch platform as a base upon which more expensive finish veneers were applied. Eric Baldwin

East End House Engineer: CRAFT | Engineering Studio Contractor: Modern Green Home Facade: Mahagony decking over Pro Clima weather resistant membrane; EPDM over plywood sheathing Roof: Mahagony decking over EPDM Aluminum doors: Arcadia Aluminum windows: Gerkin Windows and Doors

A-300 4

Above: The exterior is clad in mahogany, birch, and EPDM rubber, each material covering a separate floor.

155.9°

9'-8"

8'-0 5/8"

37'-4" T.O. FOOTING

CHECKED BY:

NO

DRAWN BY:

NO

631-276-3523 | nilay@oza-architects.com

NILAY OZA AIA

COHEN \ OZA HOME

7'-10"

11'-0"

39'-6" FIRST FLR LVL

30'-0" BASEMENT LVL COURTESY OZA SABBETH ARCHITECTS

1

CROSS SECTION

Section at Grid Line A (First Flr.) Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"

SHEET#

A-300

62 Joels Ln, Sag Harbor, NY 11963

11 7/16" 6 5/8"

1'-5 1/2"

L

7'-9"

L

L

V

L

°

10'-3 1/2"

L

L

V

212.5

9'-2 7/8"

L

V

8'-1 1/2"

8'-0"

44'-6" AVG. STREET LVL

L

V

PROJECT #

DATE:

18'-0"

7 5/8"

2'-2 3/4" 17'-0"

155.9°

49'-9 1/2" SECOND FLR LVL 48'-4" T.O. RETAINING WALL

° 2.5

3"

12

17'-0"

1'-0"

.9° 65

1'-8 7/8"

57'-9 1/2" SECOND FLR CEILING

As Noted

04-15-17

Left: The building’s multiple cladding materials required a range of section and corner details.

1'-0"

PERMIT SET

24.1°

1505_CO

3

SCALE:

2

3 3/8"

.5°

1

1596 SAG HARBOR TURNPIKE, SAG HARBOR, NY 11963

2'-3 1/2"

57

11 1/2"

L AUR A EGGER 2 1/2"


25

Residential Construction

Smart Homes

Products

Summer 2020

Automated via voice control or smart apps, the latest devices are connected to a central hub to optimize energy usage and minimize consumption levels.

Decora Smart Voice Dimmer Leviton

Laser Egg+ CO2 Kaiterra

PowerView Motorization Hunter Douglas

This dimmer, available in early 2020, enables users to fully automate lighting via voice control or remotely with the Leviton app. Features include dimming, preset schedules, custom “scenes,” vacation mode, and more. And because it is equipped with Amazon Alexa, many other “smart” functions like music streaming and news updates are available.

Using cloud-based calibration, this device’s sensors accurately detect levels of carbon dioxide, air quality, temperature, and humidity. Users can monitor the device remotely via the Kaiterra app, which allows them to see shifts in air quality in real time, understand trends, and set alerts that notify them when measurements exceed preselected levels.

Tired of turning the blinds down? Cover all windows at the touch of a button. PowerView Motorization is designed for use with the Hunter Douglas app, but it is also compatible with Alexa, Google, Apple Home Kit, and other smart home platforms. It is available with over 20 shade styles that are customizable by color, size, and fabric.

leviton.com

kaiterra.com

hunterdouglas.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Line Voltage Doorbell NuTone For quick installation, this doorbell kit comes with a built-in transformer and a wireless, battery-free push button. It allows users to choose one of eight electric chime tones. nutone.com

Buoy Whole Home Water Controller Buoy Labs

Installed directly in the main water line, Buoy shuts off the water supply when a leak is detected. Users can track water usage in real time and chart trends via the Buoy app. buoy.ai

Smart Home Starter Kit Aqara Aqara’s kit includes a central hub to manage a full range of wireless smart home automation, including lighting, security, and surveillance. Users can activate their devices—from window and door sensors to a smart plug that can turn on the coffee maker every morning—via voice commands or remotely with Apple Home or the Aqara Home app. aqara.com


26

Origami

Residential Construction

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

JEREMY BIT TERMANN

Architect: Waechter Architecture Location: Portland, Oregon Contractor: Yorke & Curtis Structural engineer: Grummel Engineering Civil engineer: KPFF Landscape: Lango Hansen Rainscreen: James Hardie Concrete block: Mutual Materials Windows: VPI Quality Windows Doors: Andersen, VPI Quality Windows Cabinetwork: Euro-American Design Paint: Miller Paint Solid surfaces: Caesarstone Floor and wall tiles: Emser Tile

Lighting: Kuzco Lighting, RP Lighting + Fans Plumbing: Duravit sinks, bathtubs, toilets, and faucets Origami is a new residential development by Waechter Architecture in Portland’s Piedmont neighborhood. As an urban gesture, the project occupies a full city block with twelve wood-framed townhouses. The buildings’ footprint surrounds a shared internal court at the back, where each residence has private space for gardens and parking. Exterior wall surfaces allow each unit to retain its own character. The design takes inspiration from origami, the Japanese process of folding paper to cre-

COURTESY WAECHTER ARCHITECTURE

Top: The gabled roofs and walls take cues from origami, the Japanese art of folding paper. Above left: A wall detail shows how metal flashing and channels meet the James Hardie siding at corners.

Above right: The folds of the massing articulate the development's twelve lots.

ate complex forms. In a play of light and shadow, the team used the concept of “the fold” to shape a roofscape that connects the gabled facades of each unit. Waechter decided to use Hardie siding and asphalt shingles to bring together the exterior walls and roof surface. To enhance the desired qualities of shadow relief and texture, the designers went beyond cladding with several techniques, including a flashing detail and window placement. Principal Ben Waechter explained the approach, noting, “At a building scale, we folded the facade, and at each of the folds there is a special detail that visually gives the impression that the facade plane has been scored

and folded. This three-piece flashing detail allows the fold to bend at a concave or convex angle. All the windows are recessed into the wall cavity rather than attached directly to the outside face of the sheathing. With the windows recessed, the trim is able to be applied perpendicular to the facade, giving it more visual depth than what is typically achieved with standard flat trim.” Origami is a study in scale and balance for new multifamily housing. The project’s concept provided individual articulations of each unit while maintaining the sculptural impact of the whole, and in turn, created a subtle identity for the development. Eric Baldwin

COURTESY WAECHTER ARCHITECTURE


27

Residential Construction

Products

Summer 2020

Connected Kitchens

From a wireless charging surface to a touchless faucet, these devices feature technologies that make cooking and entertaining easy.

Sensate Kohler This voice-activated kitchen faucet is truly hands-free. Commands include turning the water on and off, dispensing measured amounts of water, and touchless motion-based interactions. Via the KOHLER Konnect app, users can track water usage and detect leaks. us.kohler.com

Dual Fuel Range, 48 inches, 4 Burners, 4 Zones Fisher & Paykel

Featuring dual cooking areas—four gas burners and four induction zones—this integrated range is equipped with a high-resolution touch screen interface. Besides controlling obvious functions, like the precise temperature of the oven, the platform gives users access to recipes and information about ideal settings for different kinds of cooking.

400 series wine storage Gaggenau This wine climate cabinet features a TFT touch display that controls three different temperature zones. To hide or display up to 99 bottles, the units come with glass-framed or stainless steel doors in 18- and 24-inch widths. gaggenau.com

fisherpaykel.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

GENNY Watergen USA

DUO Carafe Heatworks

This standing water filter actually makes water from air—up to 8 gallons per day. Originally designed for communities without access to clean water, the technology requires only an electric power source to deliver a renewable supply of H20.

With two spouts—one red, one blue—this carafe instantly heats and cools water to a temperature within 1 degree Fahrenheit of the set point. Powered by batteries wirelessly charged on the magnetic port, the heating and cooling elements are not compromised by exposure to water and air (and don’t leave a strange taste in the filtered water).

watergenusa.com

myheatworks.com

Intentek Wireless Charging Surface Formica

Forget the phone charger—Formica has installed wireless charging technology directly within a laminate surface. Integrated coils wirelessly charge Qi certified devices simply placed on top. Durable and easy to clean, the surface is offered in a range of colors and textures. formica.com


28

Residential Construction

Products

The Architect’s Newspaper

Touchless Bathroom

These bathroom products turn on and off via automated commands. Other enhancing features include thermal disinfection, scald protection, hygienic flush, and more.

Viu/XViu Duravit This ceramic bathroom furniture collection features a smart mirror vanity with touchless icons to control ambient lighting and myriad other functions. When paired with Duravit’s electronic facet, D.1e, the unit displays water temperature via the color of the light on the handle, from a cold blue to a hot red. duravit.us

RP WASHLET+ RX Wall-Hung Toilet TOTO

KOVA Select KOVA

This high-tech potty is outfitted with a concealed connection that can support up to 880 pounds. Spalike functions include an automatic air deodorizer, a warm air dryer, and a heated seat with temperature control (and, obviously, auto flush).

Vertically integrated company Katerra recently launched KOVA, a division of modular appliances, plumbing, and lighting to outfit entire projects. The KOVA Select Plumbing System encapsulates the scope of products needed for any bathroom (and kitchen), including faucets, shower mixers, diverter valves, and more.

totousa.com

kovaproducts.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Hi-Tech Bluetooth Mirror Strasser Woodenworks This fully automated mirror with perfect LED lighting for makeup application also features Bluetooth-enabled sound, defogging heat, and touch controls. It is offered in three sizes: 24 by 36 inches, 36 by 36 inches, and 48 by 36 inches. strasserwood.com

TapeMat Kit with SunStat Connect Wi-Fi Thermostat SunTouch

The newest addition to this family of electric floor heating products is a programmable, touch-screen thermostat control, the SunStat Connect Wi-Fi. The kit comes complete with everything needed for assembly, including peel-and-stick tape for easy and quick installation. The 2-foot-wide TapeMat is available in various lengths. suntouch.com

Water Leak & Freeze Detector Roost

Detect leaks and frozen pipes with this sensor that sends alerts via the Roost app. Place it anywhere where a potential threat exists: underneath a sink, near toilets, or by pipes that could freeze. getroost.com


29

Residential Construction

Products

Summer 2020

Heating, Ventilation, and Cooling

The latest HVAC systems for single-family homes, apartments, and other residential applications provide plentiful ventilation along with efficient cooling and heating at the touch of a button.

BreezElite Ventilation Fan Delta This bathroom exhaust fan allows for hands-free operation with a built-in humidity sensor. Its special mounting-bracket system simplifies installation, maintenance, and renovation. deltabreez.com

MM14CHCS Portable Air Conditioner Honeywell

Set on rolling wheels, this portable indoor system houses four features within one unit: heating, cooling, airflow, and dehumidification. Ideal for single rooms (or New York studios), the MM14CHCS has three fan speeds, a 24-hour energy savings timer, light-touch digital buttons, and a remote control.

Art Cool Mirror LG Aptly named, this wall-hung HVAC unit features an opulent mirrored chassis. Offering superior energy efficiency with real-time feedback, the duct-free inverter technology is equipped with built-in Wi-Fi for touchless operation. lghvac.com

honeywellstore.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

SLZ-KF Four-way Ceiling Cassette Mitsubishi Electric

Featuring multiple-way vane controls, this ceiling-mounted ductless unit allows users to select up to four airflow patterns. When paired with the 3D i-see Sensor, it automatically detects room capacity to adjust temperature, airspeed, and other qualities for optimal comfort. metahvac.com

nanoe X Panasonic

YHG YORK

The main feature of this ductless heat pump unit, available in early 2020, is a built-in air and surface purification system that penetrates deep into carpet and furniture fibers. With nearly whispering airflow, the technology dispenses nanoscale OH radicals to reduce odors and pollutants.

The newest release within the LX series features a compact body to fit in tight spaces. Users can connect remotely via Alexa or YORK’s Affinity Hx3 thermostat to monitor energy usage in real time.

aircon.panasonic.com

york.com


30

Residential Construction

Resources

Resources

The Architect’s Newspaper

Kitchen and Bathroom

Heatworks myheatworks.com

Space Theory spacetheory.com

CENTRIA centria.com

Rothoblaas rothoblaas.com

Delta deltabreez.com

American Standard americanstandard-us.com

Henrybuilt henrybuilt.com

Speakman speakman.com

CertainTeed certainteed.com

SMARTci smartcisystems.com

Honeywell honeywellstore.com

Amuneal amuneal.com

Hydro hydro.com

DĂśrken dorken.com

Sto Corp. stocorp.com

LG lghvac.com

California Faucets calfaucets.com

Icera icerausa.com

Strasser Woodenworks strasserwood.com SunTouch suntouch.com

DuPont dupont.com

TAMKO Building Products tamko.com

Panasonic panasonic.com

Cosentino cosentino.com

Kohler us.kohler.com

Effisus effisus.com

TUBELITE tubeliteinc.com

Mitsubishi Electric mitsubishielectric.com

Dacor dacor.com

KOVA kovaproducts.com

GAF gaf.com

USG usg.com

Noritz noritz.com

Delta Faucet Company deltafaucet.com

Kuraray kuraray.com

Dornbracht dornbracht.com

LAUFEN us.laufen.com

Drummonds drummonds-uk.com

Liebherr liebherr.com

Duravit duravit.com

Miele mieleusa.com

DXV dxv.com

Monogram monogram.com

Elkay elkay.com

Neolith neolith.com

Fiandre granitifiandre.com

Neo-Metro neo-metro.com

Fisher & Paykel fisherpaykel.com

Perlick perlick.com

Weather and Air Barriers

MgO Systems mgosystems.com

Formica formica.com

Porcelanosa porcelanosa.com

3M 3m.com

Owens Corning owenscorning.com

Gaggenau gaggenau.com

Pure + FreeForm purefreeform.com

Balco balcousa.com

Rieder rieder.cc

GROHE grohe.us

Roost getroost.com

BASF basf.com

ROCKWOOL rockwool.com

JEREMY BIT TERMANN

Thermador thermador.com ThermaSol thermasol.com TOTO totousa.com True truemfg.com Walker Zanger walkerzanger.com WatergenUSA watergenusa.com Waterworks waterworks.com Wolf, Sub-Zero, Cove subzero-wolf.com Viking Range vikingrange.com

Henry henry.com Huber Engineered Woods huberwood.com Icynene-Lapolla icynene-lapolla.com Johns Manville jm.com Kingspan Light + Air kingspanlightandair.us LP Building Solutions lpcorp.com Metl-Span metlspan.com

Sealants, Foams, and Chemical Anchors Bostik bostik.com LIQUID NAILS liquidnails.com MAPEI mapei.com Sika usa.sika.com STI Firestop stifirestop.com Titebond titebond.com Tremco tremcoinc.com ZIP System Liquid Flash zipliquidflash.com

Heating and Cooling

Uponor North America uponor-usa.com YORK york.com

Smart Home Aqara aqara.com Buoy buoy.ai Hunter Douglas hunterdouglas.com Kaiterra kaiterra.com Leviton leviton.com Mockett mockett.com NuTone nutone.com

Bosch bosch-home.com

COURTESY AQAR A


Facades 31

Facades

Case Study Products

Summer 2020

HUF TON + CROW

Our annual facade supplement explores the state of building skins in the United States today and what they’ll look like tomorrow. One of the biggest trends we’re seeing is the growth of custom repetitive manufacturing, which is making bespoke cladding systems more attainable for a wider array of projects than ever before. A panel of international leaders in facade engineering discusses the capabilities and long-term implications of the technology in a series of interviews. Case studies of innovative projects from across the country cover a variety of materials and applications, including the spacecraftlike glass fiber–reinforced plastic facade of Los Angeles’s Lucas Museum of Narrative Art and the ETFE pillows of The Bloomberg Building (home of The Shed) in New York City. Product listings round up the latest in customizable cladding systems, biophilic tensile screening, coatings, and curtain wall systems. We also dissect the vogue for exoskeletal towers to understand what the future of facades has in store. By Gabrielle Golenda and Matthew Marani


32

Facades

Re-Framed

Feature

The Architect’s Newspaper

In cities across the country, a new class of towers celebrates structural lines while pushing technological boundaries. By Matthew Messner

HUF TON+CROW

Zaha Hadid Architects’ One Thousand Museum tower in downtown Miami features an innovative glass fiber reinforced concrete frame. When 875 North Michigan Avenue, formerly the John Hancock Center, opened on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile in 1969, it signaled a departure from the all-too-prevalent trabeated Miesian skyscraper. Its subtly tapered 100-story form and iconic X-frame structure, designed and engineered by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Bruce Graham and Fazlur Khan, respectively, demonstrated that beauty and structural performance need not be mutually exclusive. As if taking this lesson to heart, a new crop of expressively framed towers has sprung up around the country in recent years,

each one upping the ante in exuberant form and structural daring. In Seattle, a short walk from the city’s famed, OMA-designed central library, The Mark gamely cantilevers over its older neighbors. The 48-story hotel-and-office tower, designed by ZGF Architects and engineered by Arup, relies on a hybrid steel “megabrace” and concrete core structure to perform its acrobatic feat. Comprising multistory steel members, the triangulated megabrace—so termed by Arup—addresses the structural complexities of building a formally expressive tower in the

volcanically active region. The architects also rehabilitated the two historic structures nestled below The Mark’s protruding midsection: the First United Methodist Church (now an event space) and the Rainier Club. Their efforts have resulted in an eclectic city block, complete with classically proportioned low-rise structures and a decidedly contrapposto tower. In San Francisco, the Heller Manus Architects–designed 181 Fremont employs a similar megabrace structure (again courtesy of Arup) capable of withstanding the city’s seismic activity and ever-present wind loads.

But the slightly tapering tower also deploys a structurally integrated damping system (rather than the more typical tuned mass damper), which enabled the architects to increase the tower’s height; at 802 feet, 181 Fremont is the tallest residential high-rise on the West Coast. And because the shocklike dampers work in-line with the megabrace, the design team was able to eliminate 3,000 tons of steel from the project. The envelope created additional efficiencies; calibrated to the angle of the sun, the “saw-tooth” glass facade reduces solar gain by 6 percent. continued on page 34



34

Facades

Feature

Re-Framed Continued

The Architect’s Newspaper

CONNIE ZHOU

The Mark by ZGF Architects and Arup cuts a striking silhouette in downtown Seattle, thanks to its hybrid steel “megabrace” and concrete core structure.

GILES ASHFORD

COURTESY STEVE PROEHL

Ateliers Jean Nouvel’s 53 West 53 tower in Manhattan uses a reinforced-concrete structural frame.

In San Francisco, Heller Manus Architects has designed 181 Fremont, which makes cunning use of a structurally integrated damping system.

continued from page 32 In a departure from the steel systems normally associated with exoskeletal structures, Ateliers Jean Nouvel turned to concrete for the French firm’s first residential tower, 53 West 53 in Midtown Manhattan. At almost the same supertall height of 875 North Michigan Avenue, 53 West 53 even takes some aesthetic cues from the Chicago icon, but the similarities are superficial. Nouvel’s skyscraper was meant to be even taller, but political and economic exigencies— negotiations with city planning, the Great Recession—prompted a complete structural

luxury high-rise employs a unique structural system made up of 4,800 prefabricated glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panels. The pieces, which were individually fabricated in Dubai and test fitted before being shipped to the dense Miami lot, act as both concrete formwork and finished surface. Whereas 181 Fremont and The Mark contend with intense seismic conditions, One Thousand Museum is faced with a very real hurricane threat. The structural system was put to the test perhaps earlier than expected when Hurricane Irma, a Category 4 storm, struck Miami in September

rethink, including subbing out the steel for reinforced concrete. Sloping and slanting up to a pointed precipice, the structure trades a normal diagrid for highly irregular facets, palpable on the exterior as well as the interior. The result is a celebration of the structure in all of the building’s 145 units, each with expansive windows spanning massive diagonal structural members. In downtown Miami, One Thousand Museum takes the possibilities of concrete to even further extremes. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects and engineered by DeSimone, the

2017, as construction was underway. By exploring the formal potential of GFRC, the svelte tower sets a new bar for aesthetic, structural, and construction methods. As a proof of concept, it represents a dramatic advancement of 875 North Michigan Avenue’s revolutionary construction, while opening new doors for expressionist towers to come.


Pulp Studio’s Precision Edge®

Other Manufacturer’s

The exposed edges on glass handrails are an aesthetic detail you don’t want to overlook. Codes only require that handrail glass be laminated, but high-quality edgework is imperative for the integrity of the design. Never feel pressured to accept a pre-polished laminate product when you have better options. Precision Edge ® complements the design by providing a high-quality, zero-tolerance finish, with perfect alignment for both tempered and annealed laminated glass.

www.pulpstudio.com

2100 W. 139th St. Gardena, California 90249 Tel: 310-815-4999 Fax: 310-815-4990 Email: sales@pulpstudio.com


36

Facades

Products

The Architect’s Newspaper

Biophilic Tensile Screening

In an attempt to connect nature with the built environment, these vertical greening systems enliven building skins with flora. Added benefits include sound absorption, daylight screening, and reduction of solar heat gain. By Gabrielle Golenda

BRUCE DAMONTE

Modular Panels greenscreen

Trellis System Green Wall Jakob Rope Systems

Greenscreen’s welded-wire green facade wall system has a flexible panel structure that allows for mounting at various depths and angles. Standard panels are offered in 4' widths by 6', 8', 10', 12', and 14' lengths, and can be installed vertically or horizontally. Custom panels are also available.

Jakob’s modular trellises are fashioned from lightweight, rigid panels that can be freestanding or wall-mounted. The system comes as a kit, which includes wire trellises, spacers, anchors, high-tensile steel cables, and supplementary equipment.

greenscreen.com

jakob-usa.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Basic Wall GSky

Omni Facade Omni Ecosystems

Using 5' and 10' screens, this modular vine system is designed for full plant coverage on expansive, monolithic facades. GSky designs and fabricates the panels, then installs irrigation and greenery on-site.

Made from lightweight aluminum, this screening solution is easy to install. It is often paired with Omni Infinity Media, a self-regenerative soil ecosystem that minimizes runoff.

gsky.com

omniecosystems.com


From design to delivery, coast to coast- we’ve got you covered! American Metalcraft is a WOSB certified aluminum architectural metal manufacturer with 34 years of leadership and innovation in the A/E/C environment. With our own in-house PVDF paint line, we engineer, fabricate and finish all under one roof. Products include rain screens, sunshades, perforated, shadowbox and in-fill panels, brake metal, column covers, custom exterior and interior elements and more. Our project portfolio ranges from hospitals, casinos, hotels, K-12 schools and universities to labs, bridges, corporate headquarters and more. Order all of your aluminum architectural elements from American Metalcraft for top quality and turn key solutions.

Request a quote:Â scott@americanmetalcraft.com Call us at: (770) 459-3605 or (251) 223-3990 www.americanmetalcraft.com


38

Facades

Products

Charred Wood Cladding

The Architect’s Newspaper

A centuries-old Japanese technique, yakisugi, often called shou sugi ban outside of Japan, is a way of charring wood to prevent decay and infestation, as well as provide dimensional stability and fire resistance. These manufacturers use their own processes to mimic traditional results. By Gabrielle Golenda

Ignite Thermory

Charwood Montana Timber Products

Kebony Shou Sugi Ban Delta Millworks

Unlike other manufacturers, Thermory doesn’t use fire in its shou sugi ban. Instead, the company uses steam and heat processing for added durability, moisture wicking, and rot resistance. The panels have a charred-looking finish.

Made from reclaimed wood from the western United States, this shiplap siding is stained and sealed in six tones ranging from lightly seared to blackened.

Delta Millworks, a timber manufacturer based in Austin, Texas, takes Norwegian wood brand Kebony’s Monterey Pine Clear lumber and chars it to emphasize the wood grain. Delta offers the product in Gator or Half Gator (thoroughly or more lightly scorched).

thermoryusa.com

montanatimberproducts.com

deltamillworks.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

MATSU reSAWN TIMBER co.

Suyaki Nakamoto Forestry

Blackland Matchstick Woods

reSAWN singes British wood brand Accoya’s high-performance wood to a charcoaled crisp, providing added durability and weathering resistance. While recoating is encouraged to conserve the charcoal surface, the exposed timber will naturally develop a gray patina over time.

Four mills in Hiroshima and Tokushima prefectures burn a thick, water-repelling, UV-resistant soot layer on Japanese cedar sourced from sugi and hinoki forests. The wood is then oiled to seal the soot layer, creating a hydrophobic surface that requires little to no maintenance.

Matchstick chars this cypress by hand to amplify the wood’s natural deeply grooved texture and finishes it with a VOC-free sealant. The Texas company offers Blackland in 1"-thick planks either 6" or 8" wide and up to 12' long.

resawntimberco.com

nakamotoforestry.com

matchstickwoods.com



40

Facades

Survey

The Architect’s Newspaper

Fabrication Futures

Facade engineers discuss the international trend of custom repetitive manufacturing.

Computer-aided manufacturing has revolutionized the field of facade manufacturing over the last decade. Dana K. Gulling, author of Manufacturing Architecture, describes the overall trend as one of “custom repetitive manufacturing,” which reestablishes a level of customizability in industrial processes and facilitates fruitful collaboration between architects, facade engineers, and manufacturers from the design-assist phase to completion. To learn a bit more about the shift, AN surveyed leading facade engineers about how it affects their work. By Matthew Marani

COURTESY HATFIELD GROUP COURTESY FRONT INC

Erleen Hatfield Managing Partner, Hatfield Group Custom repetitive manufacturing (CRM) has the potential to change how we design and construct buildings by making advanced digital design processes—like computational and parametric design—a viable option for a broader range of clients. This results from custom-designed elements being fabricated cost-effectively and with minimal production waste. In our work as a design-driven engineering firm, we embrace CRM as a powerful tool for realizing even the most technically demanding architectural designs. Before CRM, fabricating the type of custom elements associated with these processes was too expensive for most clients—it only made sense for high-budget projects, so the tremendous potential of digital design methods could not be realized on a broad scale.

COURTESY SURFACE DESIGN GROUP COURTESY BURO HAPPOLD

Michael Min Ra Cofounding Partner, Front Inc Key factors driving the realization of custom systems and components are a combination of conceptual demand and corresponding supply through advancements in and adaptations of technology in design tools, transfer of data, and compatible methods of manufacturing. This sequential exchange of digital data from relatively low-resolution initial design to highly refined final solution enables successful custom fabrication and assembly of parts, and variability within given system parameters and schedules. This mode of practice is applicable to both repetitive and variable facade typologies. Repetition offers profound advantages in allowing more detail definition with simplified cost control, whereas variety can be accommodated through instantiation. As the costs of digital design processes diminish and designers’ manufacturing and construction knowledge expands, this process of customization will proliferate to the extent seen in other industries that benefit from economies of scale.

Anna Wendt Director, Buro Happold Repetitive manufacturing has long been admired from a cautious distance by both engineers and architects. Cost efficiency, precision, mass production, and shorter lead times are advantages that shouldn’t be ignored. The increasing opportunity to introduce unique, customizable features to the repetitive manufacturing process provides further opportunities for ensuring that a sense of craftsmanship is achieved for iconic buildings. An example where the Buro Happold facade engineering team has pioneered the use of such technology is on the King Abdulaziz Centre for World Culture in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The project, designed by Snøhetta, has a unique facade comprising an intricate surface made from 215 miles of CNC-bent stainless steel tubes. Innovative planning and design allowed the design to be optimized and developed for production by the facade contractor seele.

Benson Gillespie Partner, SURFACE DESIGN GROUP The ability for fabricators to provide custom facade systems has been a blessing for smaller and midsize projects. Our 10 Jay Street project [in Brooklyn, New York], designed by ODA, is a great example of this trend, where a completely custom curtain wall system was used to achieve a geometrically complex facade design at a relatively limited scale. We expect that custom facade systems will only increase throughout the industry as parametric software becomes more integrated within design and fabrication processes. This trend has led to an increase in the numbers of international fabricators participating in the design-assist and bidding processes, as their custom systems are often competitively priced in comparison with standard systems offered by local vendors. This leveling of the global playing field has significantly expanded the options available to designers and owners.

COURTESY STUDIO NYL

Chris O’Hara Founding Principal, Studio NYL The most important aspect of maximizing custom fabrication in mass production is to use the technology judiciously. Oftentimes in our studio, we try to take complex forms and develop them for modest budgets. To achieve this goal, we use a “kit of parts” mentality. We use mass-produced extrusions for glazing systems and mass-produced cladding support systems for our opaque cladding, and marry them with a substructure that can be digitally fabricated or arranged in a unique geometry to realize complex forms or longer spans. Often lost in our ability to fabricate is the reality of installation. We can solve the translation of fabrication to installation through panelization, but in our experience it often is the marriage of high tech and low tech that leads to the best results. The fun and challenge is: How do we manipulate the systems our installers are comfortable with and use basic principles to make them unique?

COURTESY HEINTGES

COURTESY DESIMONE CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Ashley Reed Director, DeSimone Consulting Engineers When we consider the repetitive manufacturing and automation of building enclosure systems, we need to evaluate three distinct phases: design, fabrication, and installation. Advances in fabrication technologies and installation practices are instigating a collapse of the latter two phases. However, people are still superior at improvising and handling the complexity of on-site conditions and fabrication. Enclosure systems consist of assemblies designed to withstand loads and integrate varying levels of boundaries to control heat, air, and moisture. Currently, the fabrication of assembly components is automated, but the compilation of these components into the ultimate assembly is still largely reliant on human labor.

COURTESY THORNTON TOMASET TI

Alloy Kemp Associate, Thornton Tomasetti Custom repetitive manufacturing has forced us to be smarter about where we implement custom solutions and repetitive processes. Designing bespoke facades, even if they’re easier to realize now, still can incur increased cost. For example: Processes like heatwelding ETFE panels or laying up composites over a mold can be programmed to be repeated even when the physical output is different. But for curtain wall extrusions, numbers of dies are still a major cost factor. Attaching mullions at varying angles is less influential on cost. While we’re past the point of specifying one typical detail, not everything can be made fully custom at the same economy. It’s the fun, exciting challenge of being a facade engineer: to make complex facades developable from a repeated kit of parts and processes.

Karen Brandt Senior Principal, Heintges Although custom repetitive manufacturing is not a new technique for some materials in facades, like terra-cotta, exploration and advancement of the design potential of custom repetitive manufacturing is increasingly a part of our consulting work with architects. We’ve observed a shift in interest from designing “one-off” final products to interest in custom tools used in the fabrication process that have the potential to amplify the value of both human and machine fabrication time. There is a fascinating range in “custom tool” approaches: from an extremely expensive but reusable tool used for the fabrication of complex bent architectural glass to an extremely inexpensive, but ultimately disposable, CNC-routed foam mold for architectural precast concrete. Sustainability will ultimately be the most important consideration to advance these approaches.


Sponsored Content

Aluminum Extruders Council: Your Questions Answered You may know about how aluminum extrusions are used for facade solutions in contemporary buildings and for modernizing historic properties, but you probably have questions. We are the Aluminum Extruders Council (AEC), the trade association representing more than 70 percent of aluminum extrusion produced in North America, and we’re here to answer your questions about how extrusions can effectively contribute to a range of building solutions. Whether a component in an entry door, window, curtain wall, canopy, sun shade, light fixture, railing system, or any of a host of other building elements, aluminum extrusions are valued for their light weight, strength, durability and corrosion resistance, low maintenance, finish options, and contribution to sustainability. Offering almost limitless design flexibility, aluminum extrusions enable sophisticated design features and labor-saving functionality to be readily incorporated into building components that meet critical occupant safety, productivity, and sustainability objectives.

Aluminum Extrusion Resources Take advantage of our educational resources to learn more about how aluminum extrusion can be a cost-effective, attractive, and sustainable solution for your next project: Aluminum Extrusion Manual Everything you wanted to know about alloys, applications, and designing with extrusions is included in this 191-page design manual.

CHAD BAUMER PHOTOGR APHY

The JW Marriott Nashville, designed by Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates and Arquitectonica, features a bold elliptical cylindrical form achieved uncompromisingly, yet economically, with YKK AP America’s extruded aluminum window wall and Technoform’s polyamide thermal barriers.

White Papers • Daylighting Views, Health & Wellness: The Role of Extruded Aluminum Building Components • Aluminum Extrusions: Building Occupant Health and Safety • Aluminum Extrusions: Viruses & Bacteria Environmental Product Declarations & Life Cycle Assessment • Aluminum Extrusions: Mill Finished, Painted & Anodized • Thermally Improved Aluminum Extrusions • Aluminum Extrusion Life Cycle Assessment And check out our website at AEC.org for more educational resources. About AEC The Aluminum Extruders Council (AEC) is dedicated to advancing the effective use of aluminum extrusion in North America, and is committed to bringing comprehensive information about extrusion's characteristics, applications, environmental benefits, design, and technology to those who would design and use extrusions, including architects, product designers, engineers, and the academic community. Further, AEC is focused on enhancing the ability of its members to meet the emerging demands of the market through sharing knowledge and best practices.

COURTESY ALUMINUM E X TRUDERS COUNCIL

The Indiana Historical Society in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana, showcases beautiful extruded aluminum windows installed in 1999.


42

Facades

Case Study

The Bloomberg Building

The Architect’s Newspaper

IWAN BA AN

Architectural designers: Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Rockwell Group Location: New York Facade manufacturers: Vector Foiltec, Cimolai, CS Facades Facade installer: Sciame Construction Structural engineer: Thornton Tomasetti System: Custom steel shell clad in ETFE panels Product: Texlon ETFE Hudson Yards, the mega-development reshaping Manhattan’s Far West Side, needs little introduction; it has been both praised and vilified for its gigantic scale and contentious urban ethos. Regardless of the controversy surrounding it, the project showcases some ambitious engineering. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) with Rockwell Group, The Bloomberg Building’s versatile ETFE cladding and mobile shell exemplify the development’s remarkable construction. The Bloomberg Building, home of The Shed, a cultural center, is a multipurpose structure composed of four stories of loftlike spaces clad in a unitized glass curtain wall. The building is encased in a pillowy shell of diamond-shaped ETFE panels that rest on six gargantuan tracked wheels—bearing some resemblance to the industrial shipping infrastructure formerly located on the nearby Hudson River. ETFE is a pliable and lightweight alternative to glazing. The Shed lies atop Hudson Yards’ overall foundation, which is composed of a vast network of trusses spanning old rail yards below, and the use of heavy insulated glass units would potentially overload this nonadjustable structure. According to DS+R associate principal Charles Berman, ETFE was also chosen for its spanning capabilities and

inherent flexibility. “ETFE can be fabricated into much larger, self-supporting, pneumatic cushions that allowed the facade to enclose the structural steel frame without intervening substructures of aluminum or steel,” Berman said. “ETFE’s flexibility permitted DS+R to address the dynamic deflections that The Bloomberg Building experiences when in motion without the complex moment allowances and expansion joinery that a glass and metal facade would require.” Collaboration proved crucial to the project. DS+R, facade consultant and structural engineer Thornton Tomasetti, contractor Sciame, and fabricators were involved from the early design-assist phase. According to Thornton Tomasetti associate Alloy Kemp, the early stages of the design sought to push the limits of the ETFE panel size while meeting the daylighting and acoustical requirements of the performance space within. The structural steel frame is girded with a U-shaped upstand that is fastened at key points; fabricator Cimolai assembled each component in Pordenone, Italy, prior to shipment to New York. Once in place, the steel shell was outfitted with aluminum extrusions and plates, and then the ETFE panels were installed. Inflation tubing was set for each panel during the installation process. The material and location also presented unique challenges for the contractor. “ETFE must be installed in temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Any colder and the material becomes brittle and will lack the pliability needed for installation,” said Sciame senior vice president Steven Colletta. “Getting the material to look right—it cannot be too tight or too slack—required a great deal of field adjustment and coordination to account for the anticipated movement of structural steel, all the more complicated because of Hudson River–borne winds.” Matthew Marani

COURTESY DILLER SCOFIDIO + RENFRO

Top: The Bloomberg, which houses The Shed, rests at the base of 15 Hudson Yards and is enclosed with a movable ETFE shell.

Above: Custom aluminum extrusions, fastened to a steel upstand with aluminum plates, are the points of connection for the ETFE cushions. Inflation tubing for the panels passes through the steel upstands.


Arch Newspaper.indd 1

1/24/2020 11:01:04 AM


44

Facades

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

Lucas Museum of Narrative Art

COURTESY LUCAS MUSEUM OF NARR ATIVE ART

Architect: MAD Architects Location: Los Angeles Architect of record: Stantec Architecture Enclosure consultant: Walter P Moore GFRP panel fabricator: Kreysler & Associates The form of the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art is suggestive, shape-shifting, not unlike the popular media to which the nascent institution is dedicated. Under construction since 2018, the curvilinear 290,000-square-foot museum is beginning to animate the entire western edge of Los Angeles’s Exposition Park, a 160-acre park opposite the University of Southern California. The project, which is named after its chief benefactor, the filmmaker George Lucas, joins a loosely cohered complex of cultural and recreational destinations, including the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, the California Science Center, and

the Los Angeles Coliseum. In 2014, the Beijing-based firm MAD Architects prevailed in an international design competition that tasked participants with translating the lofty, future-oriented miseen-scène of the Lucas brand into a landmark piece of architecture. After a lawsuit prompted the museum to relocate from Chicago to Los Angeles, MAD refined its winning proposal into a stunningly amorphous “creature” with nary a right angle in sight, popularly likened to a spaceship by locals and critics alike. Containing a permanent collection and rotating exhibits dedicated to the media of filmmaking, in addition to theaters, classrooms, and a free public research library, the sweeping structure gracefully (in renderings, at least) spans 185 feet at its center to form a new gateway to Exposition Park. The enormous building rests on a base isolation system that will gently rock the

structure in the event of an earthquake. But in order for that system to work, the design team had to be extra mindful of the weight of the outer paneling, or rainscreen. After it was discovered that glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), a composite material popular among architects of curvilinear building facades, would overburden the base isolation system, the team opted for glass fiber–reinforced plastic (GFRP), a highly durable composite material a fraction of the weight of GFRC. The chief benefit of both composites is the supersmooth exterior surface they can yield, provided that panels interlock in just the right way. To that end, MAD enlisted an army of tools including Maya, Rhino, Dynamo, and Revit, each with a number of plug-ins and custom scripts. The architects sent all this modeling information over to Kreysler & Associates’ production facility on Mare Island, in Northern California, where each of the 1,500

GFRP panels is being fabricated. There, a CNC machine cuts out custom foam molds, into which a resinous mixture is injected; after the curing process, robot arms scan the panels to verify their dimensions and contours before sanding them to a smooth finish. The panels will then be shipped to Exposition Park, where, beginning this month, they will be installed in a secondary structure of variegated trusses branching off the burly primary structure, which is made up of predominantly straight beams. At the time of writing, the museum’s superstructure is only halfway erected, the first outlines of a cinematic vision. For now, observers will have to fill in the gaps—or scene—themselves. Shane Reiner-Roth

Top: Located at the edge of Exposition Park, the Lucas Museum will have an otherworldly presence befitting the Lucas brand. Left: An exploded axonometric drawing of the facade shows the exterior GFRP panels, secondary structure, weather wall, and building structure.

COURTESY STANTEC ARCHITECTURE AND WALTER P MOORE


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COURTESY ESKENAZI HEALTH

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46

Facades

Charles Library

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

MICHAEL GRIMM

MICHAEL GRIMM

Left: Sheltered entryways create covered plazas for Temple University’s Philadelphia campus.

Top: Facing a busy pedestrian thoroughfare is a cedar-clad entryway that’s carved into the side of the library’s formidable granite base.

Above: The Charles Library’s curvaceous wooden arches extend past glass facades and into a soaring domed atrium lobby.

MICHAEL GRIMM

Architect: Snøhetta Location: Philadelphia Architect of record; sustainability and LEED consultant; MEP engineer: Stantec Civil engineer: Hunt Engineering Company Structural engineer: LERA Facade consultant: Heintges Design programming consultant: brightspot strategy Dome geometry and framing fabricator: Radius Track Glass curtain wall assembly and installation: National Glass System: Split-faced granite and red cedar rainscreens; glass curtain wall Stone: Coldspring split-faced Mesabi black granite Glass curtain wall: 1" IGU (1/4" clear glass, 1/2" airspace) with coatings on second surface; coatings at arched entrances: Viracon VE85; coatings elsewhere: Viracon VNE-63 Interior wood: ACGI Linear Systems Open Series 3 with western red cedar, 2" by 5/8" nominal thickness Exterior wood: ACGI Linear Systems Open Series 3 with western red cedar, 2" by 1" nominal thickness Contractor: Daniel J. Keating

In designing the Charles Library at Temple University in North Philadelphia, Snøhetta wanted to make a contemporary statement that would integrate harmoniously into the pedestrian core of a leafy, architecturally diverse urban campus that is still largely defined by historic stone masonry edifices. The resulting building, a research library clad in stone, wood, and glass and topped with one of Philadelphia’s largest green roofs, achieves this goal with aplomb. Completed in August 2019, the 220,000-square-foot library serves as a bold yet welcoming center of gravity for the surrounding landscape. “In the course of identifying the strategic goals of the project, we identified a strong need for the library to be a magnetic heart of the campus—and embracing, so to speak,” said Snøhetta project manager Chad Carpenter. “It’s a place that people want to come to that’s at the heart of their path between all the different departments on campus.” The designers wanted the library to reference the stately stone facades of neighboring buildings. After considering the use of precast concrete panels, the team ultimately chose an open-joint stone rainscreen system when budget calculations showed that the former would not be viable. Six-inch vertical sections

of split-faced Mesabi black granite sourced from Minnesota-based quarrier and fabricator Coldspring clad much of the building. “A lot of universities have a fairly rigid material palette, but Temple’s campus has evolved in a different way,” Carpenter said. “But a lot of the most important and oldest buildings on campus are stone buildings. And we picked up a little bit on the way in which those buildings used stone. We weren’t trying to make a contextual building. It’s a contemporary building that also speaks to the materiality, solidity, and durability of some of the best buildings on campus.” Cut into the building are its main portals and pièces de résistance: soaring western red cedar archways that lead into a triple-height domed atrium lobby that’s also clad in a thicker version of the same ACGI cedar. “Often in architecture there’s a desire to control color and texture, and to know exactly what you’re going to get,” Carpenter said. “Cedar has quite a bit of color tone variation so that when you have this geometry that’s allencompassing and enveloping, that variation and liveliness in color and tone breaks it up and keeps it from becoming overwhelming.” In addition to warmth and variation, cedar is particularly resilient in outdoor applications

and easily bendable, which allowed the team to avoid cutting and carving the material using CNC machines. The cedar components were assembled flat and then shipped to the site, where they were bent. The library’s swooping wood-lined portals help open the library to the rest of the campus. A smaller corner entry, which directly faces one of Temple’s busiest pedestrian intersections, creates a sheltered plaza that looks straight through the library’s sprawling lobby to a larger arched entry on the opposite side of the building. “That sort of porosity of the building and embedding the desire lines of the campus right into the circulation flow of the library was very much part of the design,” said Carpenter. Matt Hickman



48

Facades

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

Architect: James Carpenter Design Associates Location: New York

on display once more in the facade of the new Nordstrom flagship in New York, located at the base of the Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture–designed Central Park Tower, which will be the world’s tallest residential structure when finished. The store’s undulating curtain wall, made of curved and supersize glass panels, ripples across seven stories of the tower’s south and north elevations. According to JCDA, the wavelike form is an homage to the rivers bounding Manhattan. Spanish glass manufacturer CRICURSA— one of the few manufacturers worldwide with the technical capacity to produce extra-large curved glass panels—was pulled into the project at an early stage. “The design started with the glass itself and worked out to the surrounding frame system, so ensuring the bent profiles were achievable in terms of structure,

manufacturing, handling, and shipping was important in the early design stages, most critically in the visual mock-up and the performance mock-up stages,” JCDA studio director Joseph Welker explained. In total, there are five typical profiles and four unique corner profiles, and their dimensions range in height from 17'6" to approximately 19'6", and in width from 3'10" to 6'2". The result is a succession of convexities and concavities following an A-A-B-B rhythm, which create occupiable spaces similar to those of bay windows. The curtain wall is backed by a diaphanous steel mesh veil; like the curtains in the Pool Room of the nowdefunct Four Seasons restaurant in the Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson– designed Seagram Building a few blocks to the east, the veil filters daylight and adds

depth to the facade. It is difficult to overstate the complexity of the curtain wall system, and New York– based facade consultant SURFACE DESIGN GROUP played an essential role in developing a design that balanced aesthetic concerns, thermal performance, structural behavior, and code compliance. “The final glass composition was developed as a slump-formed, complex-curved, insulated glass unit, comprised of various layers of laminated, low-iron glass and a subtle, custom ceramic dot frit pattern,” said SURFACE DESIGN GROUP partner Benson Gillespie. “Aluminum mullions were stretch-formed to an exacting tolerance that matched the glass.” Matthew Marani

Nordstrom Flagship Facade manufacturers: CRICURSA, Tvitec, Permasteelisa Facade installer: Permasteelisa Facade consultant: SURFACE DESIGN GROUP System: Custom curtain wall Product: CRICURSA Curved Glass XXL Over the last four decades, James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA) has been a pioneer in advanced glass installations and facade design in projects like the Museum at the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the Fulton Center Sky Reflector-Net in New York. The firm’s skill in achieving lightness and transparency is

CONNIE ZHOU

COURTESY PERMASTEELISA

Above left: A diaphanous steel mesh curtain backs the curtain wall, which, along with a subtle ceramic frit, reduces glare. Above: The custom glass curtain wall was fabricated by Permasteelisa, and is fastened to a steel anchor plate at the floor slab with extruded aluminum hooks. Left: The floor-toceiling curtain wall modules are arranged in an A-A-B-B pattern, and, like bay windows, are occupiable.

CONNIE ZHOU


49

Facades

Products

Summer 2020

Unitized Curtain Walls

These curtain wall systems can be glazed, sealed, and assembled off-site to save time. By Gabrielle Golenda

1620UT/1620UT SSG Curtain Wall System Kawneer

Kawneer’s structural silicone-glazed system is ideal for lowand mid-rise applications. The system provides a 2" sightline in 6" or 7½" depths. kawneer.com

Signature Series Unit Wall Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope

Schüco Façade UCC 65 SG Schüco

Designed for optimal thermal performance, this unit is outfitted with reinforced polyamide struts. It is offered in both captured and structural silicone-glazed options.

Schüco’s Unitized Customized Construction (UCC) system allows for modular integration of various components to fashion a custom-built curtain wall. With sightlines as little as 2.5", the assembled units resemble an all-glass facade.

obe.com

PATRICK COULIE

400SS Curtainwall Tubelite Perfect for low- and mid-rise projects, 400SS supports insulated glass or panels up to 1" thick via the secure grip of the ½" screw spline. The framing system is available in 19 standard paint colors and 11 anodized finishes. tubeliteinc.com

schueco.com

KEN GREEN

H-60 Unitized Channel Glass Frame System Bendheim

This system uses Bendheim’s channel glass in a linear design that diffuses light and minimizes glare without sacrificing privacy. It can be specified in a range of finishes and colors to match other architectural finishes. bendheim.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

YCW 750 XT YKK AP YCW 750 XT uses a two-part barrier to provide superior thermal performance. For added structural integrity, the weight of the glass rests on integrated supports, redirecting the glass load off the thermal barriers. ykkap.com


50

Facades

Products

Custom Facade Sources

The Architect’s Newspaper

With specialized knowledge in building materials, production, and construction, these manufacturers and fabricators leverage digital design tools to realize complex and bespoke facade designs. By Gabrielle Golenda

TIM GRIFFITH

Gate Precast

Permasteelisa Group

MG McGrath

Specializing in architectural precast concrete, Gate Precast produces supporting structural systems as well as self-supporting facades and light-weight rain screens. Notable projects using Gate Precast products include Dallas’s Perot Museum of Nature and Science, by Mor- phosis; the Atlanta Braves’ new home, Truist Park, by Populous; and Brooklyn’s One South First, by COOKFOX.

Permasteelisa collaborates with design teams to develop, engineer, fabricate, and install custom building envelopes with thermal, acoustic, and air barriers. The unitized curtain walls of Studio Gang’s MIRA Tower, in San Francisco, along with those of New York’s Central Park Tower, by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, and the Kohn Pedersen Fox–designed One Vanderbilt, were all fabricated and installed by Permasteelisa.

gateprecast.com

permasteelisagroup.com

MG McGrath specializes in the fabrication, installation, and distribution of custom metal and glass enclosures. The Minnesota-based company is also capable of integrating stone, epoxy, cement, and terra-cotta into their facade systems. Recently, it provided the perforated aluminum cladding for MANICA Architecture’s Chase Center in San Francisco, in addition to developing a glass stone rain screen for Santiago Calatrava’s St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in New York City.

HALL + MERRICK

mgmcgrath.com

WILL PRYCE

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Roschmann Group

NBK Architectural Terracotta

Island Exterior Fabricators

The Roschmann Group offers solutions for custom facades and roofing. With an expertise in one-off applications, the company has the capability to produce cladding in aluminum, glass, sheet metal, steel, timber, and glass fiber–reinforced plastic. SANAA, Maya Lin Studio, and Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have all used Roschmann’s bespoke products.

Utilizing the bespoke terra-cotta cladding and system TERRART CUSTOM, NBK provides tailored design solutions in a variety of shapes, colors, textures, and glazes. Custom profiles include solid corner tiles, radius tiles, radius baguettes, and windowsill and wall copings.

Island Exterior Fabricators, which provides support from design assist to installation, can integrate features such as privacy screens, louver systems, balconies, and stress skins, into their custom-fabricated facade panels and systems. Island has worked with Snøhetta; Morphosis; and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on buildings throughout New York and Boston.

roschmann.group

nbkterracotta.com

islandef.com


51

Facades

Products

Weather and Air Barriers

Summer 2020

Transition Membranes

These flexible air barriers wrap around small, intricately detailed areas to provide ventilation and prevent moisture buildup in a continuous membrane assembly. By Gabrielle Golenda

DensDefy Transition Membrane Georgia-Pacific

StoGuard Transition Membrane Sto Corp.

ExoAir 110AT Tremco

Formulated with a butyl-based adhesive, DensDefy selfadheres to hard-to-reach areas, such as gaps, vertical expansion joints, and drift/control joints. It is offered in widths of 6", 9", and 12".

This nimble solution is designed for continuity at transitions, including from sheathing to foundation, between dissimilar materials, and at masonry control joints. The system is ideal for vertical above-grade wall construction with concrete, glassmat gypsum sheathing, concrete masonry, and wood-based sheathing.

ExoAir 110AT is an impermeable, self-adhering, tape-like sheet designed to be applied directly to transition areas like window and door openings. It is best used with steel, wood, and poured concrete substrates.

buildgp.com

tremcosealants.com

stocorp.com

Waterproofing Barriers

Sprayed or rolled, these liquid-applied waterproofing solutions quickly seal without special installation equipment. By Gabrielle Golenda

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Hydropel Sealer Kryton

Henry Pumadeq System Henry

Hydropel is a clear, water-based sealant made with silane and siloxane compounds that bind to the surface substrate to form an insoluble barrier. It is easily sprayed or rolled on concrete, brick, mortar, and masonry, in vertical or horizontal applications.

Pumadeq is a flexible and long-lasting protective layer that cures in as little as 30 minutes. Henry’s special formula combines methyl methacrylates with polyurethane for added durability.

This elastomeric coating protects concrete, precast concrete, and concrete masonry units from water intrusion. It can also be used to bridge cracks between substrates up to 1/16".

henry.com

poly-wall.com

kryton.com

Home Stretch Liquid Waterproofing Membrane Poly Wall


52

Facades

Products

Paint and Primer Hybrid Exterior Coatings

The Architect’s Newspaper

Made with acrylic copolymers for long-lasting performance, the latest outdoor varnishes are selfpriming and provide advanced protection from peeling, cracking, and blistering. By Gabrielle Golenda

Aura Exterior Paint Benjamin Moore Aura is a thick coating, requiring fewer layers to protect the substrate. The paint has a proprietary formula that makes its color extra resistant to fading. benjaminmoore.com

PERMANIZER Exterior Acrylic Latex PPG

SeasonPLUS Exterior Paint Valspar

This 100 percent acrylic latex paint is UV resistant for durable adhesion and to keep color bright and saturated. It also fends off dirt, moisture, and tannins.

Valspar’s UV-resistant coating provides excellent coverage year-round. It’s well suited for a wide range of exterior surfaces, including timber, aluminum and vinyl siding, masonry, brick, and cement, among others.

ppgpaints.com

valsparpaint.com

THISTLEWOOD FARMS

High Endurance Plus Exterior Paint + Primer Glidden

This durable exterior coating resists fading, cracking, and peeling. It protects building envelopes through blistering summer heat and frosty winter temperatures. glidden.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Duration Exterior Acrylic Latex Sherwin-Williams

MARQUEE Exterior BEHR

Duration Exterior Acrylic Latex furnishes an extra-thick, enduring, and mildew-resistant coating. It is offered in low-luster, flat, satin, and glossy sheens.

BEHR’s paint-primer hybrid provides a nonstick finish that repels dirt. Its antimicrobial and mildew-resistant formula also minimizes moisture retention.

sherwin-williams.com

behr.com


53

Facades

Resources Biophilic Design

PPG ppgpaints.com

greenscreen greenscreen.com

Sherwin-Williams sherwin-williams.com

GSky gsky.com

Resources

Glass and Wall Systems

Summer 2020

Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope obe.com

AGC Glass agcglass.com

Pilkington pilkington.com

Swisspearl swisspearl.com

AGNORA agnora.com

Pulp Studio pulpstudio.com

Jakob Rope Systems jakob-usa.com

Trespa trespa.com

Bendheim bendheim.com

SAFTI FIRST safti.com

Omni Ecosystems omniecosystems.com

Valspar valsparpaint.com

CRICURSA cricursa.com

SageGlass sageglass.com

C.R. Laurence crlaurence.com

Saint-Gobain saint-gobain-northamerica.com

Erie Architectural Products erieap.com

SchĂźco schueco.com

GAMCO gamcocorp.com

sedak sedak.com

Glasswerks glasswerks.com

Tecnoglass tecnoglass.com

Graham Architectural Products grahamwindows.com

Trosifol trosifol.com

Guardian Glass guardianglass.com

Tubelite tubeliteinc.com

J.E. Berkowitz jeberkowitz.com

View view.com

Kawneer kawneer.com

Viracon viracon.com

Kinestral kinestral.com

Vitro vitroglazings.com

NorthGlass northglass.global

YKK AP ykkap.com

Ceramics, Terra-cotta, and Engineered Stone Boston Valley Terra Cotta bostonvalley.com

Cladding Concepts International claddingci.com Cosentino cosentino.com Fiandre granitifiandre.com Florim florim.com HG Stones hgstones.com Marmi Faedo marmifaedo.com NBK Architectural Terracotta nbkterracotta.com Neolith by TheSize neolith.com Porcelanosa porcelanosa-usa.com Shildan shildan.com TerraCORE terracorepanels.com

Composites and Coatings Abet Laminati abetlaminati.com AkzoNobel akzonobel.com Axalta axalta.com Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com Corian corian.com Eastman eastman.com FunderMax fundermax.at Glidden glidden.com

Concrete

Fabcon fabconprecast.com Gate Precast gateprecast.com High Concrete highconcrete.com TAKTL taktl-llc.com

Contractors and Fabricators Benson Industries bensonglobal.com Enclos enclos.com Harmon harmoninc.com Island Exterior Fabricators islandef.com MG McGrath mgmcgrath.com Permasteelisa Group permasteelisagroup.com Roschmann Group roschmann.group Walters & Wolf waltersandwolf.com W&W Glass wwglass.com Zahner azahner.com

Fabric Bemo bemousa.com Birdair birdair.com EFCO efcocorp.com Structurflex structurflex.com Vector Foiltec vector-foiltec.com

HUF TON + CROW


54

Facades

Resources

The Architect’s Newspaper

Rigidized Metals Corporation rigidized.com

Delta Millworks deltamillworks.com

BASF basf.com

Alcoa alcoa.com

Sapa sapabuildingsystem.com

Kebony us.kebony.com

Dörken dorken.com

ALPOLIC alpolic-americas.com

Spectrum Metal Finishing spectrummetal.com

KLH klh.at

DuPont dupont.com

ALUCOIL alucoil.com

Sto stocorp.com

Lunawood lunawood.com

Georgia-Pacific buildgp.com

Matchstick Woods matchstickwoods.com

Henry henry.com

Montana Timber Products montanatimberproducts.com

Huber Engineered Woods huberwood.com

Cambridge Architectural cambridgearchitectural.com

Nakamoto Forestry nakamotoforestry.com

Johns Manville jm.com

Bunting Architectural Metals buntingarchitecturalmetals.com

Cascade Architectural cascade-architectural.com

Prodema prodema.com

Kryton kryton.com

CL-Talon cltalon.com

CENTRIA centria.com

reSAWN TIMBER co. resawntimberco.com

LP Building Solutions lpcorp.com

Kingspan kingspan.com

GKD Metal Fabrics gkdmetalfabrics.com

Sierra Pacific Industries spi-ind.com

Poly Wall poly-wall.com

KME kme.com

HAVER & BOECKER haverusa.com

Technowood mytechnowood.com

Rockwool rockwool.com

Metalwërks metalwerksusa.com

Renson renson-outdoor.com

Thermory thermoryusa.com

Sika usa.sika.com

Resources, Continued Metal

Aluflam aluflam-usa.com Alumil alumil.com BŌK Modern bokmodern.com

Metl-Span metlspan.com Móz mozdesigns.com POHL pohl-facades.com Pure + Freeform purefreeform.com

Metal Mesh and Screening

Timber Accoya accoya.com binderholz binderholz.com

Weather and Air Barriers

SMARTci smartcisystems.com STI Firestop stifirestop.com

3M 3m.com

Tremco tremco.com

475 High Performance Building Supply foursevenfive.com

USG usg.com

CONNIE ZHOU


UPCOMING VIRTUAL WORKSHOPS Our CE|Strong workshops are curated according to region within the Continental United States. On-hand instructors will respond to the application of their materials and software tools to local conditions: such as proper insulation to avoid thermal bridging in regions prone to harsh winters and efficient UV protection for glazed facades. Attendees will leave with a greater understanding of efficient material uses which blend with overall design approaches.

Southeast August 26

Southwest September 1

Midwest

Pacific Northwest October 15

Northeast

November 13

October 1

To register go to cestrong.com


Wood Construction 56

Wood Construction

Products

The Architect’s Newspaper

From the biggest to the tallest, timber is growing (no pun intended) on everyone. We asked engineers what they are excited about, dove deep into some of the highest-profile projects, and examined all the important products that make timber construction possible, from fasteners to noncombustible cladding. By Gabrielle Golenda

COURTESY SMARTL AM


57

Wood Construction

Survey

Timber-rific

Summer 2020

Three engineers describe their most innovative timber projects. By Matthew Marani Eric McDonnell Principal, Holmes Structures I have been lucky enough to work on a number of innovative mass timber projects this year. These include Redfox Commons, designed by LEVER, which utilized salvaged timbers to create a connecting building between two refurbished historic warehouses; District Office, a six-story mass timber building designed by Hacker that is the future home of our Portland office; NIR Center (bottom), designed by Hennebery Eddy, a proposed ten-story hybrid structure of mass plywood floor panels and steel DELTABEAMs utilizing the new Type IV-B heavy timber building regulation approved for the 2021 International Building Code; and the Adidas North American Headquarters

expansion project, also by LEVER, which is using a unique hybrid structure of mass timber floor cassettes and precast concrete beams and columns (below). The most innovative of all would likely be Katerra’s Catalyst Building in Spokane, Washington, the first project to use CLT panels made in Katerra’s new manufacturing facility. This five-story office and classroom building is constructed almost entirely of mass timber, including CLT ribbed floor panels, glulam beams and columns, and CLT cladding panels, along with the first use of CLT shear walls utilizing buckling-restrained braces (BRBs) as ductile hold-down elements. MORIYAMA & TESHIMA ARCHITECTS

Paul Fast Founding Partner, Fast + Epp Perhaps the most groundbreaking project we have been working on this year is The Arbour, a new ten-story building for George Brown College in Toronto designed by Moriyama & Teshima Architects (above). It features a novel structural system consisting of the slab-band arrangement commonly used in concrete construction, but replaces most of the concrete with mass timber. Composite CLT-concrete slab bands with an overall thickness of 15.5 inches span 30 feet between large 1.4-foot-by-3.9-foot timber columns, and

infill 6-inch-thick CLT panels clear span 15.5 feet between the slab bands. Central stair and elevator cores consisting of steel columns and diagonal bracing provide lateral resistance for the building. The end result is a primarily timber construction floor system that offers a thickness and flat soffit comparable to concrete construction but with a sharp reduction in both embodied carbon and construction time. The exposed timber flooded by ample daylight will also create a wonderful physical work environment for students and faculty.

COURTESY HOLMES STRUCTURES

HACKER ARCHITECTS

Anne Monnier Principal, KPFF

HENNEBERY EDDY ARCHITECTS

While we completed several mass timber buildings over the past five years, the sheer quantity of projects getting to the construction stage last summer was a new record. Two projects in Portland, Oregon—the Adidas North American Headquarters, designed by LEVER Architecture, and the District Office, designed by Hacker Architects (above)—saw their structural frames go up this past year. The District Office features an innovative optimized, fiber-count mass timber frame that utilizes a tight colonnade column layout in one direction with long-span glulam beams. Not only does it allow for a clean, fully exposed, one-hour fire resistance–rated mass timber

frame for maximum daylighting, but it also enables organized routing of MEP systems. This is further developed by providing chases between CLT panels to allow for smaller distribution lines such as conduits and sprinklers. The Adidas expansion encompasses a more traditional column layout with double-glulam girders in the South Building and precast concrete girders in the North Building, both accommodating MEP routing through and/ or over the girders coupled with a panelized CLT and glulam beam floor system. Speed of construction and fewer pieces to handle were key drivers on this fast-track project.


58

Wood Construction

Case Study

The Architect’s Newspaper

University of Arkansas Adohi Hall Architect: Leers Weinzapfel Associates Mackey Mitchell Architects modus studio Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas

Landscape architect: OLIN Civil engineering: Development Consultants Incorporated Contractor: Nabholz Structural engineer: Engineering Consultants, Inc. Timber consultant: Equilibrium Consulting MEP and fire engineer: Bernhard TME Sustainability: Entegrity Posts and beams: Holzpak European spruce-pine-fir glulam Floor and roof slabs: Holzpak European spruce-pine-fir 7-ply CLT Structural connectors: Rothoblaas Rainscreen: Morin metal panel Brick: Glen-Gery Carbon Black Flashed Exterior insulation: ROXUL CAVITYROCK semi-rigid mineral wool Roofing membrane: Firestone UltraPly TPO XR Membrane Roofing insulation: Firestone ISO 95+ GL Windows: Traco TR-6800 Curtain wall and doors: Kawneer 1600 Glazing: Solarban 60 and 70 Exterior finishes: Benjamin Moore Arborcoat on exposed exterior wood and Sherwin-Williams Sher-Cryl HPA on exposed metal Adohi Hall, a 708-bed coed dorm designed by Leers Weinzapfel Associates, Mackey Mitchell Architects, and modus studio for the University of Arkansas, is the largest cross-laminated timber (CLT) building in the United States. The name of the project honors the Cherokee, who passed near the site while being forced to march the Trail of Tears. Adohi, the Cherokee word for “woods,” was chosen in consultation with citizens of the Cherokee Nation and references the sustainably sourced wood used in the CLT construction. Completed in 2019, Adohi is a distinctive new gateway to the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Its series of interconnected timber structures and courtyards rests on a sloping, 4-acre site at the southern edge of the campus. A serpentine band of student rooms connected by a ground-level passage defines three distinctive courtyard spaces for interactive learning in architecture, design, and other arts. The 202,027-square-foot building includes classrooms, maker spaces, performance spaces, administrative offices, and faculty housing. Advanced timber technologies, like CLT panels and glulam beams and columns, were integrated throughout to reduce the carbon footprint of such a large and complex building. The building’s interiors celebrate the timber structure. Exposed structural wood ceilings are used in the student rooms, study rooms, floor lounges, and ground floor common spaces. The project’s main gathering space, the Cabin, also features a wood ceiling and trusses that span the full width of its lounge spaces. Outside, a light metal jacket of zinc-toned panels with copper-toned and white accents covers bars of living space that seem to float above the glass-clad base and the landscape below. Eric Baldwin

TIMOTHY HURSLE Y

1

2

3

4

5

15.9

3'‐4"

issue for permit/review: 2017.09.29 issue for construction: 2017.10.30 revisions: mark

GENERAL ELEVATION NOTES 1.

REFER TO WALL, FLOOR, AND ROOF TYPES SCHEDULE FOR SPECIFIC COMPOSITION INFORMATION. DIMENSIONS ARE TO FACE OF CONCRETE WALL, FRAMING, STRUCTURAL GRID LINE, OR OTHER STRUCTURAL ELEMENT UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. SEE STRUCTURAL SHEETS FOR FOOTINGS, STRUCTURAL COLUMNS, DETAILS + NOTES. SEE BUILDING SECTIONS FOR ADDITIONAL TOP OF WALL HEIGHTS. ALL WINDOW LOCATIONS DIMENSIONED IN PLAN TO CENTER OF ROUGH OPENING. FIELD VERIFY ALL ROUGH‐DIMENSION FOR WINDOWS, DOORS, AND OTHER ELEMENTS. TRIM VERTICAL FLASHING AT MASONRY TO BE FLUSH WITH EXTERIOR FINISH SURFACE. ALIGN VERTICAL MULLIONS WITH COLUMN GRID, U.N.O.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

15

14.1

20'‐8"

19'‐4"

14

R

Q

4'‐8"

20'‐0"

P

O

12'‐0"

N

16'‐0"

M

16'‐0"

L

16'‐0"

K

16'‐0"

16'‐0"

J

16'‐0"

date

description

EXTERIOR MATERIALS

TIMOTHY HURSLE Y

A

16

6

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

TIMOTHY HURSLE Y

METAL WALL PANEL TYPE 1 METAL WALL PANEL TYPE 2 METAL WALL PANEL TYPE 3 METAL WALL PANEL TYPE 4 CONCRETE FACE BRICK EXTERIOR WOOD CLADDING, COATED FIBERGLASS WINDOW UNIT ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED ALUM. STOREFRONT

Top: The building features two kinked housing bars that are connected by a ground-floor space.

NOTE: SEE WINDOW, STOREFRONT, AND CURTAINWALL TYPE DRAWINGS FOR GLAZING TYPE.

I

12'‐0"

Above left: Timber trusses structure the ceiling of a common space on the ground floor.

C5 A3.01

B

BLDG. A ‐ LEVEL 02 1313' ‐ 7"

BLDG B ‐ LEVEL 03 1313' ‐ 7"

10'‐1"

10'‐1"

BLDG. A ‐ LEVEL 02 1313' ‐ 7"

WOOD SOFFIT Q2

BLDG. C ‐ GROUND 1293' ‐ 0"

1291' ‐ 0"

WOOD SOFFIT

BRICK SUPPORT LEDGE

ZINC COATED COPPER FLASHING

BLDG B ‐ GROUND 1282' ‐ 0"

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

REMOTE FOB READER

ELEVATION ‐ BUILDING C ‐ WEST C3 D2 A1.10AS 3/32" = 1'‐0"

15.4

15.9

I

12'‐6"

J

12'‐0"

K

16'‐0"

L

16'‐0"

M

16'‐0"

N

16'‐0"

O

16'‐0"

P

16'‐0"

Q

12'‐0"

S

R

20'‐0"

G

B A R I I S T ER N0.

4124

R

A A

C5 A3.01

E A ED

13'‐0"

C H R I R E

14.4

14'‐6"

1291' ‐ 0"

WOOD SLAT SCREEN WALL, STORM‐ PROOF METAL LOUVERS BEYOND EXTERIOR WOOD CLADDING, COATED

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

B

14.1

WOOD SLAT SCREEN WALL, STORM‐PROOF METAL LOUVERS BEYOND

REMOTE FOB READER

EXTERIOR WOOD CLADDING, COATED

ELEVATION ‐ BUILDING C ‐ NORTH 3/32" = 1'‐0"

Left: As shown in the elevations, the ground level that connects the two housing bars is clad in glass.

S

C1 9 ‐‐‐‐‐

Q4

BLDG. C ‐ GROUND 1293' ‐ 0"

ZINC COATED COPPER FLASHING

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

BRICK SUPPORT LEDGE

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

Q3

16'‐7"

WOOD SOFFIT

10'‐6"

WOOD SOFFIT Q1

BLDG. C ‐ MECH PLATFORM 1303' ‐ 6"

Z7

Z6

16'‐7"

10'‐6"

BLDG. C ‐ MECH PLATFORM 1303' ‐ 6"

C

Above right: A timber ceiling covers a breezeway under a housing bar.

E1 A3.60

K A NSA T R C C H I T E

16'‐7"

WOOD SOFFIT WOOD SOFFIT

Q6

Q5

BLDG. C ‐ GROUND 1293' ‐ 0"

BLDG. C ‐ GROUND 1293' ‐ 0" 1291' ‐ 0"

WOOD SOFFIT E

BLDG. C ‐ MECH PLATFORM 1303' ‐ 6"

10'‐6"

10'‐1"

BLDG. A ‐ LEVEL 02 1313' ‐ 7"

10'‐1" 16'‐7"

10'‐6"

10/27/2017 4:44:53 PM BIM 360://UASDH/16.47 - UASDH - ENVELOPE.rvt

BLDG. C ‐ MECH PLATFORM 1303' ‐ 6"

BLDG B ‐ LEVEL 03 1313' ‐ 7"

BRICK SUPPORT LEDGE

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

E1 5 ‐‐‐‐‐

ELEVATION ‐ BUILDING C ‐ SOUTH 3/32" = 1'‐0"

WOOD SOFFIT

ALUM. CURTAINWALL, 4‐SIDED STRUCTURALLY GLAZED

BLDG B ‐ GROUND 1282' ‐ 0"

BLDG B ‐ GROUND 1282' ‐ 0" E3 6 ‐‐‐‐‐

ELEVATION ‐ BUILDING C ‐ EAST 3/32" = 1'‐0"

1291' ‐ 0"

BRICK SUPPORT LEDGE

STADIUM DRIVE, FAYETTEVILLE, AR 72701

E1 A3.60

BLDG B ‐ LEVEL 03 1313' ‐ 7"

STADIUM DRIVE RESIDENCE HALLS

D

contents.

BUILDING C ELEVATIONS

design.

100% CD - IFC

date.

2017.10.30

project.

16.47

drawn by.

LWA

A2.17

COURTESY LEERS WEINZAPFEL ASSOCIATES


59

Wood Construction

Mass Timber

Products

Summer 2020

The latest mass timber products have strength, stability, and design flexibility. These cross-laminated timber (CLT), glued-laminated timber (GLT), and structural composite lumber (SCL) products can realize building heights and spans that would have previously required steel, masonry, or concrete structural support. By Gabrielle Golenda

Brisco Fine Line Panels Brisco Manufacturing Ltd.

KLH Cross-Laminated Timber KLH Massivholz

Nordic X-Lam Nordic Structures

Ideal for floor, ceiling, wall, or roof applications, these laminated veneer lumber (LVL) panels are designed with layers of thin scarf jointed veneers. They are offered in sizes up to 11½ inches thick, 48 inches wide, and up to 60 feet long.

These spruce CLT panels come in two types (transverse and longitudinal) and have three structural applications: for walls (transverse panel); and for slabs and roofs (longitudinal panel). Both panel types are made with double layers to increase rigidity and can be up to 55 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 1½ feet thick.

Nordic Structures CLT is fashioned from three orthogonal layers of lumber laminated with glue and structural adhesives. It can be used in wall panels, floor slabs, roof slabs, and light framing.

briscoman.com

nordic.ca

klh.at

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Glulam Plus Structurlam Mass Timber Corporation

This glued-laminated product is made with Douglas fir wood with small knots and tight growth rings. Glulam Plus can be engineered in an array of shapes and sizes for various structural applications. structurlam.com

Westlam Beams Western Archrib Pairing a unique combination of western spruce and lodgepole pine, Westlam Beams are made from structural glued-laminated timber in imperial and metric sizes. Potential applications include floor beams, roof beams, headers, purlins, and trusses. westernarchrib.com

SmartLam Cross-Laminated Timber SmartLam

Appropriate for floor, roof, and wall applications, SmartLam’s cross-lamination technology allows for two-way span applications. The units are made with spruce-pine-fir and hem-fir lumber in 12 inch to 120 inch widths, 4⅛ inch to 12⅜ inch thicknesses, and up to 40 foot lengths. smartlam.com


60

Wood Construction

Products

Ties and Fasteners

The Architect’s Newspaper

Tightly secure wood framing with the latest fasteners and ties. These connecting solutions for mass timber meet code requirements and are easy to install. By Gabrielle Golenda

CTX Big Timber Construction Fasteners

Finished in a long-lasting bronze coating, this structural grade connecting screw is meant for exterior use. CTX is available in 1-inch to 16-inch lengths. bigtimberfasteners.com

VGZ EVO FRAME Rothoblaas This fully threaded screw is perfect for connecting small wood structural elements like light frame uprights and crossbeams. The petite cylindrical head installs flush in the timber framework for a concealed appearance. rothoblaas.com

ASSY VG Reverse Head screw MyTiCon Timber Connectors Designed for timber reinforcement, ASSY VG Reverse Head screws are some of the longest fully threaded screws on the market, available in lengths from 31½ inches to 59 inches. At 9/16 -inch, the screw’s very small diameter is nearly invisible after installation. myticon.com

Paneltwistec DAG flange button head screw Eurotec

These screws feature milled ribs above the thread and a sharp screw tip to reduce torque that causes splitting. The special hardened carbon steel coating resists corrosion and contains no chromium oxide, which is typical for other electrogalvanized products. eurotec.team

TimberLOK Structural Wood Screw FastenMaster

Ideal for heavy applications, TimberLOK is a screw for code-compliant truss and rafter connections. With a sharp point and sturdy threads, it is offered in lengths from 2½ inches to 10 inches. fastenmaster.com ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED


61

Wood Construction

Case Study

Noncombustible Cladding

Summer 2020

For buildings with timber structures, a noncombustible skin can be used to reduce the rate of fire spread. By Gabrielle Golenda

Swisspearl Largo Vintago Swisspearl

EQUITONE fiber cement panels EQUITONE

concrete skin Rieder

Made of mineral fiber cement, these noncombustible panels can be installed as flashing or lapped siding. Vintago is offered in large format sizes and with a sanded surface available in ten colors.

EQUITONE fiber cement panels are sound absorbent, firesafe, and water- and wind-resistant. They are available in five smooth or textured finishes.

Fashioned from glass-fiber-reinforced concrete, these facade panels are strong and lightweight. The mineral-based material is inherently nonflammable and is offered in a variety of textures.

swisspearl.com

equitone.com

rieder.cc

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

Ductal Ductal

STONESCREEN Aerolite STONESCREEN

Allura Fiber Cement Allura

This lightweight cladding system is self-supporting, insulating, and watertight. In addition to offering standard size panels, Ductal also custom fabricates precast facades from the same fiber cement materials.

Made from lightweight reinforced foam glass, these stone composite panels are ideal for high-rise construction. STONESCREEN Aerolite is stable; it will not corrode and is not unaffected by extreme temperatures, frost, or water.

ductal.com

stonescreen.org

Made for residential and light commercial applications, Allura Fiber Cement siding is resistant to UV rays, salt spray, and freeze-thaw cycles. The series is available in three textures, a wide array of colors, and 4-foot-by-8-foot, 4-foot-by-9-foot, and 4-foot-by-10-foot sizes. allurausa.com


62

Wood Construction

Resources

The Architect’s Newspaper

Non-Combustible Cladding

Ties and Fasteners

Mass Timber

Structurlam structurlam.com

Big Timber Construction Fasteners bigtimberfasteners.com

Bison Innovative Products bisonip.com

Think Wood thinkwood.com

Eurotec eurotec.team

Brisco Wood Preservers briscowood.com

Tolko tolko.com

FastenMaster fastenmaster.com

D.R. Johnson Wood Innovations oregonclt.com

Vaagen Brothers Lumber vaagenbros.com

MyTiCon Timber Connectors myticon.com

Euclid Timber Frames euclidtf.com

Western Structures westernstructures.com

Simpson Strong-Tie strongtie.com

Freres Lumber Co. frereslumber.com

West Fraser westfraser.com

Rothoblaas rothoblaas.com

International Beams ibewp.com

WoodWorks woodworks.org

Resources Ductal ductal.com EQUITONE equitone.com James Hardie jameshardie.com Rieder Rieder.cc STONESCREEN stonescreen.org Swisspearl swisspearl.com

Katerra katerra.com

NA ARO

Kebony kebony.com

Timber Construction Software

LignaTerra lignaterra.com

Boise Cascade bc.com

Nordic Structures nordic.ca

cadwork cadwork.com

Pacific Woodtech pacificwoodtech.com

Katerra APOLLO apollo.katerra.com

SmartLam smartlam.com

RISA Tech risa.com

Sterling sterlingsolutions.com

Rosboro rosboro.com

StructureCraft structurecraft.com

Weyerhaeuser weyerhaeuser.com

NA ARO


PRESENTS

THE FUTURE OF MASS TIMBER September 24 Ask any architect or engineer—timber is growing (no pun intended) on everyone. Mass timber construction is on the rise from the Pacific Northwest to the Deep South, promising new potentialities in tactile design and engineering; all while offering aesthetically pleasing solutions to sustainability goals. The Future of Mass Timber will foreground exemplary timber projects across North America; identify bestcase practices for their assembly; and spotlight emerging technologies within this exciting field.

events.archpaper.com/masstimber


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